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International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968

Available Online at www.rfbss.org Vol.1, Issue 3, November-2012 Page: 78-88



Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 78


ANALYSIS OF BLOOD FLOW THROUGH STENOSED VESSEL UNDER
EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELD

Mitali Sarma
Research Scholar, Dept. of Mathematics, Singhania University, Rajasthan, India
E-mail: mitali_sarma15@yahoo.in



Abstract: To study the effect of magnetic field of blood flow through stenosed vessels, a numerical model has been
developed. The blood is assumed to be an incompressible Newtonian fluid. The effect of slip at the boundary in presence of
transverse magnetic field, momentum and energy integral equation is used. The problem under investigation is solved
numerically using Shooting method. It is assumed that when the Hartmann number increases the fluid velocity and the wall
shear stress is greatly affected. It is observed that the centerline velocity U decreases with increasing Reynolds number at
M=1.5. The nature of U is also same with no slip. Moreover, the centerline velocity U increases when the Hartmann number
increases with slip at Re=50 and in no slip case. On the other hand, it is seen that when Hartmann number increases, the axial
velocity (v) decreases in both with slip and in no slip condition. In contrast, the axial velocity increases when Reynolds
number increases with slip. Similar phenomena observed in no slip also.

Keywords: Stenosis, magnetic field, Hertmann number, Reynolds number, laminar.

1. Introduction
The study of blood flow in stenosed human arteries has been object of scientific research nowadays. Stenosis means the
localized narrowing of an artery. It causes of arterial disease. It is caused mainly due to intravascular atherosclerotic plaque
which develops at the arterial wall and protrudes into the lumen of the vessel. Stenosis disturbs the normal blood flow
through the artery. There are much evidence that hydrodynamic factors can play an important role in the development and
progression of this disease. With the help of hydrodynamics the flow of blood through such type of arteries can be control.
Many scholars have been studied in this topic. Several flow characteristics, such as wall shearing stress [1, 2], pressure [3, 4]
and turbulence [5, 6] may have potential medical significance. Higher resistance to flow can also become increasingly
important as the Stenosis becomes more severe [7]. The potential importance of hydrodynamic factors has been recognized
for many years, the study of the mechanics of flow in constricted tubes remains a great problem. Lee and Fung [8] solved the
problem of flow in constricted tube numerically. Many researchers have shown that the blood is an electrically conducting
fluid. The flow of blood in human circulatory system can be controlled by applying appropriate magnetic field. The
Lorentzs force will act on the constituent particles of blood and this force will oppose the motion of the blood and thus
reduces its velocity. The blood flow under the application of appropriate magnetic field may help in the treatment of certain
cardiovascular diseases and in the disease with accelerated blood circulations such as hypertension, hemorrhages etc. The
conducting pulsatile blood flow with micro organisms represented by two fluid model through circular channel which
diverges at a slow exponential rate under magnetic field has been studied by Rathod and Gayatri [9, 10]. Blood flow in
stenosed artery has been studied by Shukla [11, 12] without magnetic effect and they have considered no slip at the
boundary. Experiments on blood flow shown that under certain flow conditions, there exists a slip at the wall in blood flow.
Therefore it is necessary to study the flow of blood in a stenosed artery with an axial velocity slip at the wall. Effects of slip
in blood flow through stenosed artery have been studied by Chaturani and Biswas [13, 14]. An attempt is made in this
analysis to study the flow of blood through a stenosed artery with the effect of slip at the boundary in presence of transverse
magnetic field. Momentum and energy integral equations are used to study the inertial effects on the flow through the
stenosed artery. Although blood is non-Newtonian at low shear rates it can be treated as an incompressible Newtonian fluid
at the flow rates encountered in the larger arteries where Stenosis commonly occurs. Blood flow is known to be laminar.
2. Mathematical formulation of the problem
The real blood circulation system consists of three dimensional elastic tubes of varying cross-section and angle of
bifurcation. For the sake of mathematical convenience, we discuss the magnetic effect on unsteady flow of blood through a
International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968
Available Online at www.rfbss.org Vol.1, Issue 3, November-2012 Page: 78-88

Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 79

two dimensional, non- conducting, parallel plate and equally branched channel such that one stress of blood from trunk is
branched into two different streams.
For this analysis, blood has been considered to be Newtonian, incompressible, homogeneous and viscous fluid. The Fahreus
Lindqust effect is significant only when the vessel diameter is less than 1 mm unlike the case here. As such the Reynolds
number does not vary much in the region of any one bifurcation. Thus the viscosity of the blood is treated as constant.
The static magnetic field B
0
is applied in a direction perpendicular to the flow of blood. We make the following assumptions
for electromagnetic interactions:
(i) The induced magnetic field and the electric field produced by the motion of blood are negligible. since blood has low
magnetic Reynolds number [15]
(ii) No external electric field is applied.
With the above assumptions we consider two dimensional steady laminar flow of blood through an axially symmetric
stenosed artery in presence of a transverse magnetic field (Fig. 1). The axial coordinate and velocity are z
*
and u
*

respectively, and are considered to be positive in the downstream direction with U
*
as centerline velocity. The radial
coordinate r
*
and velocity * are positive when directed outward from the centerline. The local radius of the axi symmetric
tube is R
*
(z
*
) and R
0
is the radius of the unconstricted sections in the upstream and downstream of the stenosis, B
*
is the
applied magnetic field in r
*
direction.




Fig. 1. Geometry of an arterial Stenosis with axial velocity slip at wall.

The Navier-Stokes equations of motion in cylindrical polar coordinates are
2 2 2 2
2 2 2 2 2
1 1 1 2 u v u v u p u u u u v u
u
r r r z r r r r r z r r
v
u p u u
c c c c c c c c c
+ = + + + +

c c c c c c c c c

(A)
2 2 2
2 2 2 2 2 2
1 1 1 2 v v v uv v p v v v v v v
u w
r r r z r r r r r z r r
v
u p u u u
c c c c c c c c c
+ + + = + + + + +

c c c c c c c c c

(B)
2 2 2
2 2 2 2
1 1 1 w v w w p w w w w
u w
r r z r z r r r r z
v
u p u
c c c c c c c c
+ + = + + + +

c c c c c c c c

(C)

U
u
R(z)
v

O
B
0
r
R
0

L
0

z
International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968
Available Online at www.rfbss.org Vol.1, Issue 3, November-2012 Page: 78-88

Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 80

Equation of continuity is
1
0
u v u w
r r r z u
c c c
+ + + =
c c c
(D)
The governing equations of the flow under the assumed conditions are the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes
equation. Under the magnetic field applied in r direction the equations in the axial and radial directions becomes
0 = +
c
c
+
c
c
-
-
-
-
-
-
r
v
r
v
z
u
(1)
- -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
u B
z
u
r
u
r
r
u
v
z
P
r
u
v
z
u
u
2
2
2
2
2
1 1
p
o
p
(2)

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
2
2 2
2
1 1
z
v
r
v
r
v
r
r
v
v
r
P
z
v
u
r
v
v
p
(3)
It is convenient to write these equations in dimensionless form by means of the following transformation variables,
0 0
2
0
0 0 0
0
0 0 0
, , , , , , , ,
u
u
u
p
- - - - - - - - -
= = = = = = = = =
U
U
U
U
P
P
U
v
v
U
u
u
R
t U
t
R
R
R
R
z
z
R
r
r
where p , ,
0
-
P U are the average velocity in the unobstructed tube, pressure and density of blood respectively.
Then

z
u
R
U
R
z
u
U
R z
z
U u
z
z
z
z
u
z
u
c
c
=
c
c
=
c
c
c
c
=
c
c
c
c
=
c
c
-
-
-
-
0
0
0
0
0
0
. .
. .

r
v
R
U
R
r
v
U
R r
r
U v
r
r
r
r
v
r
v
c
c
=
c
c
=
c
c
c
c
=
c
c
c
c
=
c
c
-
-
-
-
0
0
0
0
0
0
. .
. .

Using the above transformations, (1)-(3) become,
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
= +
c
c
+
c
c
R
U
r
v
r
v
R
U
z
u
R
U

0 = +
c
c
+
c
c
r
v
r
v
z
u
(4)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
u B
z
u
r
u
r
r
u
z
p
r
u
v
z
u
u
2
0
2
2
2
2
1 1
p
o
v
p

0
2
0
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
2
2
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
uU B
z
u
R
U
r
u
R
U
rR
r
u
R
U
z
p
R
U
r
u
R
U
v U
z
u
R
U
u U
p
o
v
p
p

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c

0
2
0
2
2
2
0
0
2
0
0
2
2
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
uU B
z
u
R
U
r
u
rR
U
r
u
R
U
z
p
R
U
r
u
R
U
vU
z
u
R
U
uU
p
o
v

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
0
0
0
2
0
2
2
2
2
0 0
1
U
R
uU B
z
u
r
u
r
r
u
U R z
p
r
u
v
z
u
u
p
o v

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c

International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968
Available Online at www.rfbss.org Vol.1, Issue 3, November-2012 Page: 78-88

Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 81

0
0
0
2
0
2
2
2
2
1 2
U
R
uU B
z
u
r
u
r r
u
R z
p
r
u
v
z
u
u
e
p
o

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c

u M
R z
u
r
u
r r
u
R z
p
r
u
v
z
u
u
e e
2
2
2
2
2
2 1 2

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
(5)

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
2
2 2
2
1 1
z
v
r
v
r
v
r
r
v
v
r
P
z
v
u
r
v
v
p

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
2
2
2
0
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
2
2
2
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
z
v
R
U
R
U
r
v
r
v
R
U
rR
r
v
R
U
v
r
P
R
U
z
v
R
U
uU
r
v
R
U
vU
p
p

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
2
2
2
0
0
2
0
0
2 2
0
0
2
2
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
2
0
z
v
R
U
R
U
r
v
r
v
rR
U
r
v
R
U
v
r
P
R
U
z
v
R
U
u
r
v
R
U
v

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
2
2
2 2
2
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
2
0
1
z
v
r
v
r
v
r r
v
R
U
v
r
P
R
U
z
v
R
U
u
r
v
R
U
v

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
2
2
2 2
2
0 0
1
z
v
r
v
r
v
r r
v
R U
v
r
P
z
v
u
r
v
v

c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
=
c
c
+
c
c
2
2
2 2
2
1 2
z
v
r
v
r
v
r r
v
R r
P
z
v
u
r
v
v
e
(6)
Where
0
BR M
pv
o
= = Hartmann number

v
0 0
2
Re
U R
= =
u
p
0 0
2 U R
=Reynolds number
u is the fluid viscosity.
In order to proceed, three simplifying assumptions are made.
(i) The terms due to the viscous component of the normal stress in the axial direction

c
c
2
2
z
u
are negligible which has been
extensively used in the analysis of non-uniform flow.
(ii) The axial velocity is expressible as a suitable polynomial.
(iii) The pressure gradient term can be eliminated since,


c
c
=
c
c
R R
dr
z
P
ru R dr
z
P
r
0
2
0

Boundary conditions are
(i)
s
u u = at r = R(z)
(ii) 0 , 0 ), (
3
3
=
c
c
=
c
c
=
r
u
r
u
z U u at r = 0

International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968
Available Online at www.rfbss.org Vol.1, Issue 3, November-2012 Page: 78-88

Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 82

(iii)
2
1
) (
0
=

R
dr ru

(iv) u = U and 0 =
c
c
r
u
at =
R
r

Multiplying (5) by r, rearranging and integrating over the cross section of the tube, we get the integral momentum equation.
In the same manner, an integral energy equation is obtained by multiplying equation (5) by r and integrating over the cross
section. Using the above assumptions and combining the integral momentum and integral energy equations we get,

|
.
|

\
|
c
c
+ |
.
|

\
|
c
c
=
c
c

c
c

R
s
R R
r
u
u R R dr
r
u
r R dr ru
z
dr ru
z
R ) 1 (
Re
2
2
1
2
2
2
0
2
0
3 2



R R
urdr dr ur R
M
0 0
2 2
2
Re
2
(7)
The dimensionless polynomial velocity profile can be expressed as
4 3 2
) / ( ) / ( ) / ( ) / ( R r E R r D R r C R r B A
U
u
+ + + + = (8)
On using the boundary conditions (i) to (iii) we get
| |
4 2 2
) / )( 2 ( 3 ) / )( 2 3 ( 2 R r G F R r G F F R u + =

(9)
Where F=R
2
U, G=R
2
u
s
, u
s
is slip velocity, when F=2 and u
s
=0 in (9) parabolic profile is obtained. The blunted profile can be
expressed as

s < + +
s s
=
1 / , ) / ( ) / (
/ 0
4 2
R r R r C R r b a
R r U
u


(10)
Using the boundary condition (iv), equation (1) reduces to
| |

s < +

+
s s
=
1 / 0 , ) / ( ) / ( 2 2 1
) 1 (
/ 0
4 2 2 2
2 2
R r R r R r
u U
u
R r U
u s
s

(11)
Where
) (
) 2 3 (
G F
G F


=
When 2F + G = 3, 0 = and with this restriction the blunted velocity profile equation (10) reduces to a polynomial profile.
When 2F +G<3, is positive and real. When 2F+G>3, is imaginary. So, the blunted velocity profile, equation (3.2.10)
will be valid for 2F+G<3 and for the case 2F+G>3, the polynomial velocity profile equation (9) will be used to approximate
the flow. The profile equations (3.2.9) and (3.2.11) are substituted into (3.2.7). Then it becomes
+ + + + + '

= ' 0667 . 0 ( ) ( 2571 . 0 )


2 2
( 1333 . 0 )
3 3
( 0286 . 0 {
3
[ FG G F G F G F R R U
+ I I + + F F M
s
u U G F 0048 . 0
2
0429 . 0 Re][ /
1
2
2 Re / ) ( 4 } 3429 . 0 ) ( 0143 . 0
1
] 0286 . 0 ) 0071 . 0 0143 . 0 0119 . 0 (

G F G (12)
where,

< +

+ + + +

> +
= I
3 2 }
3
) 1 (
2
9
) 1 (
3
) 1 (
2
9 2 ) 54 96 10 12
2 2
43 (
2
) (
{
) 1 ( 3
) (
3 2 2
G F
F
G F F FG G G F G F
F
F G
G F G F
and
International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968
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Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 83

< + +

+
> + +
= I
3 2 ) 5 . 1 8 . 4 ( ) 166 . 0 742 . 0 ( ) 333 . 1 058 . 4 ( {
) 1 ( 9
) (
) 5 . 0 333 . 0 (
3 2 ] 5 . 0 } 737 . 0 ) 028 . 0 ( ) 072 . 0 ( { 3 [
3 3 3
2
2
3 1
G F R R G R F
F
G F
R G
G F G F R

The primed quantities represent derivatives in the axial direction. The intial condition for solving (12) comes from the
assumption of poiseuille flow in far upstream of the Stenosis, i.e., 2 , 1 , = = = U R z o . (13)
The wall shear stress component at any distant r from the tube axis is given by
] 1 [ ) (
4
1
2
R
r
u
T
R w
' +
c
c
=
On using the velocity profiles in (9) and (11) in the above expression the wall shear stress becomes

< + ' +

> + ' +
=

3 2 ], 1 [
1
) (
3 2 ], ) ( 1 )[ 2 3 (
2
2
1
2 3
G F R
R u U
G F R G F R
s

(14)
In separated region continuity requires

=
s
r
rudr
0
2 / 1 (15)
Where r
s
is the radial co-ordinate of the separated stream line. From (9) and (15) we get,
2 2
2 4
} ) / ( 1 { 2 ) / (
} ) / )( 2 ( ) 3 {( ) / ( 1
R r R r
R r G G R r
F
s s
s s


= (16)
The particular stenosis geometry used was selected after Young [200] and is described by the expressions

>
s +
=
0
0
0
, 1
, ) cos 1 (
2
1
) (
Z z
Z z
Z
z
z R
t o

where o =(Stenosis height)/ R
0
and Z
0
=(Stenosis length)/2R
0
. Three model stenosis with geometries defined in the above,
but with different values of o and Z
0
were constructed for the experimental testes (Table 1).
Table 1: Geometric parameters of the model Stenosis
Model Numbers R
0

o
Z
0
Percent Stenosis
M-1 0.372 1/3 4 56
M-2 0.372 2/3 4 89
M-3 0.372 2/3 2 89

For classification purposes the severity of a stenosis is often defined by the maximum reduction in lumen area expressed as a
percentage (percent stenosis). Model M-1 represents a relatively mild stenosis with a 56 percent severity of constriction and
a total length of 8R
0
. Model M-2 has the same length but is more severe with 89 percent constriction. To evaluate the effect
of stenosis length, model M-3 was designed to have the same severity as M-2 but only half of its length.

4. Result and discussion
The problem under investigation is solved numerically using Shooting Method. Numerical calculations have been done for
various combinations of parameters i.e., the Hartmann number M and Reynolds number Re with slip and no slip. The Young
model is used in computing the centerline velocity U. After obtaining the centerline velocity U from (12), the axial velocity
profiles (u) are computed directly by substituting U into (9) or (11). Then the value of u substituting in equation (13) the
velocity profile v are computed. The wall shear stress T
w
has been computed from the relation (14) for both slip and no slip
case.
International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968
Available Online at www.rfbss.org Vol.1, Issue 3, November-2012 Page: 78-88

Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 84

Numerical results are shown graphically. It has been observed that the effect of the Hartmann number M and Reynolds
number Re on the velocity field as well as on the wall shear stress is very prominent.
It is observed that the centerline velocity U decreases with increasing Reynolds number at M=1.5 (Fig. 4). The nature of U is
also same with no slip (Fig. 5). The centerline velocity U increases when the Hartmann number increases with slip at Re=50
(Fig. 2). The nature of U is same in no slip case also (Fig. 3). It is seen that when Hartmann number increases the axial
velocity (v) decreases with slip (Fig. 6). A similar case occurs in no slip also (Fig. 7). The axial velocity increases when
Reynolds number increases with slip (Fig. 8). A similar case occurs in no slip also (Fig. 9).
The present problem reduces to the problem discussed by Chaturani [14] when M=0. It is observed that when the Hartmann
number increases the fluid velocity and the wall shear stress is greatly affected. Numerical results agree well with their
solution in non-magnetic case. The mathematical expressions may help medical practitioners to control the blood flow of a
patient whose blood pressure is very high, by applying certain magnetic field.

REFERENCES

[1] Ahmed, S. and Sut, D. K., Effect of Applied Magnetic Field on Pulsatile Flow of Blood in a Porous Channel, Int. J.
Comp. Tech. Appl., Vol. 2 (6), pp. 1779-1785, Nov-Dec 2011
[2] Caro, C.G., Arterial Fluid Mechanics and Atherogenesis : Recent Advances in Cardiovascular Disease, ed. Niimi, H.,
vol. II (Supplement), Suita, Osaka, Japan, pp. 7-11 (1981)
[3] Caro, C.G., Transport of Material Between Blood and Wall in Arteries, In Atherogenesis: Initiating Factors, Ciba
Foundation Symposium, Vol. 12, pp. 127-164 (New Series), Elsevier, Excerpta Medica, North Holland, Amsterdam (1973).
[4] Chaturani, P and Biswas, D., Effects of Slip in Flow Through Stenosed Tube, Physiological Fluid Dynamics I: Proc. Of
1
st
International Conf. on Physiological Fluid Dynamics, September 5-7, pp. 75-80, IIT-Madras (1983)
[5] Chaturani, P and Biswas, D., Resistance to Blood Flow Through a Steosed Tube with Axial Velocity Slip at Wall, Proc.
12
th
NC-FMFP, NFM-10, pp. 400-405, IIT-Delhi (1983)
[6] Lee, J.S. and Fung, Y.C. Flow in Locally Constricted Tube at Low Reynolds Number, J. Appl. Mech., 37-9-16 (1970)
[7] May, A.G., Deweese, J.A. and Rob, C.G., Hamodynamics effect of arterial stenosis, Surgery, Vol. 53, pp. 513-524
[8] Rathod, V.P., Gayatri, Applied Science Periodical, Vol. 2 (1), pp. 52-58 (2000)
[9] Rathod, V.P., Gayatri, Bull. Of Pure and Appl. Sc. Vol. 19E(1), pp. 1-13 (2000)
[10] Texon, M., Arch. Int. Med., Vol. 99, pp. 418 (1957)
[11] Texon, M., Atherosclerosis and its origin, Sandler, M. and Bourne, G.H., eds. Newyork, Academic Press (1963).
[12] Womersley, S.R., An elastic tube theory for pulse transmission and oscillatory flow in mammalian arteries, Wright Air
Dev. Ctr, Tech. Rep. WADC-TR, pp. 56-614 (1957)
[13] Womersley, S.R., K. Physics, vol. 127, pp. 553-563 (1955)
[14] Sarma, Mitali and Sut, Dusmanta Kumar, Analysis of Pulsatile Flow of Blood in a Porous Channel under Effect of
Magnetic Field, Int. J. Comp. Tech. Appl., Vol. 2 (6), pp. 2001-2014, Nov-Dec 2011
[15] Shukla, J.B., Parihar, R.S. and Gupta, S.P., Effects of Peripheral Layer Viscosity on Blood Flow Through an Artery
with Mild Stenosis, Bull. Math. Biol., 42, pp. 797-805 (1980).
[16] Shukla, J.B., Parihar, R.S. and Rao, B.R.P., Bull. Math. Biol., Vol. 42, pp. 283-294 (1980).
[17] Sud, V.K. and Sekhon, G.S., Physiological Fluid Dynamics. III, Swamy, N.V.C. and Singh, M. Eds. pp. 286-186,
(1978)
[18] Sut, Dusmanta Kumar and Hazarika, G. C., Effect of Magnetic Field on Pulsatile Flow of Blood in a Porous Channel,
International Journal of Mathematical Archive-2(11), pp. 2251-2257, Nov. 2011
International Journal for Basic Sciences and Social Sciences (IJBSS) ISSN: 2319-2968
Available Online at www.rfbss.org Vol.1, Issue 3, November-2012 Page: 78-88

Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 85

[19] Sut, Dusmanta Kumar, Study of Blood Flow with Effects of Slip in Arterial Stenosis Due to Presence of Transverse of
Magnetic Field, International Journal of Mathematical Archive-3(3), pp. 983-993, Mar. 2012


Fig. 2. Variation of Center line Velocity for different Hartmann number at Re=50


Fig. 3. Variation of Center line velocity for different Hartmann number at Re=60 with no slip

-3.75-3.5 -3.25
-3
-2.75-2.5-2.25
-2
-1.75-1.5-1.25
-1
-0.75-0.5-0.25
0
0.25 0.50.75
1
1.25 1.51.75
2
2.25 2.52.75
3
3.25 3.53.75
4
r/R ->
v ->
M=1
M=2
M=3
M=4

-3.75-3.5-3.25
-3
-2.75-2.5-2.25
-2
-1.75-1.5-1.25
-1
-0.75-0.5 -0.25
0
0.25 0.50.75
1
1.25 1.51.75
2
2.25 2.52.75
3
3.25 3.53.75
4
M=1
M=2
M=3
M=4
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Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 86


Fig. 4. Variation of center line velocity for different Reynolds numbers at M=1.5 with slip




Fig. 5. Variation of center line velocity for different Reynolds numbers at M=1.5 with no slip


0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
-3.8-3.5-3.3-3 -2.8-2.5-2.3-2 -1.8 -1.5-1.3-1
-0.8-0.5-0.30
0.25 0.50.75 1
1.25 1.51.75 2 2.25 2.52.75 3
3.25 3.53.75 4
z ->
U ->
Re=100
Re=110
Re=120
Re=130
Re=140

0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
4500
-3.8 -3.5-3.3-3 -2.8-2.5-2.3-2 -1.8-1.5-1.3-1
-0.8-0.5-0.30 0.250.50.751 1.251.51.7
5
2
2.252.52.753
3.253.53.754
z ->
U ->
Re=45
Re=50
Re=55
Re=60
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Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 87


Fig. 6. Variation of Velocity profile for different Hartmann numbers at Re=50 with slip



Fig. 7. Variation of Velocity profile for different Hartmann number at Re=50 with no slip


0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -10 -12 -14 -16 -18 -20
r/R ->
v ->
M=4
M=3
M=2
M=1

-20 -18 -16 -14 -12 -10 -8
-6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8
10 12 14 16 18 20
r/R ->
v ->
M=4
M=3
M=2
M=1
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Mitali Sarma, Analysis of blood flow through stenosed vessel under effect of magnetic field 88


Fig. 8. Variation of Velocity profile for different Reynolds number at M=0.50 with slip



Fig. 9. Variation of Velocity profile for different Reynolds number at M=0.50 with no slip


20 18 16 14 12 10
8 6 4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -10 -12 -14 -16 -18 -20
r/R ->
v ->
Re=30
Re=40
Re=50
Re=60
Re=70
Re=80

20 18 16 14 12 10
8 6 4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -10 -12 -14 -16 -18 -20
r/R ->
v ->
Re=20
Re=30
Re=40
Re=50
Re=60