Vote Nov.

6th Column L

Call For A Ride to the polls 856-839-0466
Paid for by ROMANO2012, Rebecca Bard, Treasurer
WWW.ROMANO2012.COM
See our ads on pages 5 and 12.
VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 38 | OCTOBER 31, 2012
I NS I DE : PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE: PG. 4 • VETERANS DAY EVENTS • HIGH SCHOOL REUNIONS • TUSK AT LEVOY
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CONNECTI NG YOU TO SOUTH JERSEY. WEEKLY.
Vineland’s proposed sports complex will be a mecca for athletes and
sports enthusiasts near and far.
E C R W S S
L o c a l
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
$350M Sports Complex Proposed
A huge complex proposed for a Lincoln Avenue site in Vineland will serve up a wide variety
of indoor and outdoor athletics. { BY RYAN DINGER }
Continued on page 29
Cumberland County College
will present “Spirituals to Funk”
featuring Dr. John, pictured, and
The Blind Boys of Alabama, at 3
p.m. this Sunday, November 4, in
the Guaracini Performing Arts
Center, Sherman Avenue, Vineland.
Hear masters meld jazz, blues
and gospel when New Orleans
keyboardist and Rock and Roll
Hall of Fame inductee Dr. John
joins gospel music legends The
Blind Boys of Alabama in their
first-ever joint tour.
Based on the legendary
Carnegie Hall “Spirituals to
Swing” concerts produced by
John Hammond in the 1930s, this
concert will deepen your affection
for meaningful music.
Dr. John is universally cele-
brated as the living embodiment
of the rich musical heritage exclu-
sive to New Orleans.
Tickets for “Spirituals to Funk”
are $50 for premium seats; $35
for all other seats. They can be
purchased with a credit card by
calling 856-692-8499 or by visit-
ing the CCC Box Office. Hours are
10 a.m.–2 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday; and 10 a.m.–7 p.m.
Wednesday.
Mayoral, Freeholder Candidates
Outline Plans
In Vineland’s mayoral race, incumbent mayor
Robert Romano is seeking a second term, chal-
lenged by former two-term mayor Perry Barse,
current city council member Douglas Albrecht,
former city council president Ruben Bermudez,
and labor activist David W. Mazur. Romano
defeated Barse four years ago, and Bermudez
was beaten by Barse when he won his second
term in 2004. Neither Albrecht nor Mazur has
run for the top office before.
At the county level, voters will select two can-
didates to serve on the Cumberland County
Board of Chosen Freeholders. The two seats are
currently held by Republicans Tom Sheppard
and Mary Gruccio, both running for re-election.
In last November’s elections, Republicans took
control of the freeholder board for the first time
in decades. Now the party needs to defend both
Sheppard’s and Gruccio’s seats to maintain con-
trol of the board. The candidates running on the
Democrats’ ticket are Joe Derella, Jr. and Doug
Long. Read all of their profiles starting on page 24.
R
on Nametko has a vision for area youth athletics.
For over a decade, the founder of The Magic
Sports Complex of NJ has envisioned a major
indoor/outdoor state-of-the-art athletic facility that
will offer a host of sports-related and recreational
activities and special events in southern New Jersey.
Now he wants to build that facility in Vineland.
On October 22 at Vineland’s City Hall, Nametko and
his team of developers submitted their application to
build a $350 million sports complex on south Lincoln
Avenue, near Route 55. The Zoning Board, which received
the proposal, will have one month to review the project
before hearing the pitch from Magic Sports during a
regularly scheduled meeting on November 28. Should
that first meeting go well, Magic Sports would then be
asked to go back and prepare a site plan for the project.
“This project is not about me,” said Nametko, during
Dr. John, Blind Boys at CCC
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MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
MICHELE LOW Advertising Executive
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
LORI GOUDIE Graphic Designer
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Ste. 205, Vineland, NJ 08360
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2012. All
rights reserved.
I
don’t know how much it’s going to
help the farmers, but there sure seems
to be a bumper crop of campaign signs
in South Jersey. Hope they harvest
them all after next Tuesday.
And, speaking of next Tuesday, don’t for-
get to get out and vote.
I know it has been a long, long, long cam-
paign and it’s going to seem even longer over
the next few days as the candidates battle
over the last few fence-sitters.
I read recently that the Big Two (the
Dems and the GOP) are going to spend over
$2 billion on the election.
I wonder if that figure includes the money
spent by the Political Action Committees (PACs).
In fact, I wonder if the Big Two hasn’t
become the Big Three.
Because, most of the really ugly political
ads you see on TV come from the PACs.
Those ads are easy to spot. They’re the
ones that don’t include a smiling shot of the
candidate at the end saying he or she
“approves this message.”
It took me a while (I’m not nearly as
smart as most politicians) to figure out the
language in these ads. When they say a can-
didate “recognized” a problem, it usually
means the candidate didn’t do anything
else—and won’t in the future.
When a candidate says, “polls show,” he
or she is usually leaving out the key adjective
“our,” as in, “our carefully selected group of
people” polled exactly the results we needed
to make our point.
When an ad says a candidate is “working”
on a problem, you can be sure he or sure will
retire as soon as the votes are counted.
When a candidate says, “That’s a very good
question,” the only thing you can be sure of is
that you won’t understand his or her answer.
That’s not to say all candidates are liars,
bums or lazy. Although, an alien who had
nothing to base an opinion on but the adver-
tisements, might be forced to come to that con-
clusion. There are enough good ones out there
that I still have hope for our political system.
Problem is that not enough of them get
elected—and that’s our fault as voters.
Seriously, if you vote a party line (either
party) you’re undermining all the blood,
sweat and tears that have gone into making
this country great.
Our ancestors fought the most powerful
nation in the world to gain its independence;
fought brother against brother to keep our
nation united; and fought countless wars on
foreign soil to keep us safe.
And you’re going to let somebody else
decide which are the best candidates?
It’s our own fault for letting them think
we’re stupid. How can they not?
I watched all four of the national debates
and attended the local mayoral one.
Here’s my scorecard: Romney won the
first, the second was a tie and Obama might
have won the third because Romney phoned
it in. On the VP side, Biden looked like a
teen-ager who’d had a few too many Red
Bulls and Ryan didn’t seem sure enough of
his answers: call it a draw.
But before the debaters even finished
shaking hands the pointy heads were already
explaining to me what I’d just seen and
heard: as though the candidates had been
speaking ancient Babylonian.
To me, “left” and “right’ are directions
and “far left” and “far right” are just further
directions. The “right” the politicians should
be talking about and leaning toward is the
“right” that balances “wrong.”
The only thing that the candidates seem
to agree on—at least in their ads—is that they
are against taxes, for protecting seniors, and
proud to be Americans. Well, I’m all of those
things and I’m not even a candidate.
Here’s what I think about the Presidential
race: I voted for Obama in the last election.
Part of the reason was that he is black.
Before some of you get all twisted: in that
same election (if they’d gotten their party’s
nod) I might have voted for Hillary Clinton
(because she’s a woman) or Mitt Romney
(because he’s a Morman).
The other candidate (said the old guy)
was just too old. Obama was younger and his
campaign slogan was “change.”
Well, I thought, it was time for a change
and what better way to express it than with
the country’s first black president?
Here’s the change I got: a devastated
economy, no help for seniors (two years
without even a cost-of-living raise in Social
Security) and a supreme lack of leadership.
The final straw for me was when Obama
threw Hillary Clinton under the bus over
that whole embassy thing during one of the
debates. Secretary of State Clinton the day
previous had accepted responsibility for the
failures to protect the embassy.
When asked about it, Obama’s response
was, yeah, she did it, but she reports to me.
That’s the moral equivalent of admitting
your car was involved in an accident, but some-
one else was driving and you were out of town.
Happy voting day! I
I
Does and Don’ts
{ BY PAUL J. DOE, FORMER EDITOR, CUMBERLAND NEWS }
Just Vote
How Doe sees the election, for what it’s
worth, and a plea to cast your ballot.
1 $350M Complex Proposed
A huge sports complex is proposed
for a S. Lincoln Avenue site.
RYAN DINGER
1,
24-27 Mayoral, Freeholder
Candidates
3,6,8 Faces in the News
4 Prizeweek Puzzle
10,19 In Our Schools
12 News in Brief
15 Enemy Implants
During WWII, German POWs were
housed and employed locally.
VINCE FARINACCIO
16 DINING
18 What To Do?
MainStreet Vineland events offer
“something different.”
TODD NOON
20 Entertainment
22 Community Calendar
23 Veterans Day Events
30 REAL ESTATE
31 CLASSIFIEDS
Grapevine 1-2 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:37 AM Page 2
Reverend Visits
Edgarton Christian
Academy
Rev. Howard Marshall of the Newfield
United Methodist Church recently visited
Edgarton Christian Academy and prayed
with the staff and students for the blessings
of their new school. Rev. Marshall is pic-
tured speaking with second grader Jimmy
Ketcham, 6, of Vineland.
October
Celebrations
Happy Wedding
Anniversary and
Birthdays to Gloria and
Rafael Medina. What a
beautiful month to cele-
brate with their children
Rafael Julian, Joseph,
Joshua and David. God
Bless you all.
From
The Cole family
SMS Adds Website Media Specialist to Staff
Vivienne Alex has joined the staff at
Scientific Marketing Services (SMS),
the South Jersey-based Marketing/
Advertising/Web Services Resource.
Alex’s primary function is dedicated to
helping area businesses get the kind of
selling websites they need to compete
in today’s changing marketplaces.
SMS extensive web services offer
complete website design, hosting,
updating, language conversion pro-
grams, animation, flash graphics, pho-
tography, Search Engine Optimization
(SEO), social media access, video
streaming, as well as proven web
advertising techniques.
WWW.TEAMBARSE.COM
Ordered and Paid for by Vineland Campaign 2012, John Barretta Treasurer
Serious Leadership for Vineland
PERRY BARSE
CARLOS
VILLAR
ANTHONY
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then "sell" you a higher priced service.
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HOW TO ENTER:
$ PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE $
ACROSS:
1. During divorce proceed-
ings, judge’s remarks about
her makes wife _.
3. An employer should _
his staff enough time if they
have an important task to do.
6. Reader finds story unbe-
lievable, especially the
repeated reference to beauti-
ful _ and its significance to
specific people.
8. In years gone by, _
tended to be less complex
than they are these days.
11. Famous American
female singer.
12. Poem celebrating nature
details how even a small _
can be considered beautiful.
14. If _ is very important in
terms of revenue, it should be
kept under close scrutiny.
15. When she sees child
alone on small_ surrounded
by high waves, concerned rel-
ative alerts others that
youngster needs help.
19. Having the same rights.
20. The fact that you _
nothing is likely to prey on
your mind.
21. As Christmastime draws
near, it could be pleasing for
parents to see a _ spirit in
their children.
DOWN:
2. Years ago, it was common
to see _ hanging in small back-
yards of many family homes.
4. Sports columnist predicts
popular basketball team, with
previous outstanding scoring,
will easily get _ support
throughout coming season.
5. Retired lawyer recalls
important legal cases often
involved wading through _ of
correspondence dating back
many years.
7. Boyfriend gives partner a
valuable ring with an _ set-
ting on the fifth anniversary
of their first date.
9. A _ will make your pulse
beat faster.
10. The sounds made by a bird.
13. Writer complains bitterly
that many of his _ are altered
a lot during the editing process.
16. Shortly before event,
athlete worries about whether
his javelin can adequately _
through the thick air that
engulfs the arena.
17. Stressed–out executive
rejoices, knowing she has, at
last, found _ in the tranquil
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18. During arduous event,
student announces she’ll soon
need a long rest, since she’s
really feeling _.
THIS LIST INCLUDES, AMONG OTHERS,
THE CORRECT WORDS FOR THIS PUZZLE.
ALLOT
ALLOW
ARMS
ARTS
BEAT
CARVE
COAL
CURVE
DECK
DOCK
ELLA
EQUAL
FESTIVE
FILE
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HAVE
HEAT
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LOCAL
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OVAL
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RILL
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WORDS
WORKS
PRIZEWEEK 102712
$600
1. Solve the puzzle just as you would in
any crossword puzzle. Choose from each
printed clue the word that best fits the
definition. Write the answers in the blank
space provided in each puzzle until all
spaces have been filled in.
2. There is no limit to the number of times
you may enter, however no facsimiles or
reproductions will be accepted. Only original
newspaper entry forms will be accepted.
3. Anyone is eligible to enter except
employees/directors of South Jersey
Federal Credit Union (SJFCU) and the
Grapevine and their immediate families.
4. A basic prize of $50.00 will be awarded
to the winner(s) of each weekly Prizeweek
Puzzle. In the case of multiple winners, the
prize money will be shared. If no correct
puzzle entries are received, $25.00 will
be added the following week. Winners
agree to permit use of their names and
photos by SJFCU and/or the Grapevine.
5. Entries can be mailed to South Jersey
Federal Credit Union, Attn: Prizeweek
Puzzle, PO Box 5429, Deptford, NJ
08096, or dropped off 24 hours a day, 7
days a week in the vestibule of SJFCU,
106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland. Mailed
entries must be received by SJFCU no later
than 10 am on the Monday following the
Wednesday publication of the Prizeweek
Puzzle. Entries dropped off at the SJFCU
Vineland branch must be received no
later than 8:30 am on the Monday fol-
lowing the Wednesday publication of the
Prizeweek Puzzle. SJFCU assumes no
responsibility for late or lost entries.
6. South Jersey Federal Credit Union
reserves the right to issue additional
instructions in connection with the
Prizeweek Puzzle. All such instructions
are to become part of the official rules.
Visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com for list
of additional rules.
This week’s jackpot
Note contest rules at the top of this page.
Readers can deposit their puzzles 24/7
in the drop-slot located in the vestibule of
South Jersey Federal Credit Union,
106 West Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Note: Use a debit card from any financial institution
to gain access to the vestibule drop box after hours.
Entries must be deposited by 8:30 am on Monday.
Or, completed puzzles can mailed to:
South Jersey Federal Credit Union
Prizeweek Puzzle
PO Box 5429
Deptford, NJ 08096-0429
Mailed entries must be received by 10 am on Monday.
SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S
PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE
The answers to last week’s puzzle
are below. For a detailed explanation
of the answers to last week’s puzzle
and additional rules, visit
www.SouthJerseyFCU.com
Due to Hurricane Sandy-related office closures, the
puzzle entries sent for the October 24 issue puzzle
were not reviewed in time for publication. If a winner
has been identified, the jackpot for this week’s puzzle
will be $50. If no winner has been identified, the
jackpot for this week’s puzzle will be $650.
Jackpot increases by $25 each week if
no winning entry is received!
Grapevine 3-11 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:27 AM Page 4
Vote November 6th Column L

THE RIGHT CHOICE FOR VINELAND
• Committed to serving as a full-time Mayor
• Lowered electric rates 4 times
• Lowest electric rates in the State of NJ
• Vineland is ranked #1 in the country for solar powered green energy
• Established the 1st Vineland Mayor’s Youth Council
• Established the “Welcome Home Program” to honor Vineland veterans
• More than $11 million in road improvement projects
PROMOTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Paid for by ROMANO2012 Rebecca Bard, Treasurer
Vineland Employment Increased • Established Landis MarketPlace, featuring the Amish Market
Proposed Magic Sports Complex
Will create hundreds of permanent jobs
Create 200-400 temporary construction jobs.
Significant tax ratables will be created for the city and region.
The estimated economic impact to the region is $250 million annually.
THOMPSON LABOY COCCARO ARROYO ROMERO
FREE Pre-Election Rally • Nov. 5
St. Anthony’s Greek Hall • Wheat Road, Vineland • 6 PM
Need a ride to the polls? CALL 856-839-0466
FOR CITY COUNCIL
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Faces in the News
I
Agriculture Officials Visit County College
Cumberland County College recently hosted a discussion with state and feder-
al agriculture officials as part of a newly-established educational lecture series
by the New Jersey Farm Service Agency.
CCC agriculture students heard from Karen Kritz (second from left), represent-
ing the NJ State Department of Agriculture, who reviewed and discussed a vari-
ety of agriculture programs, grants and resources that are available to beginning
farmers. FSA Loan Officers Robert Maxwell and Matthew Pavone discussed loan
eligibility criteria for those seeking to begin or expand a farm operation.
Entrepreneur Stacey Davis shared personal experiences with operating a com-
munity-supported agricultural project in southern New Jersey.
Harvest Fest Parade Another Rousing Success
The Deerfield Harvest Festival Parade drew more than 100 units and groups
from throughout southern New Jersey to celebrate farming and this year's
theme, "Country Stars & Stripes." The route ran from Deerfield Township School
to the Rosenhayn Fire Hall on Morton Ave.
Deerfield’s 2012 Farmer of the Year, Vernon Smith and family, owners of Chris
Smith‘s Christmas Tree Farm were in the parade. Floats, marching groups,
antique and classic cars, farm equipment and fire and rescue units joined
Cumberland Regional, Vineland, Gateway and Glassboro high school bands in
the line of march.
Winning floats included: 1st place 4H Float Under the Sea; 2nd place Little
Rascals; and 3rd place English Septic’s Fall Pick Up Truck.
Pictured: The first-place winning float “Under The Sea,” which was presented by the
local 4H Club.
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Sanskaar Cleans Up Local Park
As part of a community outreach program by Sanskaar, a Friends of India
Society Project, 26 kids and 11 parents got together on October 21 to clean up H.
Pagliughi Park. The group scoured every corner of the park, collecting five bags
of trash and four bags of recyclables. This was the organization’s second park
cleanup this year.
Vineland Women’s Club Supports Family Promise
On a beautiful
fall day recently,
Tina's Fund for
Domestic
Violence
Awareness dedi-
cated their
Domestic
Violence
Memorial Garden.
There were
approximately
100 people in
attendance at
Giampietro Park
at 3231 E. Landis
Avenue, Vineland.
Mayor Romano, Senator Jeff VanDrew, Assemblymen Nelson Albano and Matt
Milam, Prosecutor Jennifer Webb McCrae, Denise Rosen from SERV, Dale Elbeuf,
Superintendent of Recreation and Peter Coccaro, III, City Council Liason were
speakers at the event.
Contained on the Monument is a poem which was written by Kathleen
Lemons, a member of Tina's Fund. Lemons read her poem to the crowd.
Another member of Tina's Fund is Amy Matish, who spoke about her past
involvement with domestic violence. Afterwards she read a poem that she wrote
which was on the back of the program book and which will be engraved on one
of the granite benches. Brian Keener, whose sister Kimberly was a victim of
domestic violence and is being honored on the monument, spoke about her and
read an emotional poem about her. Brianna Durand sang “Broken Wing” by
Martina McBride.
Myrna Durand, founder/president of the organization, explained the meaning
of the Memorial Garden. The monument, in the shape of a podium, stands for
the voice of the victims. There are three weeping cherry trees representing
strength, hope and faith. She stated that it is her hope that others will find their
strength, not lose hope but keep faith alive. There is life after abuse and there is
life free from abuse. There are many more victims out there who keep their
silence, something that leaves them feeling alone, filling them with shame and
with darkness.
To close the dedication, Durand rang a bell with each victim's name that was
read, a total of 42 known names. She has asked for any family members who
have lost a loved one to contact her so that their loved one’s name can be
included on the monument. To date, there are 15 names. This Memorial Garden
is a benchmark project in New Jersey. Tina's Fund will be replicating this project
in Gloucester and Salem counties in the near future.
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Faces in the News
I
Boys & Girls Club Holds “Lights On Afterschool”
The Boys & Girls Club of Vineland recently held a "Lights on Afterschool"
event to showcase the achievements of its afterschool programs and students at
its Carl Arthur site. The youth members celebrated the positive benefits of after-
school programs by coloring light bulbs and stating why they think the after-
school program at the Boys & Girls Club is important for them. Lights On events
are held across the nation to call for support to ensure that afterschool pro-
grams in local communities across the country thrive. The Club believes that
every child should have access to afterschool.
Master Gardeners Decorate Bridgeton Zoo
On Monday, October 15, five
members of Cumberland County
Master Gardeners Organization
decorated Bridgeton’s Choanzick
Zoo with fall decorations. Master
Gardener Mary Ellen Rucci is
coordinating various horticultural
projects to be done throughout
the zoo in the next few years. Her
plantings will not only beautify
the grounds, but also provide
herbs, vegetables, fruits and
berries to the zoo’s residents.
Members of the public are wel-
come to help.
Members of the Cumberland County Gardeners Organization line a zoo sign with corn
stalks as part of their fall decoration efforts.
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Interact Club Members Help at Fall Clean-Up Day
Members of Vineland High School’s Interact Club joined Main Street Vineland
volunteers at the mini-parks at Landis Avenue and the Boulevard, in Vineland, on
recently to prepare the areas for the planting of flowers the following weekend on
Fall Planting Day. Interact is Rotary International’s service club for young people
ages 12 to 18. Interact clubs are sponsored by individual Rotary clubs.
Pictured from left: Gerardo Franco, Rebecca Watson, Shamar Cummings, Desiree Aponte,
Bridgitt Leon, advisor Jessica Albertson, interpreter Donna Giannio, and Arielle Aponte.
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Ruben
Bermudez
John Procopio Terra Dower Edwin Cintron Maritza Gonzalez
The BermudezTeam
Vote Column N
Before You Vote, I Want You To
Know Where I Stand
Moving Forward...Together
For Mayor
For City Council For City Council For City Council For City Council
Paid For By Bermudez For Mayor, Thomas Owoo, Treasurer.
For a ride to the polls,
call 856-507-0022
The Bermudez Team Plan
Hire a professional
Business Administrator
Develop a coordinated
economic development
marketing plan
Appoint a Citizen’s
Budget Committee
• Cultivate regional
economic development
partners
• Launch a Stronger
Safer Neighborhoods
Initiative (SSNI)
Work for new job
training and educational
opportunities
As your full-time mayor, I will be focused every
day on finding practical solutions that protect
taxpayer dollars, enhance economic development
opportunities, and make our neighborhoods
safer and more attractive for new businesses.
Vineland’s Future is in your hands.
On November 6, vote for Real Change.
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Festival SingFest Winners Announced
On Saturday, October 13,
members of Cumberland
County Master Gardener’s
Organization, under the
supervision of Master
Gardener Jane Hankins,
planted 500 daffodil bulbs
in The Old Broad Street
Presbyterian Cemetery in
Bridgeton. The brilliant
spring display is just part of
Hankin’s plan for this his-
toric site. Throughout the
next few years, she hopes to
replant trees destroyed in
storms as well as continue
the planting of flowerbeds
in the hallowed grounds.
The Master Gardeners of
Cumberland County pause for
a photo during their day of
work at the Old Broad Street
Presbyterian Cemetery in
Bridgeton.
Grapevine 3-11 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:27 AM Page 9
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VOTE FOR STEPHEN PLEVINS
INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE
Running for Vineland City Council
ON NOVEMBER 6 VOTE FOR PLEVINS
See What Plevins Has Done For Vineland Already:
• Founder of Broaden Your Horizons, an after
school program which has since become the
Vineland Boys and Girls Club
• Member of the Vineland Planning Board
• Past member of the Vineland Sewage Authority
• Co-Founder of Project Thanksgiving, a
program that provides Thanksgiving meals to
over 750 area families in conjunction with the
Salvation Army
Stephen Plevins was born and raised in Vineland and has called it his home for nearly
50 years. A graduate of Vineland High School, he has made it his life’s work to improve
the community he grew up in. In 1971, he graduated from the University of Maryland
with his Bachelor’s degree in Community Public Relations and Government. He has
done graduate coursework at both the University of Maryland and the University of
Northern Colorado. That’s why he’s your best choice for City Council.
Awarded The
Presented By
R
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P
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B
I L
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U
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H
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U
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ORDERED AND PAID FOR BY PLEVINS FOR COUNCIL, 28 TEMPLE RD., VINELAND, NJ 08360
For establishing the Broaden Your Horizons after-school program
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In Our Schools I
Delsea HS Participates In Pink Day
Delsea Regional High
School participated in “Pink
Day” on October 19 with stu-
dents and staff wearing pink
and pink ribbons to com-
memorate Breast Cancer
Awareness Month. Students
in the high school Student
Government Association and
Renaissance Club sold pink
ribbons, pink pencils and
pink lollipops and staff
members paid to wear jeans,
collecting a total of $390 to
send to the Central and
South Jersey Affiliate of the
Susan G. Komen Foundation.
From left: (standing) Kayla Staley, Tina White, Tiara Nock, Kristyn Casselle, Falyn Kirby,
D'Naija Thomas, Taylor Greene and Sidney Bangura (kneeling) Nick Lopes, Nick
Gaetano, Danielle DiStefano, Trevor Smolsky, Madalyn DaSalva and Jim Kelly.
First Graders of
the Month
Mary F. Janvier School in
Franklin Township recently
announced its first grade
students of the month for
the month of September.
They are, from left: (Back
Row) Collin Quick, Sophia
Spera, Danny Oyola, Dakota
Andrie and Charles Larkey;
(Front Row) George Ayers,
Veronique Lewis, Victoria
Tyran, Lealand Lash and
Samantha Watson.
Second Graders
of the Month
Mary F. Janvier School in Franklin
Township recently announced its second
grade students of the month for the month
of September. They are, from left: (Back
Row) Mason Carr, Mason Scimeca, Nathan
Croce and Samantha Cole; (Middle Row)
Reese Gebhard, Madison Long, and Leila
Porter; (Front Row) Allsion Reber and
Calista Boxczyk.
Third Graders
of the Month
Mary F. Janvier School in Franklin
Township recently announced its kinder-
garten students of the month for the
month of September. They are, from left:
(Back Row) Sophia Taylor, Kendle Hack,
Cameran Smith, and Kayleigh Barndt;
(Middle Row) Jimmy Reardon, Willie
Bonds and Michael Cunningham; (Front
Row) Diego Gallardo.
Grapevine 3-11 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:27 AM Page 10
Ellison Trivia Team Named Quiz Bowl Champions
Nothing tests your know-how quite like a quiz bowl, but Ellison's Trivia Team
was ready to rumble at the 5th Annual St. Augustine Prep Quiz Bowl. With heads
full of facts and figures galore, team members set out to do their best and to have
fun. Fortunately, they achieved both goals, as team members were named
Champions of this year's contest, which involved many elementary and middle
schools in South Jersey.
"Quiz bowls are difficult to prepare for, as the questions asked can be on
absolutely anything and are impossible to predict," says Caroline Chapman, Head
of School and Co-Moderator of the Trivia Club. "We focused our practice sessions
on learning to work together to generate answers and solve equations and other
math problems. The kids had a blast practicing, enjoyed discovering the unique
talents and knowledge of their club-mates, and were thrilled to do so well."
Quiz bowls participants, from left: Max Matusow, 8th Grade, Pittsgrove; Jake Aulffo, 8th
Grade, Vineland; Spencer Infranco, 8th Grade, Vineland; Anuj Patel, 7th Grade, Vineland;
Jonah Hammerstedt, 7th Grade, Vineland; Julia Albertson, 7th Grade; Vineland; Daniel
Farrell, 8th Grade, Pittsgrove; Gianni Finizio, 8th Grade, Vineland; Austin Mayweather, 7th
Grade, Mullica Hill; Jake Ottinger, 7th Grade, Vineland; Priya Patel, 7th Grade, Vineland.
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Check out our website at www.ccaymca.org, follow us on Twitter and like us on
Facebook for up-to-date Y information, specials, Y stories, contests and more!
(856) 691-0030 • Open at 5:00 am
1159 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360
HERE TO STAY
Celebrating 85 Years In Our Community
Fall II Program Session – starts this week!
Holidays are quickly approaching and what better way to help you feel good about the extra temptations
than to keep in shape with an exercise class! We have something for everyone, including free water, land and
Zumba classes to facility members! Fall II session began Monday, October 29th – it’s not too late to register!
Holiday Care
When school is out, the Y is in! November is a short month for school and the Y will be providing Holiday Care
each day school is closed! Holiday Care runs from 7:30 am - 5:30 pm with breakfast, lunch and a snack
provided. Activities include swimming, games, crafts and more. Grades Pre-K to eighth – cost is $25.00 a day.
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Cumberland Professional Campus
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Building 2, Suite A, Vineland, NJ
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OLMA Student Receives Leadership Award
Abby Zee, a senior at Our Lady of
Mercy Academy in Newfield and resi-
dent of Mullica Hill was the first
recipient of the Widener University
and NBC 10 News Award for leader-
ship. The award honors students who
show leadership in their community,
and comes with a $20,000 scholar-
ship over four years if the recipient
attends Widener University. Zee was
presented a plaque with her name by
Joe McGeever, Widener University’s
Assistant Director of Admissions, in
honor of this achievement.
Abby Zee poses with the school’s principal, Sr. Grace Marie, and Widener University’s
Assistant Director of Admissions, Joe McGeever, as she receives her plaque.
Reutter School Wins No Place For Hate Award
The Caroline L. Reutter School
has been named as a No Place For
Hate Award School for the 2011-
2012 academic year. Reutter School
achieved this award through its
ongoing, research-basedcharacter
development initiative. The Anti-
Defamation League, who organizes
the No Place for Hate program,
presented Reutter School with a
banner to be placed in the school’s
cafeteria.
From left: Jenna McCarty, Student
Council President, Jordyn Cudd,
Student Council Vice President and
Reutter Principal Ted Peters pose with
the No Place For Hate banner.
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Vote Nov. 6th Column L • Call For A Ride to the polls 856-839-0466
Paid for by ROMANO2012, Rebecca Bard, Treasurer
IT'S TIME TO
SET THE RECORD
STRAIGHT!
JOBS INCREASED
Despite one of the worst economies in the country’s history,
• Vineland’s employment increased over the last 4 years
• New Jersey’s employment decreased by 114,000 jobs
BUDGET STABILIZED
The prior Barse administration depleted the city’s fund
balance to an unhealthy level, jeopardizing Vineland’s bond
rating. My administration had to raise fund balances to
healthy financial levels.
PUBLIC SAFETY PROTECTED
The former Barse administration jeopardized the safety of
Vineland residents when it transferred $2 million in police
officer salaries to shaky, unstable and unsustainable Urban
Enterprise Zone funding – just one example in a long
record of fiscal irresponsibility. When New Jersey slashed
Vineland’s UEZ funding, my administration protected
Vineland public safety by transferring those jobs back to
sustainable sources of funding
FLEET VEHICLE SAVED TAXPAYER DOLLARS
I’ve seen flagrantly misleading and erroneous claims
about use of a municipal car as Mayor
TRUE: Car was not specially-ordered.
TRUE: I saved the city tens of thousands of dollars in
salary and benefits by serving as Director of Public Safety
without compensation for more than 4 years.
TRUE: Former Mayor Barse billed the City for his travel
expenses. I did not, saving the city thousands of dollars
in travel expenses.
TRUE: Use of a fleet vehicle was a more economical
alternative.
VINELAND ELECTRIC UTILITY SAVED
• Former Mayor Barse’s goal was to sell the electric utility
• Rather than dumping the utility, I converted it to a clean
energy, money-saving facility
• The utility reduced rates 4 times
• The electric utility has saved Vineland’s residents
$16 million a year
• Under my leadership Vineland is ranked #1 for solar
powered green energy
THOMPSON LABOY COCCARO ARROYO ROMERO
FOR CITY
COUNCIL
Friends Bargain Book Sale at
Vineland Public Library
Visit Vineland Public Library, 1058 E.
Landis Avenue, for the annual Bargain
Book Sale, opening at 11 a.m. on Saturday,
November 3 and continuing through mid-
December. The Doris Tripp Room is
stocked wall to wall with great books for
every interest. The room will be restocked
daily with new titles. Book sale hours are
Monday to Thursday 10-7:30; Friday 10-
4:30; Saturday 11-3:30. The library will hap-
pily accept donations in good condition for
the book sale during October and
November. Call 794-4244, ext. 4727 to
make arrangements for dropping off books.
College Offers Intro to
Teaching Course
Cumberland County College offers the
New Pathways to Teaching in New Jersey
program (NPTNJ) that provides a process
for individuals to become licensed teachers
without having to complete a traditional
training program.
A pre-service component to NPTNJ,
“Introduction to Teaching,” will begin Nov.
15 and meets for four sessions on the
Cumberland County College campus,
Sherman Avenue and College Drive.
Classes will run from 5-10 p.m. Thursday
evenings, November 15 and 29 and
December 6 and 13. Cost is $199. This
course is a requirement to begin the
NPTNJ program.
NPTNJ is a state-approved alternate
route curriculum that addresses a
statewide need for teachers at the elemen-
tary, middle and high school levels. Basic
eligibility requirements include a
Bachelor’s or higher degree, and a 2.75 min-
imum GPA in the highest degree earned.
Call 856-691-8600 ext. 345 for NPTNJ
program information, and to register for
the Introduction to Teaching class.
SJH is Affiliate of UMDNJ-
School of Osteopathic
Medicine
South Jersey Healthcare and the
University of Medicine and Dentistry of
New Jersey-School of Osteopathic
Medicine have signed an agreement desig-
nating the medical center as a major clini-
cal affiliate of the medical school. The new
agreement expands the relationship begun
five years ago between the two major
health institutions and supports efforts to
address the anticipated physician shortage
in South Jersey, which could become par-
ticularly acute in the area.
“By 2020, New Jersey is expected to
have 2,800 fewer physicians than needed to
adequately care for its growing—and
aging—population,” said Dr. Thomas A.
Cavalieri, dean of the UMDNJ-School of
Osteopathic Medicine. “At the same time,
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D E E T N A R
News in Brief
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we know that physicians are more likely to
practice in the same area where they
receive their training.”
“Partnering with UMDNJ-School of
Osteopathic Medicine was a natural fit,”
said Chet Kaletkowski, SJH president and
CEO. The school draws almost 80 percent
of its students from New Jersey, with
almost a quarter from the southern coun-
ties. Although our residents will be able to
practice anywhere in the country, I believe
a significant number will choose to provide
care in our region after getting to know our
hospitals, physicians and employees.
At any one time, more than two dozen
third and fourth year students from the
medical school are at SJH, gaining valuable
clinical experience in family medicine,
obstetrics and gynecology, internal medi-
cine, general surgery, pediatrics and other
specialties.
These experiences are especially valu-
able since the UMDNJ-School of
Osteopathic Medicine has expanded its
class size in anticipation of the growing
demand for physicians. The current first
year class of 162 students represents a 50
percent increase over the typical entering
class of just a few years ago.
A recently launched graduate medical
education program at SJH will ultimately
provide for 140 intern and residency posi-
tions in eight specialty areas under the
medical school’s Osteopathic Postdoctoral
Training Institute, as well as the nation’s
first osteopathic fellowship program in
urogynecology. These newly graduated
doctors are working side-by-side with SJH
physicians, gaining valuable experience and
insight. At the same time, they enhance
patient care with the knowledge of the lat-
est treatments and philosophies medicine
has to offer.
School District Seeking
Volunteer Translators
Vineland Public Schools is seeking vol-
unteers from the community to serve as
translators and interpreters on an as-need-
ed basis, said JoAnne Negrin, supervisor of
instruction for World Languages. These
volunteers will assist families who do not
speak languages spoken by district staff.
“We are in particular need of languages
such as Gujarati, Punjabi, Mandarin,
Cantonese, Ukranian, Turkish, and
Zapotec,” said Negrin, who is also supervi-
sor of English as a Second Language (ESL)
and BilingualEducation.
Those interested in helping the com-
munity as a language volunteer should con-
tact Negrin at 856-794-6700, ext. 2030 or
ext. 2018.
College to Host Bone Marrow
Drive
The Rotaract Club at Cumberland
County College will host a Bone Marrow
Donor Registration, in conjunction with
the annual fall American Red Cross blood
drive, on Tuesday, November 13. The
bone marrow registration, conducted by
DKMS Americas, will take place from 8
a.m. until 1 p.m. in CCC’s gymnasium,
Sherman Avenue and College Drive.
Appointments are not necessary, and
testing requires a painless swab to the
inside of the cheek. The entire process
takes just five to 10 minutes. Potential
donors must be between the ages of 18 and
55, be in good general health, weigh at least
110 pounds and not exceed a maximum
body mass index of 40. Certain health pre-
requisites must also be met.
With medical advances in the donation
process, the majority of those who donate
bone marrow can do so without needing an
invasive surgical procedure, and can return
home the same day that they donate.
DKMS is the world’s largest bone mar-
row donor center, with more than 3.6 mil-
lion registered donors. Their mission is to
lead the fight in defeating blood cancer by
empowering people to take action. More
than 31,000 of the organization’s donors
have helped to save the lives of others.
When you register with DKMS, you can be
found as a donor match for any patient in
need of a bone marrow transplant.
Every four minutes, someone is diag-
nosed with bone cancer. Finding a match-
ing donor is a matter of life and death, as
even with a registry of millions, six out of
10 patients never receive the lifesaving
transplant they need. Registering to
become a bone marrow donor is more than
a cheek swab; it is a commitment to help
save a life.
The Rotaract Club will also accept dona-
tions for DKMS Americas. Registering one
potential bone marrow donor costs the
non-profit organization $65. As DKMS
does not require new donors to pay a regis-
tration fee, and does not receive govern-
ment funding, it must rely on donations
from the general public to help offset its
costs. DKMS uses 100 percent of the finan-
cial contributions to register new potential
donors.
For more information about DKMS and
to learn about registering as a bone marrow
donor, visit www.getswabbed.org
SJH Family Success Center
Opens New Location
South Jersey Healthcare’s Family
Success Center has opened a new location
in Commercial Township at the Louise E.
Moore Senior Center (8879 Highland
Street, Port Norris, 856-413-5494).
The Family Success Center, a program
offered by IMPACT (Innovative Model for
Preschool and Community Teaming), will
offer a variety of services and programs
that connect Commercial Township fami-
lies with community resources ranging
from housing and legal assistance to help
obtaining household items and food. The
new center will provide services to parents,
grandparents, foster parents, or guardians
of children through the age of 18 who
reside in Commercial Township. Parents
Continued on next page
Are you afraid to get your injections
due to the meningitis cases caused
by contaminated medications?
THERE IS NO NEED TO FEAR. The office
of Dr. Stephen Soloway has never received medications from
the Massachusetts compounding center that has caused this
epidemic. Our injection medications were purchased prior to
June 2012 from a pharmaceutical company in Texas that we
have done business with for years. To be safe we have even
compared our lots to those reported by the CDC and confirmed
that our medications are safe and free of any contaminants.
There is no reason to not get the treatments you need. Please
call our office, conveniently located in Vineland NJ, and sched-
ule your injection today. If you have any concerns or would like
further information please call our office at
855-SOLOWAY (765-6929).
Stephen Soloway, M.D., FACP, FACR, CCD
Arthritis & Rheumatology Associates of S. Jersey, P.C.
2848 S. Delsea Drive, Ste 2C, Vineland, NJ 08360
Phone: (856) 794-9090 Fax: (856) 794-3058
Toll Free: (855) SOLOWAY www.DrSoloway.com
Member
FDIC
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Grapevine 12-19 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:34 AM Page 13
will have access to educational programs
such as computer, first aid and CPR classes,
as well as a variety of regularly scheduled
family activities.
CCC's Study Abroad Program
Professor Luis A. Henriquez (center) of
Universidad del Sagrado Corazon in San
Juan, Puerto Rico, recently visited
Cumberland County College to introduce
students to a new study abroad program.
This will be Cumberland County
College’s first study abroad program for
students. The program is designed for CCC
students who have an interest in attending
Universidad del Sagrado Corazon as trans-
fer students.
When students earn an associate degree
in a relevant program at Cumberland, and
meet USC’s transfer requirements, they
will be able to continue as a junior at
Sacred Heart University without loss of
credits. Cumberland County College and
Sacred Heart University offer transfer pro-
grams in an array of professional fields,
including Business, Technology, Natural
Science, Nursing, Social Science,
Education, Arts and Communications.
For more details: 856-691-8600 ext. 336.
Florida Fruit Sale
The Dorothy Volunteer Fire Company
Ladies Auxiliary will be selling fruit from
Florida. Orders will be accepted through
November 19. Fruit being offered for sale
includes Florida Navel oranges, Ruby Red
Grapefruit, Florida juice oranges, tangelos,
tangerines, and specialty boxes with several
kinds of fruit. Fruit will be delivered direct
from Florida to Dorothy in December, and
will be here in plenty of time for
Christmas. To order fruit, call 856-875-
7548 or 609-476-2436.
Millville Rescue Squad is Site
for Spay/Neuter Surgeries
The Animal Friends Foundation (AFF)
has come up with an innovative way to get
Millville’s feral and stray cats sterilized and
thus humanely manage feral cat popula-
tions in the community. AFF will take
spay/neuter surgeries on the road by
launching a MASH (Mobile Animal
Sterilization Hospital) clinic at the Millville
Rescue Squad on Sunday, November 4,
thanks to a $10,000 grant from PetSmart
Charities
®
. A team of veterinary techni-
cians, seasoned volunteers and a licensed
veterinarian experienced in high volume
spay/neuter will set up the clinic. The sur-
geries, which include rabies and distemper
shots, are free for those caring for
feral/stray cats in the 08332 zip code. The
fee for pet cats and stray/feral cats for all
other municipalities is a very reasonable
$50. Appointments are required for all cats.
For appointments and other informa-
tion, contact AFF through its website at
www.animalfriendsfoundation.com or
call 856-503-5572.
High School Seeks Business
Partners
Vineland High School is seeking busi-
ness partners to take part in its
Community-Based Instruction program,
which helps prepare students for employ-
ment after graduation from high school,
according to Cindy Veale, School to
Career/Transition Coordinator
This program is designed for 18 to 21-
year-old students who have not yet gradu-
ated from high school, but have completed
the academic requirements and have some
level of independence. Students are placed
in community partner worksites and are
mentored by an employee with the support
of a special education teacher and or aide.
Community-Based Instruction provides
students with an opportunity to demon-
strate what skills have been learned in the
classroom as well as experience actual
work environments to help prepare them
for the future.
“This program has had a major impact
on students’ lives,” said Veale. “Please con-
sider the possibility of a partnership.”
If you will be able to participate, in any
capacity, contact Veale at 794-6800, ext.
2623 or by email: cveale@vineland.org.
Dog Obedience Classes Offered
Dog obedience instructor and 4-H
leader Linda Lemmo is now accepting reg-
istrations for dog obedience classes for
puppies and dogs aged 9 weeks to adult.
To be able to enjoy your dog, your dog
must well-behaved. Obedience classes train
your dog to become obedient and have the
good manners and habits of a family pet.
For a dog to stay healthy and be safe, it must
be under control at all times. That behavior
and control come fromthe owner and you
will learn basic obedience commands that
every dog and owner should know. New
classes start on Thursday, November 8, 6
and 7:15 p.m. at the 4-H Center, located at
291 Morton Avenue in Rosenhayn
(Deerfield Township). The cost for the
eight-week course is $80.
Pre-registration is required by calling
856-459-2377. Leave your name and phone
number and Lemmo will contact you.
These classes are open to the public.
Call the 4-H Center at 856-451-2800,
ext. 3 to learn how you can become
involved in the 4-H dog Project. I
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Continued from previous page
Let’s make health care pleasant again.
CompleteCare is a system of 18 offices with one radical idea:
Healthcare should make you feel better.
So, yes, we see everyone, even if you don’t have insurance.
Yes, we handle virtually all the paperwork for you.
Yes, you can get an appointment fast. On the phone or online.
Healthcare that’s easy and affordable? That’s our job. And our mission.
Primary Medical • OB/GYN • Dental Care • Pediatrics • Specialty Care
Walk-ins welcome
Se habla Español
You can
aord great
healthcare.
For details or to make an appointment:
856-451-4700 • www.CompleteCareNJ.org (24/7)
Mayor Romano and his
“taxpayer funded muscle car” on duty at
Romano Campaign Headquarters
Tuesday, October 23, 2012.
Ordered and Paid for by Vineland Campaign 2012, John Barretta, Treasurer.
VINELAND RESIDENTS:
Your Taxpayer Dollars
At Work...
Grapevine 12-19 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:34 AM Page 14
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Vintage Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO }
Enemy Implants
POWs housed and employed locally were treated
according to the rules of the 1929 Geneva Convention.
A
ny system of change requires a
period of time in which those
involved adjust and adapt, and
it was no different for
Cumberland County’s contingent of
German POWs housed in Fairton and
employed by Bridgeton’s P.J. Ritter
Company. The 75 men transferred from
Fort Dix to Robinson’s Farm compound
during the peak of World War II soon put
to rest any apprehensions they and others
might have had about their involvement
with U.S. civilians in a Cumberland
County food processing plant. Accepted as
fellow employees by other workers, the
local POWs soon learned that their treat-
ment strictly adhered to the rules of the
1929 Geneva Convention.
According to “War on the Home Front,”
former Ritter Personnel Director Earl L.
McCormick’s account of the local POW
story published in South Jersey Magazine,
The Ritter Company usually provided
hourly music programs over the public
address system. McCormick reports that,
after a daily dose of jazz, the prisoners
requested more classical selections. They
were soon given the opportunity to submit
requests to the personnel officer like the
other employees. A steady flow of titles
from the POWs followed, none of which
originated from their homeland. Instead,
the Germans had become enamored of the
American songbook.
While the choice of music in the work-
place was a minor issue at best, another
request would provide a challenge to both
the military and the P.J. Ritter Company.
McCormick reveals that the prisoners’
new appeal was “to get the guns out of
their backs.” According to the article, the
POWs found the weapons distracting
while they worked and, more importantly,
they felt that guns weren’t necessary.
Before anyone could confront them
with the obvious argument that the
weapons discouraged escape, the prison-
ers explained that any attempts to flee
into Canada or Mexico would place them
into another hostile territory at war with
their homeland. And with an ocean book-
ending the West and the East, “it would be
futile to escape.”
McCormick consulted with the Fort Dix
commander and the Fairton camp captain.
The request placed the military and the
company in a quandary, and all angles had
to be examined. If military personnel were
placed only at strategic points outside the
plant and allowed periodic patrols through
the facility, a more efficient and productive
workplace would be created. But the con-
cerns over whether or not the lack of a
regular military presence within the build-
ing would lead to arguments or fights with
civilian workers remained.
In the end, both the military and the
Ritter Company decided to “take a
chance,” but with stipulations. The POWs
would determine whether the military
presence inside the building would return
by their conduct. Fort Dix was prepared to
reinstate its soldiers in the workplace at
the first sign of problems. And while the
prisoners candidly could not promise that
any of their compatriots “would not go stir
crazy,” they assured their captors that
they would “restrain him on the spot”
should it occur.
The decision proved to be the correct
one. McCormick writes that, after the
removal of guards, “there were no ‘inci-
dents,’ production increased, and the
POW workers were satisfied. The closer
contact with civilians evidently gave the
Germans a much different conception of
the American workers than painted by
Hitler, Goebbels and the German propa-
gandists.”
Still, a prevailing confidence that
Germany would win the war pervaded the
camp at Robinson’s Farm. Information
about a secret Nazi weapon about to be
unleashed had reached the prisoners,
indicating that someone in the workplace
was relaying messages. The FBI was noti-
fied and agents were planted among the
Ritter Company workers. They soon
apprehended the culprit, a long-time
employee who had been asked by an
undisclosed contact to relay “simple mes-
sages to a prisoner described as the [con-
tact’s] nephew.” The arrest ended any fur-
ther leaks.
Because six cents of each POW’s hourly
wage was in credit that could be used at
the camp canteen, McCormick explains,
the prisoners could obtain “cigarettes and
other items that were severely rationed
for civilians” at cheaper prices because
they weren’t taxed. It wasn’t long before
the Germans began bartering with their
coworkers and “soon almost every tent in
the POW camp in Fairton had a radio…”
News of the war would now be relayed by
American sources. I
I
Grapevine 12-19 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:34 AM Page 15
Andrea Trattoria, 16 N. High St., Millville,
697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves
Italian specialties in atmosphere of fine dining.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served
tapas style, catering, private parties.
Extensive wine list. Live music Thurs. night.
Babe's Village Inn, Martinelli Avenue,
Minotola, NJ 856-697-1727. Famous crabs,
seafood, Italian cuisine. Eat in or Take out.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland,
691-0909. Breakfast and lunch spot offering
sandwiches named for colleges near and far.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S.
Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Home-
made chocolates and candies, custom gift
baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink
specials. Take-out. Happy Hour Mon-Fri
3pm-7pm, Sun-Thu 10pm-cl. All Sports
packages available. NBA League Pass, NHL
Center Ice, & MLB Extra Innings.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland,
697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet
friends at bar. Daily lunch and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring “Gutbuster” a
21-oz. burger, pizza, wings, subs, dinners.
Black Olive Restaurant. 782 S. Brewster Rd,
Vineland. 457-7624. 7 a.m. - 10 p.m daily.
Entrees, desserts. Take out available.
Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville,
327-8011. All food is homemade, including
the potato chips.
Bombay Bites, 112 W. Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland, 696-0036. Indian cuisine. $8.95
lunch buffet ($5.99 on Mondays).
Bruni's Pizzeria. 2184 N. 2nd St., Millville
(856) 825-2200. Award-winning pizza since
1956. Open Mon-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sun. 11
a.m.-9 p.m.
Bruno's Family Restaurant, Cape May Ave.
and Tuckahoe Rd., Dorothy, 609-476-4739.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner, pizza. Open Mon-
Sat. 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St., Millville,
327-3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-can-eat buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge, Bakery,
3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 765-5977.
Happy hour everyday 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. half-
priced appetizers, and reduced drink specials.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main/Magnolia
rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads,
doughnuts, custom wedding cakes.
Dakota Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at Ramada,
W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-
8600. Stylish atmosphere perfect for an
upscale lunch or dinner. Delicious steaks,
seafood and sushi. Closed Monday for dinner.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main
Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and
dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes
year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-
1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-out, too.
Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24
hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored
recipes, fresh ingredients.
Double Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland, 213-6176. Open for lunch and din-
ner. Traditional tavern fair.
Elmer Diner, 41 Chestnut St., Elmer. 358-
3600. Diverse menu of large portions at rea-
sonable prices.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and
pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800.
Greek and American cuisine, pizza.
Fat Jack's BBQ. Cumberland Mall, next to
Starbucks, 825-0014. Open 7 days a week,
11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Eat in or take out. Serving
ribs, wings, sandwiches, salads and sides.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Tuckahoe
Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and
dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it
all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sun.
Gina’s Ristorante, Landis and Lincoln Aves.
in ShopRite Plaza, Vineland. 205-0049.
Serving dinner Tues.-Thurs., 4-9 p.m.; Friday
& Sat., 4-10 p.m.; Now serving lunch: Tues. -
Fri. 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Reservations recom-
mended. Takeout available.
Golden Palace Diner Restaurant 2623 S
Delsea Dr, Vineland, 692-5424. Serving
breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course,
4049 Italia Avenue, Vineland, 691-5558. The
golfers’ lounge and bar serves lunch and
snacks daily from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The
Greenview Inn is a fine dining restaurant
open for dinner Wed.-Sun. at 5 p.m.
Guiseppe's Italian Market, 528B N. Harding
Hwy, Buena. 856-213-6391. Hot & Cold Take
outs. Crabs Friday & Saturdays.
SHOP RITE LIQUORS OF VINELAND
Salute To Local
Wineries Series
Featuring Sharrott Winery
-Series-
One
CRIMSON
SKY
750 mL
$13.99
CRANBERRY
WINE
500 mL
$12.99
VIGNOLES
750 mL
$12.99
WINTER
SPICE
750 mL
$13.99
JUST PEACHY
SANGRIA
750 mL
$13.99
PRICES VALID 10/31/12 THROUGH 11/06/12
See Our
Facebook Page
For All Our
Spectacular
Upcoming Events
$
2.00 Off
ANY BOTTLE OF WINE FROM
SHARTOTT WINERY
Excludes tobacco, sale items and items prohibited by law. Cannot be
combined with any other offers. Coupon code: 110612, Exp:11/06/12
SENIOR COUPON
$
1.00 Off
(62 AND OLDER)
YOUR PURCHASE OF $10 OR
MORE WITH THIS COUPON
Excludes tobacco, sale items and items prohibited by law. Cannot be
combined with any other offers. Coupon code: 110612, Exp:11/06/12
SHARROTT COUPON
Limit 1 Limit 1
1853 Vine Rd. Vineland
691-4848
Fax: 856-691-2294
marcaccimeats@verizon.net
SPECIALS
Oct. 31
st
- Nov. 3
rd
EBT
$
1
59
lb.
$
2
99
lb.
$
3
29
lb.
$
4
59
lb.
BEEF CHUCK
SHORT
RIBS
END
CUT
CHOPS
SIRLOIN
STEAKS
BEEF
BUTTER
STEAKS
lb.
.49
¢
CHICKEN
LEG QUARTERS
10 LB. OR MORE
.99
¢
FRESH
PICNICS
(2 PC. VACUUM PACKED)
lb.
$
2
49
lb.
TURKEY
CHOPS
Happy Halloween!!!
To celebrate we decided to slash our prices this week, come on in and check out the lowest
prices in South Jersey! We guarantee our products, service and prices will not spook you!
STORE HOURS: MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 7:00AM TO 6:00PM
$
1
89
lb.
CENTER CUT
PORK
CHOPS
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1
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}
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3
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MAKE YOUR OWN
DINING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries,
the area has choices to satisfy any appetite.
Call for hours.
Grapevine 12-19 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:34 AM Page 16
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W
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.
G
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3624 South Delsea Drive, Vineland NJ
856-362-5508
Breakfast 7:30am to 11am Sat. & Sun.
Lunch 11am to 4pm Mon. thru Fri.
Dinner 4 pm to 9 pm Mon. thru Thurs. • 4 pm to 10 pm Friday
Dinner 11 am to 10 pm Sat. • 11 am to 9 pm Sunday
Senior Early Bird 1 pm to 3 pm Mon. thru Fri.
Take Out Available
CLIP & SAVE COUPON
Monday Through Friday • 11 am to 4 pm
Not to be combined with any other coupon or offer. *With purchase of Beverage/Per Person. Expires 12/31/12 GVN.
¡
*$1.00 OFF
LUNCH
CLIP & SAVE COUPON
Saturday & Sunday • 7:30 am to 11 am
Not to be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 12-31-12 GVN
¡
$1.00 OFF
BREAKFAST
Only
$
5.99
PIZZA, PASTA, SOUP
AND SALAD BAR
Exp. 11/21/12
10
for
10
10 Menu Items
for $10 Each.
Served with soup or salad and
unsweetened iced tea
947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, NJ 08360
Phone 856-563-0030 • Fax 856-794-2693
Lunch Buffet Mon. - Sat. $6.49
LUNCH BUFFET
Monday through Saturday
Reg. $6.49 w/Coupon $5.49!
Harry’s Pub at Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and
Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600. Lunch & dinner
daily. Happy hour daily 4-6pm with half-price
apps. Live Entertainment Wed. thru Sat.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St.,
Millville, 825-2288. All-you-can-eat buffet.
Howie’s Dugout All Star Cafe, 3569 E.
Landis Ave. (Across from Shoprite at Lincoln
and Landis). $3 lunches from 12 - 4 p.m.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
362-5978. Serving subs, sandwiches, and
take-out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens,
homemade sides, catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St.
(Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and
Japanese cuisine. BYOB.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily.
Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal,
chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cui-
sine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch
and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet.
Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E.
Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick
oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union
Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding
facility and intimate restaurant. Dungeness
Crabs Night on Tuesdays in the Bistro.
Gourmet Pizza Nite on Wed.
Millville Queen Diner, 109 E. Broad St.,
Millville. 327-0900. Open 24 hours daily.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head
rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and
dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St.,
Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering.
Mori’s, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 690-0300.
Adjacent to the Landis Theater Performing
Arts Center. Includes a “casual, upscale”
restaurant with a banquet facility and lounge
on site. Lunch and dinner.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-
9825. Full bar menu, drink specials.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High Street
Millville, 293-1200. Year round Fresh seafood
daily, slow roasted prime rib specials, deli-
cious summer Salads, everyday lunch & din-
ner specials, homemade corn beef, kitchen
open until 1 a.m., outdoor beer garden.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cui-
sine—lamb dishes and salads.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-
0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; con-
venient drive-thru, mini-meal specials.
Peking Gourmet, 907 N. Main Rd., (Larry’s II
Plaza), Vineland, 691-0088. Chinese. Takeout
only. All major credit cards accepted.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-
1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink
specials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-
8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups,
curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian.
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600. Open Daily,
6 a.m.-11 p.m. Breakfast served all day. Daily
specials Monday thru Friday. Over 30 din-
ner selections at 2 for $19.99 and also 7 for
$7.00 available 7 days a week starting at 3 pm.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery.
Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee.
A Taste of the Islands, 731 Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 691-9555. First prize winning
BBQ Ribs, Jamaican Jerk chicken, Curry
chicken, seafood, rice and beans and much
more. Closed Sunday only.
Ten22 Bar & Grill at Centerton Country
Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Lunch and dinner. New tavern menu
features soups, salads, burgers, sandwich-
es, wraps and entree selections. Sunday
Brunch extravaganza.
Tre Belleze, 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-
8500. Serving lunch and dinner daily with
complimentary buffet on Fri. from 3-6 p.m.
Serving gluten-free pizza, pasta and beer.
Home of the Screamer Wings.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat
Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish,
steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out.
Live music Saturday & Sunday night.
Dungeness Crab All You Can Eat.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena
Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled
meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily.
Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd.,
Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland,
691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches,
wings.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-
0909. Continental cuisine and spirits
served in a casually upscale setting.
Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics
served in a picturesque setting.
Grapevine 12-19 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:34 AM Page 17
D
owntown Vineland will be a vibrant
and desirable place to live, shop, dine
and work. It will be an exciting com-
munity destination, attracting visitors and res-
idents alike by embracing history, culture and
progress through architectural preservation,
celebrating our diverse heritage and encourag-
ing the arts, theater and entertainment.
So reads the Main Street Vineland Vision
Statement—a declaration of the goals our
organization and volunteers are working
toward. That work, however, requires more
than just dedicated people willing to donate
their time and talents. It takes money.
As has been the case for so many people,
businesses and organizations over the past
few years, Main Street Vineland has had to
tighten its belt in response to economic reali-
ties. This has caused us to evaluate the proj-
ects and programs we are working on and
make decisions on what we can continue to
do while still working towards the goals out-
lined in our Vision Statement.
To help raise critical funds for Main
Street Vineland, a small group of volunteers
headed by Organization Committee
Chairman Jason Scythes of Susquehanna
Bank recently planned and carried out our
second annual “A Taste of Vineland”
fundraiser, which was held in the beautiful
banquet room at Lou Ferretti’s Mori’s on
Landis. For this event, over a dozen Vineland
restaurants donated samples of their signa-
ture dishes for attendees to enjoy. Those
eateries taking part in this year’s event
included Bennigan’s, Crust ‘n Krumbs
Bakery, Jim Main’s Bakery, Mori’s on Landis,
Milly’s Deli, Olympia Restaurant, Sweet Life
Bakery, Taste of the Islands, Tres Bellezze,
Luciano’s New Orleans Seafood Kitchen, Las
Lomas Fresh Mexican Grille and the Amish
Market at Landis MarketPlace.
An important—and fun—component of the
night’s festivities was a terrific silent auction
that featured prizes donated by the Amish
Market at Landis MarketPlace, the Battleship
New Jersey, the Bay-Atlantic Symphony,
Booby Dee’s Rock ‘n Chair Restaurant, Kathy
and Jack Cavallero, Dandrea Produce, The
Grapevine, the Hoffman Law Office, Rose and
Ken Lewis, Congressman Frank LoBiondo,
Lorie Anne Jewelry, Marciano’s Restaurant,
MoonSunshine Décor, Lou Ferretti’s Mori’s
on Landis, Spiaggetta Seafood Trattoria and
TurtleStone Brewing Company.
As great as the event was, it simply would
not have been a success without the kindness
of those who purchased tickets to attend,
which included a group of 10 people from
General Mills/Progresso who were looking
for “something different to do” rather than
simply going out to dinner.
The generosity of the community—in time,
treasure and talents—was overwhelming, and
on behalf of all of us associated with Main
Street Vineland, I thank you for your support.
****
Downntown’s annual Holiday Parade is
fast approaching. Sponsored again by a gen-
erous donation from Susquehanna Bank, the
2012 Parade theme is “Sounds of the
Holidays.” Groups interested in participating
may send in an application with a $20 fee.
All applications must be received no later
than Friday, November 2, as no registrations
will be permitted the night of the parade.
Apply at www.MainStreetVineland.org or by
calling the office at 856-794-8653. I
Retiring Is Easy.
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government insured Reverse Mortgage
• Homeowners must be 62 years or older
and have equity in their home.
• You keep the title to your home, and must
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Angela Goldberg
Branch Manager—NMLS #243545
Office: 856-692-9494
agoldberg@gatewayfunding.com
1117 E. Landis Ave, Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360
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*Consult your tax adviser Gateway Funding Diversified Mortgage Services, L.P. #1071; Branch NMLS #241866; NJ Residential Mortgage Lender License
(#9939819). This is not an offer to extend credit to any individual who may be entitled to a more complete disclosure per RESPA, TILA, HOEPA, or any
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“Opening Doors to Home Ownership” • www.gatewayfunding.com
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nding.com
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609-646-6666
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INDOOR SOCCER
Now Registering
individuals and teams for
our Under-6 program
(ages four & five)
For info. Call 856-694-4303
1269 Dutch mill Rd.,
Newfield, NJ (Malaga Acres)
www.gaetanoindoorsoccer.com

Downtown Vineland
{ TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }
I
What To Do?
MainStreet Vineland events offer
“something different to do.”
For a no-obligation
advertising consultation,
call 856-457-7815 or e-mail:
sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today.
Advertise in
The
Grapevine
and get
incredible
results.
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In Our Schools I
The annual Mr. Sacred Heart competition
will be held on Saturday, November 17, in the
Jim Mogan Auditorium at the school. This
year 14 senior boys will be competing for the
title. The theme for this year’s show is Lion
King. The show begins at 7 p.m. Admission is
$8 for students and $10 for general admis-
sion. Calendars and DVDs of the performance
will be available for purchase the night of the
event. Proceeds from the event will help
defray the costs of Project Grad, which pro-
vides a safe night of food, entertainment, and
fun for the 2013 SHHS graduates.
This year’s contestants are as follows:
Mr. January is Zach Donato from Cedarville.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Donato.
Zach will be performing a comedy magic act
for the talent portion of the program.
Mr. February is Khyle Lee-Williams from
Vineland. He is the son of Kenny Williams and
Tracie Lee. Khyle will be dancing and singing
to “Jingle Bell Rock” from the movie Mean
Girls.
Mr. March is Justin DeRossi from Vineland.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Bryan DeRossi.
Kyle will be performing the Midget Dance.
Mr. April is Arin Scalfo from Vineland. He is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Scalfo. Arin will
be performing the Gangmam Style dance.
Mr. May is Anthony Langdon from
Cedarville. He is the son of Toni Jalowitz and
Brian Langdon. Anthony will be dancing for
his talent.
Mr. June is Nathaniel Jones from Mullica
Hill. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Jones.
Nate will be performing a drum solo.
Mr. July is Josh Bowker from Millville. He is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bowker. Josh
will be playing the drums to a remix of “Vegas
Girl.”
Mr. August is Steven Steigerwalt from
Vineland. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto
Steigerwalt. Steve will be dancing to “Apache
Jump On It,” along with Mr. December.
Mr. September is Jonathan Donnelly from
Vineland. He is the son of Enixa and Steven
Dorfman. Jon will be dancing to “Baby Got
Backpack.”
Mr. October is Vinnie Criniti from Vineland.
He is the son of Michele Cicchino. Vinnie will
be playing the electric guitar.
Mr. November is Kevin Allen, Jr. from
Vineland. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kevin
Allen, Sr. Kevin will be dancing to “The
Evolution of Dance.”
Mr. December is Theodore F. Mercurio, III
from Estell Manor. He is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Theodore F. Mercurio, Jr. Theo will be
dancing to “Apache Jump On It,” along with
Mr. August.
Mr. April Fool is Andrew Magazzu from
Vineland. He is the son of Carmella and Louis
Magazzu. Andrew will be singing Tom Jones’
hit “It’s Not Unusual.”
Mr. New Year is Ryan Veltman from
Millville. He is the son of Steve and Terri
Veltman. Ryan will be performing a mime to
the song “Torn.”
Clockwise, from top left: Zach Donato, Khyle Lee-
Williams, Justin DeRossi, Arin Scalfo, Anthony
Langdon, Nathaniel Joes, Josh Bowker, Steven
Steigerwalt, Jonathan Donnelly, Vinnie Criniti,
Kevin Allen, Jr., Theodore F. Mercurio, III, Andrew
Magazzu and Ryan Veltman.
Mr. Sacred Heart Candidates Announced
Grapevine 12-19 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:35 AM Page 19
The Award Winning
MUSEUM
STORES
at
WHEATONARTS
say
Thank You!
To Our Customers
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION WEEK
Oct. 27 to Nov. 4, 2012
10am to 5pm

MYSTERY DISCOUNT
of 20% to 50% off your
entire purchase* in each
store. Receive a FREE Eco
tote bag when you visit. Enjoy
complimentary refreshments
in all museum stores
while you shop.

One lucky customer will
receive a $250 SHOPPING
SPREE at the WheatonArts
Museum Stores. Sign up in
the stores during the week.
The winner will be selected
on Sunday, Nov. 4 at 5pm.
wheatonarts.org
ShopWheatonArts.com

856.825.6800
Millville, NJ 08332
WheatonArts is open Tuesday
thru Sunday, 10am to 5pm

FREE to Shop and Stroll!

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OCTOBER 3–NOVEMBER 3
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Karaoke
Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-close,
$3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance Party Fridays 9
p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas. All Sports
Packages: MLB Extra Innings, NBA League
Pass, NHL Center Ice, and NFL Sunday
Ticket. $3 12-oz. Coors Light & $5 23-oz.
Call for RSVP and details.
EVERY TUESDAY
Karaoke. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea
Dr., Vineland. Sing your heart out. 765-5977.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr., Vineland. Latin-inspired dance
party. 765-5977.
Country Dancing. The Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. 7–11 p.m.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue Ave.,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz featur-
ing area's best jazz duos. 6:30 - 9:30 p.m.
No cover. RSVP recommended.
Magician Kevin Bethea. Centerton
Country Club & Event Center, Ten22 Bar &
Grill, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. 6–8 p.m. Magician and slight-of-hand
illusionist.
Jeff Giuliani of Eleven Eleven. Double
Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland.
Live acoustic 7–10 p.m..
NOVEMBER 1 THROUGH 3
Nightlife at Ten22. Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, The Patio Bar at
Ten22, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Wed.: Country Night with DJ Bob
Morgan, 7-11 p.m. Lessons and non-stop
dancing (song requests all night) on one of
the largest dance floors in region. $5
admission. Thurs: DJ Tommy B 8 p.m., Fri:
TBA 9 p.m., Sat: DJ Tommy B 9 p.m.
Nightlife at Mori’s. Lou Ferretti's Mori's
on Landis, 830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
690-0300. Thurs.: Adelante 7–11 p.m.. Fri.:
TBA 8 p.m. Sat.: TBA 8 p.m.
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour
Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks.
Wed.–Sat., live entertainment.
Nightlife at Double Eagle. Double
Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland. Live music every Friday night.
NFL Sunday Ticket Package Turtlestone
Brewing Co. on draft, along with 16
other imported and domestic beers.
Happy Hour daily 3–6 p.m.
www.doubleeaglesaloon.com
NOVEMBER 2, 3, AND 4
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Tues.: Bike Nite with
live entertainment. Thurs.: Karaoke. Fri.:
Mike Bryan Band. Sat.: DJ/band. Daily
drink and food specials.
Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar
House Irish Pub. 123 N. High St., Millville,
293-1200. Wed.: Karaoke 9 p.m., Fri.:
Tom Buckley Band 9 p.m., Sat.: Scott
Seabock 9 p.m.
EVERY FRIDAY
Gene Cortopassi. Merighi's Savoy Inn,
E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland,
691-8051. 6 p.m. Dinner music.
www.savoyinn.com.
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony
Morris. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea
Dr,, Vineland. All of the most popular main-
stream dance music. 765-5977.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
The Troubadour KP. Bogart’s
Bookstore. 210 N. High St., Millville.
Free. Live music 7–9 p.m.
Seminole’s Comedy Show. Merighi's
Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd.,
Vineland, 691-8051. Call for more details.
691-0030, ext. 307.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Pat Witt: Art Spirit Encore. Levoy
Theatre, 126-130 N. High St., Millville. 3
p.m. A 25-minute documentary pro-
duced and directed by ArtC’s Bill Horin
and Frank Weiss. Besides Witt, it fea-
tures friends, family, and past and pres-
ent students. Proceeds benefit the Barn
Studio of Art and ArtC. For more infor-
mation, call 856-327-6400. Tickets $10.
www.levoy.net
Catherine Wacha. Bogart’s Bookstore.
210 N. High St., Millville. Free. Live
acoustic. 7–9 p.m.
Pégate a la Risa. Landis Theater, E.
Landis Ave., Vineland. 7:30 p.m.
Comedy, featuring many talented Puerto
Rican comedic actors, is based on the
#1 comedy show in Puerto Rico Includes
comedy of an adult nature appropriate
for ages 16 and up. Persons under 18
should be accompanied by a parent.
Tickets: Orchestra $20 | Mezzanine $25.
NOVEMBER 16 AND 17
The Dining Room. Vineland High School South Auditorium, W. Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland. 7 p.m. both days plus 2 p.m. matinee on 11/17. Polaris Players' presentation
of A.R. Gurney’s in-depth portrait of a vanishing species—the upper-middle-class white
Anglo Saxon Protestant (WASP). Tickets are $10 and available from any cast member,
or by contacting Noelle Panichella at VHS South, Patti Nelson at VHS North, or by call-
ingHank Ehrlich at 856-498-5420.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
TUSK. Levoy Theatre, 126-130 N.
High St., Millville. 8 p.m. All the
great hits of Fleetwood Mac, which
has featured the talents of Mick
Fleetwood, Christine and John
McVie, Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie
Nicks and others over the years.
Tickets $29 – $23. www.levoy.net
TIM MILLER’S
HOME REPAIRS
- No Job Too Smal l -
Painting • Drywall • Decks
Windows • Siding • Flooring
FREE ESTIMATES
SENIOR & MILITARY
DISCOUNTS
24 Hour Emer gency Ser vi ce
TIM MILLER
Owner/Operator
30 Years of Experience
Office: 609-202-8987
PUBLIC
ADJUSTER
USTER
J
LIC
B U
a m S o o TTo b o J o N
A HOME REPPAIRS
TIM MILLER
l l a
AIRS
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USTER
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F • g n i d i S • s w o d n i W
• l l a w y r D • g n i t n i a P
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SENIOR & MILITTAR
TE FREE ESTIMAATES
g n i r o o l F
s k c e D
- l l a
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AR
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DISCOUNTS
8 - 2 0 2 - 9 0 6 : e c i f f O
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Bridal Show&Expo
The Greenview Inn
At Eastlyn Golf Course
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012
Doors Open at 6:30 pm
4049 Italia Avenue, Vineland, NJ 856-691-5558
ELEGANCE • SOPHISTICATION • DISTINCTION • EXCITEMENT
You will find this and more at this
super Grand Opening Expo, created
to bring you the latest styles and
trends for 2013 and beyond!
• Fashion Show Featuring Rienzi
Bridal of Vineland, NJ
• Entertainment Segments
• The Best Wedding Professionals!
• Have a complimentary photo taken
in a photo booth at the show!
• Special show discounts
• Door prizes & Grand prizes
• Food Tasting
A Tasting of Items
from Wedding
Packages
BACHELORETTE
PARTY
GRAND PRIZE
GIVEAWAY!!
Jackie “The Joke Man” Martling. Levoy
Theatre, 126-130 N. High St., Millville. 9
p.m. A longtime fixture of radio’s Howard
Stern Show, comedian Jackie “The Joke
Man” Martling was born and raised on
Long Island, NY. This event is a live taping
event for Jackie’s next CD! No one under
18 permitted. Must show proof of age.
Tickets $22-$27. http://www.levoy.net
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4
Much Ado About Classics. Bogart’s
Bookstore. 210 N. High St., Millville. Free.
Book discussion of A Vindication of the
Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft.
2 p.m.
Dr. John and The Blind Boys of
Alabama. Cumberland County College,
Guaracini Fine and Performing Arts Center,
Vineland. 3 p.m. New Orleans keyboardist
Dr. John joins Gospel music legends The
Blind Boys of Alabama in their first-ever
joint tour. Tickets: $50 premium seats, $35
all other seats. No coupons, vouchers or
discounts
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
Cumberlads. Maurice House, 1719 W. Main
St., Millville. 7 p.m. Men’s a capella chorus
under the direction of Gene Tubertini, sings
a blend of popular older songs and show
tunes. 825-0511.
NOVEMBER 15 THROUGH 18
Noises Off. Luciano Theatre of the Guaracini
Performing Arts Center, Sherman Ave. and
College Dr., Vineland. 8 p.m. except 3 p.m.
matinee on Sunday. Cumberland County
College Department of Theatre takes the
play by Michael Frayn to the stage.
Described by The New York Post as “the
funniest farce ever written,” this play-within-
a-play includes missed cues, slamming
doors, on-stage and backstage intrigue, and
an errant plate of sardines. Directed by
Broadway veteran Deborah Bradshaw.
Tickets are $12 for adults; $8 for age 55 and
older, and those under 18. Tickets can be
purchased over the phone with a credit card
by calling 856-692-8499, or in person dur-
ing business hours: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday; and 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Wednesday.
Nutcrackers on Display
Vineland Public Library, 1058 E.
Landis Avenue, is featuring a display
of Nutcrackers and Nutcracker related
items during November and
December. Some items included in
the exhibit are unusual Nutcrackers,
jigsaw puzzles and holiday orna-
ments. The exhibit is from the collec-
tion of local resident Carol Duffy who
has been collecting Nutcrackers for
more than 20 years. The display is on
the first floor of the library.
Exhibits and displays may be
viewed during regular hours:
Monday–Thursday (10-8); Friday (10-
5) and Saturday (11-4). For informa-
tion, call the library at 794-4244.
High School Reunions
• Did you miss your Buena Regional
High School graduating class
reunion? Did you graduate between
the years 1990 and 2000? Then
this party is for you! BRHS’s gradu-
ating classes of 1990-2000 are
invited to celebrate at the Big Ass
Reunion Party, hosted at Merighi’s
Savoy Inn in Vineland. On Saturday,
November 17, from 7 to 11 p.m.,
there will be a local DJ and danc-
ing, hot and cold hors d’oeuvres
stations, desserts and coffee, plus
lots of reminiscing with old friends.
In addition, you can look forward to
a cash bar for all of your beverage
needs.
Gather all of your closest friends
from high school and treat your-
selves to a night filled with food,
fun, and reminiscing! The attire is
casual: just be yourself and be
ready to rekindle old friendships.
Tickets are $30 per person and are
available online at
www.savoyinn.com or can be pur-
chased in person at The Savoy Inn
on the corner of Landis and Union.
For more information, call 856-691-
8051 or find on Facebook at the
“BRHS Big Ass Reunion” group
page.
• Vineland High School Class of
1992 is holding its 20th class
reunion on Saturday, November 24,
starting at 7 p.m., at Merighi’s
Savoy Inn. Tickets are $35 per per-
son (includes food stations, DJ, pho-
tobooth, dancing, and more Cash
bar available. Check or money order
payable to Lori Bertacchi, 2260
Pennsylvania Ave., Millville, NJ
08332. If your name has changed,
please include your maiden name
on check. They will be creating a
slideshow of high school days, so
scan your favorite photos and email
them to Kevin Dunn at kevin@test-
sportsclubs.com.
• Vineland High School Class of
1982 is holding its 30th class
reunion on Saturday, November 24,
from 7 p.m. until midnight, at the
newly remodeled Greenview Inn at
the Eastlyn Golf Course. The
Greenview Inn is located at 4049
Italia Avenue. Tickets are $75 per
person and include a full course
meal, beverages and entertainment
by a disk jockey.For more informa-
tion, including a reservation form:
http://www. vineland.org/pr/pub-
lic/vhs82_reunion.pdf The class
officers are also attempting to
reach all classmates. Please con-
tact them through their Facebook
page - VHS Class of 82, or contact
Lisa (Rosi) Arena at
larena@vineland.org.
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COMMUNITY CALENDAR

HAPPENINGS
FIRST AND THIRD THURSDAYS
Grupo de Autismo. Convent, 23 W.
Chestnut Ave., Vineland. 10 a.m.–12 noon.
Group of families with children diag-
nosed with autism. Share information,
ideas, experiences, and suppport.
Addressed to the Hispanic community
and people with special needs. 882-8929,
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31
Free Kids Harvest Party. Abundant
Living Church, 849 Route 54, corner of
Jackson Rd. & Rt. 54, Buena Vista
Township. 7–8:15 p.m. Hayride, goodies,
games. Please, no spooky costumes. 609-
561-6019.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Health & Information Fair. Abbott’s
Building, 7 Washington St., Bridgeton.
10:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Youth
Immunization and Outreach program at
Gateway Community Action Partnership
will hold the fair. Event is free and open
to the public and features health, immu-
nization and nutrition information as well
as social service program information.
Give-away items, balloons, popcorn, cot-
ton candy, face painting, music and
games for children. 856-451-5600.
NOVEMBER 1 AND 15
Scrabble. Vineland Public Library, 1058
E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 6–7:30 p.m.
Game boards, dictionaries and scoring
paper provided (but if you have a board,
feel free to bring it). Free, sponsored by
The Friends of Vineland Library.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Boogie Nights. The Event Center, Forest
Grove Rd. and Delsea Dr., Vineland. 7
p.m. Dinner and dancing. 856-696-4380,
ext. 106.
Basket & Bag Bingo. Millville Elks
Lodge No. 580, 1815 E. Broad St.,
Millville. 7 p.m., doors open at 6. Don
your red, white and blue as Woodland
Country Day School hosts their ‘Vote
America’ Basket & Bag Bingo Try to win
one of the many beautiful Coach or Vera
Bradley Bags, or baskets made by that
famous company in Ohio. Advance tick-
ets $20 until 10/28, $25 after. Call Diane
at 856-453-8499 ext. 112.
NOVEMBER 2 AND 3
Bake Sale, Soup Sale and Chinese
Auction Fundraiser. Fairton United
Methodist Church, 20 Main St., Fairton. 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Homemade soups, baked
goods, hot dogs and sandwiches. Soups
are $3 for 16-ounce container, $6.00 for
32-ounce container. Call 856-451-4182.
Antique & Collectibles Sale. Women’s
Club of Vineland, 677 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland. Friday 10 a.m–6 p.m., Saturday
10 a.m–4 p.m. Admission free.
Christmas Yard and Food Sale. Malaga
Camp Meeting, 4488 Arbutus Rd.,
Newfield. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Get your holiday
decor. 856-691-3154.
NOVEMBER 2 THROUGH 4
Choose: Where Will You Be When
Reality Strikes? Chestnut Assembly of
God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland. 7
p.m. PG-13, parental supervision strongly
suggested. $3 adults, $1 kids 12 and
under. 856-691-1205, ext. 25.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Cumberland County College
Foundation Starlite Gala. 6 p.m.
Social Hour, 7–11 p.m. Dinner and
Dancing. Catering by Feast Your Eyes,
music by the David Christopher
Orchestra, black tie optional, open bar,
silent auction. Tickets $150 pp. For infor-
mation, call 691-8600 ext. 392.
Substitute Teacher Training Seminar.
Cumberland County College, Sherman
Ave. and College Dr., Vineland. 9 a.m.–3
p.m. The program cost is $99. Call CCC’s
office of the Workforce Education Alliance
at 856-691-8600 ext. 345 for more
details and to register.
Glasstown Chapter of the National
Federation of the Blind of New
Jersey Meeting. Trinity Episcopal
Church, 800 E. Wood St., Vineland. 10
a.m.-12 noon. RSVP Lydia Keller 856-
696-3518.
TATCA Breakfast Fundraiser. Rosary
Hall at Saint Padre Pio, Dante Ave.,
Vineland. 8 a.m.–12 noon. $8 adults,
$4 children. Additional donations are
encouraged. Tickets available from the
church rectory by calling 856-691-7526
or from Limpert Brothers at 856-691-
1353 or at the door. The TATCA website
is www.theanswertocancerarmy.com
Oysterfest. Greenview Inn at Eastlyn
Country Club, Vineland. 5:30–9:30 p.m.
Cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, and the fabu-
lous keyboard music of Irv Mellman.
Dinner starts at 6:45 p.m. and a cash bar
will be open throughout the evening. At
7:45, we will be treated to a special
address by NJ Secretary of Agriculture
Douglas H. Fisher. Mr. Fisher, a lifelong
resident of Cumberland County, will
speak to us about the importance of
farming in the Garden State. Tickets $85
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Cumberland County Economic
Development Breakfast & Tri-
Chamber Business Expo.
Cumberland County College /
Luciano Conference Center, Sherman
Ave. and College Dr., Vineland. 8
a.m.–1 p.m. "The Future - It's
Everybody's Business!" County
Economic Status, Business Success
Profiles, Vendor Displays and
Information, Two Breakout Sessions
10 and 11 a.m. FREE / Open to the
public / Registration Required at
856-691-7400.
Bus Trips
• The Team Department of the Millville
Woman's Club is sponsoring a bus trip to
The Society Hill Playhouse in Philadelphia
followed by dinner at the Pub. The show
being presented is the comedy Cooking
With The Calamari Sisters on Saturday,
November 3. Leaving the clubhouse, 300
"E" Street at 12 noon. There will be a 2
p.m. show followed by dinner. Tickets are
only $90 and includes all costs. Checks
can be made out to TEAM. Call Sharleen
Johnson at 327 1024 or email gun-
ner750@comcast.net for tickets or ques-
tions.
• Shop the Lancaster Outlets and dine
at Shady Maple Smorgasbord on
Saturday, November 10. Depart SJH
Fitness Connection (rear parking lot) at 8
a.m. return at 9 p.m. Tickets: $51 (for bus
fare and dinner) per person. Itinerary
includes Tanger and Rockvale Outlets. For
reservations and information, contact Jill
Higgins (856-358-8822). Proceeds benefit
Girl Scout Troop #97420.
• The Friends of Vineland Public
Library are offering a bus trip to New York
City on Saturday, November 10. Design
your own itinerary and enjoy the theater,
museums, shopping and diverse restau-
rants in the Big Apple. The cost is $36
and includes transportation and helpful
handouts. Call the library Administration
Department at 794-4244 ext. 4732 for
more information or stop in the library
Monday through Friday from 10-5 to pur-
chase tickets. All proceeds benefit the
Vineland Public Library.
• Ramoth Church (Vineland Nazarene)
is sponsoring a bus trip to Rockvale and
Tanger Outlets in Lancaster, PA, on
Saturday, November 17. Bus leaves
church parking lot at 8 a.m. and returns
at 7 p.m. $40 per person includes trans-
portation, driver gratuity, coffee/water/
doughnuts. Call 358-9124.
• St. Padre Pio Parish is sponsoring a
trip to Radio City Music Hall to see “The
Christmas Spectacular with the Rocketts”
on Sunday, December 2. Tickets are $120
pp. Cost includes show, bus, tip and time
in city. Call 856-691-7526 for more infor-
mation and flyer.
Our Lady Of Mercy
Academy
A Private,
Catholic,
College Prep
High School for
Young Women.
1001 Main Rd. Newfield, NJ 08344
856.697.2008 www.olmanj.org

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Relax – you have peace of mind
because you had your fireplace
cleaned & serviced by the best.
American Fireplace sells, installs
and services wood & gas fireplaces,
stoves & inserts & gas logs. So
relax and enjoy the warmth & cost
savings of your fireplace or stove.
American Fireplace
Hearth Shop & Chimney Sweep
Member National Chimney Sweep Guild
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856.457.5689
Certified Chimney Sweep #6775
Visa, Mastercard & Discover Accepted
NJ Licensed Contractor #13VH01293200
$100 OFF
Purchase & Installation Of Any Wood,
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Not to be combined with any other offer. Must present
coupon at time of purchase. Expires 12/31/12
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Veterans Day Flag and
Remembrance Ceremony. Delsea
Regional High School, Fries Mill Rd.,
Franklinville. 9 a.m. This event will be
conducted by the student cadets in
JROTC and Cadet Lieutenant Colonel
Adrian Foy, the Battalion
Commander, who will lead the invo-
cation and the flag salute. This will
be followed by the national anthem,
a welcome to guests, and a reading
of the Veterans Day Proclamation
tribute to Veterans along with sharing
personal experiences about the
JROTC program, and will give the
history and significance of Veterans
Day. All retired veterans and active
duty soldiers are welcome to attend
and at end of program, join the
JROTC students in their classroom
where they will be conducting a
reflection of the meaning of Veterans’
Day along with their instructors,
Lieutenant Colonel Dane Woytek, 1SG
Ed Walls and SSG James Merritt.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
The Sisterhood of Beth Israel
Congregation Honor Jewish War
Veterans. 1015 E. Park Ave.,
Vineland. 6:30 p.m. Cocktails, hors
d’oeuvre, buffet Paid-Up Event follow-
ing Friday evening Shabbat services,
which will start at 6:30 p.m. and will
be led by Rabbi Alfredo S. Winter,
spiritual leader of Beth Israel
Congregation.
The event will benefit the service-
men and women who suffer through
lengthy hospitalizations following
their tours of duty, and who experi-
ence daunting travel and living
expenses to access care.
Through the “Value Our Vets” pro-
gram, Women’s League for
Conservative Judaism sisterhoods,
members, families, and friends will
provide gift cards from grocery
stores, restaurants, and pharmacies
to help defray some of the veterans’
living expenses.
In lieu of payment for the buffet,
those attending the event should
bring a gift card of at least $10 from
CVS, Target, or Rite-Aid—the mer-
chants selected by Beth Israel
Congregation Sisterhood for the
program.
Members of Jewish War Veterans
Post 126 from Cherry Hill, NJ will be
in attendance with their commander,
Dr. Henry David. At services, they will
give a brief synopsis of the founding
and functions of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United States of
America, as well as the contributions
that American Jews have made to
the defense of our country since its
inception.
Reservations are required for the
event. The reservation fee is $5 for
Sisterhood members and their
spouses, and $10 for non-Sisterhood
members and their spouses. There is
no charge for veterans and their
spouses. Checks, made payable to
Beth Israel Sisterhood, must be
received at the synagogue as soon as
possible.
For more information all Beth
Israel Congregation services, events,
and programs, please call the syna-
gogue office at 856-691-0852.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
11th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Day. 1 Leddon St.,
Millville 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
Millville Army Air Field Museum
(MAAFM), along with area high
school students and community
groups, will pay tribute to our
nation’s veterans at Millville Airport.
All veterans are invited to attend and
be honored. The event is free of
charge and open to the public.
Displays on the museum grounds will
include re-enactment groups, military
vehicles, antique automobiles from
the Cohanzick Antique Auto Club, an
A-4 Skyhawk, the C-23 Short Sherpa,
and model airplane exhibits. This
year’s event will feature Vietnam War
displays. An 11am ceremony will
include a presentation of the colors
and a musical salute to veterans. The
New Jersey VFW State Chaplain will
offer prayers for veterans both alive
and deceased. In commemoration,
there will be a wreath laying and
moment of silence. The day’s activi-
ties will also feature a FREE
‘Canteen’ lunch for all visitors, spon-
sored by Verna’s Flight Line
Restaurant and Catering, that is
donating all of the food and drinks
for the event. Special thanks Verna’s
Flight Line and to South Jersey Paper
Products for donating paper
products.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11
Of Faith and Freedom. First United
Methodist Church, 700 Landis Ave.,
Vineland. 11 a.m. The Cathedral Choir
at First United Methodist Church will
be performing "Of Faith and
Freedom" Celebrating Our Legacy of
Liberty by Joeseph Martin. This is a
cantata which will be the entire
Sunday morning service. Everyone in
the community is invited especially
our veterans of all wars and service.
Please join us.
VETERANS DAY EVENTS
Remembering our servicemen and women
per person and full tables may be
reserved for groups of 10. RSVP by 10/26.
Purchase tickets at 856-785-2060 or
www.bayshorediscovery.org.
NOVEMBER 3 AND 10
Fall Yard and Bake Sale. St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church, 3rd and Mullberry sts.,
Millville. 8 a.m–1 p.m. Yard sale benefits
Lutheran World Mission Support, the bake
sale supports the Millville Help & Hope
Food Larder. 856-825-3008.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4
Chicken Barbecue. Holy Trinity Russian
Orthodox Church, 2211 W. Landis Ave.,
Vineland. Noon–5 p.m. $10 eat in or take
out. Live music with dance floor, plenty of
table seating in the hall.
Lines on the Pines for KIDS. Batsto
Village Visitor Center, Wharton State
Forest, Hammonton. 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
Free, rain or shine Families will have the
opportunity to meet authors and artists;
listen to Jersey Folk, Country Blues and
Universal Nu Jazz music; learn about fire
safety, hiking safety and how to read maps.
Authors and artists will sell their books
and art. Crafters will offer baskets, jewelry,
decoys, specialty soaps and scents Areas
to investigate live raptor species and car-
nivorous plants; make jewelry and baskets;
paint, color,; get photo tips; have hands-on
and sensory nature experiences; play
games and participate in unique learning
experiences. 609-561-0024.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Cell Phones and Social Media. VHS
South Auditorium, W. Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland. 7 p.m. Sgt. Tim McLaughlin of
Vineland Police will present a safety pro-
gram regarding the dangers of cell phones
and social media.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Annual All-You-Can Eat Soup-N-
Salad. Trinity Episcopal Church, 800
Wood St., Vineland. 4:30–7 p.m.
Homemade soups, salads, breads,
desserts, beverages. $8, Children 5-12: $4.
Children under 5: Free. 856-691-1589.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
After School Movie. Millville Public
Library, 210 Buck St., Millville. 4:30 p.m.
Watch a Thanksgiving movie featuring
favorite cartoon characters. Rated G for
general audiences. Popcorn provided, bot-
tled water and other snacks permitted.
Free but RSVP. 856-825-7087, ext. 12.
Vineland Service Clubs Council
Awards Dinner. Centerton Country Club,
1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove. 6 p.m. $37
per person. RSVP by 11/1 to 856-692-2581.
Resume Workshop. Vineland Public
Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland.
5:30–7:30 p.m. Develop a resume that
gets noticed and produces positive
results. Free but seating limited. RSVP
856-794-4244 ext. 4243.
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About the candidate:
I amcurrently the Vice Mayor of Millville
where I have served as a City Commissioner
for the past 16 years. I ama lifelong Millville
resident and proud of the time I spent as a
coach and athletic trainer at Millville High.
I received my BS in Health and PE at
West Chester University in 1978 and for the
past 14 years I have been the Marketing
Manager for NovaCare Rehabilitation, and
worked as the Center Manager for Sports
Physical Therapist. In addition to my job, I
serve as a member for NATA, NSCA, and
League of Municipalities of NJ, to name a few.
As a coach, I have taught my players there
are three kinds of people—those who make
things happen, those who watch things hap-
pen and those who wonder what just hap-
pened. I’mrunning for freeholder because
my career is about making things happen.
To me, this race is about the future. I have
spent my time working with and mentoring
young people, whether it has been with Babe
Ruth League Baseball or serving as a softball
coach for teams throughout the County.
I love Cumberland County. I amglad my
wife Susan chose it to raise our son and
daughter. However, I see the challenges and
opportunities, and I amconfident in our plan
to get Cumberland County working again.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the county?
The three biggest issues facing
Cumberland County are the lack of a plan
for economic development, an increasing
amount of violence and crime and the fact
that we have 10,000 unemployed residents.
In county government, there is too much
time spent solving political problems and not
dealing with the real problems that affect our
residents. We lack a comprehensive econom-
ic development plan and as a result, we are
losing jobs. There is not a cooperative plan to
manage the escalating amount of crime and
violence occurring in our communities. The
county government has failed to invest in a
full-time vocational school that will allowour
residents the opportunity to compete for
high-paying jobs.
My running mate and I understand that
many of these issues are interrelated. We
will not realize our economic development
potential until we mitigate the violence and
crime. We will not lower our unemployment
rate unless we are training our residents to
compete for those jobs.
For too long, one issue has been used as
an excuse to not solve the other issue. For
the past several months we have met moth-
ers, fathers, seniors, veterans, working fami-
lies, and young professionals who want to
believe in the future of our county. They
deserve solutions, not excuses.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
Prior to launching our campaign, Doug
Long and I worked on detailing plans that
will meet the issues head on. We have a diverse
set of experience and skill sets; each has been
able to incorporate his unique perspectives.
First, we have introduced a multi-phased
plan to improve our county’s economic
development efforts. We realize that by
bringing businesses back to the county it will
help lower our tax rate, provide jobs for our
residents and improve quality of life.
Second, our C.O.O.R.E plan to address the
crime and violence in our streets has been
created is cooperation with lawenforcement
experts and community leaders. The plan
focuses on the core elements that county gov-
ernment can facilitate to bring municipalities
together to solve the problemtogether.
Third, we will invest in a full-time voca-
tional school so that our residents can com-
pete for high-paying jobs. With a highly
trained work force, more companies will
relocate here and we will move our county
in a better direction.
Finally, our first act will be to overturn the
Republican decision that denies Cumberland
County residents first priority in getting jobs
on projects being done right here in
Cumberland. Our residents must come first.
Please provide a closing statement:
This campaign is about getting
Cumberland County back to work. We must
end the political gamesmanship that thwarts
progress. We must stop relying on budget
gimmicks and be responsible in our govern-
ment. Doug and I have a real economic devel-
opment plan that will bring jobs back to
Cumberland County. We have a comprehen-
sive plan to mitigate the violence and crime
in our communities. We will invest in a full-
time vocational school so that our residents
can have the training to compete for high-
paying jobs. We will give Cumberland County
residents first priority for county jobs. I am
asking for your vote so that together, we can
get Cumberland County working again.
About the candidate:
I grewup on the family farm. I amone of
four daughters to Williamand Mildred
Consalo. I married Michael Gruccio in 1981
and had two children. I lost my husband to
cancer in 1990 and raised my children as a
single parent since they were two and six
years. I have been an educator for 38 years
serving the Vineland Public Schools as a
teacher, principal, assistant superintendent
and was appointed superintendent in July.
I was elected freeholder in 2011 to fill an
unexpired term. I also served two prior
terms as freeholder in 2002 and 2005. I am
presently the senior member on the
Freeholder Board and believe I bring a
knowledge base and stability. I hope the cit-
izens of Cumberland County give me the
opportunity to continue to serve them.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the county?
Property taxes, crime and jobs.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
As a freeholder, I believe these three
issues must be addressed on an ongoing
basis. As freeholders, we have held the
county tax levy for the past four years. In
the past year, we have cut costs to the tax-
payer through the sale of the Manor for $14
million. The Manor was losing $2–3 million
a year. We have consolidated departments,
resulting in a savings of approximately
$70,000 and we have established a JIF,
which is projected to save $400,000.
We continue to explore more ways to
reduce cost. One presently being discussed
is the establishment of an in-house legal
department.
Crime is another serious issue facing our
county. One reason is that with the county
jail, three state and one federal prison in the
area, many families move here to be close to
their incarcerated family member. Once
released, families usually stay in the area. We
have gangs and drugs to deal with, which
end up causing crimes that negatively affect
our community. We are trying to deal with
this through a gang task force, a drug task
force and working with the prosecutor’s
office and local police. Another reason for
crime is that many people do not have jobs
and are struggling, causing themto resort to
desperate measures.
County government can have an impact
on jobs and the economy by keeping taxes
down and assisting businesses to work
through the levels of bureaucracy, such as
working with the DEP (Department of
Environmental Protection), the health
department and the planning department to
provide assistance and make it a smoother
process. Lower taxes and available space at a
reasonable price should help make our coun-
ty attractive to businesses. I believe we must
use our resources such as our CCTEC and
Cumberland County College to educate,
train and re-train our residents for the jobs
newbusiness and industry would require if
they located here to provide themwith a
good and well-trained labor source.
Please provide a closing statement:
As an educator, I believe that education
is one of the most important ways we can
address the important issues we are facing.
We need to educate our youth to be produc-
tive citizens prepared for the work force,
which in turn will help all of us. We can’t
give up on the issues but rather continue to
find ways to address themwithout a finan-
cial burden to our citizens.
I served as a freeholder for two terms
and again this past year filling an unexpired
term. I have always made my decisions
based on what I believe is best for all citi-
zens in our county. I work in a bipartisan
way to help our county be the best it can be
while being fiscally responsible.
Sometimes tough decisions have to be
made and I amnot afraid to make them. If
elected I will continue to represent all the
people of Cumberland County and make fis-
cally sound decisions to move our county
forward without impacting jobs and services
for our citizens.
Candidate: Mary Consalo Gruccio
Freeholder (Republican)
Candidate: Joseph Derella, Jr.
Freeholder (Democrat)
FREEHOLDER CANDIDATES (4)
VPS TV ELECTION COVERAGE
COMCAST CH. 9 / VERIZON CH. 41
Vineland School Board Candidate
Forum (recorded 10/22)
Wed., 10/31 at 10 a.m.; Thurs., 11/1
at 10 a.m.; and Fri., 11/2 at 10 a.m.
QBC ELECTION COVERAGE
COMCAST CH. 2
2012 Vineland Mayoral Debate
Sun., 11/4 at 9:30 p.m.
Tues., 11/6 at 12 a.m.
Tues., 11/6 starting at 8p.m. Election
Live: hosted by Jim Quinn with
numerous special guests and politi-
cal analysts, election results.
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About the candidate:
I amrunning for freeholder because the
residents of Cumberland County need a
voice, our children deserve a brighter future
and I believe my experience will help set a
newdirection for the county.
When my wife Krystal and I chose to
raise our three sons here it was because we
loved the area. Fromour farmlands to our
downtowns and fromour suburbs to lakes,
the only thing greater than what our county
has to offer is the spirit of our residents. I
knowthat together, we achieve our potential.
I ama lawyer, having received my JD/
MBA fromWidener University of Law. Our
practice, Long Marmero and Associates, con-
centrates on representing governmental and
quasi-governmental entities in the areas of
tax and contract law. Our client list includes a
long list of governmental entities regarding
redevelopment and economic development. I
have been working for over a decade to assist
governments meet and exceed their growth
and development plans while protecting
themfromthe ravages of overdevelopment.
As much as I love my job, I ammost pas-
sionate about helping people realize their
potential. This is why I aman active member
of the Board of Directors of the My Ride
Foundation, an organization that provides
transportation for disabled Veterans. Also, I
have worked to raise money for United Way,
March of Dimes and American Cancer Society.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the county?
There are over 10,000 residents out of
work, crime and violence are escalating and
jobs are moving out of Cumberland County.
These are real issues that touch every
family, every senior and everyone who shares
our vision of a better Cumberland County.
These issues require time, dedication and
effort to solve. Unfortunately, the
Republican-controlled Freeholder Board
does not seemto share our priorities.
When the freeholders voted against giving
county residents priority in hiring, they
denied hundreds the opportunity to work.
When they chose to balance the budget with
gimmicks while refusing to cut spending,
they set us on a bad financial path that could
limit future investment in key priorities.
When they failed to invest in a full-time
vocational training school, they denied resi-
dents an opportunity to compete for high-
paying jobs. When they remain silent while
crime and violence increase, they allowthe
issue to perpetuate. Our residents deserve a
Freeholder Board focused on these priorities.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
Joe Derella and I are dedicated to getting
Cumberland County working again. Our first
act in office will be to overturn the
Republicans’ decision to deny residents first
priority for jobs in Cumberland County. If
Cumberland County tax dollars are being
spent, they should be spent on our residents.
We will not hide fromthe challenge of
addressing crime. That is why we have intro-
duced a multi-phased plan for economic
development. The first step in that plan is to
be aggressive. I will meet with any business
who is looking to relocate here and will work
to convince those who may have overlooked
us. By bringing businesses back to the county
it will help lower our tax rate, provide jobs
for our residents and improve quality of life.
We understand one of the keys to improv-
ing economic development is to address
crime and violence. That is why we will
oppose any Republican effort to eliminate the
Department of Corrections and we will
implement our C.O.O.R.E plan; a plan that
focuses on the core elements that county
government can facilitate to bring our munic-
ipalities together to address the problem.
We will invest in a full-time vocational
school so that our residents can compete for
high-paying jobs. This is the cornerstone of
our campaign and we believe the County
cannot continue to delay.
Joe and I have spent our lives working for
others and we will make sure that your coun-
ty government begins working for you.
Please provide a closing statement:
First, let me thank everyone reading this
section to learn more about candidates and
every level of government. In what has
turned into a divided electorate, you should
be applauded for taking the time to educate
yourself about those who you entrust with
your tax dollars. I amasking for your support
because we are running to get Cumberland
County working again. We understand that
the County needs a full time vocational
school and we will invest in one. We believe
you should feel safe in your community and
we will end the practice of ignoring the prob-
lemlike the current Freeholders. We will
implement a real economic development
plan to bring businesses to Cumberland
County. In challenging times, you have to
want the ball. Joe and I have decided to step
and run because we believe this vision is
achievable and we are asking you to remem-
ber us on Election Day.
Candidate: Doug Long
Freeholder (Democrat)
About the candidate:
I am58 years old. I amthe son of David T.
Sheppard and Margaret Lawrence Sheppard.
I ammarried to Patricia Hirst Sheppard (32
years). We have three children.
I graduated fromBridgeton High in 1972
and Cornell University in 1976 ( BS in
Agricultural Business Management and
Marketing). I returned to our family farmto
work with my father and brothers, Erwin and
David, also Cornell graduates. When we
returned, the farmwas 150 acres and
employed 15 people including us. Today we
farm1,500 acres and employ 250.
I started as a public servant at the age of
26 on the Lawrence Township School Board,
serving for nine years. Next I served for 20
years on township committee, serving as
mayor for eight years. Lastly, I was elected to
the County Freeholder Board in 2009, the
position I amseeking re-election to now.
I feel my education, work experience ,
civic experience and record in the job qualify
me to be re-elected to this job. I learned the
value of hard work on my father’s farm
where at a young age we did every job from
planting to harvest to packing and every-
thing in between. Our father always paid us
so we knewhard work had its rewards. This
is why when it is time to do the county’s
budget, I amfrugal with the public’s money,
I knowhowhard you have worked for it. My
education gave me the tools to be able to dis-
sect the financial data given us and deter-
mine where changes can be made. My expe-
rience in government gives me the knowl-
edge of what works and what does not.
Finally, my record shows that I have the will
to make the changes necessary.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the county?
Property taxes: In this economy, we need
to make government as efficient as possible.
Crime: We need to make our county a
safe place to live and work.
Jobs: We need to encourage existing busi-
nesses to expand and attract newones.
Howdo you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
Property taxes: In the 10 months we have
controlled the Board, we have already made
significant progress. We passed a budget that
used $800,000 less in surplus and left much
more in surplus than 2011 and resulted no
increase in the tax levy. We sold the Manor
($14 million) that was loosing $2.5 to 3 mil-
lion annually. We entered into a Joint
Insurance Fund with other counties that will
save $400,000 per year out of a $1.6 million
budget. We combined departments under
one head saving $70,000+ per year. This
month we will start a Legal department in
house that we feel will save us $200,000+
out of an annual expense of $900,000. We
have already hired an outside consultant to
reviewthe jail to find ways to make it more
efficient ($2.7Movertime per year).
Items that we will be looking at for next
year include health Insurance, a $14Mitem
that may provide savings nowthat employ-
ees share in the cost, and savings would ben-
efit both sides. Privatizing some functions
like ditch cleaning that private contractors
have both the equipment and the expertise
to perform(we are five years behind by
department figures). We need to be willing
to look at every line itemto find savings,
there can be no sacred cows.
Crime: We need to get all parties that can
help together to forma task force to meet
this problemhead on. We need to include
the prosecutor, state police, sherriff, schools,
churches and local police as well as any
other agencies that can help. In the long
term, anything we can do to help people
make better decisions than crime is on the
table. That should include access to better
jobs through education at the Vo-Tech and
the County College.
Jobs: An improved job market helps each
of the two preceding problems. Newbusi-
nesses and expanded existing ones brings a
bigger tax base to help with property taxes.
More jobs gives our people better choices
than a life of crime. In addition to improving
the educational system, we can encourage
investment in other ways. We need to help
businesses navigate the red tape of both
county and state departments. We need to
make improvements to our infrastructure
like sewer, water, roads and bridges. We have
competitive advantages in the county like
cheap land and a willing workforce that we
need to more aggressively advertise.
Please provide a closing statement:
Mary Gruccio and I have both proven we
have the knowledge, experience and will to
do the job that needs to be done on the
Freeholder Board. We have always worked
in a bipartisan manner to achieve what the
taxpayers need. We have made decisions
that were in the best interest of all of the
people. Change is not always popular but
you have elected us to make hard choices
even when special interests fight to prevent
it. Please give us your vote on November 6
and we will continue to do what’s right.
Candidate: Thomas Sheppard
Freeholder (Republican)
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About the candidate:
I have been married to Kathleen
(Reuben) for the past 33 years
I amthe proud dad of Kristin and Perry
Barse
I ama 1970 graduate of Sacred Heart
High School and a 1974 graduate of the
University of Scranton with a B.S. In
accounting.
I ama Certified Public Accountant in
public practice in downtown Vineland
Qualifications:
I have the courage of my convictions
As a small business owner in this City,I
amvery qualified to serve as Vineland's
mayor.
I have been a job creator in both the
public and private sectors.
I have the education and life experi-
ences necessary to performthe duties of
mayor at a high level.
I have the ability to make a decision.
I have a track record of credibility and
success in both the public and private sec-
tors.
I love our City and want to restore it to
the prestigious position that all
Vinelanders have a right to expect.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
1.Fiscal irresponsibility and no atten-
tion to detail.
2.Prioritizing of quality of life issues
which all Vinelanders deserve.
3.The need to enhance educational
opportunities for all Vinelanders.
Howdo you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
1.Bring professional oversight back to
the financial affairs of the City.
The elimination of all "perks" inappro-
priately taken by elected officials
Working to eliminate the siphoning of
millions of dollars fromthe Electric Utility
every year into the municipal budget when
these dollars should be used to reduce the
rates of all Vineland Utilities customers.
2.We will protect the integrity of
Vineland 's Master Plan established during
the prior administration which eliminated
over 10000 potential building lots in our
City and was a giant step in keeping our
City frombeing overrun by over develop-
ment.
We will re-establish public safety as a
priority
We will re-establish code enforcement
in the City
We will re-establish the paving and
maintenance of the City's roadways which
was essentially eliminated four budgets
ago by this administration.
3.We will re-establish the close working
relationship which existed between the
Municipality and the Vineland School
Systemprior to this admnistration.
We will fight for the establishment of a
full time four year Cumberland County vo-
tech high school.
We will seek to enhance opportunities
for Vineland residents by looking to part-
ner with Cumberland County College to
establish a presence in downtown Vineland
as well as reaching out to Rowan, Stockton
and Rutgers for similar initiatives.
Please provide a closing statement:
I have presented a vision for our City
which I feel captures the hopes and
dreams of most Vinelanders.We need to
re-establish the thought process in deci-
sion making for Vineland which contem-
plates our City's needs for decades to
come,not just on a year to year basis.We
need leadership which will face the prob-
lems that confront all New Jersey munici-
palities as opportunities not burdens to
make Vineland the example people will
point to as a progressive,proactive leader
among New Jersey municipalities.
Candidate: Perry Barse
Slate: Vineland Taxpayers First
About the candidate:
I am48 years old and was born and
raised in Vineland. I graduated from
Vineland High School class of ’82. I gradu-
ated fromthe University of Maryland with
BA in Politics and Economics. I graduated
fromRowan University with Master’s
Degree in Business. I have been a loan offi-
cer in various financial institutions, served
as the Business Coordinator for the
Cumberland County office of Planning &
Development and also as Director of the
Vineland Downtown Improvement
District. I amcurrently a sitting City
Councilman, Liaison to Vineland
Municipal Utilities and Board Member of
the Urban Enterprise Loan Committee and
Planning Board.
I amowner and manager of Bob
Albrecht Tire & Service, a family owned
business. I ammarried to Sophia
(Frangakis) and have one son, Samuel. I
had been a volunteer for nearly 15 years,
serving as an officer with the Landis
Theatre Redevelopment Association. I
have been a member, and have served as
president, of the St. Anthony Parish
Council.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of
Vineland?
The primary issues facing the City of
Vineland are:
1. The lack of well-paying jobs.
2. Property taxes and the tax burden
3. Lack of Common Sense leadership.
Howdo you plan to address the
issues listed above if elected?
We must create a new economic cli-
mate for Vineland. This would, I feel,
address the city two primary problems:
jobs and taxes.
The first step is to bring major employ-
ers and new industries to Vineland. As
mayor I would establish a volunteer
Economic Action Council made up of busi-
ness and community leaders who will
draft parameters to identify those indus-
tries we will target. Once those parameters
are established I will create a professional
position to implement that search and
focus the full energies of the city on this
effort.
The second step involves what I call
“Economic Gardening.” We will literally
knock on the doors of the many successful
businesses currently operating within the
city to ask how Vineland can help them
grow. This could involve: technical help,
assistance with loan applications to aid in
expansion; or exploring new market
opportunities. The important thing is
that—much like a garden—their needs are
attended to on a regular basis.
The final step is the formation of a
Commerce Center to create a one-stop
shop for businesses seeking to open or
relocate in Vineland. This Commerce
Center assigns a single navigator-type liai-
son whose responsibility is to guide the
prospective business though red tape.
When implemented, these ideas will
increase the city's tax base and help ease
the tax burden on homeowners.
I will take a Common Sense approach
to City Government. I will adopt a capital
budget focusing on the most pressing
needs of city. The idea is simple, prioritize
the city's needs and when money is avail-
able we can address the items at the top of
the list. This sounds simple, but for the
last 12 years Vineland has drifted without
real leadership or accountability. I have
the skills, background, education and dedi-
cation necessary to do the job right and, as
mayor, I will be accountable.
Please provide a closing statement:
I’masking for your vote in the
November Election because I believe I am
the best qualified candidate for mayor.
These are difficult times for taxpayers,
myself included, and I have a plan to ease
the taxpayer's burden by paying close
attention to costs, as well as establishing
and funding a programfor successfully
widening our tax base by bringing new
businesses and industry to our city.
I grew up in Vineland, attended its
schools and make my home here. As a sec-
ond generation business operator, I want
to ensure that my son—as well as the sons
and daughters of all our residents—have
the same opportunities I had.
I believe in myself and I believe in my
city. I amconfident that my education,
background and experience make me the
most qualified candidate to be your mayor.
Thank you for your support and considera-
tion in the upcoming election.
Candidate: Douglas Albrecht
Slate: For the People, With the People
MAYORAL CANDIDATES (5)
The City of Vineland requires a
runoff election in these instances:
1. No candidate for mayor receives
at least 50 percent of the votes cast,
plus one vote (a runoff between the
two highest vote getters is required).
2. No two candidates for city coun-
cil receive at least 50 percent of the
votes cast each, plus one vote (a
runoff between the 10 highest vote
getters is required).
The runoff election, if necessary,
will be conducted on Tuesday,
December 4, 2013.
OUTLINE OF MUNICIPAL ELECTION RUNOFF PROVISION
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About the candidate:
I have been married to my wonderful wife
Abigail for the past 38 years and have two
daughters. I have maintained a successful
business on Landis Avenue for over 32 years,
Juvante Formal Wear, which my daughter
Deidre now runs day-to-day. As a result, I am
able to commit to being your full-time mayor.
My public service includes two terms
(eight years) on the Vineland City Council,
serving as president from 2000 to 2004. Also,
I previously served as president of the
Downtown Merchants Association, and as a
member of the Chamber of Commerce Board
of Directors, the Vineland Planning Board,
the Downtown Improvement District, and
the Boy Scouts of America Executive Board.
I currently serve as President of the Latin
American Business Alliance of New Jersey
and the Hand Foundation, which provides
non-profit organizations with financial assis-
tance. I am also a member of the Salvation
Army Board.
I enjoy volunteering my time to help the
community whenever possible and have also
been involved in missions and humanitarian
trips that have taken me to countries in
Central and South America.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
First, we have to lower the city’s unem-
ployment rate which is currently at 14 per-
cent. This means nearly 10,000 of our fellow
residents are without jobs. While the nation’s
economy has steadily added jobs every
month since March 2010, the unemployment
rate in Vineland is essentially unchanged.
Despite claims by the mayor that “our eco-
nomic development structure is fine,” it is
clear the economic plans put forth by the
current administration are not working.
Vineland has unlimited potential but has
been losing jobs for four years, Our most
educated are moving away to find their
future elsewhere because they don’t see one
here. This must change.
Second, we need to bring professionalism
back to the mayor’s office to ensure all citi-
zens are welcomed, respected, and listened to.
We need to ensure that taxpayer dollars are
being spent wisely, and that mistakes and mis-
management are kept to a minimum. We need
leadership that’s true to Vineland’s unique
heritage and character, that recognizes the
interests of all the people who live here, not
just the insiders and the influential.
Third, we need to ensure our neighbor-
hoods are safer, more affordable for families,
attractive to new businesses, and responsive
to the diverse needs of all residents.
How do you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
My administration will be focused every
day on finding practical solutions to economic
challenges, supporting budget priorities that
protect core city services and encourage edu-
cational opportunities, and promoting policies
that make our neighborhoods stronger, safer,
and more attractive.
I have put forth a three point-plan that
details several strategies aimed specifically at
“Job Creation and Economic Growth,” bring-
ing “Transparent, Accessible, and Competent
Government” back to Vineland, and providing
a better quality of life for city residents
through “Stronger, Safer, More Connected
Neighbourhoods.”
Each strategy includes specific interrelat-
ed proposals including the creation of a
“Citizen’s Budget Advisory Committee,” the
implementation of a “Mayor’s Business
Visitation Program,” working with the
Freeholder Board to establish a four-year
vocational technical high school in
Cumberland County, supporting businesses
who already call Vineland home through a
coordinated economic development market-
ing plan, a re-evaluation of the current down-
town development policy and implementa-
tion structure, complete department reviews,
and a review of the business administration
of the city.
Please provide a closing statement:
We need to find innovative ways to ease
the burden on taxpayers. The Bermudez
Team is committed to bringing back to city
government respect, responsibility, integrity,
and accountability. We can’t afford four more
years of mistakes, wasteful spending, and
broken promises.
Simly put, my approach to life and my val-
ues are very much in line with my faith, fami-
ly, and friends. I am a product of the
Vineland community. I have grown up here,
created a successful business, developed
many relationships, and have been a part of
the growth of the community. I would be
honored to be the next mayor of this great
city. Make the right choice for real change in
Vineland and lets Move Forward Together.
Vote for the Bermudez Team on
November 6 – Column N.
Candidate: Ruben Bermudez
Slate: Moving Forward Together
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For more information regarding site location and hours, contact the site directly.
For more information on other recycling programs in Cumberland County, please call the
Improvement Authority at 825-3700 or visit our Website at www.ccia-net.com.
Drop Off Centers
City of Bridgeton Maintenance Building
Public Works Complex, Florida Ave.
Telephone: 455-3230
Commercial Township Public Works Garage
2370 Memorial Ave.
Telephone: 785-3100
Cumberland County Solid Waste Complex
169 Jesse's Bridge Rd., Rosenhayn
Telephone: 825-3700
Maurice River Twp., behind the Municipal Garage
556 Main St., Rt. 616, Leesburg
Telephone: 785-1120
City of Millville Public Works, Ware Ave.
Telephone: 825-7000
City of Vineland Public Works, 1086 E. Walnut Rd.
Telephone: 794-4250
The following locations are only open to
residents served by these Townships’
convenience centers:
Please call the drop off center in advance
to confirm drop off days and times.
NO
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NOT ALLOWED AT THE CURB!
COMPUTER MONITORS!
LAPTOPS!
DESK TOP COMPUTERS!
TELEVISIONS!
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INSTEAD, They must be taken to the following
Downe Twp.
Fairfield Twp.
Hopewell/GreenwichTwps.
Lawrence Twp.
Stow Creek and Shiloh
Upper Deerfield Twp.
Drop Off Centers
THE SOUP KITCHEN OF
VINELAND AUXILIARY
The Soup Kitchen of Vineland Auxiliary is a non-prot 501 (c) (3): contributions: tax deductible 170 (b) (1) (A) (vi).
COMING TO VINELAND
April 7, 2013 • 3 p.m.
(856) 690-5509 • soupkitchen@verizon.net
Soup Kitchen of Vineland Auxiliary, PO Box 636, Vineland, NJ 08362-0636
An Afternoon to Remember
of Spirituals and Folk Music
At 1st Methodist Church,
700 E. Landis Ave.
Light refreshments will be served.
Free Will Offering.
SCOTT BREINER
Renowned Director, Organist and Pianist
And the 50-member Cape Shore Chorale
Originally scheduled for early July, this concert was
postponed due to the severe storm that devastated
our region. We are excited to announced the resched-
uled concert date and look forward to presenting it
on April 7. Since its inception the Cape Shore Chorale
has been under the direction of Scott J. Breiner, one
of the most respected musicians in South Jersey.
Save the date and don’t miss this musical event!
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About the candidate:
I was born and raised in Vineland by a
family that believed serving the community
was a civic duty. My father served as a city
councilman for 12 years and as mayor for
eight years. I served as a police officer for the
City of Vineland for 34 years, starting in the
Safe Streets Unit. Following that, I served in
the Mobile Patrol and then K-9 Patrol. I was
later promoted to Sergeant and assigned to
the Street Crimes Unit, then promoted to
Lieutenant assigned to Internal Affairs. I
served in that position until I was elected as
the Mayor of the City of Vineland, at which
time I retired to be a full-time Mayor.
I have been married to my wife Ann for 36
years and have two children. I believe my 34
years on the police force has given me
insights to the city from the street side and
by serving as Mayor for the past four years
the experience from an administrative side. I
believe the progress that we have made over
the past four years shows the city is moving
in the right direction.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
I believe the three biggest issues facing the
City are jobs, taxes and public safety. The
entire nation has been in a funk since the
2008 financial collapse. Vineland was not
immune from this great recession; however,
we have fared better than many other cities in
New Jersey. Job creation will be essential in
moving Vineland forward as a great place to
live and work and raise a family.
Vineland also happens to be located in a
state that has one of the highest property
taxes in the nation. Also, we are a very large
community geographically, which leads to
more roads and area that must be maintained
by the city as well as needing taxes to sup-
port a very large school system. It becomes a
balancing act between taxes and services, or
revenue and expenses. You need to be as fru-
gal as possible in spending taxpayer dollars;
however, you don’t want to cut services to the
point that it becomes detrimental to the City.
The county suffers from the highest
unemployment in the State coupled with the
lowest income. Because of this, we became
an attractive site for prisons offering jobs
with wages and benefits that could sustain a
middle class. With those prisons came an
additional crime element that was not pres-
ent prior to their arrival. This has put an
additional strain on our police departments.
How do you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
In order to attract companies to a
Vineland, there usually has to be an advan-
tage that they can get here as opposed to
somewhere else. Vineland capitalizes on this
by offering financial assistance through our
UEZ loan program and also offering afford-
able land off of Route 55. Even though new
UEZ funding has been eliminated, we are
fortunate to have a healthy UEZ loan pro-
gram that started when my father was mayor
and has grown substantially over the years.
In addition to these advantages, Vineland is
now able to market that it has the lowest
electric rates in the State. This is extremely
important to high energy consumers in the
manufacturing industry. We will continue in
our endeavors to establish a medical educa-
tion institution in Vineland. Healthcare is the
fastest growing industry and the need for
more medical professionals will be dire in the
future. But the biggest job creators are exist-
ing businesses that expand. We will continue
to offer financial assistance and bring our
partners at the State and County to help both
new and existing businesses expand.
We have cut expenses wherever we could
and will continue to do so. We also plan on
creating new ratable with the expansion of
the west Landis Avenue corridor and the
potential development of the 300 acres off of
Route 55. We will also continue to work
toward lowering the electric rates for our
customers. We will continue to give all the
possible support we can to our police depart-
ment. Without a safe community, there can
be no prosperity.
Please provide a closing statement:
I took office in 2008 at the start of the
worst recession since the Great Depression.
In spite of this, the City managed to keep its
workforce at the same level while surround-
ing communities lost jobs. Although the state
of the economy prevented a lot of new devel-
opment, the City was able to aid many busi-
nesses with financial assitance to allow them
to retain and even expand jobs. We also cre-
ated new jobs by attracting businesses to
buildings that were vacant. When I took
office, there were plans to totally outsource
our electric generation, today we generate
our own electricity, we are number one in
solar energy and we have the lowest rates in
the State. There are many projects now on
the drawing board that should come to
fruition within the next four years. I believe
we are on the right course and wish to con-
tinue with our progress.
Candidate: Robert Romano
Slate: Proven Progress
About the candidate:
I am 57 years old and I work at the
Woodbine Developmental Center as a
Habilitation Plan Coordinator. I have a B.A.
from Montclair State College in Psychology. I
have two adult children.
My qualifications to be mayor are first:
In dealing with law and enforcement. I
am a former holder of a license approved by
the N.J. Racing Commission in Security-
Special Police- Atlantic City Race Track. I am
a former holder of a license approved by the
N.J. Casino Control Commission for security.
I am a former Special Deputy Sheriff of
Atlantic County.
Volunteer Services: I am a former volun-
teer firefighter for both Richland and Port
Monmouth N.J. fire companies.
Labor Activist: Working Families.
Business owner: I own shares in racehorses.
Written many letters to the editorial sec-
tion on various problems that existed con-
cerning this city.
Won $3.2 million in municipal bonds for
road and repairs for people of Middletown
N.J. 1991.
Community Activities: Founder and
President of the Association of Concerned
Taxpayers (ACT)
Only citizen living in Vineland today to
present a plan to city council to sell shares for
a generator to residents of Vineland- Approved
by council (Daily Journal- 08/26/09. Titled
Public can buy bonds to upgrade city utility)
Former license holder (statement of eligi-
bility) Teacher of Psychology- State of NJ
These are my qualifications to be Mayor
of this city. I have done things and got things
passed for the people of Vineland in the last
four years that nobody else has done in this
city and I was not in an elected position.
In your opinion, what are the three
biggest issues facing the City of Vineland?
Property Taxes: Taxes are very high in
this city and as far as I’m concerned we have
to stabilize taxes. The mayor raised the prop-
erty taxes in his first two years while in office
it was about 8 cents per $100 of property
assessment value. In his third year in office
he raised taxes again. In his fourth year there
was no increase in property taxes. Guess
what—it is an election year. In this horrific
economy there are more than 700 homes
being foreclosed on in this city and the
unemployment rate is 14 to 19 percent.
Vineland residents face difficult decisions on
a daily basis on how to pay their bills.
City Budget: I am concerned about the
economic situation in Vineland today. We
have serious fiscal problems, runaway sky-
rocking taxes and declining revenues. These
are long-standing problems, time after time
we spend money we do not have. When we
borrow money and bond for projects this con-
tinues the cycle that we have seen for too long.
Economic Development: We need to
bring more jobs and services to other sec-
tions of Vineland other then along West
Landis Ave near Rt. 55. Unfortunately the
area on West Landis Avenue is running short
for development. There is much more area
that could be developed. Look at the trade
jobs it could bring to the city—masons, elec-
tricians, plumbers, carpenters and others.
How do you plan to address the issues
listed above if elected?
I believe that this city must return to full
employment, and it begins with having a
strong middle class. That is why I am pur-
posing to build—not using taxpayer’s
money—a multi-million dollar complex in
southern Vineland if I am elected mayor. If
we are successful with the project this would
ease the pain of unemployment and bring
economic growth to our city. This complex
will be open year-round and will have many
activities throughout the year. It will bring
business to Vineland and help the businesses
that are already here. It will stop the foreclo-
sure rate here in this city or at least cut it
down. We are too big a city to limit ourselves
to small dreams. How are we going to pay for
this multi-million dollar project? This plan
that I have to build a multi-million dollar
complex will be financed by selling shares to
the people of Vineland, businesses of this city
and others. This proposal is on the same lines
that I presented back in 2009 to sell shares in
a generator. If that proposal would have been
allowed to continue, today this city would be
at full employment and debt free, I believe.
Please provide a closing statement:
I have heard from many citizens living in
Vineland who are losing their jobs and strug-
gling to pay bills. I meet with them daily. We
(the people of Vineland and I) came up with
the multimillion dollar complex idea. We are
working hard to do all that we can to create
good jobs for working families. If my com-
plex is successful, it will provide a safety net
for those citizens living in Vineland who
might have faced long-term unemployment.
With this project and working together, we
can help more people living in Vineland to
find and keep good jobs and enjoy a healthy
standard of living.
Candidate: David W. Mazur
Slate: Association of Concerned Taxpayers of Vineland
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a press conference to present the pro-
posed project for Vineland residents on
October 25. “It’s about taking care of
people. Mom and Dad can travel with
their children to play the game. It doesn’t
matter the child’s game, level, ability or
even where they play—now they’ll play it
here in Vineland.”
Outlined in their plan is the construc-
tion of 12 baseball fields of varying sizes,
eight softball fields, four soccer/lacrosse
fields, six regulation tennis courts, includ-
ing a 1,000-seat tennis area, a 400-meter,
eight-lane outdoor track/soccer/lacrosse
field with seating for 2,500 people, out-
door facilities including sand volleyball
courts, basketball courts and children’s
play parks throughout the grounds, and
an athlete’s village, with housing for up to
3,000 athletes (1,500 male and 1,500
female), which includes a dining hall,
commercial kitchen, laundry facilities and
a game room. The crown jewel, though, is
a 10,000-seat Monolithic Dome known as
the Magic Area, which will house an
indoor track, basketball courts, and flexi-
ble seating to adapt to events. Included in
the arena would also be classrooms and
broadcasting facilities for children inter-
ested in learning about that aspect of the
sports business. And that’s just phase one
of their plan.
Phase two would include a 500-room
hotel, complete with a conference center
and three restaurants, and a 50,000-
square-foot indoor water park, along with
a seven-acre outdoor water park and an
office and fitness center.
According to the developers, funds for
the gargantuan facility will all come from
private investors, with Vineland not being
asked to pay a single cent. SORA
Northeast Development LLC, a develop-
ment firm based in Sewell, NJ, is handling
the funding.
This will not be SORA’s first foray into
the development of a multimillion-dollar
project in southern New Jersey. Most
recently, they funded the development of
Rowan Boulevard, a $300 million project
that created housing, retail shops, and
commercial office space in Glassboro
near the campus of Rowan University.
“I think SORA was able to put together
a pretty big piece of the puzzle here,” said
Greg Filipek, principal and master devel-
oper of SORA. “We wanted to take this
from a vision to a reality. Our company
doesn’t take on little projects. We look at
projects that have
meaning, that have a
purpose, that will stim-
ulate the economy and
really help, and we felt
we found that here.”
“It’s hard to believe
they could make such a
financial commitment
during these economic
times,” said Vineland
Mayor, Robert Romano.
“But they’ve assured us
they can.”
Based on the projec-
tions of the developers,
the Magic Sports
Complex would not
only create hundreds of direct and indi-
rect jobs—along with 200 to 400 tempo-
rary construction jobs—but also inject
about $250 million annually into the local
economy.
“They tell me Vineland’s unemploy-
ment rate is at 14 percent,” said Nametko.
“I can’t solve 14 percent. But I can bring
1,000 jobs to this community.”
One concern is that the jobs created
would be filled by people brought in from
outside the local community. The devel-
opers were insistent this was not part of
their plan.
“We’re not planning to farm anything
out as far as jobs go,” said Nametko.
“We’d like to hire people who live as
close to Vineland and Cumberland
County as possible. We’ll be working
closely with the Office of Unemployment
and Training to get the people needed to
fill these jobs.”
Should the project be approved, con-
struction would begin on the 288-acre
facility in the summer of 2013, with
phase one being completed the following
summer.
An approval is far from a guarantee,
though, as Nametko has learned. Several
years ago, Magic Sports proposed a simi-
lar project in Mays Landing. That project
never materialized, in part, due to resi-
dents’ concerns about traffic and light
pollution.
“One of the ways this project is differ-
ent is location,” said Filipek. “We weren’t
involved in the project until recently, but
I understand there were major concerns
about the location in Mays Landing.
We’ve addressed that now. This project
will be adjacent to Route 55 to relieve
congestion. That was a big hurdle for us.
“One of the reasons we picked this site
was to mitigate traffic problems as much
as possible,” he added.
Perhaps still scarred from his past
failures, Nametko ended his address to
the audience with a plea for public
support.
“Can I guarantee this is going to hap-
pen? No. I have to go through the zoning
board and the approval process. Most
importantly, I have to have your support,”
he said, referring to the residents of
Vineland on hand. “If I have that, I guar-
antee this will happen in Vineland.” I
SPORTS
Continued from cover
“They tell me Vineland’s
unemployment rate is 14 percent.
I can’t solve 14 percent. But I can bring
1,000 jobs to this community.”
—Ron Nametko, Founder,
The Magic Sports Complex of NJ
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TOP LEFT: The proposed complex, say its
developers, will include a 10,000-seat,
domed arena for basketball and track
events.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Phase II of the project
will include a hotel (to the left) and con-
ference center, along with an indoor/out-
door waterpark.
Grapevine 29-32 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:46 AM Page 29
BRIDGETON
123 Oak St., Darrin Pulman to Robert
B Parry on 9/6/12 for $45,000
COMMERCIAL TWP
2729 High St., Bivalve Packing Co. Inc.
to Dara P Stewart on 9/5/12 for
$47,000
173 Point Breeze Rd., Mike Dubrink to
Peter R Forte on 9/10/12 for $89,900
DOWNE TWP
173 Bayview Rd., C&D General
Contracting LLC to William Pohl on
9/10/12 for $10,000
175 Bayview Rd., C&D General
Contracting LLC to William Pohl on
9/10/12 for $80,000
FAIRFIELD TWP
Seabreeze Rd., Robert M Giacoboni to
State of New Jersey Dept. of Env. Prot.
on 9/10/12 for $130,405
HOPEWELL TWP
153 Harmony Rd., Rodney J Whitt to
Wayne R Hymer on 9/6/12 for $192,500
LAWRENCE TWP
3005 Seaview Avenue., Lionel E
Milbourne, Jr. to Steven Smith on
9/5/12 for $122,300
5 Alpha Ln., Harry Shaw to Lisa
Labrusciano on 9/10/12 for $70,000
Ramah Rd., John J Formicola to
Nature Conservancy on 9/10/12 for
$210,035
MAURICE RVR TWP
3664 Rt. 47, Beneficial Financial I Inc.
(DBA) to Robert J Affa on 9/5/12 for
$50,000
MILLVILLE
100-102 Chestnut St., Diana Yearicks
to Jill Gunn on 9/4/12 for $158,000
1240 E Broad St., Sec. of Housing &
Urban Development to Salvatore W
Roggio on 9/5/12 for $51,475
2039 Wheaton Ave., Naomi Cruz to
Sheryl A Greenshields on 9/5/12 for
$115,000
705 Magnolia Ave., Carie Kretschmer
to Cordelia Hill on 9/5/12 for $137,500
2534 Newcombtown Rd., Edward W
Emenicker to Rebecca C McGough on
9/5/12 for $144,000
147 Sugarman Ave., Jennifer S Matteis
to Christopher Wallace on 9/5/12 for
$162,000
305 Hazel Blvd., Ronald P Seaman to
William Wildin on 9/5/12 for $170,000
2230 Shamrock Ln., Jill C Swaim to
Tanya Runkle on 9/5/12 for $178,000
6 Fox Cove Dr., Michelle Mease to
Debra Appleby on 9/5/12 for $217,500
21 Vine St. E., M&T Bank to George
Gedrimas on 9/10/12 for $25,000
624 S 3rd St., Charles Hulitt, Jr. to
William Riland on 9/10/12 for $35,000
36 Walnut Rd., Deutsche Bank
National Trust Co. (Trust, by Atty.) to
Jeffrey Burris on 9/10/12 for $93,000
420 Spencer Place, Federal National
Mortgage Assoc. (by Atty to Julio M
Pumarejo on 9/10/12 for $177,400
UPPER DEERFIELD
73 W Sunset Pine Dr., Carl H West to
Alicja Mariano on 9/5/12 for $169,000
92 W Deerfield Rd., Joan Mck Ackley
to Brian K Ackley on 9/7/12 for
$80,000
59 Fox Rd., New Jersey Home
Construction Inc. to Cody Dennis on
9/7/12 for $139,900
VINELAND
2147 Franklin Dr., Dorothy M Bianco to
Rebecca Barber on 9/5/12 for
$131,000
1053 S Orchard Rd., Ri-Co LLC to Ebet
Flitcraft on 9/5/12 for $135,000
1069 Chelseas Way, RPJ Properties
LLC to Noe Bautista Cuevas on 9/5/12
for $144,900
585 Brentwood Dr., Michael S Clegg
(by Atty.) to John Caruso on 9/5/12 for
$160,000
1331 Garrison Rd., Donna McMahon
(Ind. Pers. Rep.) to Albert Giovinazzi
on 9/5/12 for $162,000
1114 Jamic Rd., Ebet Flitcraft to Alfred
Buck on 9/5/12 for $183,000
2439 E Chestnut Ave., Charlotte B
Ferrarie to Kuzmicz D&D Construction
LLC on 9/6/12 for $34,500
2960 Eagles Ct., Glenn Construction
Co. to Kuzmicz D&D Construction LLC
on 9/6/12 for $52,000
2459 Madison Ave., Charlotte B
Ferrarie to Kuzmicz D&D Construction
LLC on 9/6/12 for $56,000
1161 Roberts Blvd., Michael Lillie to
Sherylanne Lillie on 9/7/12 for $35,945
755 E Oak Rd., Maria Flores to Aaron
Dickel on 9/10/12 for $90,000
4318 Stanley Terr., Serafin Rivera to
Justin Krebs on 9/10/12 for $137,000
2051 Rudolph Dr., Carol A Sciore to
Tarin N Leech on 9/10/12 for $190,500
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UNLIMITED POTENTIAL
Fantastic Location In A Quiet Neighborhood
1258 Iris Avenue, Vineland
Family raised, now house is too big.
Large yard on a quiet street. Priced to sell.
Thomas Riggione, Broker-Associate
Coldwell Banker Excel Realty (856) 696-1111
1100 E Landis Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360
E X C E L R E A L T Y
REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
The following transactions of $20,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in
the month of September 2012 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month).
Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives.
Nominate Your Hometown Hero Today!
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/hometownheroes
Is it someone who gives of their time and energy to make our
community a better place to live and work? Perhaps they’re a
policeman, fireman, teacher, coach, volunteer, serviceman or
woman, public servant, or an everyday hero who makes
personal sacrifices so that others can live better lives.
They don’t do it for the recognition, but we think they should be recognized anyway.
Grapevine 29-32 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:46 AM Page 30
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Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.
Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or changed. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
of card__________
Signature:__________________________________________
Printed Name:______________________________________
Name ___________________________________
Address__________________________________
City__________________________Zip_________
Phone #: ________________________________
email____________________________________
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Suite 205
Vineland, NJ 08360
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Mail Ad
Form with
Payment TO:
Classifieds
Call for more information
856-457-7815
1.____________
2.____________ 3.____________ 4.____________ 5.____________
10.____________
15.____________
9.____________
14.____________ 13.____________
7.____________
12.____________
6.____________
11.____________
20.____________ 19.____________ 18.____________ 17.____________
16.____________
25.____________ 24.____________ 23.____________ 22.____________
21.____________
30.____________ 29.____________ 28.____________ 27.____________
26.____________
35.____________ 34.____________ 33.____________ 32.____________
31.____________
40.____________ 39.____________
42.____________
41.____________
44.____________ 43.____________ 45.____________
47.____________
46.____________
49.____________ 48.____________ 50.____________
38.____________ 37.____________
36.____________
8.____________
Check if needed.
Refer to prices above.
JBold
J Border
CLASSIFIEDS
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time to make room in that attic, garage or
basement, and there’s no better way to get the
word out than to advertise your yard sale in
The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured.
“no job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777.
Vineland 3-BDRM, 1-BA,
Eat-in-Kitchen, LR, DR,
family-room, sunroom,
mudroom, plus 2 spare-
rooms! Basement w/work-
shop, W/D hookup, 2 stor-
age-rooms. $1050. Call
856-825-7600
Share a Nice Big Modern
House in a Great
Neighborhood. $850. a
month. All utilities includ-
ed. Call 609-213-0832
East Vineland two bed-
room, one bathroom half
house. All tile and hard-
wood, large craft-made
kitchen. Great neighbor-
hood. Very clean. Freshly
painted. $1250/mo,
includes all utilities. Call
856-278-2834
Furnished rooms for rent.
For clean, quiet, drug-free
individuals only. Laurel
Street, Bridgeton.
$495/mo. Includes utili-
ties. One and a half
month’s security.
References required. Call
856-453-8323.
Experienced Stylist want-
ed. Up to 60% commis-
sion. Paid vacation and
bonuses. Call Rose or
Kathy at 856-213-5316.
Protocall Staffing is seek-
ing 100+ people for
Production, Packaging etc.:
• Competitive pay
• Many shifts available
• Must have 2 Valid forms
of ID. Apply in Person M-
TR, 9am-Noon, at 106
Landis Ave, Vineland NJ
or call 856-848-2196
Phone Sales. 10%
Commission. Must have
laptop and cell phone.
Call 609-213-0832
Christian Daycare seeking
P/T caregivers. Located
in Millvile, NJ. Exp.
Preferred. Phone 856-
825-8800.
Start your own business
for only $10. Call: 856-332-
6446 Jasmine Avon ISR
Para Español llamen
Gresenia 856-391-5958.
ANNUAL FALL
YARD/BAKE SALE: St.
Paul’s Lutheran Church
Fellowship Hall. 3rd and
Mulberry St., Millville. Sat.
Nov. 3, and Sat. Nov. 10,
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 825-
3008 for more info.
Cleaning out entire garage
All kinds of tools, shovels,
etc. Call 856-692-0717 for
an appointment.
2006 Ford 500 Limited.
Excellent condition.
28,500 miles. $10,000.
Call 856-696-1693.
Have a bike taking up space
in your home? Please con-
sider donating it. The
Vineland Rotary Club has
partnered with Pedals for
Progress to export bikes to
third-world countries where
they are needed for trans-
portation. Also collecting
treadle and portable sewing
machines. Contact Henry
Hansen at 856-696-0643
for drop-off or pick-up.
FLUTE, PICCOLO, PAN
FLUTE, RECORDER,
FLUTE ENSEMBLE,
Lessons by Renowned
Flutist, BEVERLY PUGH,
(Member, Bay-Atlantic
Symphony). ALL AGES-
ALL LEVELS, REASON-
ABLE RATES & MUSIC
FOR ALL OCCASIONS.
Phone: (Machine) 856-
455-1098. Email:
BevsPanFlutes@aol.com
WANTED! Slightly used
childrens books (donated)
to the Coats for Kids event
at the NJMP, Call Brian
856-364-6011 to arrange
pick up.
Wanted Dead or alive.
Junk or running cars.
Quick removal. Cash
paid. 856-649-2732.
TOT LOT providing quality
child care, ages 0-3,
accepting NJCK & TANF.
Mon-Fri 6:30 am.–7pm.
$140 per week w/meals.
856-641-7407.
All American Plumbing
and Drain Cleaning.
Specialing in all plumb-
ing services and repairs,
all at very reasonable
rates. Serving Vineland
and Millville Just give us
a call! 856-696-3052
REAL Painting:
Reasonable Prices–High
Quality Residential &
Commercial Painting
Interior/Exterior/Custon
Staining–South Jersey
Areas. (302) 444-2396
General House Cleaning.
20 years experience.
Reasonable, honest &
reliable. Call 856-697-
1338. Leave message.
Steelman's Drywall.
Drywall installation and
repairing nailpops, cracks,
water damage, unfinished
drywall. Big or small! Call
Joe for a free estimate at
609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance.
Vinyl and aluminum sid-
ing, concrete, brick, roof
cleaning, gutter clean-
out. Over 25 years in
business, fully insured.
(856) 692-7470.
AJB III Construction.
Licensed and fully insured.
Windows, doors, remodel-
ing, and more. Call us
today at 856-332-7865.
Electrical
Contractor
Pete Construction
Specializing in decks,
roofs and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
Homecare Provider
available: Prefer to
stay in Cumberland
County. No live in, but
daily and/or overnight
available. No driving.
Call 856-691-1133 or
856-581-5127
Help Wanted
Home
Improvement
Home
Improvement
Services
Garage/Yard Sale
Employment
For Rent
For Sale
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your drive-
way? Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
LANDSCAPING & PAVERS
Professional Installations...Over 10 Years
SPECIALIZING IN:
Lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design • Walks,
Driveways • Retaining Walls
Fire Pits • Restoration of Pavers
Call 856-982-7701
or 856-498-7571
lewbowhunter@gmail.com
See our work on

See our w
whunter@gmail.com lewbo
or 856-498-7571
Call 856-982-7701
e Pits • R Fir
ays Drivew
Landscape Design •
Lawn Maintenance
SPECIALIZING IN:
ork on ur w
unter@gmail.com
56-498-7571
856-982-7701
vers ation of Pa Restor
alls W s • Retaining
alks, W pe Design •
Maintenance
ALIZING IN:
We Buy
Used Vehicles!
See Lenny Campbell See Lenny Campbell
808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton NJ
(856) 451-0095
Items Wanted
Flute Lessons
Have a business and need more customers?
Need work? Why not get the word out through
The Grapevine’s Classifieds?
Advertize your skills and business in the
Classifieds by calling 856-457-7815.
Mowing, edging, tree
& stump removal,
clean-ups, bush &
tree trimming, mulch,
river-rock, gutter
cleaning, Vineland
area, 856-691-2017
Landscaping
Bikes Wanted
Grapevine 29-32 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:46 AM Page 31
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Grapevine 29-32 103112-de:Layout 1 10/29/12 12:47 AM Page 32