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Presentation on Lesson Observation – for the Algerian Inspectorate

Appendix 6a - Ellen Tinkham School Policy to Quality Assure Teaching Standards All staff delivering teaching (teachers and teaching assistants), will have a termly lesson observation lasting 30 – 45 minutes (may be less for non teachers). This is likely to be a joint observation and will be carried out by senior leaders. Thorough feedback will be provided, with elements of good practice and key development requirements clearly highlighted. This feedback discussion is a significant learning and development mechanism in improving and maintaining high standards of teaching. For non-teachers, it will be used to generate a training and development programme. Lessons will be graded, with the following outcomes (for teachers): o Outstanding: The elements that caused the lesson to be Outstanding rather than Good will be clearly identified and discussed with the teacher. These elements are of very significant importance to the school and will be shared with colleagues as exemplars of best practice. Each term, these elements will inform a “Top Tips” list for teachers. o Good: Good lessons will have their best aspects identified. Development points will also be discussed. A professional learning conversation between the teacher and the senior leader(s) who observed the lesson, will explore and determine how the lesson can be moved from Good to Outstanding. o Satisfactory/ Requirement to Improve: Satisfactory teaching carries a requirement to improve. Lesson feedback will clearly identify development expectations and reinforce the need for rapid change. The teacher’s performance over time will be taken into consideration, as this may be a one-off. A follow-up observation will take place within 3 weeks and changes in practice linked to the lesson feedback will be expected. Further action will be linked to the following outcomes: a) The follow-up observation finds a Good lesson: The teacher will be commended on
efforts made to effect positive change. Key elements shifting the lesson to Good from Satisfactory, will be highlighted and discussed. Coaching or mentoring (or a combination of both) will be offered, to reinforce improvement and further develop better practice.

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b) The follow-up observation finds a lesson improved but still satisfactory: Attempts
made to improve practice will be acknowledged and discussed. A package of support will be put in place to ensure the teacher develops and improves their teaching skills. This is likely to include mentoring or coaching and clear development targets with a time frame. The teacher will be observed early in the next round of observations and will be expected to produce a lesson that is at least Good.

c) The follow-up lesson remains Satisfactory with no evidence of improvement, or is
Unsatisfactory: The seriousness of unsatisfactory or underdeveloped practice will be clearly explained, in terms of the negative impact upon the learning opportunities for children. The teacher will be reminded of the Capability/ Conduct process and will need to understand the potential consequences of practice that is consistently below expectations.

Phil Silvester CBE – p.silvester@hotmail.co.uk

Presentation on Lesson Observation – for the Algerian Inspectorate
Rapid improvement will be necessary, with key short term improvement targets to significantly shift practice identified and a very tight time frame for improvement provided. A follow-up observation will take place within 2 weeks, to provide the opportunity for the teacher to demonstrate rapid improvement/ the capacity to improve. Clear targets for required long term improvement and a package of support will be put in place. This will include mentoring from an able practitioner within the school. Failure to improve within the agreed timescales, or an improvement followed by regression to previous low standards is likely to result in the triggering of formal procedures.

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Unsatisfactory: If an Unsatisfactory lesson is seen, the feedback will clearly define the seriousness of this and describe the rapid and essential requirement to improve. Capability and Conduct procedures will be outlined, including the fast-track procedure. A follow up lesson observation will take place as soon as possible, within 2 weeks. A second Unsatisfactory lesson observation will result in immediate support and targets to improve being implemented, plus the gathering of information towards the start of formal procedures. If the follow-up lesson is Satisfactory, the procedure listed above for “Satisfactory” teaching, will apply.

It is the expectation that teaching at Ellen Tinkham School is consistently Outstanding. This requires the “5 C’s”: Clarity Communication Coherence Creativity Courage These elements should be evident in - Planning - Classroom management - Resources - Learning environment presentation - TA deployment and team development - Lesson content - Pupil-led learning/ relevance to the individual - Teacher demeanour in the classroom: always modelling best practice THE 5th “C”… It takes Courage to be a creative and effective leader of learning. Occasionally, your courage may be rewarded with a totally unexpected outcome ranging from amazing success to disaster! This is how true learning happens. You will not be judged on the disaster, rather on how you deal with it and use it to the advantage of your students and their learning. At ETS there are many skilled and exceptional people. We must build on our success as a school, learn from and support one another to ensure we are all able to Be the Best that We Can Be.

Phil Silvester CBE – p.silvester@hotmail.co.uk

Presentation on Lesson Observation – for the Algerian Inspectorate

Outstanding Teaching: Top Tips! From Spring 2012 observations
Planning that includes the recording of opportunities for students to lead their own learning. We would like to see this developed further and explore how to best use it to impact on teaching and learning Planning that sets out, in very simple terms, how best to motivate/ engage individual students. This is then used to shape the learning experience. Lessons where staff and children have clearly been having fun, as well as learning. Lessons where resources are used to great effect, being motivating and interesting, well prepared and working. Lessons where the teacher has a wonderful sense of drama and can carry children into learning using their compelling presence. Lessons that move at the right pace. Examples seen this term demonstrate the clever use of time by teachers. This includes time spent on transition between activities being minimal, because everyone knows what to do and where to go; plenty of time given to “A” group students so they can absorb, process and respond. Equally important has been the faster pace for “C” group and some “B” group students, who need a steady turn-over of activities so that learning isn’t lost through a difficulty in engaging with an activity for long periods. Good use of simple, clear language. Gentle but firm, clear, concise language used in teaching has been observed, with teachers making sure learners absolutely understand. Repetition of key language, hooked to memorable experiential learning. Evidence of TAs who have had excellent training and who are deeply in tune with the learning needs of individuals. This has been especially noted with “A” group students in several instances. The best lessons are like watching a conductor with a fine orchestra. Calm, organised, involved, the conductor knows the musical score and understands how to get the very best from the combination of skills and tones in the room by giving just enough direction at the right time, then letting the music develop. We have seen teachers who know the strengths of members of their team and let them use it; who know what most interests their pupils and who use this knowledge to let students explore their own learning.

Phil Silvester CBE – p.silvester@hotmail.co.uk