www.smdailyjournal.

com
BOTH FOR CHANGE
NATION PAGE 6
PLAYOFF SPOT
UP FOR GRABS
SPORTS PAGE 11
REVOLUTION FOR
ASSASSINS CREED
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18
MITT ROMNEY AND BARACK OBAMA VIE FORCEFULLY FOR
THE MANTLE OF CHANGE
Another high for Caltrain
Family sues after
power line death
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The family of a San Mateo man fatally electrocuted by a
downed power line that knocked out power to part of the city
in April is suing Pacific Gas and Electric Company for alleged-
ly failing to maintain a safe system and not using a device that
cuts electricity once it touches a foreign body or ground.
The wife and two adult daughters of Enrique Tello claim the
55-year-old man may have been saved after he was electrocut-
ed April 20 but emergency workers couldn’t immediately
come to his aid because the energized power line remained a
danger, according to the lawsuit filed Wednesday in San Mateo
County Superior Court.
Tello was watching television with his wife of 22 years at
their home on the 1600 block of South Norfolk Street when, at
approximately 6:30 p.m., they heard an explosion from an
overhead power line separating and falling to the ground
across their property and over his pickup truck to the lawn
across the street where it started a small blaze, the suit states.
Tello, wearing only socks, went outside and, as he came near
Investor pleads guilty of bid
rigging at foreclosure auctions
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A real estate investor pleaded guilty yesterday to bid rigging
at public foreclosure auctions in San Mateo and San Francisco
counties over a two-year span, according to the Department of
Justice.
Norman Montalvo, of Concord, conspired with others at the
auctions, including the one held outside the Redwood City
courthouse, to designate a winning bidder for selected proper-
ties rather than compete against each other, according to court
documents.
Those involved kept the wining price low which, in turn,
federal prosecutors say, damaged the real estate market and
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ridership numbers keep piling up for
Caltrain as the rail line broke yet anoth-
er record in September and the numbers
could be even better for October as it had
an additional 38,000 riders hop on the
train Wednesday to watch the parade for
the World Series champion Giants in San
Francisco.
Giants fans began appearing on the
first trains to leave San Jose early
Wednesday morning and by 7:30 a.m.,
lines of passengers were wrapping
around the station, waiting to board
trains.
By 9:30 a.m., Caltrain had dispatched
seven extra trains, two that operated as
express trains from San Jose to San
Francisco and five that were dispatched
from Redwood City ahead of crowded
trains. Additional service was also pro-
vided through the morning.
Preliminary passenger counts show
that 22,000 people took Caltrain to San
Francisco Wednesday morning. On a
typical weekday morning, 9,600 people
take Caltrain to San Francisco.
Giants fans have helped fuel the
agency’s surge in ridership.
In September, Caltrain had an average
weekday ridership of 50,821, an all-time
high. It was the 26th straight month
Caltrain’s ridership has increased.
The previous all-time high for rider-
ship was set just a few months ago in
Rail line breaks ridership record again
In September, Caltrain had an average weekday ridership of
50,821, an all-time high.
See PG&E, Page 23
See GUILTY, Page 31
See CALTRAIN, Page 23
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
The opening of the big-wave surfing contest at Mavericks near Half Moon Bay is scheduled for Nov.9 and the contest waiting
period will officially run through March 31, 2013.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Surf culture carries heavy reverence to
the power of the sublime ocean in which
they play. Ritualistic commemorations
giving thanks to the sea, and to the
beloved who have passed, humble many
riders as they pay their respects.
The international Mavericks
Invitational Big Wave surf competition
hinges on the months-long waiting peri-
od that begins Nov. 9 and lasts until
March 31, during which the event may
or may not be held.
During next Friday’s opening ceremo-
ny, surfers and the public are invited to
gear up in wetsuits and paddle out in
Half Moon Bay with fellow surfers
forming a circle near the shore.
Perhaps the most famous American
opening ceremony takes place on the
North Shore of Hawaii. Eddie Aikau was
a lifeguard whose legendary selfless
death occurred in an attempt to save his
fellow canoe mates as they sunk 12
miles offshore near the island of
Molokai in 1978.
This year’s Mavericks’ ceremony will
likely honor Jay Moriarity whose story
is portrayed in the newly released film
Chasing Mavericks.
The 30- to 50-foot waves that emerge
off the coast of Half Moon Bay during
the Northern Californian winter swells
attract tens of thousands to watch and
participate in the international competi-
Mavericks window opening
Famous big wave surf contest to take place between Nov. 9 and March 31
See MAVERICKS, Page 23
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 66
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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Actor David
Schwimmer is 46.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
President John F. Kennedy delivered a
brief statement to the nation in which he
said that aerial photographs had con-
firmed that Soviet missile bases in Cuba
were being dismantled, and that
“progress is now being made toward the
restoration of peace in the Caribbean.”
“Drop the question what
tomorrow may bring, and count
as profit every day that Fate allows you.”
— Horace, Roman poet (65 B.C.-8 B.C.)
Singer-songwriter
k.d. lang is 51.
Rapper Nelly is 38.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
The remnants of a roller coast sits in the surf three days after Hurricane Sandy came ashore in Seaside Heights, N.J.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest
winds around 5 mph...Becoming west in the
afternoon.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening
then becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. West
winds around 5 mph in the evening...Becoming light.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming part-
ly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s.
Light winds...Becoming west around 10 mph in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s.
Sunday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 11 Money
Bags in first place; No. 08 Gorgeous George in
second place;and No.10 Solid Gold in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:43.27.
(Answers tomorrow)
RIGOR FLOSS MEADOW DRAGON
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The rooster was in a —
“FOWL” MOOD
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HEWIG
KNILB
MADERY
SHIGTT
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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” “ Print your
answer here:
0 2 4
5 12 18 29 56 38
Mega number
Oct. 30 Mega Millions
3 15 18 19 29
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 7 3 3
Daily Four
6 6 2
Daily three evening
In 1783, Gen. George Washington issued his Farewell Orders
to the Armies of the United States near Princeton, N.J.
In 1795, the 11th president of the United States, James Knox
Polk, was born in Mecklenburg County, N.C.
In 1865, the 29th president of the United States, Warren
Gamaliel Harding, was born near Marion, Ohio.
In 1889, North Dakota and South Dakota became the 39th and
40th states.
In 1917, British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour issued a dec-
laration expressing support for a “national home” for the Jews
in Palestine.
In 1936, the British Broadcasting Corp. inaugurated “high-def-
inition” television service from Alexandra Palace in London.
In 1947, Howard Hughes piloted his huge wooden flying boat,
the Hughes H-4 Hercules (derisively dubbed the “Spruce
Goose” by detractors), on its only flight, which lasted about a
minute over Long Beach Harbor in California.
In 1948, President Harry S. Truman surprised the experts by
winning a narrow upset over Republican challenger Thomas E.
Dewey.
In 1959, former game show contestant Charles Van Doren
admitted to a House subcommittee that he’d been given ques-
tions and answers in advance when he appeared on NBC’s
“Twenty-One.”
In 1963, South Vietnamese President Ngo Dihn Diem was
assassinated in a military coup.
In 1979, black militant JoAnne Chesimard escaped from a
New Jersey prison, where she’d been serving a life sentence for
the 1973 slaying of New Jersey state trooper Werner Foerster.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Earl “Speedo” Carroll (The
Cadillacs; The Coasters) is 75. Singer Jay Black (Jay and the
Americans) is 74. Political commentator Patrick Buchanan is 74.
Actress Stefanie Powers is 70. Author Shere (shehr) Hite is 70.
Rock musician Keith Emerson (Emerson, Lake and Palmer) is
68. Country-rock singer-songwriter J.D. Souther is 67. Actress
Kate Linder is 65. Rock musician Carter Beauford (The Dave
Matthews Band) is 55. Rock musician Bobby Dall (Poison) is 49.
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage is 48. Actress
Lauren Velez is 48. Christian/jazz singer Alvin Chea (Take 6) is
45. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is 45.
Salmon swim across
flooded road in Washington
UNION, Wash. — A flooding river
covered a road in Washington, allowing
some migrating salmon to swim across
the pavement.
Video from KOMO-TV shows one
salmon didn’t make it Wednesday when
it was caught by a dog that walked away
with its catch near Union, about 40
miles southwest of Seattle.
The salmon-crossing-the-road scene
is replayed nearly every year on the
Skokomish River. It frequently floods
after heavy rain in the Olympic
Mountains.
Smugglers’ SUV gets stuck
atop California border fence
YUMA, Ariz. — Suspected smug-
glers who tried to use ramps to drive an
SUV over a 14-foot-tall border fence
had to abandon their plan when the Jeep
became stuck on top of the barrier,
authorities said Wednesday.
Agents patrolling the U.S.-Mexico
border near the Imperial Sand Dunes in
California’s southeast corner spotted the
Jeep Cherokee teetering atop the fence
early Tuesday, Border Patrol spokesman
Spencer Tippets said. The vehicle was
perched about five miles west of the
Colorado River and the Arizona state
line.
Two smugglers on the Mexican side
of the border were trying to free the
Jeep when the agents approached,
Tippets said. They ran further into
Mexico and escaped.
The Jeep was empty, but agents said it
was probably filled with contraband like
bales of marijuana before it got high-
centered atop the fence.
The smugglers had built ramps to
drive up and over the fence, something
that has been tried at least once before.
In April 2011, agents found a truck that
had ramps built onto it and had driven
up to the border fence. A pickup had
driven up and over the fence, but it was
spotted and its occupants were captured,
Tippets said.
The agency’s Yuma sector has seen a
95 percent reduction in human smug-
gling in recent years, freeing up agents
to focus on drug smugglers.
“Because of how successful we are
we don’t have all the clutter like we had
in years past,” Tippets said. “Now that
all the clutter is gone, we’re able to
focus on things that are bigger threats.”
The terrain in western Arizona and
eastern California has little vegetation
and is much less rugged than the land in
southeastern Arizona, so smugglers
have a harder time making it into the
U.S. without being spotted.
English town to burn
Lance Armstrong in effigy
LONDON — His career is in ruins
and now an effigy of Lance Armstrong
is about to go up in smoke.
The disgraced American cyclist has
been chosen as the latest celebrity to be
burned in effigy during an English
town’s nationally famous Bonfire Night
celebrations.
Edenbridge in southeast England has
built a 30-foot (9-meter) model of
Armstrong, who was stripped recently
of his seven Tour de France titles for
doping offenses.
The effigy, to be burnt Saturday,
sports a sign saying “For sale, racing
bike, no longer required.”
Towns across Britain light bonfires
and set off fireworks on Nov. 5 to com-
memorate Guy Fawkes’ failed plot in
1605 to blow up Parliament.
Foul-mouthed parrot
seeks new home in U.K.
LONDON — Everyone has a few
faults. In Beaky’s case, he swears (a lot)
and he bites.
Not good qualities for a parrot seek-
ing a new home.
Still, honesty is the best policy, so the
Royal Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals has decided to come
clean about his shortcomings.
Supervisor Angelina Lusher said
Wednesday that anyone who takes
Beaky in will have to put up with some
rude language. The agency also says he
tends to bite people until he bonds with
them.
Beaky is a chattering lory who will
only be given to new owners with expe-
rience handling exotic birds.
Lusher says Beaky needs interaction
with people or other birds to have a ful-
filling life.
9 16 29 31 40 20
Mega number
Oct. 31 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Active Independent & Assisted Living
• Day trips & 50+ activities every week
• Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
• Secured underground parking
• Luxurious apartments, with full kitchens
850 N. El Camino Real, S.M. • 650-344-8200
License# 41050763 • www.sterlingcourt.com
Public Invited:
Join us for
“Friday Nights Live”
Music, Hors d’oeuvres
and Beverages
Every Friday
from 4:30-5:30pm
702 Marshall St., Ste. 400, Redwood City
650.369.8900
Fighting for victims
and their families
FREE CONSULTATION
(800) 308-0870
Motor Vehicle
Accidents

Wrongful Death

Traumatic Brain
Injuries

Spinal Cord Injuries

Survivors of
Domestic Violence
and Rape

Uninsured Motorist
Claims

Insurance Bad Faith
Led by former prosecutor
Todd Emanuel, Emanuel
Law Group fghts for
victims and their families.
RECENT RESULTS
$6.35 million: Settlement
afer Motor Vehicle Accident
$1.00 million: Judgment for
rape victim
$1.00 million: Settlement for
Uninsured Motorist Claim
$405,000: Judgment for
Domestic Violence Survivor
MENLO PARK
Weapons violation. A woman walked into a Pier 1 Imports
armed with a handgun on the 2000 block of Chess Drive
before 6:18 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30.
Theft. Perfume was stolen from a retail store on the 3000
block of Bridgepointe Parkway before 4:57 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.
30.
Suspicious circumstances. A substitute teacher reportedly hit
a student at a school on the 900 block of Alameda de las
Pulgas before 1:29 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30.
Suspicious circumstances. A woman was reportedly throw-
ing ladders and other objects at people as they passed by her
on the first block of North Grant Street before 4:24 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 28.
REDWOOD CITY
Petty theft. A wallet was stolen from a shopping cart at a store
on El Camino Real before 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30. The
incident was caught on video.
Bomb threat. A man called a clinic on Laurel Street advising
a bomb would go off before 2:18 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29.
Burglary. The driver’s side door lock of a vehicle was
punched open on Vera Avenue before 5:54 a.m. Monday, Oct.
29. Construction tools were stolen.
Burglary. Someone reported seeing a man use a blowtorch to
open the gate latch of a home on Coleman Avenue before 4:52
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28.
Police reports
Masked bandit strikes again
A person reported hearing footsteps that were later deter-
mined to be a raccoon on Barkentine Street in Foster City
before 12:37 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 22.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa
Clara and San Mateo counties kicked off
its Holiday Food and Fund Drive
Thursday.
The goal is to raise $12.4 million and
2 million pounds of food during the next
three months to ensure that anyone in the
community who needs a meal can get
one this holiday season and all year
long. To kick off the effort, Second
Harvest officials were joined with
Holiday Food and Fund Drive Co-chairs
Jed York, CEO of the San Francisco
49ers, BJ Jenkins of Barracuda
Networks and Dan Campbell of EMC
Corporation in San Jose Thursday for a
“tailgate” party.
“Hunger has become a serious prob-
lem in our community,” York said. “Due
to the tough economy, one in four fami-
lies in the Bay Area has fallen below the
self-sufficiency line. Now more than
ever, we all need to work together and
provide the basic life necessity of food
to all those in need. I urge everyone in
our community to join our cause and
help support Second Harvest Food
Bank’s Holiday Food and Fund Drive.”
The Holiday Food and Fund Drive is
critical because Second Harvest raises
nearly half its revenue during the holi-
day season. While the food bank serves
nearly 250,000 people every month all
year long, many people think about
hunger during the holidays.
The number of people Second Harvest
Food Bank serves has increased nearly
50 percent since the recession started in
2007 and that number continues to edge
up despite the improving economy. One
out of every 10 of our neighbors will be
receiving food from Second Harvest
Food Bank this holiday season.
Corporations, organizations and indi-
viduals can help feed neighbors by host-
ing a food drive or donating to Second
Harvest Food Bank this holiday season.
To support the campaign visit
www.shfb.org or call (866) 234-3663.
Anyone who needs food should call
Second Harvest’s Food Connection hot-
line at (800) 984-3663.
Second Harvest kicks off holiday drive with 49ers
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
California’s youth want President
Obama to serve another four-year term,
according to results of a statewide stu-
dent mock election released Thursday.
Students from a record-breaking 674
elementary, middle school and high
schools voted this week in the MyVote
California Student Mock Election,
according to a press release from the
secretary of the state. In the presidential
race, Obama received 69.29 percent of
the vote while Mitt Romney generated
23.48 percent. State youth also want
Dianne Feinstein to continue to repre-
sent the state in the U.S. Senate and nine
of the 10 November ballot propositions
would become law. In San Mateo
County, 24 middle and high schools took
part in the vote generating an estimated
15,125 votes.
Spearheaded by California Secretary
of State Debra Bowen and State
Superintendent Tom Torlakson, the
MyVote California Student Mock
Election is a hands-on civic engagement
project that helps cultivate the voters of
tomorrow. The mock election program
provided teachers with resources and
materials to broaden their civics lessons
and make the Nov. 6 election a teachable
moment.
“Even though most of the students are
not old enough to cast a real ballot this
year, they gained real insights and deep-
er understanding of our democracy by
taking part in the mock election,”
Bowen, California’s chief elections offi-
cer, wrote in a press release. “The stu-
dents researched the issues and candi-
dates, debated with each other and then
voted on ballots just like many of their
older family members will do next
Tuesday.”
The number of schools who participat-
ed in this year’s MyVote California
Student Mock Election surpassed num-
bers from the five previous mock elec-
tions. In the 2008 presidential election
season, 644 schools participated. In the
2010 gubernatorial election season, 433
schools participated. A list of participat-
ing schools and more information about
the mock election program are at
www.sos.ca.gov/elections/studentmock-
election.htm.
California youth support Obama
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The second-striker who prosecutors
say hit his stepbrother in the head with a
hammer over images of his girlfriend is
not mentally fit to defend himself against
an attempted murder charge, according
to court-appointed attorneys.
Lawrence Lee Buffington, 46, will
now be hospitalized instead of tried on
charges of attempted murder, assault,
assault with force, making criminal
threats and violating his parole. His for-
mal placement is Dec. 12.
Competency is a person’s ability to aid
in his or her defense while sanity is a
person’s mental state at the time of an
alleged crime.
Redwood City
police arrested
Buffington after being
told by his hospital-
ized stepbrother that
the man had struck
him in the head with
the tool during an
argument. The victim
said he agreed to have
Buffington stay with
him at his Redwood City residence after
his stepbrother had a fight with his girl-
friend at his Sacramento home. The vic-
tim also told authorities Buffington
accused him of having an affair with the
girlfriend after finding a photograph.
However, Buffington’s girlfriend pre-
viously told the Daily Journal
Buffington’s stepbrother was the one
who “begged” him to move in. She said
Buffington also told her immediately
after the confrontation that he had found
videos and photographs of his stepbroth-
er harming her. The woman said there
was no truth to anything in the alleged
images and she had not seen anything
herself.
The victim, who suffered a fractured
skull, was treated at Sequoia Hospital,
whose staff alerted police.
Buffington remains in custody without
bail and on a parole hold.
Man unfit for trial in hammer attack
Lawrence
Buffington
4
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
2
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1
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Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
—over 40 exhibitors!
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Free Services include
Refreshments
Door Prizes and Giveaways
Blood Pressure Check
Ask the Pharmacist
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
FREE Document Shredding
by Miracle Shred
and MORE
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, November 16
9:00am to 1:00pm
Foster City Recreation Center
650 Shell Blvd. Foster City
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Burlingame Parks and
Recreation Department was asked
by the City Council to work on a
Community Center Master Plan.
The current Recreation Center
building was built in about 1948 as a
memorial to those who gave their
lives in World War II. It has been remodeled, expanded and
repaired many times over the years. The goal is to develop a
planning concept for a community center that will meet the
needs of all age members of the Burlingame community and
that will have a useful life well into the future.
The process will involve working with a professional con-
sulting firm, community members and city staff. It will
include several community and stakeholder meetings to
identify facility and site needs and conclude with a final
written summary report of the study findings, process and
recommendations to the City Council. It is anticipated the
community meetings will begin in January 2013 and the
process will end seven to eight months later.
The Park and Recreation Department is looking for dedi-
cated community members who are interested in being part
of the process. If you would be interested in participating,
contact the Parks and Recreation Department at 558-7300
and ask to be added to the Burlingame Community Center
email notification list.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The San Bruno driver accused of run-
ning a red light and crashing into anoth-
er vehicle before fleeing the scene plead-
ed no contest to gross vehicular
manslaughter for the incident that left a
60-year-old woman dead.
Mitnesh Krishna Reddy, 22, also
admitted committing a hit-and-run and
driving while under the influence. As
part of the negotiated plea, Reddy faces
up to 11 years and eight months in
prison but a judge
indicated a likely
sentence of nine
years, said Assistant
District Attorney Al
Serrato.
Reddy will be sen-
tenced Jan. 3.
Just before 4 a.m.
Nov. 17, 2011, pros-
ecutors say Reddy
ran a stoplight on El Camino Real and T-
boned a vehicle exiting Interstate 380 in
San Bruno. The other driver, 60-year-old
Sondra Gentile, was killed while Reddy
fled after the collision. The crash shut
down the section of El Camino Real
between Sneath Lane and San Bruno
Avenue for several hours. Meanwhile,
San Bruno police tracked the car, which
is registered to Reddy, back to his home
where he was arrested.
He is free from custody on a $25,000
bail bond pending sentencing.
Driver takes deal in fatal crash
Immigrants to avoid
deportation in some crimes
OAKLAND — A new policy in
Alameda County is instructing prosecu-
tors to consider filing lesser criminal
charges for some legal immigrants in an
effort to avoid convictions with mandato-
ry deportation.
District Attorney Nancy O’Malley’s
order will make the county one of a hand-
ful in the U.S. to pass similar policies.
The policy would allow legal immi-
grants convicted of petty thefts or low-
level drug cases to avoid deportation in
exchange for longer jail sentences or
other terms.
Mom says she
smothered crying daughter
An Oakland mother has pleaded guilty
to smothering her 2-year-old daughter
because she was crying.
Tiffany Lopez had told police that she
accidentally sat on Kamilah Russell dur-
ing a game of hide-and-seek in their
apartment in March 2010.
The 21-year-old woman said the tod-
dler was hiding between couch cushions
when she sat down and accidentally suf-
focated her.
Mitnesh Reddy
Around the Bay
5
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
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By Meghan Barr
and Leanne Otalie
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Exasperation —
and in some cases fear — mounted in
New York City on Thursday, three
days after Superstorm Sandy. Traffic
backed up for miles at bridges, large
crowds waited impatiently for buses
into Manhattan, and tempers flared in
gas lines.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg said
the city would send bottled water and
ready-to-eat meals into the hardest-
hit neighborhoods through the week-
end, but some New Yorkers grew
dispirited after days without power,
water and heat and decided to get
out.
“It’s dirty, and it’s getting a little
crazy down there,” said Michael
Tomeo, who boarded a bus to
Philadelphia with his 4-year-old son.
“It just feels like you wouldn’t want
to be out at night. Everything’s pitch
dark. I’m tired of it, big-time.”
Rima Finzi-Strauss decided to take
the bus to Washington. When the
power went out Monday night in her
apartment building on the Lower East
Side of Manhattan, it also disabled
the electric locks on the front door,
she said.
“We had three guys sitting out in
the lobby last night with candlelight,
and very threatening folks were pass-
ing by in the pitch black,” she said.
“And everyone’s leaving. That makes
it worse.”
The mounting despair came even
as the subways began rolling again
after a three-day shutdown. Service
was restored to most of the city, but
not the most stricken parts of
Manhattan and Brooklyn, where the
tunnels were flooded.
Bridges into the city were open, but
police enforced a carpooling rule and
peered into windows to make sure
each car had at least three people.
Frustration builds in
storm-stricken East
By Alicia A. Caldwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — For the next
week the federal government will pay
all of the costs to help get public
transportation and power restored to
parts of New York and New Jersey hit
hardest by Superstorm Sandy, the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency said Thursday.
FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate
said President Barack Obama has
approved requests from New Jersey
and New York for the government to
cover the costs for emergency trans-
portation, including helping repair
subway tunnels and get buses run-
ning, and power grid repairs for 10
days. He did not give any estimates
of how much that could cost.
The president’s decision does not
mean that the government will even-
tually reimburse the states for all the
costs to repair damage from the mas-
sive storm that plunged parts of
Manhattan into darkness, shut down
much of the subway and destroyed
parts of the New Jersey shore.
Fugate said FEMA generally pays
states back for 75 percent of repair
and recovery costs. In some cases, the
agency has covered as much as 90
percent of disasters costs.
But Fugate said it’s too early to
know how much of the costs the gov-
ernment may eventually cover.
“What will be needed later, as far
as cost share adjustments, will be
made later,” Fugate said.
Officials from both states have
asked that the government reimburse
the local governments for all of the
costs.
Insurance companies have estimat-
ed that the storm could cost them
anywhere from $10 billion to $20
billion.
Gov’t paying for emergency
transportation in New York
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A tourist looking out at the ocean
from a hotel near Miramar spotted a
body in the water Thursday morn-
ing, a San Mateo County sheriff’s
spokeswoman said.
The body, that of a white man in
his 30s, was pulled from the surfline
along Miramar Beach after the
tourist called authorities around
9:30 a.m., sheriff’s spokeswoman
Rebecca Rosenblatt said.
There were no obvious signs of
trauma and the cause of death has
not been determined, according to
Rosenblatt.
The Coroner’s Office is working
to identify the body and notify fam-
ily members.
Man’s body found at Miramar Beach
REUTERS
People wait to take buses back to the Brooklyn borough in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in New York.
6
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By David Espo and Kasie Hunt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DOSWELL, Va. — Five days before the
election, Republican challenger Mitt Romney
and President Barack Obama vied forcefully
for the mantle of change Thursday in a coun-
try thirsting for it after a painful recession and
uneven recovery, pressing intense closing
arguments in their unpredictably close race
for the White House. Early voting topped 22
million ballots.
Republicans launched a late push in
Pennsylvania, long viewed as safe for Obama.
The party announced a $3 million advertising
campaign that told voters who backed the
president four years ago, “it’s OK to make a
change.” Romney and running mate Paul Ryan
both announced weekend visits to the state.
The Obama campaign was increasing its ad
buy in Pennsylvania following the RNC’s
move, an aide said while declining to cite how
just much the campaign planned to spend.
A three-day lull that followed Superstorm
Sandy ended abruptly, the president cam-
paigning briskly across three battleground
states and Romney piling up three stops in a
fourth. The Republican also attacked with a
tough new Spanish-language television ad in
Florida showing Venezuela’s leftist leader,
Hugo Chavez, and Raul Castro’s daughter,
Mariela, saying they would vote for Obama.
The storm intruded once again into the race,
as New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg
endorsed the president in a statement that said
Sandy, which devastated his city, could be
evidence of climate change.
Of the two White House rivals, Bloomberg
wrote, “One sees climate change as an urgent
problem that threatens our planet; one does
not. I want our president to place scientific
evidence and risk management above elec-
toral politics.”
The ever-present polls charted a close race
for the popular vote, and a series of tight bat-
tleground surveys suggested neither man
could be confident of success in the competi-
tion for the 270 electoral votes that will
decide the winner.
The presidential race aside, the two parties
battled for control of the Senate in a series of
10 or more competitive campaigns. The pos-
sibility of a 50-50 tie loomed, or even a more
unsettled outcome if former Gov. Angus King
of Maine, an independent, wins a three-way
race and becomes majority-maker.
Romney, Obama: I’m the candidate of change
Polls chart a close race for the popular vote,and a series of tight battleground surveys suggested
neither Barack Obama nor Mitt Romney can be confident of success in the competition for
the 270 electoral votes that will decide the winner.
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Listen up voters,
you’re the boss.
Your employee has barely produced the
past two years, has hardly showed up for
work, hasn’t cooperated with others and has
gotten low marks on every evaluation. Time to
fire ‘em, right?
Wrong.
When the results are counted this Tuesday,
Americans will have resoundingly rehired a
big majority of the House and Senate despite
railing for months about an ineffective, bitter-
ly divided Congress.
Help from the once-a-decade redrawing of
congressional districts is one reason so many
lawmakers will return to Washington. The
first election after that politically driven
process is typically a high point for those in
office. But redistricting is hardly the only rea-
son. The power of incumbency, with its name
recognition and cash advantages, also is
responsible.
At least 15 senators of the 22 seeking re-
election are expected to cruise to new terms.
The same is true for at least 330 House mem-
bers from coast to coast, based on interviews
with Republicans and Democrats, opinion
polls and a tally of non-competitive races.
There have been some close calls. Twenty-
one-term Rep. Charlie Rangel faced a scare in
his primary but probably will win in his heav-
ily Democratic New York City district. Sen.
Orrin Hatch fought off a tea party challenge
and is expected to easily win a seventh term in
solidly Republican Utah. Ethics and sex scan-
dals — even skinny dipping in the Sea of
Galilee — won’t stop other incumbents.
Yet in survey after survey this year,
Americans overwhelmingly have given
Congress an abysmal approval rating in the
low double-digits. Even its members joke
darkly about their standing compared to, say,
used car salesmen or tax collectors or even
journalists.
Support for Congress, Sen. John McCain,
R-Ariz., has often said, is “down to paid
staffers and blood relatives.”
Most of Congress coming back despite low approval
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Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Mayor Bloomberg
endorses Obama
By Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg
backed President Barack Obama over Republican Mitt
Romney on Thursday, saying the incum-
bent Democrat will bring critically needed
leadership to fight climate change after the
East Coast devastation wrought by
Hurricane Sandy.
The endorsement from the politically
independent and nationally recognizable
mayor was a major boost for Obama, who
is spending the campaign’s final days try-
ing to win over independent voters whose
voices will be critical in determining the
winner of Tuesday’s election.
Both candidates had eagerly sought the nod from
Bloomberg, who didn’t endorse a presidential candidate in
2008 and has publicly grumbled about both Obama and
Romney. But Bloomberg said the possibility that Sandy result-
ed from climate change had made the stakes of the election
that much clearer.
“We need leadership from the White House, and over the
past four years, President Barack Obama has taken major steps
to reduce our carbon consumption,” Bloomberg wrote in an
online opinion piece.
A full-throated stamp of approval this was not. Even as he
pledged to cast his vote for Obama’s re-election, Bloomberg
faulted the president for discounting centrists, trading in divi-
sive, partisan attacks and failing to make progress on issues
like gun control, immigration and the federal deficit.
The billionaire businessman and former Republican also
praised Romney as a good man who would bring valuable
business experience to the White House but said Romney had
reversed course on issues like health care and abortion. “If the
1994 or 2003 version of Mitt Romney were running for presi-
dent, I may well have voted for him,” he said.
By Jim Heintz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — What ails Vladimir
Putin?
The Russian leader whose image of
physical vigor is key to his success has
canceled several foreign trips in recent
weeks, postponed his annual live televised
question-and-answer session with average
Russians, and has rarely left his suburban
residence outside Moscow.
A respected Russian newspaper
claimed Thursday that a publicity stunt
during which Putin
tried to lead cranes on
their migratory paths
in a motorized hang-
glider aggravated an
old injury.
Putin’s office
denies it was the flight
with cranes, insists it
is just a pulled muscle
and spins the situa-
tion, saying that athletes often get banged
up. Besides, it says, Putin’s avoiding the
Kremlin office so he doesn’t tie up
Moscow traffic with his motorcade —
something that hasn’t seemed to trouble
him during his previous 12 years in power.
So what’s really wrong?
Combine the old Russian custom of
keeping a leader’s health problems secret
with a massive PR apparatus that micro-
manages information about Putin to the
nth degree and what do you get? A lot of
speculation.
After celebrating his 60th birthday in
early October, Putin has rarely left his
official residence, sparking claims that ill-
ness or injury had laid him low.
Israel confirms killing
Arafat deputy in 1988
JERUSALEM — Israel acknowl-
edged Thursday it killed Palestinian
leader Yasser Arafat’s deputy in a 1988
raid in Tunisia, lifting a nearly 25-year
veil of secrecy and allowing a rare
glimpse into the shadowy world of its
secret operations.
One of the commandos was disguised
as a woman on a romantic vacation, and
one of the weapons was hidden in a box
of chocolates.
Khalil al-Wazir, who was better
known by his nom de guerre Abu Jihad,
founded Fatah, the dominant faction in
the Palestinian Liberation Organization,
with Arafat and was blamed for a series
of deadly attacks against Israelis.
Two of those involved in the opera-
tion that killed al-Wazir now hold
high political office in Israel —
Defense Minister Ehud Barak and
Vice Premier Moshe Yaalon. At the
time, Barak was deputy military chief,
and Yaalon was head of the elite com-
mando unit Sayeret Matkal. Their pre-
cise roles in the operation were not
divulged, and both men’s offices
declined comment.
Putin lays low, reasons seem odd
Vladimir Putin
Around the world
Michael
Bloomberg
LOCAL 8
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C
ongrats to Daly City Clerk
Annette Hipona, who was award-
ed certification by the
International Institute of Municipal
Clerks. The certification makes her the first
Daly City clerk with the designation and
makes Daly City the ninth San Mateo
County city with a certified clerk.
***
Redwood City 2020 and Redwood City
were awarded a $15,000 “Let’s Play” grant
to promote active play, exercise, health and
wellness of kids in the community. The
money, which comes from the Dr. Pepper
Snapple Group and nonprofit KaBoom!,
will expand the use of school playgrounds
during non-school hours.
***
Is it time to get in the holiday spirit? The
mastermind behind the Lights on Minorca
in Millbrae thinks so. While the light show
was absent last year, the family expects to
bring it back this year just after
Thanksgiving. Be sure to stop by!
***
Looking for some tea in Burlingame?
Starting Nov. 10 there will be a new location
— David’s Tea at 1400 Burlingame Ave.
The tea place is known for offering unique
flavors like popcorn, root beer float, choco-
late, red velvet cake and even jelly beans.
***
A total of 375 volunteers turned out for
the third annual “Faith in Action Day”
sponsored by the First Presbyterian
Church of Burlingame Saturday, Oct. 27.
Volunteers cleared unruly ivy patches
from the campus quad at Borel Middle
School in San Mateo, worked on a Habitat
for Humanity site in Daly City, packed
1,200 snack bags for CALL Primrose
Center, rose before dawn to serve breakfast
to several dozen residents at Shelter
Network’s Maple Street facility, carved
pumpkins with children at the First Step for
Families shelter, barbecued lunch for resi-
dents at Safe Harbor Shelter and enter-
tained seniors residing at Mills Estate and
Burlingame Villa.
Other volunteers dusted library shelves at
the Burlingame Public Library and deliv-
ered donated games to Hillcrest Juvenile
Hall. Children in the preschool and after-
school programs at First Presbyterian
made soup kits to donate to CALL Primrose
clients, while another crew made fleece
blankets for families at First Step.
***
Interested in learning about veterans’ ben-
efits? Jeffrey Young from the San Mateo
County Veterans’ Services Office will
present information on available benefits 3
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6 at the South San
Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange
Ave.
***
Plastic bags are getting lots of attention in
San Mateo County. Those interested in
learning more can watch a free movie about
topic called “Bag It,” 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 7 at the Lane Room in Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road. The 45-
minute movie will be followed by a brief
discussion led by Dean Peterson, director
of environmental health for San Mateo
County, who will explain the ramifications
of the county’s plastic bag ordinance.
***
The 49ers recognized the winners of the
sixth annual 49ers Perry/Yonamine Unity
Award during a pregame ceremony at their
Oct. 14 home game.
The award, named for the former 49ers
players and pioneers of unity and diversity,
Joe “The Jet” Perry and Wally Yonamine,
was presented to 49ers NT Isaac Sopoaga,
Hayward Lancers Youth Football &
Cheer Coach Allan Chatman and Riley’s
Place of Woodside. In honor of their
achievements, the San Francisco 49ers
Foundation will be making $10,000 contri-
butions in their names to the programs.
***
The San Carlos Youth Advisory Council
recently met and voted to donate $250 to
support Healthy Cities Tutoring. The YAC
is a volunteer group of middle school and
high school students appointed by the San
Carlos City Council. Healthy Cities
Tutoring helps kids who struggle to succeed
in school. Community volunteers provide
one-to-one tutoring and mentoring to chil-
dren to increase their academic success and
self-esteem. The program began in 1997 and
serves more than 150 children annually at
six San Carlos schools.
The Youth Advisory Council chose to sup-
port the work of Healthy Cities Tutoring
and recognize the success of the program
helping students in San Carlos. Members of
the YAC also participate as tutors in the pro-
gram. For more information about HCT visit
www.healthycitiestutoring.org. For more
information about the Youth Advisory
Council visit
www.cityofsancarlos.org/depts/pr/scyc/coun-
cil/default.asp.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
Two bonds placed
on February 2008 ballot
The week of Nov. 2, 2007, two San
Mateo County school districts placed
multi-million bond measures on the
February 2008 ballot.
The first, a $165 million bond for the
Sequoia Union High School District, was
slated for new classrooms, technology and
vocational education centers. The second,
a $175 million bond for the San Mateo-
Foster City Elementary School District,
was to fix leaky roofs, faulty plumbing
and add classroom space.
County health
care task force expands
The Blue Ribbon Task Force on Adult
Health Care Coverage Expansion agreed at
a meeting the week of Nov. 2, 2007 to add
two members, union representative Nadia
Bledsoe for labor and one from grassroots
advocacy group Association of
Community Organizations for Reform
Now (ACORN).
The task force was set to meet in
December 2007 to review recent surveys
of employers about insurance offerings
and figure out the best way to pay for uni-
versal health care.
The Board of Supervisors adopted pre-
liminary recommendations in July 2007
and later funded salaries and benefits for
57 new positions at the San Mateo
Medical Center. Services for the Well
Program pilot group of those below 200
percent of the federal poverty level began
in September 2007.
From the archives highlights stories originally
printed five years ago this week. It appears in
the Friday edition of the Daily Journal.a
OPINION 9
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Vote no on Measure
B, district elections
Editor,
You have a right to choose who repre-
sents you. Elections should not be about
deciding which half of the voters gets
representation. A truly representative
democracy requires representation for
all.
District elections, like the current at-
large elections, fail to ensure representa-
tion for voters. Both are exclusionary by
design and can leave about half of us
without representation of our choice.
Both protect incumbents from competi-
tion for re-election. Both undermine
majority rule. Both will elect a Board of
Supervisors that is much more homoge-
neous and less diverse than the county
is.
It is impossible for one person to rep-
resent an entire district, to vigorously
advocate for the varied interests and
opinions of every voter in a district,
especially when a winner only has to get
about half the votes. Single-winner, win-
ner-take-all elections are incapable of
giving voters good representation.
A much fairer way to elect county
supervisors would ensure that any group
of like-minded voters comprising one-
fifth of the voters would elect one of the
five county supervisors. Multi-winner
ranked choice voting, also known as
choice voting, is a good way to do that.
Such proportional representation ensures
voting rights much better than district
elections can.
To learn more about the the failures of
district elections, Measure B and repre-
sentation for all, visit www.rep4all.org.
Vote “No” on Measure B as a way of
saying that we deserve better than a
choice between two bad options.
David Cary
Belmont
Measure B — Yes
Editor,
I am writing in support of Measure B.
If Measure B passes, election of county
supervisors will be done on a dis-
trictwide basis instead of countywide, as
currently is the case. My perspective
comes from having grown up in a rural
area, coupled with my experience of
having run for county supervisor.
Advice given to me was to spend my
time and resources on the most populat-
ed areas of the county, especially the
northern half, east of Skyline Boulevard.
The coastside was to be ignored. As one
who grew up in an area like the coast, I
didn’t have the heart to heed my advi-
sors.
So I look at it this way: If Measure B
passes, the importance of the urban
areas on the election of the supervisor
representing District Three, which incor-
porates most of rural San Mateo County,
including the coast, will be reduced.
The problem, by the way, is similar to
what was faced at the Philadelphia
Convention in 1787, when delegates
wrestled with representation in both
chambers of Congress, as well as the
election of the executive: too much
influence left to the more populated
states would disenfranchise the less pop-
ulated ones. In 1787, they had more
ways to deal with the issue because they
were dealing with various elected
offices. We, on the other hand, are deal-
ing with one, simple, five-member
board; we have fewer options. Measure
B, as I see it, is the best option. Vote
yes.
Matt Grocott
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
Franchise fees — A
taw law loophole?
By Charlie Bronitsky
W
hile most Foster City’s residents were likely
watching our San Francisco Giants win game 7
of the National League Championship Series, a
few of us were in a City Council meeting. At that meeting,
the council voted 3-2 to increase the franchise fees for trash
collection from five percent to 10 percent.
What are franchise fees, you may ask?
Well franchise fees are the fees that cities
charge to vendors, such as Recology, for
the “privilege” of providing some service
to the city residents and businesses. In
this case it was trash and recycle collec-
tion. These fees are supposed to be used
to offset the cost incurred by the city
when the vendor provides services. In the
case of trash collection, those costs would include the cost for
someone at the city to interface with residents, businesses and
Recology when there are collection problems. Other costs
would include things such as wear and tear on our streets
from the trucks driving on them.
Who pays these franchises? Well, Recology pays them to
Foster City, but Recology is allowed to treat them as what is
called a “pass-thru” and pass the cost off to the ratepayers. In
other words, you and I pay these fees.
You will soon be receiving a notice in the mail advising
you of a change to the franchise fee along with some other
changes. The good news will be that not only do we have the
lowest collection rates in the county, there is also not going to
be an increase for the coming year. Sounds great, right?
Well, actually the reason that there is not going to be an
increase in the collection rate is because the city is expecting
to actually collect from Foster City residents and businesses
about $300,000 more than it will have to pay to Recology.
Rather than return this money to us, the council, by a 3-2
vote decided to increase the franchise fee and keep about
$275,000 of this money to use to offset the projected budget
deficit. Moreover, this effect will be somewhat hidden since
there are already excess funds collected and thus no need for
a rate increase in the upcoming year. However, doubling the
franchise fees will make it much more likely that there will
be an increase in the future, with us residents and businesses
paying the city at least $275,000 more each year (and proba-
bly higher) in the form of these franchise fees.
Frankly, as I said at the council meeting, I was shocked and
offended. I told the council that I saw this as a hidden tax and
that there was no justifiable reason for increasing the fran-
chise fees. I reminded them that I have always stood for the
proposition that we should balance the budget by cutting
excesses but not by taxing. If we get to the point where we
need to decide to cut key services or tax, we should take it
directly to the residents and businesses and allow them to
decide by vote. Unfortunately three councilmembers disagree
and voted for the increase.
Cutting excesses and resetting other fees to appropriate lev-
els could make unnecessary the $275,000 of additional fees
that the city will be charging our residents and businesses. We
could save $50,000 by not spending money on exploration of
two new parks, Werder Park and Destination Park, during
these difficult economic times. We could save another
$50,000 by not building a veterans wall with public funds.
We could save $300,000 by ending the subsidy for recreation
programs and simply charge those who use the programs the
actual cost (The $300,000 subsidy is down from about
$600,000 when I was first elected to the council). There are
other things that can be cut and revised that will in no way
effect the quality of life for Foster City residents and busi-
nesses. To do that, however, we need to stop spending on new
and unnecessary programs. Until that happens, I urge all of
our businesses and residents to stay aware of hidden taxes,
such as increased franchise fees, because this could be just
the tip of the iceberg.
It was argued at the meeting that the $275,000 represents
less than $10 per residents and that other cities charge a 10
percent franchise fee. I find neither of these arguments per-
suasive nor, in fact, even relevant. If we want to tax we
should put a tax measure on the ballot and let people vote.
This is not the city’s money and the city should not presume
to simply take it.
There will be further public hearing on these fees and I
urge each and every one of you to understand this issue better
and to make your position known and heard. Being fiscally
conservative with your money is not always easy. There are
hard decisions to make. Reasonable minds can disagree. But I
think we should be more open about things such as franchise
fees and other areas where costs are born by us, before we
decide that taxing is the way to go.
Charlie Bronitsky is a member of the Foster City Council. He
can be reached at cbronitsky@fostercity.org or (650) 286-3504.
Guest perspective
San Mateo County voters will head to
the polls Nov. 6.The Daily Journal has
made the following endorsements for
state propositions, candidates and
local measures.
Federal offices
U.S. House of Representatives-
District 14
Jackie Speier (D)
U.S. House of Representatives-
District 18
Anna Eshoo (D)
State propositions:
Proposition 30: Quarter-cent sales
tax increase and increase in upper-
income personal income tax for
education — YES
Proposition 31: Government reform
and local plan money — NO
Proposition 32: Prohibition of
political contributions by payroll —
NO
Proposition 33: Change state auto
insurance policies — NO
Proposition 34: Repeal the death
penalty — NO
Proposition 35: Expand definition of
human trafficking and increase
penalties — YES
Proposition 36: Repeal “Three
Strikes”law — NO
Proposition 37: Require labeling for
genetically engineered food — NO
Proposition 38: Increase personal
income tax to fund education — NO
Proposition 39: Change taxing
methods for multistate businesses to
fun clean energy job fund — NO
Proposition 40: Affirm political office
redistricting — YES
State offices
State Senate-District 13
Jerry Hill (D)
State Assembly-District 22
Kevin Mullin (D)
State Assembly-District 24
Rich Gordon (D)
Candidates for local office
San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors, District Four: Warren
Slocum
San Mateo County Board of
Education, area seven: Joe Ross
San Mateo County Harbor District
Board of Commissioners: Sabrina
Brennan,William Holsinger and Pietro
Parravano
Half Moon Bay City Council: Marina
Fraser, John Muller
Sequoia Healthcare District: Kim
Griffin, Katie Kane
Local measures
Measure A: Half-cent sales tax
increase for county services — NO
Measure B: County charter change to
shift to district from at-large elections
for the Board of Supervisors — YES
Measure C: County charter change to
make controller position appointed
— YES
Measure D: $56 million bond
measure for Burlingame schools —
YES
Measure G: $199 annual parcel tax for
San Bruno schools — NO
Measure H: $72 million bond
measure for San Carlos schools —
YES
Half Moon Bay Measure J: Half-cent
sales tax increase to fund city services
— NO
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visit http://www.smartvoter.org/.
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BUSINESS 10
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,232.62 +1.04% 10-Yr Bond 1.715 +1.72%
Nasdaq3,020.06 +1.44% Oil (per barrel) 89.410004
S&P 500 1,427.59 +1.09% Gold 1,716.60
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
It’s only been a day, but November on
Wall Street is already looking a lot better
than October.
Strong economic data and corporate
news converged Thursday to give U.S.
stocks their best day since mid-
September. Positive signs about the job
market and higher auto and retail sales
reports pushed stock futures up before
the market opened. The Dow Jones
industrial average rose 100 points the
first half hour of trading. At 10, two
more strong reports came out and
pushed the Dow up as much as 177
points. It fell back some, but held a
steady gain for the rest of the day.
The Dow closed up 136.16 points, or 1
percent, at 13,232.62. It was the best day
since Sept. 13.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
15.43 points, or 1.1 percent, to 1,427.59.
The Nasdaq composite index added
42.83, or 1.4 percent, to 3,020.06.
All three indexes fell in October, their
first monthly losses since May.
The 10 a.m. surge came after the
Institute for Supply Management said
factories are seeing more orders and
increased production. The index has
shown growth for the first two months of
this quarter, an encouraging sign about
the health of corporate America. Before
that, manufacturing had decreased for
three straight months.
The Conference Board said
Americans’ confidence in the economy
surged last month to the highest level in
nearly five years. Many were encour-
aged by an improving job market, the
group said.
Traders watch manufacturing and con-
sumer confidence because factories and
consumers are crucial players in the eco-
nomic recovery. Manufacturing lifted
America out of recession, and the resur-
gent car industry has supported the econ-
omy during recent periods of weakness.
Consumers, meanwhile, account for
about 70 percent of economic activity. If
they’re not confident enough to spend,
no one else has the buying power to take
up the slack.
Manufacturing growth tends to signal
higher corporate earnings, said Doug
Cote, chief market strategist at ING
Investment Management. U.S. compa-
nies are midway through reporting their
third-quarter earnings, which have been
relatively weak. If factories keep boost-
ing their output, Cote said, earnings are
more likely to bounce back this quarter.
“What you want to see is advancing
corporate profits, broad manufacturing
growth and strong consumer spending,”
Cote said. Cote said those factors set the
tone for the market.
Before trading began, the government
said applications for unemployment ben-
efits fell 9,000 last week to a seasonally
adjusted 363,000, a level consistent with
modest hiring. Separately, payroll
provider ADP said businesses added
158,000 jobs in October, more than
economists had expected.
Data lifts market
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Thursday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Visa Inc., up $5.12 at $143.88
The payments processing company
posted fourth-quarter results that beat
Wall Street’s expectations thanks to
overseas growth.
Scripps Networks Interactive Inc.,up $1.80
at $62.52
The operator of cable networks such as
Food Network and HGTV, said that its
third-quarter net income grew 20 percent.
Nasdaq
Bon-Ton Stores Inc., up $1.23 at $13.49
Revenue at the retailer’s stores open at
least a year rose 3.7 percent in October on
strong sales of dresses, shoes and
outerwear.
Ross Stores Inc., down $3.82 at $57.13
The retailer said that revenue at stores
open at least a year climbed 4 percent in
October,short of Wall Street’s expectations.
Zumiez Inc., down $4.19 at $21.13
The retailer lowered its third-quarter
earnings guidance due to lower than
expected sales because of the weak
economy in Europe.
Wet Seal Inc., up 15 cents at $3.01
The teen retailer’s revenue at stores open
at least a year fell 7.6 percent in October,
but it still beat analysts’ expectations.
Catamaran Corp., up $4.04 at $51.20
The pharmacy benefit management
company said its third-quarter earnings
fell 19 percent, but it raised its earnings
forecast for the year.
ArthroCare Corp., up $1.91 at $31.99
The medical product maker said that its
profit rose in the third quarter on higher
surgical tool sales and reduced expenses.
Big movers
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — LinkedIn Corp. out-
paced Wall Street’s expectations with its
third-quarter results, solidifying its sta-
tus as an investor favorite at a time when
other Internet companies have fallen
from grace.
The professional networking company
booked a profit in the third quarter,
reversing a loss in the same period a year
ago as revenue grew at a faster pace than
analysts expected. Its stock climbed
$6.40, or 6 percent, to $113.25 in after-
hours trading, after closing down 8 cents
to $106.85 at the end of regular trading.
Embraced by investors, LinkedIn has
been an exception among Internet com-
panies that have gone public in recent
years. Others, such as Facebook Inc.,
online deals site Groupon Inc. and game
company Zynga Inc. are all trading well
below their initial public offering price.
LinkedIn’s stock price, meanwhile, has
more than doubled since its May 2011
IPO .
LinkedIn said Thursday that it earned
$2.3 million, or 2 cents per share, in the
July-September period. That’s up from a
loss of $1.9 million, or 2 cents per share,
a year ago.
Adjusted earnings were $25.1 million,
or 22 cents per share, in the latest quar-
ter, double what analysts expected.
Revenue grew 81 percent to $252 mil-
lion from $139.5 million. Analysts sur-
veyed by FactSet expected revenue of
$244.6 million. The company gets about
two-thirds of revenue from the various
fees it charges to mine the profiles and
other data on its website, the rest come
from advertising. It saw increases in all
areas.
LinkedIn 3Q results sail past expectations
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A flurry of data
issued Thursday sketched a brightening
view of the U.S. economy in the final
days before a presidential election that
will pivot on the strength of the recovery.
Cheaper gas, rising home prices and
lower unemployment have given con-
sumers the confidence to spend more.
And retailers, auto dealers and manufac-
turers are benefiting.
At the same time, many employers
remain anxious about the economy,
which is why only modest hiring gains
are forecast for Friday’s jobs report for
October. It will be the last major report on
the economy before Election Day.
Both presidential candidates pressed
their arguments Thursday for why
President Barack Obama’s economic
stewardship should or should not earn
him another four-year term. Campaigning
in Roanoke, Va., Mitt Romney argued
that under Obama, household incomes
have fallen behind inflation and poverty
has worsened.
Obama, in a speech in Green Bay, Wis.,
contended that Romney’s proposals are
the same “top-down policies that crashed
our economy.”
Consumers give economy a lift
CONSUMERS:
Americans have taken heart from
recent declines in the unemploy-
ment rate.Theyappear increasingly
confident that the economy can
sustain its modest recovery. That’s
translating into more consumer
spending — the fuel of U.S. eco-
nomic growth — even though
businesses have pulled back and
exports have slowed.
Consumer confidence jumped last
month. The Conference Board
index of confidence reached 72.2,
its highest sinceFebruary2008,two
months into the Great Recession.
The index is still below the level of
90 that’s consistent with a healthy
economy. But it’s up from 40.9 a
year ago — the sharpest one-year
increase since 1994, according to
Robert Kavcic, an economist at
BMO Capital Markets. And the
index is far above its all-time low of
25.3 in February 2009, in the midst
of the financial crisis.
Consumers arealsospendingmore
at retail stores, a separate report
showed Thursday. Sales in stores
open at least a year rose 5 percent
inOctober,accordingtoatallyfrom
21 retail chains by the International
Council of Shopping Centers.Some
of the increase, though, might re-
flect higher spending for
generators, batteries, water and
other supplies in preparation for
Superstorm Sandy.
JOBS:
Job growth will likely remain mod-
est. Most companies are reluctant
to make major investments in hir-
ing or equipment, economists say.
Economists have forecast that em-
ployers added 121,000 jobs last
month — too slow a hiring pace to
drive down the unemployment
ratequickly.Theratehas declinedin
recent months in part because
some people have given up look-
ing for work.
Applications for unemployment
benefits fell 9,000 to 363,000 last
week, the Labor Department said
Thursday. That level suggests that
hiring is unlikely to pick up much
from its current pace of about
150,000 jobs a month.
A report by payroll provider ADP
showed that private companies
added 158,000 jobs in October, up
from 114,000 in September. ADP
updated its methodology for the
October report.It has frequently di-
verged sharply from the
government’s figures.
The U.S. economy expanded at a 2
percent annual pace in the July-
September quarter, up from 1.3
percent inthesecondquarter.Most
economists expect growth may
slow a bit in the fourth quarter,
partly because of disruptions from
Superstorm Sandy.
Still, even at 2 percent annual
growth, the economy is growing
too slowly to bring rapid relief to
roughly 12 million out-of-work
Americans. With the unemploy-
ment rate still high, steady growth
of more than 3 percent is generally
needed to reduce it.
AUTO SALES:
Americans are buying more big-
ticket items, like cars and
appliances. Auto companies re-
ported steady sales gains last
month despite losing three days of
business to the storm in heavily
populated areas of the Northeast.
Toyota said its sales rose nearly 16
percent for the month.Volkswagen
reported a 22 percent jump.
Honda’s sales gained 8.8 percent.
Chrysler’s sales rose 10 percent,
General Motors’ 5 percent and
Ford’s less than 1 percent.
MANUFACTURING:
Steady consumer spending is sup-
porting gains in U.S. factory
production. That’s true even
though businesses in the United
States and overseas have reduced
their demand for high-cost manu-
factured goods.
The Institute for Supply Manage-
ment, a private trade group, said its
indexof factoryactivitytickedupto
51.7 in October from 51.5, slightly
below the average for the past year
of 52.2. A reading above 50 indi-
cates expansion.
The ISM said new orders and pro-
duction rose. The increase came
mainly in consumer-oriented in-
dustries such as furniture, food and
beverages, and computers. De-
mand for machinery, chemical
products, steel and other metals
fell.
U.S.businesses have become more
cautious in recent months. Some
are concerned that Congress will
fail to reach a budget deal before
January.If lawmakers can’t strike an
agreement,sharp tax increases and
spending cuts will take effect next
year and could trigger another re-
cession.
Reports on economy
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Daily Journal’s Game of the
Week is actually Burlingame High
School’s Game of the Year.
So pick your cliché — do or die,
backs against the wall, play like
there’s no tomorrow. The truth is, at 1-
3 the Panthers have one shot to extend
their season another week and make a
fifth straight appearance in the Central
Coast Section playoffs. A win against
Aragon High School Friday night
gives Burlingame a 2-3 record in
Peninsula Athletic League Bay
Division play and, by virtue of the
head-to-head tiebreaker, earns them
the league’s fourth automatic qualify-
ing spot in CCS.
So win, Panthers, and you’re in.
Lose, and it’s time to start painting the
banners for the Little Big Game.
“It’s something that we’re taking
very seriously,” said Burlingame head
coach John Philipopoulos. “And I
think the kids responded well with a
good week of practice.
“We’ve been bouncing back all
year. Whether it’s been key injuries,
tough losses or a combination of the
two. The resiliency of this team is
amazing. These kids come out, they
grind every day, there have been mil-
lion reasons to cash it in and hang our
heads and look to the next year or the
next sport or whatever it may be. But
somehow we keep fighting. We keep
working hard and we’re hopeful that
we can come out on the positive side
of a close game.”
The Game of the Week is scheduled
for a 7 p.m. kickoff at the Panther Pit.
“This game is huge,” said Aragon
head coach Steve Sell. “Granted, win-
ning last week took some of the pres-
sure off — I knew we had to win two
of the last three games. It has implica-
tions whether we get to play at home
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Not only Redwood City bragging rights were on the
line when the Woodside volleyball team traveled down
the hill to take on rival Sequoia Thursday evening in
the finale of the Peninsula Athletic League regular sea-
son, both teams were still in the running for the Ocean
Division crown.
Woodside came in holding a one-game lead over
both Sequoia and South City. A Sequoia win would
mean all three would finish with a 12-2 record and
would share the league title. A Woodside win would
give the Wildcats the outright championship.
Sequoia came out flying to start the match, winning
the first set 25-15 … and then Woodside’s Christine
Alftin took over. A junior transfer from volleyball
powerhouse St. Francis, Alftin was basically unstop-
pable as she helped carry the Wildcats to a 15-25, 25-
22, 25-17, 25-13 victory.
“We’re kind of known for coming out slow,” Alftin
said. “(After losing that first game) we said, ‘That was
our warm up.’ It takes us a while to get reset.”
In Game 1, 2 and 4, Alftin was merely mortal,
amassing 20 kills. It was in Game 3 that she proved
she is no ordinary volleyball player. In that third set,
Alftin put on a clinic, finishing with 15 kills in the
game and ending the match with a mind boggling 35
kills.
“That’s definitely a few (kills),” Alftin said. “It’s
unexpected. It was a good game.”
With the win, Woodside (13-1 PAL Ocean, 25-9
overall) not only clinched the Ocean Division crown
but also earned the division’s lone automatic Central
Coast Section bid.
Sequoia coach Jane Slater said her team had no
<< Raiders need to improve in red zone, page 16
• Stanford men looking for NCAA berth this season, page 14
Friday, Nov. 2, 2012
TOO YOUNG TO KNOW BETTER: A PAIR OF CSM FRESHMEN LOOK TO MAKE MARK AT STATE CROSS COUNTRY MEET >>> PAGE 12
Best Bets
Terra Nova (2-1, 4-4) at
Menlo-Atherton (3-1, 5-3), 7 p.m.
The Tigers were taken down by
Aragon last week, 32-31. The Bears
were baffled by Sacred Heart Prep,
14-7. … Terra Nova outscored
Sacred Heart Prep 44-30 in 2011. …
The winner of this matchup will
most likely finish in a two-way tie
for the Peninsula Athletic League
Bay Division crown, along with
Sacred Heart Prep — assuming the
Gators beat a winless Half Moon
Bay squad. … The Tigers racked up
560 yards of offense, including 399
yards passing. … The Bears, who
went into last week’s game averag-
ing 256 yards of offense per game,
was held to just 189 by SHP, includ-
ing just 84 yards rushing, their sec-
ond-lowest output of the season.
El Camino (3-1, 5-3) at
San Mateo (3-1, 4-4), 2:45 p.m.
The Colts galloped away with a
32-0 win over Mills last week. The
Bearcats bowed to Capuchino, 30-
20. … El Camino buried San Mateo
last year, 34-7. … El Camino man-
aged just 88 yards of offense in the
first half last week, but exploded for
181 yards in the second half — all
on the ground. … RB Anthony
Hines had just 55 yards at halftime,
but finished with 216 yards rushing
on 18 carries. He had runs of 65 and
84 yards in the second half. … San
Mateo also struggled in the first half
against Cap, managing just 48 yards
of offense. … The Bearcats rallied
from a 17-0 halftime deficit to take a
20-17 lead early in the fourth quar-
ter, but could not shut down
Capuchino.
Mills (1-2, 3-4-1) at
Hillsdale (1-3, 1-7), 7 p.m.
The Vikings were vanquished by
El Camino 32-0 last week. The
Knights notched their first win of the
year with a 30-14 win over
Carlmont. … Hillsdale demolished
Mills in 2011, winning 46-0. … The
Mills offense has taken a big step
back the last couple of weeks, scor-
ing just three points over its last two
games. … The Vikings will be with-
out RB Antonio Jeffrey for the rest
of the season after he injured his
Playing to play on
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Burlingame can’t afford to stumble when the Panthers host Aragon tonight at 7. Burlingame needs to beat the Dons
to lock up the PAL Bay Division’s fourth automatic CCS playoff spot if the Panthers want to play in the postseason.
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Woodside’s Christine Alftin,left, finished with
a match-high 35 kills in the Wildcats’four-set
win over Sequoia Thursday evening.
See BEST, Page 13 See GOTW, Page 13
See ROUNDUP, Page 15
Burlingame and Aragon fight for PAL Bay’s last CCS spot
Woodside takes Ocean title
Iinuma wins PAL singles title; SHP boys’ polo moves into WCAL finals
SPORTS 12
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Peninsula
Jewish
Community
Center (PJCC)
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Carson Palmer
and the Oakland Raiders have done a
fairly good job moving the ball down
the field so far this season.
Getting the ball into the end zone
has been a different case.
The Raiders (3-4) have been one
of the NFL’s least efficient teams
when it comes to red zone offense,
converting only about one-third of
their trips inside the opponent’s 20-
yard line into touchdowns.
As encouraging as it has been to
get close to the end zone, Palmer
said it is even more discouraging to
have to settle for field goals from
Sebastian Janikowski instead of con-
sistently turning those trips into
seven points.
“We want touchdowns,” Palmer
said. “As much faith as we have in
Seabass, if you cross the 50 he’s in
his range, we want to get seven
points. We’ve been fortunate. Our
defense played so well that we
haven’t needed seven points on
every drive, but there’s going to be
those games where the other offense
is on fire and you’d better score 70
percent of the time when you get
down there if you want to win the
game. We need to improve on it, and
we will.”
While most teams typically wait
until Fridays to work on their red
zone offense, the Raiders began
work on fixing those problems earli-
er in the week after struggling inside
the 20 last week against Kansas City.
The Raiders reached the end zone
on just one of six red zone trips in
the 26-16 win against the Chiefs,
although one ended in a kneel down
at the end of the game and coach
Dennis Allen admittedly got conser-
vative on another trip when Oakland
needed a field goal to make it a
three-score game in the fourth quar-
ter.
“Execution has got to step up,”
offensive coordinator Greg Knapp
said. “It has always been in my back-
ground of going to a new offense,
(red zone) is the longest part of the
team to develop, because things hap-
pen faster, because of where you’re
at on the field. It takes a little more
precision and that just takes time and
repetition.”
The performance in Kansas City
dropped Oakland’s touchdown effi-
ciency rate to 34.8 percent, second
worst in the NFL and down from a
51.1 percent mark in 2011.
The problems have come whether
the Raiders have tried to run or pass.
Their red zone rushing is fourth
worst in the league at 2.27 yards per
carry, including just 1.86 yards per
carry and one touchdown for Darren
McFadden.
There were questions about how
Oakland would do in short-yardage
situations this year after losing bruis-
ing back Michael Bush in free
agency to Chicago. But Bush aver-
aged just 1.48 yards per carry inside
the 20 a year ago.
“It’s just executing and making the
plays when they’re presented,”
McFadden said. “We’ve had oppor-
tunities in the red zone. It’s just a
matter of executing plays when
they’re presented to us.”
Knapp said the team has altered its
running style a bit, mixing in more
power blocking schemes instead of
the zone scheme that was primarily
used in the opening month.
“We definitely increased our gap
run blocking scheme to get a better
balance and keep defenses honest,
and we’ve done it well, so we’ll keep
that same kind of formula working,”
Knapp said. “It’s a good change-up
for us to have some kind of gap
scheme with that outsize zone.”
With the ground game struggling
near the end zone, the Raiders have
actually passed the ball more than
running it in the red zone. But
Palmer has completed just 16 of his
36 red zone passes, with six of the
plays ending up in touchdowns.
Half of those scores have come
from Denarius Moore, who has been
Oakland’s most reliable red zone
player, catching seven of the nine
throws his direction. Palmer is just 9
for 27 when throwing to everyone
else.
Raiders seek to solve red zone woes
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College of San Mateo cross coun-
try head coach Joe Mangan
described the life of a freshman run-
ner as a course with lots of highs and
lows. Eventually, come the sopho-
more season, runners become fully
assimilated to the college life and
can truly hone their athletic skill.
But the difference this year as the
Bulldogs head to the NorCal finals
Saturday at Crystal Springs in
Belmont, is the men have a pair of
runners that are hitting that peak a
bit ahead of schedule.
“To me, this has really been a pos-
itive experience with them because
they’ve found some success in the
learning stage,” Mangan said of
Francisco Vargas and Anthony
Cortez. “Once we can solidify that
and add more experience to that, I
think if they can stay healthy, they
can really have some success come
track season and next year.”
The potential is there for both run-
ners after finishing 14th and 16th,
respectively, in the Coast
Conference championships last
week. Their results were good for a
fourth-place finish overall. They’ll
take that positive vibe and confi-
dence into Saturday’s meet and try
to qualify for the state meet.
“On a historical basis,” Mangan
said, “the times they ran [at confer-
ence], if they can duplicate those,
that should put them well within the
time frame of making the state meet.
They just have to finish in the top
half.”
Vargas earned All-Conference
honors with a 14th place finish,
improving from his time a week
before of 23:37 to 22:51. Cortez fell
just short of the All-Conference line
but still improved a solid minute —
from 24-flat to 23-flat.
“What I liked about their race was,
they were probably between 25th
and 30th place at the 2-mile mark
and they just consistently moved
up,” Mangan said. “And, probably at
2 1/4 mile, the rubber band between
Anthony and Francisco was getting
stretched a bit — meaning Francisco
was taking off from Anthony. You’re
never quite sure how someone will
react to that. The next time I saw
them, the rubber band was stretched
but it was shorter than I thought it
was going to be.
“I thought Anthony bounced back
hard the last 1K and really did a
solid job. To me, it showed that he’s
starting to mature a little bit as a run-
ner. And then Francisco just kept on
picking people left and right —
stayed relaxed.”
Relaxation on the course is a sign
of maturity. And both runners have
demonstrated that they’re capable of
such.
“Both of them come from very
good programs,” Mangan said, “but
that doesn’t mean there isn’t things
they need to work on. It seems that
they’ve honed in on the points of
emphasis that I get young runners to
concentrate on. The main one is just
running relaxed.”
On Saturday, the women’s race
begins at noon and the men race at
12:45 p.m. The De Anza college
women and the American River
College men are the overwhelming
favorites.
Freshmen looking to make impact at state
SPORTS 13
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
[during CCS]. It’s going to be tough.”
Less tough though courtesy of the Dons’ latest
win — a thrilling 32-31 upset of Terra Nova. The
victory gave Aragon a 2-3 record in league play.
A loss would have forced them to win their last
two games of the season to lock up a CCS spot.
As it stands, a win against either Burlingame or
Hillsdale High School punches them a ticket to
the dance.
“On paper, there’s more incentive for them,”
Sell said. “But you kind of hope the kids want to
win every time they step on the field, no matter
what’s on the line. If we can’t get up for a game
with a league-mate then something is wrong
with us. If they’re not up for it, I think we’ll get
beat.”
“Aragon is big, they’re extremely fast, they’re
very well-balanced,” Philipopoulos said. “They
do both of those things (rushing and passing)
very well. So, we’re going to have to play very
well to have a chance to win this ball game. I
think we will. We’re ready for the challenge.”
Aragon put forth its best effort last Friday and
is playing with confidence. But Sell cautioned
against overconfidence. While Terra Nova
crushed the Panthers earlier this season, Sell said
he takes that score as an aberration. The
Burlingame team that put all three phases of the
game together to beat Half Moon Bay last week
is more of the team Sell expects to see.
“These kids, they fight,” Philipopoulos said.
“That’s exactly what we’re going to do Friday
night. We’re going to come out swinging and
hopefully our best effort is good enough to get
the job done. For us, it’s do or die in regards to
CCS. We’ve been used to getting to CCS and we
want to maintain that little streak. In order for
that to happen, we have to find a way to get the
‘W’ Friday night.”
Continued from page 11
GOTW
knee during the Vikings’ loss to San Mateo
two weeks ago. … They might have found a
capable replacement in Jaime Alfaro, who
rushed for 110 yards on 22 carries last week.
… Hillsdale QB Cole Carrithers had another
strong outing last week. A week after throw-
ing for 417 yards, he threw for 176 yards and
three touchdowns against Carlmont. … The
30 points tied a season high for the Knights.
St. Ignatius (4-1, 6-2) at
Serra (4-1, 7-1), 2 p.m. Saturday
The Wildcats fell to first-place Bellarmine
last week, 35-28. The Padres pulled out a 38-
35 win over Valley Christian. … Serra cruised
to a 49-28 win over St. Ignatius in 2011. …
Whichever team wins this matchup will grab
sole possession of second place in the West
Catholic Athletic League. … The Wildcats
have the WCAL’s second-best scoring offense
as they average 32 points per game. … Serra
boasts the WCAL’s best scoring offense, aver-
aging nearly 40 points per contest. … The
Padres rushed for 341 yards last week, led by
Eric Redwood’s 151 yards. He also scored
four touchdowns.
Continued from page 11
BEST
Sacred Heart Prep (3-1, 7-1) at
Half Moon Bay (0-3, 1-7), 7 p.m.
The Gators grabbed a 14-7 victory over
Menlo-Atherton last week. The Cougars were
crushed 31-7 by Burlingame. … The last time
these two teams met was in 2008, Sacred
Heart Prep’s first year in the PAL. The Gators
held off Half Moon Bay, 46-33. … The 14
points scored was the Gators’ second-lowest
output of the season. … The seven points
allowed was the sixth time in eight games the
Gators have allowed seven points or less. …
Half Moon Bay’s defense has now given up
31 points or more in five games, including
three straight.
Jefferson (0-3, 1-7) at
Menlo School (3-1, 7-1), 2:45 p.m.
The Indians lost 28-14 to Woodside last
week. The Knights knocked off Sequoia, 56-
21. … In 2010, Jefferson took down Menlo
14-13, the last time these teams met. …
Jefferson’s offense is averaging just over
seven points per game in Ocean Division play,
while giving up just over 35. … Menlo
eclipsed the 50-point barrier for the fifth time
this season. … QB Jack Heneghan, who threw
for 393 yards last week, has the fifth-most
passing yards in the Central Coast Section,
according to Maxpreps.com. He has thrown
for 1,791 yards and 21 touchdowns. He has
thrown just one interception.
King’s Academy (1-2, 1-7) at
Sequoia (2-2, 6-2), 7 p.m.
The Knights fell to South City 38-7 last
week. The Cherokees were more than doubled
up by Menlo, 56-21. … The only other time
these two teams faced off was in 2008, when
King’s Academy thumped Sequoia, 56-8. …
The Knights rushed for 166 yards last week,
led by Booker Robinson’s 123 yards on 11
carries. … The Cherokees rushed for 206
yards last week. … QB Mike Taylor led the
Cherokees with 176 yards rushing and three
touchdowns on 20 carries. … The 56 points
allowed was a season-high for Sequoia.
South City (4-0, 5-3) at
Woodside (1-3, 3-5), 7 p.m.
The Warriors walloped King’s Academy
last week, 38-7. The Wildcats topped
Jefferson, 28-14. … Last year, South City beat
Woodside 35-27. … Since giving up a com-
bined 67 points over a two-game span, the
South City defense has allowed a total of 26
points the last two weeks. … The Warriors’
offense continues to click on all cylinders
since making a change at QB following a 13-
7 loss to Menlo-Atherton in Week 4. Since
then, the Warriors have reeled off four straight
wins, averaging 40.25 points during Ocean
Division play.
Carlmont (0-4, 1-7) at
Capuchino (3-0, 4-4), 2:45 p.m.
The Scots were scorched by Hillsdale 30-14
last week. The Mustangs muscled past San
Mateo, 30-20. … Carlmont pulled out a 26-14
win over Capuchino in 2011. … Since an
opening-day win, the Scots have lost seven
straight games. … The 14 points scored was
the most since a 35-14 loss to Aragon in Week
3. … Capuchino RB Justin Ewing continues
his assault on the CCS single-season rushing
record. Through eight games, Ewing has
2,223 yards, leaving him 576 yards shy of the
record. … Ewing rushed for 303 yards against
San Mateo last week, giving him back-to-back
300-yard games. … The Capuchino defense,
other than a shaky third quarter, kept San
Mateo in check last week. The Mustangs held
the Bearcats to 48 yards of offense in the first
half and came up with four sacks for the game
— 2 1/2 from Zack Kohtz and 2 1/2 by Tili
Halafihi.
The Rest
SPORTS 14
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
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with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily
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THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros,
Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE EIGHTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week NINE
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 11/2/12
Miami Indianapolis
Carolina Washington
Buffalo Houston
Baltimore Cleveland
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Chicago Tennessee
Detroit Jacksonville
Arizona Green Bay
Tampa Bay Oakland
Minnesota Seattle
Pittsburgh NY Giants
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How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
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is free to play. Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Norv Turner can breathe a
little easier after his San Diego Chargers redis-
covered the end zone and ended a three-game
losing streak.
Romeo Crennel, though, will surely feel the
heat after his Kansas City Chiefs committed four
more turnovers and lost their fifth straight game.
Antonio Gates caught a 14-yard yard scoring
pass from Philip Rivers on the game’s opening
drive to snap a streak of six straight quarters
without a touchdown and the Chargers went on
to a 31-13 victory over the staggering Chiefs on
Thursday night.
Turner had been heavily criticized by fans
after the Chargers (4-4) blew double-digit, sec-
ond-half leads in losses to New Orleans and
Denver, and then lost 7-6 at Cleveland on
Sunday.
Still, at the start of halftime, some fans in one
end zone unfurled a big yellow banner that read:
“Mr. Spanos, please fire A.J. & Norv.”
Team president Dean Spanos decided in
January to bring back both Turner and general
manager A.J. Smith even though the Chargers
missed the playoffs for the second straight year.
Rivers, who looked shaky during the losing
streak, did his part by completing 18 of 20 pass-
es — a career-best 90 percent — for 220 yards
and two touchdowns, with one interception.
Rivers also threw a 13-yard TD pass to Malcom
Floyd early in the fourth quarter.
The Chiefs’ four turnovers ran their NFL-high
mark to a staggering 29, which have led to 104
points.
The Chiefs (1-7) still haven’t led in regulation
this season. Their only victory came when Ryan
Succop kicked the winning field goal against the
Saints in overtime.
Chargers down Chiefs
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Johnny Dawkins
finally showed some progress with a roster
full of players he recruited last season.
Stanford got a taste of winning big again, and
the Cardinal even hoisted a national trophy
following their final game.
Just not the one they had hoped.
After a strong finish last season culminated
in an NIT tournament title, expectations are
even bigger for Dawkins entering his fifth sea-
son on The Farm. Despite finishing 26-11 last
season to end two straight losing years, there
is still one major void on his coaching resume:
an NCAA tournament appearance.
“I thought we gained a lot of momentum
last year,” Dawkins said Thursday at Pac-12
media day in the conference’s new network
studios in downtown San Francisco. “Winning
the NIT was great for this group. But winning
our last eight out of ten games was terrific. I
thought our kids played best at the end. And a
number of those kids are returning, so I’m
very excited about our potential this upcoming
season.”
Stanford still will face a daunting task to
supplant Arizona, UCLA and California at the
top of the conference or reach its first NCAA
tournament since 2008. All three were picked
ahead of the Cardinal in the preseason media
poll.
Chasson Randle and Aaron Bright highlight
a brilliant backcourt that should help ease the
losses of frontcourt staples Josh Owens and
Andrew Zimmerman. Dwight Powell and
Josh Huestis’ roles will increase, and so will
others’ from a young team that started to blos-
som last spring.
The Cardinal posted their best win total
since that 28-8 campaign in 2007-08. Despite
finishing seventh in the conference, the deep
NIT run helped Stanford finish with the most
victories of any conference team.
“Definitely, I think the momentum will
carry over this year,” Bright said. “Toward the
end of last year, I think guys just offensively
and defensively, we just knew our roles and
we just wanted to play in the postseason. So
offensively guys were making the right play
and we didn’t really care who scored. We
were making the extra pass and guys were tak-
ing the shot.
“And then defensively, we relied on our
help, and with that came us getting a lot of
stops. And I think it will definitely carry over
to this next year.”
Dawkins, the former Duke star and assistant
coach, needed a big season last year just to
silence critics calling for his job.
After going 20-14 in his first season at
Stanford, he went 14-18 and 15-16 in his next
two. One successful year might not be enough
to quiet everybody, but it has helped in other
areas, including recruiting.
Even prep star Jabari Parker, who plays for
Chicago’s Simeon Career Academy, plans to
visit Stanford Nov. 9-11. All the other pro-
grams on his final list — Michigan State,
Duke, Florida and Brigham Young — have
been among college basketball’s best.
After NIT title, Stanford
wants NCAA tourney berth
SPORTS 15
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 1 0 1.000 —
Brooklyn 0 0 .000 1/2
New York 0 0 .000 1/2
Boston 0 1 .000 1
Toronto 0 1 .000 1
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 1 0 1.000 —
Atlanta 0 0 .000 1/2
Charlotte 0 0 .000 1/2
Orlando 0 0 .000 1/2
Washington 0 1 .000 1
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 1 0 1.000 —
Indiana 1 0 1.000 —
Chicago 1 0 1.000 —
Milwaukee 0 0 .000 1/2
Detroit 0 1 .000 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 2 0 1.000 —
Houston 1 0 1.000 1/2
Dallas 1 1 .500 1
Memphis 0 1 .000 1 1/2
New Orleans 0 1 .000 1 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 1 0 1.000 —
Utah 1 0 1.000 —
Minnesota 0 0 .000 1/2
Denver 0 1 .000 1
Oklahoma City 0 1 .000 1
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
Golden State 1 0 1.000 —
L.A. Clippers 0 0 .000 1/2
Sacramento 0 1 .000 1
L.A. Lakers 0 1 .000 1
Phoenix 0 1 .000 1

Thursday’sGames
New York at Brooklyn, ppd.
San Antonio 86, Oklahoma City 84
Friday’sGames
Indiana at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Denver at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Houston at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Utah at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
Miami at New York, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’sGames
Sacramento at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Boston at Washington, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Denver at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Utah at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 3 0 .625 262 170
Miami 4 3 0 .571 150 126
Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 227
N.Y. Jets 3 5 0 .375 168 200
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 6 1 0 .857 216 128
Indianapolis 4 3 0 .571 136 171
Tennessee 3 5 0 .375 162 257
Jacksonville 1 6 0 .143 103 188
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 161
Pittsburgh 4 3 0 .571 167 144
Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 187
Cleveland 2 6 0 .250 154 186
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 4 3 0 .571 204 152
San Diego 4 4 0 .500 185 157
Oakland 3 4 0 .429 139 187
Kansas City 1 7 0 .125 133 240
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 2 0 .750 234 161
Philadelphia 3 4 0 .429 120 155
Dallas 3 4 0 .429 137 162
Washington 3 5 0 .375 213 227
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 7 0 0 1.000 201 130
Tampa Bay 3 4 0 .429 184 153
New Orleans 2 5 0 .286 190 216
Carolina 1 6 0 .143 128 167
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 6 1 0 .857 185 100
Minnesota 5 3 0 .625 184 167
Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 208 170
Detroit 3 4 0 .429 161 174
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 189 103
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 127 142
Seattle 4 4 0 .500 140 134
St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 137 186
Thursday’sGame
San Diego 31, Kansas City 13
Sunday’sGames
Arizona at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Chicago at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Houston, 10 a.m.
Carolina at Washington, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Denver at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants, 1:25 p.m.
Dallas at Atlanta, 5:20 p.m.
Open:N.Y.Jets,NewEngland,SanFrancisco,St.Louis
Monday, Nov. 5
Philadelphia at New Orleans, 530 p.m.
NFL STANDINGS
answers and lacked the personnel to
slow down Alftin.
“We don’t have the weapons to
compete with [her skill level],” Slater
said.
After losing Game 1, Woodside
won the first four points of Game 2
and maintained a four- to five-point
cushion for most of the game. But
with Sequoia down 16-11, the
Cherokees made a run. Three straight
Woodside errors, coupled with kills
from Natalie Harden and Mikayla
Wilkes, enabled Sequoia to tie the
match at 16. With the score tied at 18,
Woodside got three straight kills from
Allie Sullberg to take a 21-18 advan-
tage before finally putting the
Cherokees away, 25-22.
Despite the Game 2 loss, Slater was
feeling good about her team’s
chances.
“The momentum was with us,”
Slater said. “We lost (Game 2) but we
came back.”
In Game 3, however, Alftin crushed
any thoughts of a Sequoia comeback.
Whether it was a terminating attack
straight down, a cut shot down the line
or a tip over the block, Alftin had all
her talents on display, putting away
ball after ball to the tune of 15 kills.
Woodside finished with 19 kills for
the game, with a 20th point coming on
a Katherine Luttrell service ace and
the final five points on various
Sequoia errors.
Sequoia was beat mentally as the
Wildcats jumped out to a 6-1 lead in
Game 4. As Alftin began her attacks
on the outside, you could almost see
the Sequoia players’ shoulders slump,
knowing they did not have an answer
for her.
“When she started hitting, it was
over,” Slater said.
Girls’ tennis
Hillsdale sophomore Mariko
Iinuma completed a spectacular sea-
son Thursday by capturing the
Peninsula Athletic League singles
championship with a 6-3, 6-1 win
over Carlmont’s Cori Sidell.
Iinuma finished PAL play with an
undefeated record as the Knights’ No.
1 singles player. She was the No. 1
seed in the tournament and proved she
deserved top billing. In three tourna-
ment matches, Iinuma lost a total of
eight games.
It’s the second year in a row Iinuma
has not lost a regular-season match in
PAL play. Last year as the Knights’
No. 2 singles player, she went 14-0
during the 2011 regular season before
losing her final two matches of the
season — both the Burlingame’s
Brooke Tsu, in the 2011 PAL tourna-
ment and again in the CCS tourna-
ment.
In doubles action, Aragon’s Kaede
Ishikawa and Samantha Wong, the
No. 3 seed, knocked off No. 4 Lauren
Sinatra and Lisa Patel of Burlingame,
In the West Bay Athletic League
individual tournament, Menlo sopho-
more Liz Yao beat Castilleja’s
Paulette Wolak 6-3, 6-1.
Boys’ water polo
The Sacred Heart Prep boys moved
into the finals of the West Catholic
Athletic League tournament with a
convincing 15-5 win over Serra
Thursday evening in Atherton.
The Gators will face Bellarmine in
the championship match at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday at SHP.
Will Conner, Bret Hinrichs,
Michael Holloway and Nelson Perla-
Ward each scored three goals for the
Gators, with Zach Churukian, Zoltan
Lazar and Scott Jollymour each added
a goal apiece.
Serra got single goals from Andrew
Bourque, Dominic Mirt, Robert
O’Leary, Kevin Villar and Zach
Zamecki.
Continued from page 11
ROUNDUP
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Hillsdale sophomore Mariko Iinuma captured the PAL singles title with a
6-3, 6-1 win over Carlmont’s Cori Sidell. In two years at Hillsdale, Iinuma is
28-0 during regular-season PAL play and 33-1 in all PAL competition.
16
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Hyundai adds new Elantra hatchback
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The new-for-2013 Hyundai Elantra GT
hatchback is a stylish, fuel-sipping, nimble car
with surprisingly quiet interior and luxury
touches that include a huge panoramic sun-
roof and a sliding center armrest.
Despite the name, though, this new Hyundai
is not that much of a GT, or Grand Tourer, in
performance.
In fact, the Elantra GT has the same 148-
horsepower, naturally aspirated, four-cylinder
engine that’s in the 2013 Elantra sedan.
This powerplant helps account for the
Elantra GT’s notable federal government fuel
economy rating of 28 miles per gallon in city
driving and 39 mpg on the highway for an
automatic transmission model. These num-
bers are near the top mileage ratings among
gasoline-only-powered, five-door hatchbacks.
Best of all, the new Elantra GT, like all
Hyundais, comes with a 10-year/100,000-
mile powertrain warranty and a limited,
bumper-to-bumper warranty for 5
years/60,000 miles.
Hatchbacks typically are priced higher than
their sedan siblings, and the Elantra GT five-
door is no exception.
Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail
price, including destination charge, for a 2013
Elantra GT is $19,170 with six-speed manual
transmission and $20,170 with six-speed
automatic.
This compares with $17,590 for a base,
2013 Elantra sedan with manual transmission
and the $18,590 starting retail price for a base,
The Elantra GT has the same 148-horsepower, naturally aspirated, four-cylinder engine that’s in the 2013 Elantra sedan.
See ELANTRA, Page 17
AUTO 17
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
2013 Elantra sedan with automatic.
Still, the Elantra GT has starting retail
prices that are lower than major hatchback
competitors’.
For example, the 2013 Ford Focus starts at
$19,995 with five-speed manual transmission
and $21,090 with six-speed automatic, while
the 2013 Volkswagen Golf starts at $20,590
for a five-door model with six-speed automat-
ic transmission.
Arguably, all hatchbacks have a flowing
side profile. But the Elantra GT’s sweeping
lines emanate from the same Hyundai Fluidic
Sculpture design that made the Hyundai
Sonata a U.S. sales winner.
Also, the Elantra GT was designed for
Europe, so some people see it as a European-
looking car.
Driving the Elantra GT test car was pleas-
ant, with the car unusually quiet at startup and
while resting at stop lights, even though the
engine stayed on the whole time.
The driver didn’t even feel vibration coming
through the gear shift lever at idle, and noise
from surrounding cars was muted.
Power delivery was steady and acceptable,
as the automatic transmission moved from
gear to gear with a smoothness expected in
higher-priced cars.
But pedal-to-the-metal acceleration in the
Elantra GT carrying four adults brought some
strenuous, buzzy sounds from the 1.8-liter,
double overhead cam four cylinder.
Torque peaks at 131 foot-pounds at a high
4,700 rpm, so there’s not real strong “oomph”
of power in many situations.
Both the Focus — with 160-horsepower
four cylinder delivering 146 foot-pounds of
torque at 4,450 rpm — and the Golf — with
170-horsepower five cylinder generating 177
foot-pounds of torque at 4,250 rpm — provide
more power.
Yet, the higher-powered Focus has nearly
the same fuel economy rating with automatic
transmission — 27/38 mpg — as the Elantra
GT.
Combined city/highway mileage in the test
car was 32 mpg, and with regular unleaded all
that’s needed, it cost just over $50 to fill the
14-gallon tank, which is 1.6 gallons larger
than that in the Focus.
Underneath the rigid body, the Elantra GT
uses the same front-wheel drive platform of
the Elantra sedan, but the steering and rear
suspension are different.
Elantra GT’s Driver Selectable Steering
mode put onto the power-assisted, rack-and-
pinion steering came with three choices —
comfort, normal and sport.
But feedback still was far off and the over-
all effect seemed more a gimmick than a steer-
ing enhancement.
Meantime, the torsion axle rear uses Sachs
shock absorbers for better body control.
In the test car, body motions were mini-
mized, the car made lane changes without fuss
and handled an emergency maneuver with
poise and confidence.
Even better, the Elantra GT’s compact size
— it’s 14 feet from bumper to bumper, which
is 9 inches shorter than the Elantra sedan —
makes it easy to park and nudge into congest-
ed streets.
Note that while the Elantra GT is compact,
it doesn’t feel lightweight.
There’s a nice, mostly flat rear floor with
34.6 inches of legroom, which is better than
the 33.2 inches in the back seat of the Focus.
The Golf has 35.5 inches of rear-seat legroom.
With rear seats folded down, cargo space in
the Elantra GT expands to a generous 51
cubic feet.
Texture and appearance of the soft-touch
plastic inside the car looked upscale, and
optional leather upholstery was supple enough
it wouldn’t be confused with vinyl.
The two-part, optional panoramic sunroof is
a first in the segment, Hyundai officials said,
and it really lightens the interior.
Not optional is a soft-touch cover over the
center storage area that doubles as an armrest.
It slides forward and back to accommodate
both short-stature and tall drivers.
The extra large display screen in the middle
of the dashboard afforded better-than-usual
views from the rearview camera.
The outside lens of this camera, by the way,
is kept clean from water, snow and dirt
because it only comes out from beneath the
Hyundai badge on the rear liftgate when the
car is shifted into reverse.
In the tester, there was a brief closing/snap-
ping sound at the back of the car as the lens
retreated inside and the badge came back
down.
The Elantra GT earned five out of five stars,
overall, in federal government crash testing.
All safety equipment is standard, including
seven air bags. One is for the driver’s right
knee and helps keep the driver in proper posi-
tion behind the steering wheel during a frontal
crash.
Continued from page 16
ELANTRA
By Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Most major automakers
reported sales increases in October despite los-
ing at least three days of business to the pun-
ishing rain and wind from Superstorm Sandy.
Toyota said its sales rose almost 16 percent
for the month, while Volkswagen reported
another strong month with sales up 22 percent.
Honda sales slowed from double-digit growth
earlier in the year to 8.8 percent, while
Chrysler sales rose 10 percent. General
Motors was up 5 percent and Ford rose slight-
ly.
Of major automakers, only Nissan reported
a decrease, 3.2 percent, as Sandy pounded the
Northeast, the company’s top-performing
region.
Yet the results show that Americans contin-
ue to buy new cars and trucks at a strong pace.
Chrysler predicted an annual sales rate of 14.7
million for the U.S. industry in October, mak-
ing it one of the year’s strongest months. Auto
sales ran at an annual rate of 14.3 million
through September.
Industry analysts estimated that the storm
cut U.S. sales by about 20,000 cars and trucks
in October as buyers hunkered down for the
storm. But the Nissan brand, which gets 27
percent of its U.S. sales from the Northeast,
was hit particularly hard.
“It is absolutely a hurt on us,” said Al
Castignetti, vice president of the Nissan divi-
sion. As of Wednesday, 65 Nissan dealers in
New York, New Jersey and Connecticut were
closed due to lack of electricity, and they
account for 40 percent of the region’s sales,
Castignetti said.
In past storms, sales were postponed, but
they typically recover quickly after people’s
lives stabilized, said Ford U.S. sales chief Ken
Czubay.
He also said there were a “significant num-
ber” of vehicles damaged by flood waters, and
that could also boost sales in November.
“Typically after the insurance companies
come in, people use those proceeds to buy new
vehicles, which they need to get back and forth
to continue their lives,” Czubay said.
Many automakers announced discounts in
the storm-ravaged region, including Nissan,
which is offering the same prices it gives to
employees.
Volkswagen said one-quarter of its dealer-
ships were affected by the storm, but it still
delivered its best October in nearly 40 years at
just over 34,000 vehicles. Sales were led by
the Passat midsize sedan, which was up 66
percent.
Chrysler said it sold 126,000 cars and trucks
for the month, led by the Ram pickup, which
was up 20 percent, and the Dodge Caravan
van, which saw sales rise 49 percent.
At Ford, sales increased only 0.4 percent to
168,000 cars and trucks. The company said F-
Series pickup trucks, the most popular vehicle
in the nation, had their best October in eight
years.
At GM, sales rose to nearly 196,000 vehi-
cles for the month, led by the Cruze and Sonic
small cars. Cruze sales were up 34 percent,
while Sonic sales rose 43 percent.
Toyota said its sales rose to 155,000 vehi-
cles. It will release more data later in the day.
At Nissan, the company said October ended
on a down note with Sandy causing major dis-
ruption in an area where it has 225 dealers.
The company’s Nissan and Infiniti brands sod
nearly 80,000 cars and trucks, down from just
over 82,000 a year earlier.
Industry analysts were expecting an annual
sales rate in October of 14.7 million to 14.9
million, but that was before Sandy hit
Monday.
The storm could cut sales by 1 percent to 3
percent, or about 20,000 vehicles, said Jeff
Schuster, senior vice president of forecasting
for LMC Automotive, an industry consulting
firm. Schuster said any lost sales would likely
shift to November, boosting totals for that
month.
But Chrysler U.S. sales chief Reid Bigland,
who doubles as head of the Dodge brand, said
in a statement that the company posted its 31st
straight month of year-over-year sales growth
even with the storm. Chrysler has revamped
nearly all of its models in an effort to boost
sales.
LMC predicts that all automakers sold about
1.1 million vehicles during October, up 11 per-
cent from a year ago, as the industry continues
its slow recovery from the Great Recession.
Most automakers report sales jumps despite storm
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
There’s never been a video
game heroine quite like Aveline
de Grandpre.
The daughter of an African
slave and a French shipping
magnate in New Orleans at the
end of French and Indian War,
Aveline is the deadly but charm-
ing protagonist of “Assassin’s
Creed III: Liberation” (Ubisoft,
for the PlayStation Vita, $39.99).
She seeks to fight injustice in
and around the Big Easy as a
member of the series’ secret
order of assassins.
The hallmarks of the
“Assassin’s Creed” franchise are
all gloriously present here in
hand-held form: traipsing across
a jagged cityscape, dispatching
foes with stealthy prowess and
plotting against the clandestine
group known as the Templars.
“Liberation” doesn’t feel like a
typical PlayStation Vita game —
and that’s both its biggest
Revolution for ‘Assassin’s CreedIII’
By Matthew Barakat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
McLEAN, Va. — Wars and
video games seem to go together
like peanut butter and jelly. But
those games usually involve
tanks and machine guns and Tet
offensives; not horses, bayonets
and Bunker Hill.
Now, though, one of the biggest
game releases of the upcoming
holiday season is immersing
players in the Revolutionary War,
with key cameos from George
Founding Father featured
in popular new video game
See ASSASIN’S, Page 22
See CREED, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
JASPER JOHNS: SEEING WITH THE
MIND’S EYE. Throughout his career, contem-
porary American artist Jasper Johns, 82, has
found new ways to explore, as he once put it,
“how we see and why we see the way we do.”
Continually reinventing his own work, he has
driven key transformation in the art world for
nearly 60 years. Jasper Johns: Seeing with the
Mind’s Eye, on view at the San Francisco
Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), surveys
the full scope of Johns’ achievements and also
reflects the very particular interest in his art in
the San Francisco Bay Area.
This major exhibition, the first museum
overview in San Francisco in 35 years, was
organized in close cooperation between Jasper
Johns and Gary Garrels, SFMOMA’s Elise S.
Haas Senior Curator of Painting and Sculpture,
who has been a longtime advocate of Johns in
the Bay Area. The presentation brings together
for the first time some 90 paintings, sculptures,
drawings and prints from SFMOMA and other
local and private collections as well as several
key works lent by the artist himself, including a
large recent canvas that is on view to the public
for the first time. Ranging across Johns’s entire
career—from his breakthrough paintings of the
1950s, which paved the way for the subsequent
development of Pop art and Minimalism, to his
most recent work — the survey offers an
overview of the visual and philosophical
inquiries central to Johns’s practice and illumi-
nates his enormous impact on artistic develop-
ments following Abstract Expressionism.
Curator Garrels said, “In reviewing Johns’s
career, what becomes evident at every stage is
the endless curiosity and discipline of the artist,
and the astonishing level of ambition and qual-
ity of the work. His art and thinking continual-
ly inspire other artists, as well as some of the
field’s most incisive critical writing. Johns has
always been a prime instigator of change, and it
makes sense that his art would strike a chord
with collectors and museums over the past few
decades in the Bay Area with its legacy of inno-
vation.”
Jasper Johns was born in Augusta, Ga., in
1930 and currently lives and works in New York
City. He studied art at the University of South
Carolina, but soon moved to New York where
he met Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage and
Merce Cunningham, becoming a central force
in the intensive reconsideration of contempo-
rary arts unfolding at the time. In the 1950s, he
developed a distinctive painting style that
would help lead American art away from the
then dominant movement of Abstract
Expressionism.
Jasper Johns: Seeing with the Mind’s Eye is
installed roughly chronologically, beginning
with a selection of Johns’s first mature paint-
ings, drawings, sculptures and prints from the
1950s and ’60s, focusing on one of his iconic
early subjects: numbers. The presentation con-
tinues with key examples from Johns’s early
sculptural and lead relief works based on com-
mon objects (Light Bulb II, 1958), for which he
used Sculp-metal, a silver-gray material that
echoes his gray paintings of the same time
(Canvas, 1956). It also looks at Johns’s play
with language and his elaborate Duchamp-
inspired puns between word and image (Wall
Piece, 1968; Bread, 1969; The Critic Smiles,
1969).
CURATOR WALK THROUGH THE
WORLD OF JASPER JOHNS. Julie Charles,
associate curator of education, SFMOMA,
shares her perspectives on Jasper Johns’s zero
through nine in a 20-minute gallery talk. Meet
in the Haas Atrium. 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov.
29. Free with museum admission.
EATS AND DRINKS AT SFMOMA. Caffè
Museo serves a menu of Italian-inspired dishes
made from fresh, local ingredients and organic
produce. Located in a light-filled space adjacent
to the museum’s entrance on Third Street, the
café offers an espresso bar, indoor and outdoor
seating and a selection of wines by the glass. All
works on view in Caffè Museo are available for
rent or purchase. The Blue Bottle Coffee Bar,
set amid modern and contemporary sculptures
in SFMOMA’s Rooftop Garden, offers a variety
of coffees, teas, drinks and sweet and savory
treats crafted by local favorite Blue Bottle
Coffee Company. Cookies and cakes inspired
by artworks on view in the museum’s galleries
are baked on the premises daily. The Coffee Bar
is the perfect place to enjoy art while sipping on
the city’s finest brew.
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is
located at 151 Third St., near the Moscone
Center. For more information, call (415) 357-
4000 or visit www.sfmoma.org. Jasper Johns:
Seeing with the Mind’s Eye runs through Feb.
3, 2013.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjour-
nal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
JASPER JOHNS AND PETERSBURG PRESS
Jasper Johns, Target with Four Faces, 1979; color etching, soft-ground etching and aquatint.
On view in Jasper Johns:Seeing with the Mind’s Eye,at the San Francisco Museum of Modern
Art, through Feb. 3, 2013.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Barry
Levinson, director of such modern
American classics as “Diner,”
“The Natural” and “Rain Man,”
makes a surprising venture into the
horror realm this week with “The
Bay,” an unnerving fright fest
about a coastal July 4 celebration
that goes horribly wrong.
Except for the fact that “The
Bay” takes place in his beloved
home state of Maryland, you’d
never know this was a Levinson
film. He has embraced the found-
footage conceit that’s become so
popular within the genre in recent
years, but he’s done so more con-
sistently and effectively than the
vast majority of these films. He
uses the stillness of mundane
moments to build real tension,
which makes the intensely graphic
gore that much
more startling.
But it’s all in
the service of a
substantial fun-
damental mes-
sage: “The Bay”
is a powerful
indictment of
bu r e a u c r a t i c
ineptitude and
corporate greed.
Since this is such a departure for
Levinson, we were curious to find
out what his five favorite horror
movies were. He was nice enough
to take the time to answer in his
own words:
“The Exorcist” (1973):
“The Exorcist” has some gutsy
filmmaking. If you go back and
watch it, pretty much nothing
scary happens for the first 45 min-
utes. Its just slowly building ten-
sion. Then the daughter comes
downstairs in the middle of her
mother’s Georgetown cocktail
party and urinates on the carpet in
front of all the guests. Its an
incredible moment and the movie
just goes from there. Its not trying
to have fun with the horror like a
lot of the films of today. It sug-
gests that this very well could have
happened.
“Frankenstein” (1931):
Don’t think you can overlook the
original “Frankenstein.” Great
design for a monster. Classical
form. And one of the great under-
stated scenes of tension when the
monster comes upon a very young
girl. She accepts him without
question. And we just wait for
something terrible to happen.
“Diabolique” (1955):
The 1950s French film directed
by Henri-Georges Clouzot. As far
as I know, no one was doing hor-
ror/thriller with as much originali-
ty as this film. The story takes
place at a boarding school in the
French countryside where a
schoolmasters wife and his mis-
tress conspire to kill him. When
they do, the body disappears and a
series of strange and disturbing
events occur. This film has some
fantastic imagery and incredible
psychological tension.
“Psycho” (1960):
Again, all the great horror
movies remain great because they
did something outside the box.
Killing a movie star as big as Janet
Leigh was unheard of. Nobody did
that. And to do it in the shower
like that. Its now become an icon-
ic moment (I actually made a good
deal of fun of it in “High
Anxiety”), but I remember my
mouth kind of dropping when I
saw it. I heard Hitchcock tried to
grab the rights to “Diabolique”
and lost out to Henri-Georges
Clouzot. In turn, he made
“Psycho” a few years later and
used some of the great imagery
“Diabolique” used with water,
bathrooms, death.
“Let the Right
One In” (2008):
I dont know if I would label this
one strictly horror, but it certainly
is terrifying. And touching. Tomas
Alfredson is one of the many tal-
ented directors coming out of
Sweden right now and this one
works so well because it’s as
interested in character as it is in
horrifying moments and imagery.
Shot against a cold, icy landscape,
it’s as much a love story between
the two children as it is vampire
film.
Levinson picks his five favorite horror films
Barry Levinson
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Brussels sprouts can generate some
pretty strong opinions. As with cilantro
or goat cheese, you either love them or
hate them.
The little stinkers are the smallest of
the crucifers and, when prepared incor-
rectly, can develop a scary aroma and
deadly taste. Weirdly, they somehow
remain a perennial feature on many
Thanksgiving menus.
In fairness, it’s hard to cook Brussels
sprouts to their best advantage because
they are so densely constructed. By the
time the heat gets to the core, there’s a
good chance that the outside has been
overcooked.
It used to be that I had no better idea
about what to do with them than anyone
else. I just followed the procedure I
learned in cooking school — trim them,
use a knife to score the bottom in a criss-
cross pattern 1/4 inch deep (so they cook
more evenly), and boil or steam them
until done. The results were not exactly
inspiring.
It wasn’t until the Two Hot Tamales
showed me a better way that I fell in
love. The Tamales — chefs Sue Fenniger
and Mary Sue Milliken, the co-hosts of
their own show on the Food Network
once upon a time — sliced the sprouts
very thin, then quickly sauteed them.
And I do mean quickly — 3 to 5 minutes
in the pan and they’re good to go.
The simplicity of this technique is, of
course, a huge bonus on Thanksgiving
Day, when you are trying to cook 500
other dishes at the same time. You can
either pre-saute the sprouts, then quickly
reheat them when the moment is right,
or just cook them from start to finish
while someone else is carving the turkey.
Even more impressive than the
process is the result — the surprising
deliciousness of these shredded sauteed
Brussels sprouts. You don’t need a lot of
fat to cook them in, and the little guys
pair up nicely with all sorts of toasted
nuts. I’ve opted for walnuts in this
recipe, but swap in your favorite. And a
tart little spritz of lemon provides the
finishing touch.
Take my word for it; when it comes to
Brussels sprouts, this recipe has turned
haters into believers over and over again.
By the way, who put the Brussels in
Brussels sprouts? The Belgians, of
course. The sprouts were first cultivated
in large quantities in Belgium in the late
1500s, and introduced to the U.S. in the
1800s.
QUICK SAUTEED
BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH
TOASTED WALNUTS AND LEMON
Start to finish: 15 minutes
Servings: 6
1/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
Heat the oven to 350 F.
Put the walnuts in a pie plate and toast
them in the oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or
until they are fragrant and are a shade
darker.
Trim the Brussels sprouts and discard
any damaged outside leaves. Use a food
processor fitted with the thin slicing
blade to shred the sprouts.
In a large skillet over medium-high,
heat the oil. Add the sprouts and lemon
zest, then reduce the heat to medium.
Cook, stirring, until crisp tender, about 5
minutes. The pan will seem very crowd-
ed in the beginning, but the Brussels
sprouts will shrink down quickly.
Season with salt and pepper, 1 to 2 table-
spoons of the lemon juice, and the wal-
nuts. Serve right away.
Tricks for perfect Brussels sprouts
In food-crazy New Orleans, food ‘deserts’ persist
NEW ORLEANS — Dwayne Boudreaux’s memories of the
Circle Food Store in New Orleans 7th Ward neighborhood are
so vivid he can walk through its colonnade of arches into the
dark and empty shell and give a guided tour of how it was before
Hurricane Katrina.
He points to where the registers once rang, patrons cashed
paychecks, children lined up to buy school uniforms and neigh-
borhood cooks shopped for dressed wild game, live turtles for
soups and abundant fresh produce.
“Everybody knew us for the fresh fruits and vegetables,”
Boudreaux said. “We were the bell pepper capital of the city.”
Seven years after Katrina flood waters inundated most of New
Orleans, the store’s barren insides are emblematic of a problem
that neighborhood activists say was exacerbated by the catastro-
phe: In a city known for its food, fresh produce and affordable
groceries are hard to come by in some neighborhoods.
In the hard-hit Lower 9th Ward, activists planned to call atten-
tion Saturday to the “food desert” with a festival including live
music, cooking demonstrations and a “pop up” outdoor grocery
in a church parking lot.
“It will be an actual grocery store, not just a farmer’s market,”
said Jenga Mwendo, a community organizer.
Mwendo said about 30 percent of residents in the Lower 9th
Ward lack personal transportation, making a trip to the nearest
full-service grocery outlet — a Walmart in the neighboring city
of Chalmette — problematic.
Lower 9th resident Gertrude LeBlanc, 76, has her own car.
And she needs it to get quality food. There are convenience
stores closer to home, but the prices are high. “For a person on
a fixed income, with no food stamps, it’s hard,” Leblanc said.
The problem with access to food in the neighborhood stretch-
es back before the storm: Mwendo said there hasn’t been a full-
service grocery there in 20 years. And price is not the only prob-
lem she sees with convenience stores.
Food brief
It’s hard to cook Brussels sprouts to their best advantage because they are so
densely constructed. By the time the heat gets to the core, there’s a good chance
that the outside has been overcooked.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
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Washington, Ben Franklin and other
Founding Fathers.
Assassin’s Creed III is due for release
Tuesday. In some ways, the game is meticu-
lous with historical accuracy. Great attention
was paid to research to recreate the cities of
New York and Boston on a one-third scale.
History professors were brought in as con-
sultants.
In other ways, the game takes liberties with
history. It integrates the Revolutionary War
into the overarching story of Assassin’s
Creed, in which the secret society of the
Knights Templar fills the role as the game’s
overarching villain.
Game creators were reluctant to reveal too
many details in advance of the game’s
release. Review copies were not available in
advance.
The game’s creative director, Alex
Hutchinson, said the ability to explore a his-
torical era that has been largely left
untouched by the gaming world was one of
the most exciting aspects of the project.
As for Washington himself, Hutchinson
said he wanted the game to portray the fact
that for the man who would become the
nation’s first president, it was far from certain
that America would win the war.
“He wasn’t sure he was going to win,”
Hutchinson said. “When you read their let-
ters, they were very uncertain for much of
their time” how the war would turn out.
Francois Furstenberg, a history pro-
fessor at the University of
Montreal, who has written about
the iconography that surrounds
Washington, served as a consultant
and said he was interested less in mak-
ing sure names and dates were per-
fect, but more in the game’s over-
arching narrative. He said the
game’s creators shared his
desire to depict the war in a
nuanced way that avoided por-
traying one side as the good
guys and vice versa.
“Anything that compli-
cates the narrative is a
good thing,” he said. “If
anything I think they
were more interest-
ed in sort of a
m u c k r a k i n g
account” of the
revolution, some-
thing that agreed
with Furstenberg.
The game’s protagonist —
Connor, half American Indian,
Half British and not aligned
with either side — served as a
good vehicle for exploring the
era in a way that avoids patriot-
ic cliches, Hutchinson said.
The game’s international fan
base also demands an even-hand-
ed approach to the Revolution,
said Hutchinson, who is fre-
quently questioned by
skeptical fans who worry
the game will be too pro-American.
Not to worry, said Hutchinson, who jokes
that he’s an Australian living in Canada
making a game about the American
Revolution for a French software company.
Even where it sought to be realistic, the
game’s creators took a few liberties.
Washington, for instance, is first
introduced as a young officer serv-
ing under General Braddock in
the French and Indian war. The
game makers took great care to
show the youthful Washington
accurately, as a redhead.
Looking at the finished prod-
uct, though, they felt they
ought to add a touch of gray
to Washington’s hair, to
more closely match the
iconic image of
Washington held by the
public.
“We did not know how
odd it is to see a red-head-
ed George Washington,”
Hutchinson said. “It was
one of those instances
where the fiction felt
more right than the real version.”
Ubisoft takes far greater liber-
ties in a downloadable add-on
game that will be available to
Assassin’s Creed players a few
months after the games release.
In “The Tyranny of King
Washington,” players confront
a scenario where Washington,
rather than yielding power to
civil authority, parlays his
power and popularity and
establishes himself as a new monarch.
At George Washington’s Mount Vernon
estate, curators are happy that the game will
introduce so many kids to Washington and
the Founding Fathers and hopefully get them
thinking about history.
“I would love for people to focus on exact-
ly the incredible choice Washington made to
relinquish power,” said Carol Cadou, senior
curator at Mount Vernon, even if the vehicle
for prompting that discussion is a game that
contorts and creates an alternate reality.
Historical figures certainly make appear-
ances in some video games, but rarely from
historical eras and rarely in a setting devoted
to realism. The popular game “Call of Duty:
Black Ops,” for instance, features John F.
Kennedy, Fidel Castro, Richard Nixon and
former Defense Secretary Robert McNamara.
But in the game, the four of them team up to
defeat an onslaught of zombies at the
Pentagon.
Cadou says that Washington has so often
been portrayed so heroically that he becomes
unrelatable.
“Washington is almost so good he becomes
bland,” she said. “Even if he’s depicted in a
negative way, it gives us an opportunity to
explore” his life that otherwise wouldn’t exist.
The Mount Vernon estate has focused in
recent years on piercing the stodgy image of
Washington on the dollar bill and sought to
emphasize his military daring and action-hero
aspects of his life story.
Mount Vernon even looked at producing its
own educational video game featuring
Washington, but ultimately concluded that
such a game would be “a little more violent
than we had the appetite for.”
Continued from page 18
ASSASIN’S
strength and weakness.
Despite its name, there’s only a tenuous
connection to “Assassin’s Creed III,” its
sweeping console counterpart. That shouldn’t
deter die-hard “Assassin’s Creed” fans from
embodying Aveline, who’s armed with iconic
hidden blades just like forerunners Altair and
Ezio, as well as her own original weapons,
such as a blowgun and a parasol loaded with
poison darts.
Unlike her male predecessors, Aveline
assumes different personas to achieve her
aims. As an assassin, she can use all weapons
and scale buildings; disguised as a slave, she
can blend in with crowds and incite riots; and
when dressed as a noble lady, she can awk-
wardly woo men. It’s an inventive touch, but
one that frustratingly makes Aveline always
feel handicapped.
Most of “Liberation” takes place in New
Orleans, beginning in 1768 as a French colony
through the American Revolution. For the
most part, the game’s story, setting, combat
and characters all work remarkably well given
the constraints of the platform, and there’s a
plethora of side quests, business pursuits and
a multiplayer mode to keep things interesting.
With missions focusing on freeing slaves
and rioting against Spanish soldiers,
“Liberation” doesn’t shy away from the harsh
realities of American history in the South. It’s
refreshing to see a video game deal with such
serious issues while maintaining a sense of
adventure. That alone should be enough for
Vita owners to give this historical action title
a try.
Unfortunately, “Liberation” is too big for its
britches. It’s difficult not to wonder how more
effective the game could have been if the
developers didn’t bend over backward in an
effort to replicate the console experience,
especially after playing through a smaller sec-
tion of “Liberation” that’s set outside
Louisiana and ultimately proved to be more
fun.
The lamest part of “Liberation” is definitely
the most unnecessary, namely, using the Vita’s
unique control scheme for actions like open-
ing letters by swiping both touchscreens or
revealing secret maps by pointing the rear
camera toward a bright light. Such novel gim-
micks wouldn’t be so disastrous if they con-
sistently worked and weren’t repeated several
times.
There are other glitches, too. Some wobbly
graphics, disappearing characters, audio
dropouts and other assorted bugs mark
“Liberation” as a less polished “Assassin’s
Creed” experience. Despite the game’s very
daring ambitions, Aveline — and “Assassin’s
Creed” fans — deserve more than
“Liberation” is able to truly deliver on the
Vita. Two stars out of four.
Continued from page 18
CREED
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, NOV. 2
The San Mateo County History
Museum ‘Free First Fridays.’ 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Old Courthouse, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information visit
www.historysmc.org.
The Garden Study Club of the
Peninsula Meeting. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
San Mateo Garden Center, 605
Parkside Way, San Mateo. All are
welcome to hear a presentation on
‘Designing your Paradise Garden,’ by
Aerin Moore. After the program, stay
and have tea and cookies. Free. For
more information call 365-6191.
Pacific Art League’s November
First Friday. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. 668
Ramona St., Palo Alto. Come enjoy
Pressing Matters, a juried print
exhibition in our Main Gallery, Decker
Walker’s solo exhibition of his oil
paintings in the Norton Gallery and
Marjory Wilson’s paintings in the
Corridor Gallery. Free. Refreshments
served. For more information contact
marketing@pacificartleague.org.
Fall Architecture Lecture Series:
Architect Sim Van Der Ryn. 7 p.m.
San Mateo Main Library, Oak Room,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Mr. Van
der Ryn is a leader in sustainable
architecture and will speak about his
experience applying principles of
physical and social ecology to
architecture and environmental
design. Free. For more information
visit aiasmc.org.
First Friday Flicks: ‘Madagascar 3
—Europe’s Most Wanted.’ 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
‘Cabaret.’ 7 p.m. Little Theatre at
Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del
Monte St., San Mateo. Director Allison
Gamlen and musical director Kevin
Gallagher are leading the Hillsdale
High School cast in sharing this
tumultuous story in the newly
renovated Hillsdale Little Theater.
Adults $15. Students and seniors $10.
To purchase tickets visit
http://hillsdalehigh.com/drama.
Waltz. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. For
Beginners Only Waltz 2 Class. For
more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Presents: ‘Hay Fever.’ 7:30 p.m.
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. The NDNU Theatre
Department presents Noel Coward’s
play, ‘Hay Fever’. $10. For more
information call 508-3456.
Bay Area e.T.c. Presents NARNIA
The Musical. 7:30 p.m. Cañada
College Main Stage Theater, 4200
Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City. $14 for
students and seniors and $19 for
adults. For more information and to
order tickets visit
www.bayareaetc.org.
‘Deathtrap.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets available 60 minutes prior to
curtain at Hillbarn Theatre. Adults
and seniors $34. Students ages 17
and under with current student ID
should call 349-6411 for pricing. To
purchase tickets and for more
information visit hillbarntheatre.org.
SATURDAY, NOV. 3
Open House at Sportshouse Multi-
Sport Complex. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 3151
Edison Way, Redwood City.
Refreshments provided by Gatorade.
Free. For more information call 362-
4100 or visit
www.sportshouseonline.com.
The Cat’s Designer Pajamas. 9:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 73 Wilburn Ave.,
Atherton. There will be a sale of
women’s and men’s designer
clothing for low prices. Benefits the
Nine Lives Foundation, which is a no
kill cat shelter in Redwood City. For
more information call 368-1365 or
visit ninelivesfoundation.org.
Johnston House Winter Tea. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Experience a traditional
English tea in the lavishly decorated
train station. Free. For more
information contact Carolyn Waring
at events@johnsonhouse.org.
Books, Movies and Apps Galore:
Downloading Media toYour Apple
Products. 11 a.m. Menlo Park City
Council Chambers, 701 Laurel St.,
Menlo Park. Q&A session and
demonstration on how to operate
digital book readers and other Apple
products. Free. For more information
call 330-2525.
Support your local artists! 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Isle Cove Clubhouse, 825
Dorado Lane, Foster City. Show and
sale includes oil paintings,
watercolors, acrylic paintings,
miniature paintings, greeting cards,
Christmas decorations and more.
Refreshments served. For more
information call 574-0706.
Maritime Day. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City, $5 for
adults. $3 for students and seniors.
Free for children ages 5 and under.
For more information call 299-0104
or visit historysmc.org.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Presents: ‘Hay Fever.’ 2 p.m. NDNU
Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The NDNU Theatre Department
presents Noel Coward’s play, ‘Hay
Fever.’ $10. For more information call
508-3456.
Bay Area e.T.c. Presents NARNIA
The Musical. 2 p.m. Cañada College
Main Stage Theater, 4200 Farm Hill
Blvd., Redwood City. $14 for students
and seniors and $19 for adults. For
more information and to order
tickets visit www.bayareaetc.org.
A Tour of Recent Genetic
Advances: A Slide Talk with
Professor Tim Stearns. 3 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more
information call 369-2004.
Michael Parkes One Man Show. 5
p.m. to 8 p.m. Borsini-Burr Gallery, 401
Main St., Montara. Michael Parkes will
show new work from his 2013
Renaissance Collection.
Refreshments provided. Opportunity
to win an original Michael Parkes
sketch. Free. For more information
visit www.borsini-burr.com.
Rumba, Cha Cha. 5 p.m. to 11:30
p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
5 p.m. to 6 p.m. International Rumba
Class. $12 at 8 p.m. for Cha Cha lesson
and Same-Sex Dance Party. $10 at 9
p.m. for Same-Sex Dance Party. For
more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
‘Panorama: The Art of Photo
Stitching’ Show Reception. 5 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Coastal Arts League, 300
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Photography
by Drew Campbell, Maggie Graham,
Kirsten Klagenberg and Jeff
Klagenberg. For more information
visit www.coastalartleague.com.
Boy Scout Annual Auction. 6:30
p.m. Lucie Stern Center Ballroom,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto.
Silent and live auction, proceeds will
go to scholarships for youth. Food
and refreshments provided. $30 per
person. To RSVP call 341-5633. For
more information visit
www.packsy.org.
‘Cabaret.’ 7 p.m. Little Theatre at
Hillsdale High School, 3115 Del
Monte St., San Mateo. Director Allison
Gamlen and musical director Kevin
Gallagher are leading the Hillsdale
High School cast in sharing this
tumultuous story in the newly
renovated Hillsdale Little Theater.
Adults $15. Students and seniors $10.
To purchase tickets visit
http://hillsdalehigh.com/drama.
Rock for Schools Benefit Concert. 7
p.m. to 10 p.m. The Vibe, 670 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. Proceeds will go to
the San Mateo Foster City Education
foundation and will specifically
benefit the music programs in the
San Mateo and Foster City
elementary and middle school
districts. Tickets are available online
or at the door on the day of the
event. Suggested donation of $10.
For more information and for tickets
visit rockforschoolsfc.com.
‘Deathtrap.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets available 60 minutes prior to
curtain at Hillbarn Theatre. Adults
and seniors $34. Students ages 17
and under with current student ID
should call 349-6411 for pricing. To
purchase tickets and for more
information visit hillbarntheatre.org.
SUNDAY, NOV. 4
Open House at Sportshouse Multi-
Sport Complex. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 3151
Edison Way, Redwood City.
Refreshments provided by Gatorade.
Free. For more information call 362-
4100 or visit
www.sportshouseonline.com.
Michael Parkes One Man Show. 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Borsini-Burr Gallery, 401
Main St., Montara. Michael Parkes will
show new work from his 2013
Renaissance Collection.
Refreshments provided. Opportunity
to win an original Michael Parkes
sketch. Free. For more information
visit www.borsini-burr.com.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music Piano Marathon. Noon to 8
p.m. 2575 Flores St., San Mateo. $20.
For more information call 574-4633.
Master Gardener Plant Clinic:
Managing Young Trees. 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. San Mateo Arboretum Society,
Kohl Pumphouse, 101 Ninth Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 579-0536 or visit
sanmateoarboretum.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
tion. People come from all over the
world to challenge Mavericks; said Jeff
Clark, Mavericks pioneer, invitational
contest director and owner of Jeff
Clark’s Mavericks surf shop at Pillar
Point.
A long time coming, the size and mag-
nitude of the beastly breaks have offi-
cially landed Mavericks as a destination
on the international Big Wave World
Tour.
“This is the real thing, and Mavericks
is the most real big wave on our west
coast. It’s really dangerous and it’s real-
ly big,” Clark said.
Stops on the seasonal event include
Peru, Chile, Oregon, Mexico and finally,
California.
Competitors must be invited to partic-
ipate in the chance to win at Mavericks
and possibly, the Big Wave World Tour.
Unlike most sports, the competition
depends on conditions; mainly, consis-
tent waves towering at least 30 feet.
Fifty-foot waves are preferable and
points increase based on risk. Points are
tallied based on a surfer’s two best rides.
“It’s got to be big, it’s got to be con-
sistent and powerful,” Clark said.
Surfers are given 48 hours to high tail
it to Half Moon Bay to compete. Last
year’s lackluster conditions worked well
for the filming of Chasing Mavericks,
but left the competition absent.
“It wouldn’t have really been fair to
hold a contest because one heat might
have waves and then the next one there
was nothing,” Clark said.
It’s not infrequent that certain destina-
tions are canceled on the tour as factors
are literally out of anyone’s hand.
Chile’s waiting period lasted from April
1-May 31 with no reliable swells, leav-
ing Chile out of the tour this year. Peru
became the first locale, culminating in
August; Oregon’s waiting period began
Oct. 1 and will last until Dec. 31; and
finally, Mexico’s will last from Jan. 1
until Feb. 28.
With El Nino this year, Clark is hope-
ful for a contest.
“It looks like we’re headed for an
early winter, and we want to take advan-
tage of the big swells in November,”
Clark said in a press release.
Clark is keen on factors that could sus-
tain a contest, noting a meteorology les-
son necessitates an explanation.
However, everyone sits in wait as to
when the elements will align.
Clark had Mavericks all to himself for
15 years before a few locals paddled out.
Many years later, international surfers
now brave the breaks once known to
few.
“I’ve been doing this [competition] for
20 years and I’ve been surfing out there
for almost 40 years,” Clark said.
A true Mavericks maven, Clark is part
of the backbone supporting the competi-
tion. Twenty-one government agencies
are also involved in generating the event,
Clark said, adding as contest director,
his group is in charge of judges, life-
guards, surfers and photography.
Plus there’s safety and conservation of
the environmentally sensitive landslide.
In 2010, a rogue surge came ashore
where onlookers and judges surveyed
the contestants. Several people were
injured leading to the closing of the
beach for this year’s event. Spectators
are also prohibited from climbing atop
the bluffs in an effort to preserve the
coast.
The Oceana Hotel and Spa at
Princeton Harbor will serve as the
Invitational Festival grounds where for
$10-$20, fans will have access to real-
time footage of the competition on
jumbo screens and exclusive commen-
tary as the contest proceeds throughout
the day. When the competition closes
and the competitors return from the
waves, attendees can share in the joy of
the winners at the awards ceremony.
For more information about
Mavericks Invitational and to sign up to
receive the 48-hour commencement
notice visit MavericksInvitational.com
Continued from page 1
MAVERICKS
June when an average of 50,390 riders
took Caltrain on weekdays.
Average weekday ridership in
September was up 12 percent over the
same month last year. The total number
of riders for the month was 1,289,890,
an increase of 8.4 percent over
September 2011, according to a staff
report.
The numbers were up in part due to
riders who attended Giants’ games in the
month. In September, the rail line trans-
ported 110,102 fans to the games at
AT&T Park. Preseason and regular sea-
son ridership was 576,053, a 12 percent
increase over last year, according to the
staff report.
The extra riders means more revenue
at the farebox.
In September, the agency reported
$5.86 million in farebox revenue com-
pared to $4.98 million during the same
month last year, a 17.6 percent increase.
For the year, total ridership is up 9.3
percent from 3.6 million riders last year
at this time to the current 3.9 million rid-
ers. The fiscal year started July 1.
Average weekday ridership for the
year is hovering above 49,300 compared
to 44,900 last year, according to the staff
report.
Total revenue for the year is up 15.4
percent from $15.3 million last year to
the current $17.7 million.
Shuttle ridership is also soaring, with a
52.1 percent increase in September over
last year. For the year, shuttle ridership is
up 32.3 percent, according to the staff
report.
The Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers
Board heard the numbers report at its
meeting yesterday.
Ridership has climbed for more than
two years now as Caltrain sets to embark
on a multi-year modernization project
that will electrify its tracks, allowing it
to run more trains when the project is
completed in 2019. The state just
released some Proposition 1A bond
money to kick-start the project, estimat-
ed to cost about $1.5 billion when com-
plete.
Despite increased ridership, Caltrain
does not have a dedicated funding
source and has relied on one-time funds
in recent years to meet its operating
budget.
When the JPB took over the operation
of Caltrain in June 1992, average week-
day ridership was 20,161. Since then,
ridership has increased nearly 150 per-
cent.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
CALTRAIN
the truck, the power line electrocuted
him, according to the suit. His wife,
Rosa, rushed to his side but first respon-
ders physically restrained her from being
electrocuted herself, the suit said. The
personnel had to use precious time call-
ing PG&E to de-energize the line before
they could attend to Tello, the suit said,
and he was declared dead at Stanford
Medical Center at 7:19 p.m.
The suit claims PG&E was negligent
in designing and maintaining a safe sys-
tem, failing to provide a device to cut the
electricity once separated and failing to
comply with federal occupational safety
standards and laws. Tello’s family also
claim they were severely emotionally
distressed by watching Tello’s electrocu-
tion.
“This was a tragic accident. We plan to
continue discussions with the family in
the hopes of coming to a swift and equi-
table resolution,” said PG&E spokesman
Brian Swanson.
A case management conference is set
for April 12, 2013.
The downed line caused 3,300 PG&E
customer outages in San Mateo.
Continued from page 1
PG&E
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2012
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Being idea-oriented
could make your brainstorms superior to your usual
thinking. However, it might be smart to write down
your ideas, so that you don’t forget any of them.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Two potentially
rewarding developments could present themselves
when you’re dealing with others. Handle these
opportunities wisely and you’ll be able to take
advantage of both.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You’re not likely to
have any trouble fnding answers for critical ques-
tions that might arise. What might be problematic for
you, however, is choosing which solution to use.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- A little self-imposed
pressure can enhance your productivity and indus-
triousness. Don’t hesitate to tackle several tasks
simultaneously, because they’ll push you to even
more success.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you can’t bring ev-
eryone together, divide your time between two close
friends who are both bidding for your companionship.
That way, no one’s feelings will be hurt.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Give priority to a
domestic matter that is currently giving you fts.
Manipulate what you must in order to achieve the
outcome that would serve everyone the best.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- This is one of those
days in which conversations with close friends
aren’t likely to be comprised of idle chatter. Ideas of
consequence are more apt to be discussed, so pay
attention.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- It behooves you to take
the time to evaluate your present position and put
your fnancial house in order. Making an in-depth
analysis could reveal many buried opportunities.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Unless you have a
variety of activities and assignments from which to
choose, you’re likely to fnd yourself extremely rest-
less and bored. Plan a busy agenda.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Blending your intuitive
perceptions with your logical ones could add an ef-
fective dimension to your thought processes. You can
be dynamite when you use all of your gifts.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- When involved commer-
cially with friends, make your social relationship with
them paramount over the business side of things.
Good friends are harder to come by than entrepre-
neurial partners.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Flexibility and willing-
ness to change tactics as events dictate are just as
important as trying to achieve an objective that you
feel is personally important. Make sure you have your
priorities straight.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
11-2-12
ThURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
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Want More Fun
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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1 Huff and puff
5 Bear’s foot
8 Strut along
11 Drama awards
13 In the past
14 Turkish title
15 Rancher, maybe
16 Small pets
18 Ice cream treat
20 Capriati foe
21 Hindu statesman
23 Legal rep.
24 Go bad
25 Yield, as interest
27 Thin Man’s terrier
31 Bonfre remains
32 Minor setback
33 Reach across
34 Can’t do without
36 Wheat or corn
38 Loophole
39 Busy loafng
40 Architect -- Saarinen
41 Unfold, in poetry
42 Visa and passport
44 Walkway
46 Fireplace
49 Bones, in anatomy
50 Golly! (2 wds.)
52 Make glad
56 Fair-hiring abbr.
57 Copper source
58 Express doubts
59 Make do with
60 Curtain hanger
61 Tiny insect
DOwN
1 Poker payoff
2 Fortas or Vigoda
3 Turn down
4 Show how
5 Leaf through
6 Get ripe
7 Most awful
8 Use a parachute
9 Eye
10 Gridiron option
12 Sleeps noisily
17 Test versions
19 Shades of meaning
21 Bottle- -- dolphin
22 A Kennedy
23 Soft wools
24 Rajah’s spouse
26 Not frequent
28 Sewing kit item
29 Tan hue
30 Pot kick in
35 Apollo, e.g.
37 Self-assured
43 Wallpaper, etc.
45 Oregon capital
46 Clarifed butter
47 Swindle
48 Helm position
49 Was in debt
51 Conquistador’s quest
53 Mademoiselle’s date
54 Famous mummy
55 Sooner than anon
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
FUTURE ShOCk®
PEARLS BEFORE SwINE®
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24 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNA’s
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimer’s or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
FT/PT Live-In caregiver on the Penin-
sula and in the South Bay. Valid driv-
er’s license and car a must.Must have
exp. and refs. Call 415-683-3171 or
visit www.sageeldercare.com.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
IRISH HELP AT HOME
Caregivers wanted.
High Quality Home Care.
Qualified, Experienced
Caregivers for Hourly and Live in
placements in San Mateo.
Inquire at: (650)347-6903
www.irishhelpathome.com
LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE
FOREMAN -Seeking experienced long
term employee. Must be knowledgeable
in general landscape maintenance with
strong background in pruning, fertilizing,
irrigation and controllers. Must have
clean DMV and speak English. 32-36
hrs. per week (Tuesday - Friday). $15.00
per hour. Maintenance laborer: $9.00 per
hour. (650)347-3914
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOVELLES DEVELOPMENTAL SERV-
ICES is seeking Program Instructors for
our medically based day program in Bur-
lingame serving individuals with develop-
mental disabilities. Monday-Friday, flexi-
ble hours. Call 650-692-2400 for more in-
formation.
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part-time + Seasonal
Start up to $13 Exp up to $20
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
STYLIST/BARBER & ASSISTANT
MANAGERS - Built-in clientele. Hourly +
commissions + bonuses + Sign-on
Bonus $. Call Juan (650)515-3195
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252512
The following person is doing business
as: Luceti’s on 25th Avenue, 109 W. 25th
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Navro
Investments, INC.. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Sandy Navarro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/12, 10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252799
The following person is doing business
as: Access Systems & Solutions, INC.,
DBA; Scaffold Inspection & Testing Co.
and US Scaffold, 1883A Beacon St.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA, 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Access Systems & Solutions, INC. CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
04/01/2008
/s/ Katie DeBattista /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252713
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Feelosopher’s Path, 128 13th
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Erin
Michelle Stallings, same address, and
Hiroshi Imase, 3-30-1 Kinunodai, Tsuku-
bamirai, Ibaraki, Japan. The business is
conducted by Copartners. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/24/2012
/s/ Erin Stallings /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/12, 10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Vasili Makarov
Case Number 122786
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Vasili Makarov. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Andre
Dragomiretzky. in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Andre
Dragomiretzky. be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: November 20, 2012
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. Probate, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Noell Kubota (State Bar #77077)
Kubota & Constino
433 Airport Blvd., Ste. 323
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
(650)579-7535
Dated: October 15, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on October 19, 16, November 2, 2012.
203 Public Notices
DEPARTMENT OF
HOMELAND SECURITY
FEDERAL EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT AGENCY
Proposed Flood Hazard De-
terminations for the City of
San Mateo, San Mateo
County, California, and
Case No. 12-09-2887P
The Department of Home-
land Security’s Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) solicits
technical information or
comments on proposed
flood hazard determinations
for the Flood Insurance
Rate Map (FIRM), and
where applicable, the Flood
Insurance Study (FIS) re-
port for your community.
These flood hazard deter-
minations may include the
addition or modification of
Base Flood Elevations,
base flood depths, Special
Flood Hazard Area bounda-
ries or zone designations,
or the regulatory floodway.
The FIRM and, if applica-
ble, the FIS report have
been revised to reflect
these flood hazard determi-
nations through issuance of
a Letter of Map Revision
(LOMR), in accordance with
Title 44, Part 65 of the
Code of Federal Regula-
tions. These determina-
tions are the basis for the
floodplain management
measures that your com-
munity is required to adopt
or show evidence of having
in effect to qualify or remain
qualified for participation in
the National Flood Insur-
ance Program. For more
information on the proposed
flood hazard determinations
and information on the stat-
utory 90-day period provid-
ed for appeals, please visit
FEMA’s website at www.fe-
ma.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bf
e, or call the FEMA Map In-
formation eXchange toll
free at 1-877-FEMA MAP
(1-877-336-2627).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252548
The following person is doing business
as: Mint USA, 180 Sylvester Road,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Leo Now, 39 El Mirasol Pl., San Francis-
co, CA 94132. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2012.
/s/ Leo Now /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/12, 10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252725
The following person is doing business
as: John’s Automotive, 1711 Old Mission
Rd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Nathan Ly, 70 Palisades Dr.,
Daly City, CA 94015. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/12
/s/ Nathan Ly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252893
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Victory Honda of San Bruno, 2)
Victory Toyota of San Bruno, 345 El Ca-
mino Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Cappo Management XXVI, INC. CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Michael Cappo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No.
12-0062474 Title Order No. 12-0111187
APN No. 033-333-150 YOU ARE IN DE-
FAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST,
DATED 10/28/2004. UNLESS YOU
TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR
PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EX-
PLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE
PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice
is hereby given that RECONTRUST
COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed
trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust
executed by ANE U. HAUPEAKUI AND
SIONE HAUPEAKUI, HUSBAND AND
WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS, dated
10/28/2004 and recorded 11/5/2004, as
Instrument No. 2004-219393, in Book ,
Page , of Official Records in the office of
the County Recorder of San Mateo
County, State of California, will sell on
11/27/2012 at 12:30PM, At the Marshall
Street entrance to the Hall of Justice,
400 County Center, Redwood City, San
Mateo County, CA at public auction, to
the highest bidder for cash or check as
described below, payable in full at time of
sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed
to and now held by it under said Deed of
Trust, in the property situated in said
County and State and as more fully de-
scribed in the above referenced Deed of
Trust. The street address and other
common designation, if any, of the real
property described above is purported to
be: 864 SOUTH NORFOLK STREET,
SAN MATEO, CA, 944010000. The un-
dersigned Trustee disclaims any liability
for any incorrectness of the street ad-
dress and other common designation, if
any, shown herein.The total amount of
the unpaid balance with interest thereon
of the obligation secured by the property
to be sold plus reasonable estimated
costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of the Notice
of Sale is $572,126.53. It is possible that
at the time of sale the opening bid may
be less than the total indebtedness due.
In addition to cash, the Trustee will ac-
cept cashier's checks drawn on a state or
national bank, a check drawn by a state
or federal credit union, or a check drawn
by a state or federal savings and loan as-
sociation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state.Said sale will be made,
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. If required by the provisions of
section 2923.5 of the California Civil
Code, the declaration from the mortga-
gee, beneficiary or authorized agent is
attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale
duly recorded with the appropriate Coun-
ty Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks in-
volved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on a
property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically
entitle you to free and clear ownership of
the property. You should also be aware
that the lien being auctioned off may be a
junior lien. If you are the highest bidder
at the auction, you are or may be respon-
sible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can
receive clear title to the property. You
are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority, and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or
a title insurance company, either of
which may charge you a fee for this infor-
mation. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the
lender may hold more than one mort-
gage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The
sale date shown on this notice of sale
may be postponed one or more times by
the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the
California Civil Code. The law requires
that information about trustee sale post-
ponements be made available to you and
to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been post-
poned, and, if applicable, the resched-
uled time and date for the sale of this
property, you may call 1-800-281-8219
or visit this Internet Web site www.recon-
trustco.com, using the file number as-
signed to this case 12-0062474. Infor-
mation about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone
information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale.
RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800
Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI
VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Informa-
tion: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale
Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.
is a debt collector attempting to collect a
debt. Any information obtained will be
used for that purpose. FEI #
1006.168730 11/02, 11/09, 11/16/2012
26 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
CITY OF HALF MOON BAY
MUNICIPAL ELECTION
NOVEMBER 6, 2012
Publication of Contributions and Contributors to Campaigns
PURSUANT TO Chapter 1.24.080 of the Half Moon Bay Municipal
Code, on the Friday proceeding any special or general election, the
City Clerk shall publish in a newspaper of general circulation the name
of each person and committee from whom a contribution or contribu-
tions totaling one hundred dollars or more have been received, the
amounts each person or committee contributed, and the candidates or
committees which received such amounts, as such appear on the cam-
paign statements filed within the six-month period prior to the election.
The following information has been extracted from campaign state-
ments required by the Political Reform Act and filed with the City Clerk
as of the filing date of October 25, 2012.
The information required to be published pursuant to Section 1.24 of
the Half Moon Bay Municipal Code is selective and does not include all
the information set forth in the candidates’ and committees’ campaign
statements.
All campaign statements are public records and are available for in-
spection in the Office of the City Clerk, 501 Main Street, Monday
through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
MARINA FRASER 2012
CONTRIBUTOR TOTAL $
Naomi Patridge 100
John S. Kolbisen 100
David and Patricia Lea 100
Allan Alifano 200
C. Mark and Jayne E. Battey 100
B. Robert Ptacek 100
Thomas and Marina Fraser 200
Jan R. Miramontes 100
Jackie and Tim Buckley 100
Republic Services, Inc. 500
Robert and Sharon Dooley 150
Beverly Ashcraft 100
Jack and Ruth Lemein 1000
Rick and Jennifer Kowalczyk 100
Jack Quinlan 250
Kevin Buckley 100
Jackie Buckley 250
Tim and Tara Buckley 200
Brad Hawkes 100
M. Keith Waddell TTEE 1000
Cynthia P. Waddell 1000
Dannell Stefanick 400
Maria Medeiros 500
Lois Mullins 100
SAMCAR 1000
Paul and Julie Shenkman 1000
COMMITTEE TO RE-ELECT FARMER JOHN MULLER HMB CITY
COUNCIL 2012
CONTRIBUTOR TOTAL $
John Kolbisen 100
Bob and Sharon Dooley 150
Allan Alifano 200
Naomi Patridge 100
Pat and David Lea 100
Jackie and JT Buckley and Jan Miramontes 200
Bob Ptacek 100
Carole Groom 150
Republic Services Inc. c/o AWIN MGMT Inc. 500
Curley and Red’s Auto Body and Towing 300
Jack and Ruth Lemein 1000
Kathy Betts 200
John and Josephine DeLuca 1000
John E. Chamberlain 200
Mary I. Colucci 100
Maria and Paulo Madeiros 500
M. Keith Waddell 1000
Cynthia Waddell 1000
Dannell and Ronald Stefanick 400
Rick Kowalczyk 100
Silvio Modena and Sally Benson 100
G. Jeffrey and Kate G. Brown 300
Sue Joswiak 300
Kevin O’Brien Insurance 100
Joseph Borges III 100
Paul J.Shenkman 1000
California Real Estate PAC 1000
Giusti Farms LLC 100
COMMITTEE TO ELECT JOHN ULLOM
CONTRIBUTOR TOTAL $
Dana and Mike Kimsey 500
CDF Firefighters 500
HARVEY RARBACK FOR HALF MOON BAY CITY COUNCIL 2012
CONTRIBUTOR TOTAL $
Karen K. Anderson 200
Dennis Paull 500
William Pemberton 100
CDF Firefighters PAC 790318 500
FRIENDS OF HMB, YES ON MEASURE J
CONTRIBUTOR TOTAL $
Rick Kowalczyk 1000
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252322
The following person is doing business
as: TippiToes DayCare, 341 East 39th
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Lyud-
mila Vasa, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Lyudmila Vasa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/12, 10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252767
The following person is doing business
as: Almond Kups, 843 Standish Rd., PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Kathleen Vallejo,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/02/2012
/s/ Kathleen Vallejo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252741
The following person is doing business
as: Asian King’s Kitchen, 3048 N. Cabril-
lo Hwy., HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
F & J Kitchen, INC. CA. The business is
conducted by an Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/02/2012
/s/ Zhao Feng Guan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #25278
The following person is doing business
as: Spiritual Choices Publishing, 210
Gramercy Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Tom Huening, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Tom Huening /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252813
The following person is doing business
as: Fashion Generations, 125 South
Blvd. #7, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Zhi Xian Su, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Zhi Xian Su /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252747
The following person is doing business
as: Ace Pizzeria, 6005 Mission St., DALY
CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Jomaca Foods,
LLC., CA. The business is conducted by
an Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/11/2012
/s/ Carlos M. Santos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/12, 10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252759
The following person is doing business
as: Dash Japanese Tapas and Sushi,
220 Main St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
C27 Kama Lounge, INC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Eric Deng/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252722
The following person is doing business
as: Backroad Saddlery, 111 Back Road,
LA HONDA, CA 94020 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: James Mil-
brath, Star Route 2, #266, LA HONDA,
CA 94020. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/22/2007
/s/ James Milbrath /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252911
The following person is doing business
as: Ariel Beauty Salon Barber & Nails,
377 Grand Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Maria Escobar,
5211 East ave. LIVERMORE, CA 94550.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Maria Escobar/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/12, 11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252969
The following person is doing business
as: Wampumm, LLC, 541 Jefferson Ave,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Wam-
pumm Holdings, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
10/05/2012.
/s/ Lawrence Ebringer/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12, 11/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252986
The following person is doing business
as: Dream Tree Builder, 1319 S. Rail-
road Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Yong Hee Ahn, 405 Serrano Dr., 9H,
San Francisco, CA 94132. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Yong Hee Ahn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12, 11/23/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252965
The following person is doing business
as: 1) HerBabyShower.com, 2) HSB Fa-
vors, 777 Morrell Ave., Apt 106, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Hatifa Wanidi Ju-
kaku, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Hatifa Wanidi Jukaku /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12, 11/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252883
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Raymees Limo Service, 310 Al-
len Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Suheir K. Michael and Khaled M. Mi-
chael, same address. The business is
conducted by Husband and Wife. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Suheir K. Michael /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12, 11/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252864
The following person is doing business
as: BK 4075, 972 El Camino Real,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
CH&P 4075, INC, CA The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Christopher Hsiung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12, 11/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252828
The following person is doing business
as: DRG Health Care Solutions, 400
Oyster Point Blvd., Ste 440, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Dis-
charge Resource Group, CA The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Marsha Hix /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12, 11/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252592
The following person is doing business
as: Canavati & Son’s, 1520 Albemarle
Way. BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Eyad Canavati, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Eyad Canavati /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/12, 11/09/12, 11/16/12, 11/23/12).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Oct. 24, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
C27 KAMA LOUNGE, INC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
220 Main St.
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale-Beer And Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 26, November 2, 9, 2012
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Oct. 23, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
BBCK ENTERPRISES, INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
920 BING ST.
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070-5328
Type of license applied for:
21-Off-Sale General
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 26, November 2, 9, 2012
NOTICE OF BULK SALE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given to the Creditors
of: ROY LAM and KEITH KWOK TOA
LUI and STANLEY MANKIT WONG,
Seller(s), whose business address(es) is:
165 E. 4TH AVENUE, City of SAN MA-
TEO, County of SAN MATEO, State of
California, 94401, that a bulk transfer is
about to be made to: JMO DESSERTS,
LLC, Buyer(s), whose business(es) ad-
dress is: 165 E. 4TH AVENUE, City of
SAN MATEO, County of SAN MATEO,
State of California, 94401.
The property to be transferred is located
at: 165 E. 4TH AVENUE, City of SAN
MATEO, County of SAN MATEO, State
of California, 94401.
Said property is described in general as:
Lease Value of that CAFÉ business
known as TEAWAY, and located at: 165
E. 4TH AVENUE, City of SAN MATEO,
County of SAN MATEO, State of Califor-
nia, 94401.
The bulk transfer will be consummated
on or after the 21ST day of NOVEMBER,
2012. This bulk transfer is subject to
Section 6106.2 of the California Com-
mercial Code. If Section 6106.2 applies,
claims may be filed at FIDELITY NA-
TIONAL TITLE COMPANY, Escrow Divi-
sion, Escrow No: 8123269-LC, 601 Cali-
fornia Street, Suite 1501, San Francisco,
County of San Francisco, State of Cali-
fornia, 94108.
Phone: 415.421.5566, Fax:
415.520.6508
ESCROW NO: 8123269-LC
This bulk transfer does
NOT include a liquor license transfer. All
claims must be received at this address
by the 20TH day of NOVEMBER, 2012.
So far as known to the Buyer(s), all busi-
ness names and addresses used by the
Seller(s) for the three years last past, if
different from the above, are: NONE
Dated: OCTOBER 17, 2012
JMO DESSERTS, LLC
BY: FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COM-
PANY AS ESCROW AGENT
_______________________________
BY: TIFFANY CRIGER, AUTHORIZED
SIGNER
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Jour-
nal, 11/02/12)
SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ512708
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Alicia Sandoval, aka Alicia
Delrio, aka Bertha A. Delrio, aka Bertha
Alicia-Sandoval, an individual; and
DOES 1 through 100, inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo es-
ta demandando el demandante): Per-
solve, LLC, a limited liability company,
dba, Account Resolution Associates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
203 Public Notices
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
MAIN COURT HOUSE- Hall of Justice,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, #194748
Edit Alexandryan, #249323
PerSolve, LLC dba Account Resolution
Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
Chatsworth, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) Mar. 23, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 19, 26, and November 2, 9,
2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
27 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Bright-eyed
6 Student of
Socrates
11 “The Mentalist”
network
14 Cut over
15 Get ready to surf
16 Last word?: Abbr.
17 Stallone’s garden
supply?
19 Halifax head
20 Lively dance
21 Cage, for one
23 Movie theater
appliances
27 Casually
mention, with “to”
28 Sacred structure
29 Buck
31 Influential sports
figure
32 Brewery
flavoring
33 Beginning to
cure?
36 French article
37 Lacking
40 To benefit
41 Cubs’ spring
training city
43 Prominent
periods
44 Cádiz cohort
46 Post office flier
48 Allied leader
49 “Gave it my best”
51 News source
since Dec. 1881
52 Musical
inadequacy
53 Feudal lord
55 Wine flavoring
56 Santa’s risky
undertaking?
62 First name in
dictators
63 Eliminate
64 Ryder rival
65 WWII carrier
66 Domingo, e.g.
67 Hides
DOWN
1 Hand holder?
2 Rural expanse
3 Changed-my-
mind key
4 Encouraging
word
5 Unsolicited
opinion
6 Doesn’t wing it
7 Like a boring
lecture, probably
8 Río contents
9 A.L. East team,
on scoreboards
10 Low tie
11 Movie about
artificially grown
bacteria?
12 Lineage
13 See 58-Down
18 Seconds
22 Storm harbinger
23 Old Testament
poem
24 Wistful remark
25 Fast-talking
salesman’s
training
materials?
26 Jewelry item
27 To boot
29 Dome cover
30 Drops (out)
32 Hand-holding
group dance
34 Oater orphan
35 Mashie and
niblick
38 Decided in court
39 Add some meat
to
42 Kolkata’s locale
45 Avril follower
47 Polecat kin
48 Saltimbocca herb
49 How much
sautéing is done
50 Warty
amphibians
51 Subject for
Archimedes
53 Buyer’s aid
54 “Based on
that ...”
57 Source of iron
58 With 13-Down,
errand runner’s
destination
59 2002 Chapter 11-
filing flier
60 Track
61 2002 British
Open champ
By Gail Grabowski
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
11/02/12
11/02/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
210 Lost & Found
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
296 Appliances
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1 BAG of Hot Wheels and Matchbox
Cars, from the 70s, Appx 40, $30
(650)589-8348
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, playgoer August pro-
gram, featuring Gloria Stuart, George
Sanders, Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20.,
San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE - Special Issue,
“Off to the Moon”, featuring Armstrong,
Aldrin, and Collins, and a special article
by Charles Lindburgh, $25., San Mateo,
(650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 (650)787-8600
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
LIONEL TRAIN Wall Clock with working
train $45 (650)589-8348
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, SOLD!
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures, SOLD!
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., SOLD!
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
298 Collectibles
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
2 MODEL ships in box $30
(650)589-8348
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. SOLD!
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 SOLD!
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - (2) $40 each, Un-
finished craftsmen style, One needs
some repair. Picture available via email,
(650)595-5549
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
304 Furniture
BENT WOOD ICE CREAM CHAIRS -(3)
$15 each, Cane Seats, Also 4 parts
chairs, Black or Tan,Picture available via
email, (650)595-5549
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH & LOVE SEAT- Floral Design.
Great Condition, $350.00, (650)266-8025
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)857-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
304 Furniture
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
AUTO WINE OPENER - mint condition,
one-touch, rechargeable, adapter, foil
cutter, built-in light, easy open, great gift,
$12.00, SOLD!
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
BUFFET SERVER, stainless, cook &
serve same dish, $20 (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., SOLD!
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw $80
(650)521-3542
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1” BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, $35., (650)521-3542
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)857-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 CUSTOM Medicine Cabinet, White
with Mirror $25 obo, (650)589-8348
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
28 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLANKET- Double bed size, dusty rose,
satin bindings, warm, like new, washa-
ble. $8., SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, SOLD!
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, work great for small of-
fice/room, extra speakers, 4 1/2 in. high,
includes cords. $8.00, SOLD!
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
METAL COWBOY STATUE - $50.,
SOLD!
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case $75 OBO,
(650)345-7352
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
perfect condition ideal gift, Only $30.,
650-595-3933
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
310 Misc. For Sale
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEAMER TRUNK $65 OBO (650)345-
7352
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TOILET - very good condition, white,
FREE! (650)573-6981
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, $15., 650-375-8044
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
SOLD!
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
316 Clothes
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 SOLD!
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole $45
(650)521-3542
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - Proform XB 550S, local
pickup, $100., (650)294-9652
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
3 FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
REDWOOD CITY
361 Encina Ave.
Sat. & Sun.
Nov. 3 & 4
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Many brand new items.
Furniture, appliances
new clothing, toys
and much more!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
166 Rockridge Rd,
San Carlos
Sat., Nov. 3rd,
9am-4pm
Designer Clothing,
Shoes, Jewelry, &
Handbags,Vintage
Goods. Also
children's clothing,
active wear,couch,
plates, candle
holders, and other
odds & ends.
Women's clothing
sizes 0-6, shoe
sizes 7-8.
And Much More!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, SOLD!
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims, SOLD!
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
318 Sports Equipment
670 Auto Service
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
29 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando
(650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JM PAINTING &
PLUMBING
New Construction,
Remodel & Repair
(415)350-1908
Lic.# C36C33
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 461-0326
Lic#933572
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Construction Electricians
Painting
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss?
Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Business Services
PUT YOUR
BUSINESS INFO
ON THE
INTERNET
FREE
Link the phone number
in your classified ad
directly to online details
about your business
ZypPages.com
Barbara@ZypPages.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Attorneys
30 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
MANUFACTURED
HOME COMMUNITY
For Ages 55+
Canada Cove,
Half Moon Bay
(650) 726-5503
www.theaccenthome.com
Walk to the Beach
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Health & Medical Massage Therapy
LOCAL/WORLD 31
Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
defrauded those expecting a level playing
field.
The investors “illegally restrained competi-
tion ... by falsely creating the appearance of
unfettered bidding while they were secretly
colluding to suppress prices,” said Scott D.
Hammond, deputy assistant attorney general
of the antitrust division, in an announcement
of Montalvo’s plea.
Montalvo was also charged with conspiring
to use the mail to carry out the scheme, make
and receive payoffs and divert co-conspirators
money that would have otherwise gone to
mortgage holders and others.
When property is auctioned, the proceeds
pay off the mortgage and debt with any
remaining money going to the homeowner.
Squelching competitive bids limits how much
money is available for both.
Montalvo is accused of committing bid rig-
ging and mail fraud in San Mateo and San
Francisco counties as early as June 2008 until
approximately September 2010. He is the
26th person to plead guilty or agree to plead
guilty as part of the DOJ’s ongoing antitrust
investigation at public real estate auctions in
Northern California, including those in San
Mateo County.
Montalvo’s plea is proof the effort is work-
ing, said Joel Moss, acting special agent in
charge of the FBI’s San Francisco division.
“Criminals who take advantage of the real
estate auction process will be brought to jus-
tice,” he said in a prepared statement.
Montalvo faces up to a decade in federal
prison and $1 million fine for violating the
antitrust law known as the Sherman Act and
up to 30 years and a similar fine for each
count of conspiring to commit mail fraud. The
government can also go after the proceeds
made by the fraud.
Anyone with information about bid rigging
or fraud related to public real estate foreclo-
sure auctions should contact the Antitrust
Division’s San Francisco Office at (415) 436-
6660 or visit
www.justice.gov/atr/contact/newcase.htm or
call the FBI tip line at (415) 553-7400.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
GUILTY
By Zeina Karam and Karin Laub
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Members of Syria’s opposi-
tion-in-exile bristled Thursday at the Obama
administration’s suggestion that Washington
will handpick more representative leaders at
a crucial conference in Qatar next week.
The new U.S. push appears aimed at creat-
ing a unified leadership that could work
more closely with the West. But there are
signs of resistance among deeply fractured
opposition groups wary of attempts by for-
eign backers to dictate strategy in the civil
war against President Bashar Assad.
“This direct tutelage and these dictates are
not acceptable to the Syrian people any-
more,” said Zuhair Salem, the London-based
spokesman for Syria’s banned Muslim
Brotherhood opposition group. The
Brotherhood is part of the main political
opposition group, the Syrian National
Council, which is dominated by exiles.
Syrians and the U.S. administration have
grown increasingly frustrated as the opposi-
tion proved unwilling or unable to coalesce.
The U.S. and its allies have long bemoaned
the lack of a cohesive leadership, and there is
little doubt that this has held back more
robust foreign aid and involvement to bolster
the opposition in its fight.
With the battle for con-
trol of Syria almost cer-
tainly to be decided on
the battlefield, the politi-
cal opposition led by
exiles is being further
sidelined.
On Wednesday, the
Obama administration
said it would push for a
major shakeup in the opposition leadership
so that it better represents the fighters risking
their lives on the frontlines. At least 36,000
people have been killed since the uprising
began 19 months ago, according to anti-
regime activists.
It was a signal that Syria’s political oppo-
sition is increasingly irrelevant, as it’s
become clearer that the conflict will be
decided by fighters.
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton said the administration was suggest-
ing names and organizations that should fea-
ture prominently in any new rebel leadership
that is to emerge from a four-day conference
starting Sunday in Doha, the capital of Qatar.
The U.S. said a revamped leadership could
rally wider international support and help
buffer against attempts by extremists among
the rebels to hijack the uprising.
Syrian opposition figures have called on
the U.S. and other Western supporters to pro-
vide the rebels with strategic weapons, such
as anti-aircraft missiles, to counter the Assad
regime’s military superiority and help the
rebels break the battlefield stalemate.
However, the U.S. has been cool to the idea.
It fears that such weapons could fall into the
hands of radical Islamists fighting on the
rebel side who might one day use them
against the U.S. and its allies.
The SNC is widely seen as ineffective and
cut off from those fighting on the ground. It
has been plagued by infighting and defec-
tions. Still Clinton’s portrayal of the SNC
leadership as out-of-touch exiles kicked up a
storm of disapproval inside and outside
Syria.
Salem said Clinton’s remarks show the
U.S. wishes to “tailor the Syrian opposition
to specific demands.”
The U.S is pushing for a greater role for
the rebel Free Syrian Army, the main fight-
ing force on the ground, among other groups.
However, the FSA and the Syria-based
National Coordination Body, made up of vet-
eran opposition figures, appear skeptical that
the disparate opposition groups can fit under
one umbrella.
Faiz Amru, a Syrian army general who
defected earlier this year, said any transition-
al government or body created abroad cannot
possibly represent those dying in Syria.
“Everyone is trying to push their own
agendas,” he said dejectedly by phone from
the Turkish Syrian border. “The big powers
have hijacked the Syrian revolution.”
Amru said he does not support any opposi-
tion group, saying that none of them care
about fighters on the ground.
The U.S. administration responded to the
criticism by saying it was not issuing dic-
tates.
“We’re not giving them a list,” said State
Department spokesman Mark Toner.
“Ultimately it’s up to the Syrians themselves
to make those choices. This is in no way
telling them what to do.”
But Clinton’s remarks were seen as dam-
aging by opposition leaders and ordinary
Syrians long wary of U.S. meddling in the
region. The opposition has been increasingly
frustrated by what it perceives as the lack of
a coherent U.S. plan to help the rebels.
Muhydin Lazikani, a London-based writer
and SNC member, said Clinton had no busi-
ness criticizing the SNC at a time when the
Obama administration has not charted a path
for Syria.
Syrians wary of U.S.push to overhaul opposition
Hillary Clinton
32 Friday • Nov. 2, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL
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