Research

Background
The External Environment As a nation, our chances of being involved in a car accident increases every day. The number of violations and traffic issues continually increase. People’s feelings toward driving have become relaxed and they treat driving lightly. Seventy seven percent of Americans drive alone to their jobs, while an additional 11 percent carpool. Most states allow individuals to drive unaccompanied by the age of 16, and all states require individuals to have a license in order to drive a vehicle. Speed limits also vary by state and even by roads. Many people argue that speed limits are set too low and other argue they are set too high. Most drivers exceed speed limits by 5-15 mph if it looks like there are not cops present. Over 100,000 people a day receive a speeding ticket in this country. There are over 41,000,000 speeding tickets per year. One in every six drivers will get a speeding ticket this year. The age groups between 17 and 24 years of age receive the most speeding tickets. Seat belt legislation is a hot issue right now. Many drivers feel their rights are violated by seat belt laws. Forty nine states and the District of Columbia have laws regarding the use of seat belts. In 24 states, the seat belt law is considered a secondary offense and a driver can only be ticketed should they be stopped for another reason. Seat belt law effectiveness varies state to state, but some areas have over 95 percent usage, while others have less than 40 percent usage. Alcohol related deaths account for 40 percent of total traffic deaths in the United States. Brigham Young University students adhere to the Honor Code, which prohibits the use of alcohol. Drivers with a blood alcohol content of .10 are six to 12 times more likely to get into a fatal crash or incur an injury than drivers with no alcohol. According to Forbes, the most dangerous day of the week to drive is Saturday. UC Berkeley’s traffic center says speeding is the single greatest contributor to serious crashes, including not paying attention to weather conditions which require a reduced speed. UC Berkeley also found that fatal crashes are 14 percent more likely to happen on the first snowy day of the season compared with subsequent ones. Accidents are 36 percent more likely to occur in January than in July, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Using a cell phone while driving quadruples your risk of crashing. Eating, tuning the radio, putting makeup on, and other such distracted behaviors are just as dangerous as texting, emailing, or talking on the phone. Passengers are one of the most frequently reported causes for distraction, with young children being four times more distracting than adults and infants being eight times more distracting. Included in our primary research is a safe driving survey distributed to Utah Valley college students, which asked many important questions to find out feelings about driving and driving habits. A copy of the survey is located at the end of this campaign write-up, after the Evaluation section. The Client

Out of concern that BYU students may be involved in preventable automobile accidents, BYUSA desires a communications effort that will encourage safe driving in the BYU community. Brigham Young University Student Service Association (BYUSA) is a studentoperated organization made to serve the students and they hold many campus events that are very popular with the student body. They have offered a budget of $5,000 to this campaign for safe driving in the BYU community. BYUSA is well known by the BYU community and they have access to several unique channels such as student email addresses and on-campus advertising. The Product, Service or Issue The issue we have encountered is that while BYU students follow the honor code and strive to live by the example of Jesus Christ, their driving choices can be reckless and irresponsible, which can lead to accident, injury, and even death. There are many choices that people can make to improve their driving awareness and safety. Avoiding distractions, following traffic laws, and remaining alert can attribute to safe driving. BYU students are living on a budget and cannot afford to not follow traffic laws. Breaking traffic laws have consequences such as: ● Speeding (1-10 MPH over the limit): $50 bail ● Speeding (11-15 MPH over the limit): $75 bail ● Speeding (16-20 MPH over the limit): $125 bail ● Speeding (21-25 MPH over the limit): $200 bail ● Speeding (31+ MPH over the limit): mandatory court appearance plus additional $10 per mile over the speed limit and $400 bail ● Speeding in a school zone, first offense (0-9 MPH over the limit): $67.50 bail ● Speeding in a school zone, first offense (10-19 MPH over the limit): $168.75 bail ● No registration in vehicle: $40 ● No insurance: mandatory court appearance and $400 bail ● No valid license: $40 bail ● Moving violations require a $32 surcharge on top of the bail amount; add a $10 traffic surcharge to that total in Salt Lake County. The average cost of a speeding ticket is $150. The average raise in insurance costs for one speeding ticket over the course of 3 years is $900. Even being in accidents causes fiscal repercussions. There will be an accident ticket that has to be paid, paying for damages to vehicles, paying for injuries, and paying damages should someone lose their life. Insurance rates go up for traffic violations, as well. The average cost (including wages, productivity loses, medical expenses, administrative expenses, motor vehicle damage, etc.) for each death in a motor vehicle accident is $1,130,000. Average cost for each nonfatal disabling injury is $61,600. Average cost for each property damage crash is $7,500. insurance companies, such as Progressive, raise insurance rates by 30 percent after a first accident and an additional 56 percent after a second. AAA will raise rates by 30 percent after a first accident and 150 percent after the second. Promotions BYUSA has not participated in or sponsored a comprehensive safe driving campaign prior to now. BYU does offer a defensive driving course for students and employees. Other

driving campaigns around Utah include: Zero Fatalities; Heads Up (pedestrians); Sleep Smart, Drive Safe (drowsy driving); Click it or Ticket (seat belts); Don’t Drive Stupid (good decision making); Drive to Stay Alive; Truck Smart (truckers); Buckle Tough (seat belts); Boost til’ 8 (child safety); Spot the Tot (child safety); Snap (seat belts); Never Leave Your Child Alone (child safety) and Road Respect (road rage). Zero Fatalities is the mother program and the backbone to many other safe driving campaigns in Utah (Click it or Ticket, Heads Up, Sleep Smart, Drive Smart). These campaigns cover five different driving dangers. ○ Drowsy driving ○ Distracted ○ Aggressive ○ Impaired Driving ○ Not Buckling Up On the Zero Fatalities site, there are sites for Utah, Nevada, and Arizona all with statistics about fatalties. Statistics cover everything, including pie graphs of weather conditions, age groups, gender, main roads, fatalities types, what holidays and road conditions. These are just fatalities, not crashes. Utah has done the most extensive public relations efforts and advertising for zero fatalities. Competition One competitor to our safe driving campaign is the high occurrence of exceeding the speed limit on the highways. Drivers feel they must go with the flow of traffic and therefore put their safety in jeopardy. Additionally, many drivers, especially during the holiday season, wish to arrive at their destinations quickly and will drive over the speed limit to do so. Distractions while driving, drowsiness and road construction also are competitors this campaign must overcome to be successful. Resources BYU offers many resources that may be used in this campaign. BYU has facilities for staged events, campus newspapers, BYU Television, BYU website, bulletin boards, standing banners around campus, volunteers from BYUSA, and sporting events. BYU also has many intervening publics, including sports icons, school officals, peers, news media outlets, faculty, and BYUSA leaders. SWOT Strengths ● BYU is a localized public ● The BYU community holds obedience to government and local laws and regulations very highly ● BYUSA is well-known among the Weaknesses ● Students lack patience to follow speed limits ● Students and some faculty are prone to distractions while driving like cell phones, eating and distractions from

BYU community ● There are pre-established mediums of communications. I.e. emails, ward communications, dorms and apartments. ● Driving habits can be generalized throughout the entire community of students and faculty ● This campaign supports ideas and behaviors with which nobody will disagree. Opportunities ● There is a great opportunity to augment the already good reputation of BYUSA ● To increase student and faculty support of safe-driving efforts ● To protect the lives of students and faculty and create a safer and more safety-aware BYU community ● Ensure a stronger future for Utah by instilling positive driving values in young families and young adults ● Reduce the number of accidents involving students and faculty ● Promote life-long safe driving habits

other passengers. ● Retention of message ● Lack of awareness of current Utah and BYU safe-driving efforts ● Faculty lacks adequate resources and knowledge of unsafe driving habits to help encourage safe habits.

Threats ● Ongoing road construction on major highways and state roads ● Poor and already unsafe driving habits will be difficult to change ● Utah weather can be inconsistent and increased awareness and safe driving techniques need to be taught for those situations ● Driving situations, distances and habits are different for each student and faculty member

Public Profiles Students living on campus ● Demographics: 18-19 years old, single, on a meal plan, low or no income ● Psychographics: Primarily LDS, socially minded, constantly around peers ● Self-interests: success in school, dating, forming friendships, being social ● Influentials: teachers, peers, resident advisers, ward leaders, parents, celebrities ● Prime information channels: wards, hall meetings, Internet, facebook, bulletin boards in dorms, word of mouth, campus events, email. ● Relationship to client: Has the strongest relationship - they participate in BYUSA activities and services more than others. Students living off campus ● Demographics: 18-26 years old, single, low to no income ● Psychographics: moving towards autonomy, primarily LDS, socially minded, eye towards marriage. ● Self-interests: dating, success in school, friendships, solidifying relationships ● Influentials: peers, parents, teachers, ward leaders, trendsetters

● Prime information channels: wards, social networking, email, Internet, television ● Relationship to client: little or no influence Married students living off campus ● Demographics: 18-30 years old, married, already has children or planning for children, low income, one or both are students ● Psychographics: family-oriented, LDS, involved in church and community activities, social ● Self-interests: success in school, expanding family, establishing family traditions ● Influentials: parents, teachers, peers, ward leaders, political and social opinion leaders (experts) ● Prime information channels: wards, Internet, social networking, television ● Relationship to client: little or no connection with BYUSA Student Employees ● Demographics: 18-30 years old, low income, part time, single or married ● Psychographics: LDS, hardworking, busy, live on a budget ● Self-interests: earning an income, success in school, job security ● Influentials: peers, supervisors, boss, co-workers ● Prime information channels: email, employee meetings, training ● Relationship to client: both are headed by BYU Faculty and Staff ● Demographics: Middle age, most have families, employed by the University ● Psychographics: Career people, LDS or at least follow the Honor Code, family oriented. ● Self-interests: student success, their own research and publications, job security, money, family, time, ● Influentials: Administration, supervisors, First Presidency, peers ● Prime information channels: Faculty meetings, email, wards, department newsletters/magazines ● Relationship to client: little or no connection to BYUSA Administration ● Demographics: Middle age, have families, employed by the University, ● Psychographics: LDS, family-oriented ● Self-interests: student success, money, University reputation, ● Influentials: The First Presidency and other church leaders, previous administrators, peers ● Prime information channels: Journals, email, Internet/websites, Faculty meetings, newsletters/magazines, ● Relationship to client: Invested interest in BYUSA. Volunteers of BYUSA ● Demographics: 18-26 years old, single or married, students

● Psychographics: caring, philanthropists, LDS, volunteer their time ● Self-interests: improve BYU, create successful events and opportunities for BYU students ● Influentials: BYUSA advisers, administrators, campus president ● Prime information channels: meetings, email, texting, social media ● Relationship to client: they volunteer for the client

Situation Analysis Brigham Young University (BYU) is a university in Provo, Utah, hosting roughly 33,000 undergraduate students as well 4,500 faculty and staff; most of whom are affiliated with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and adhere to a strict code of conduct known as the Honor Code. The Honor Code encourages commitment to morality, integrity and honesty. Brigham Young University Student Service Association (BYUSA), is the student service organization affiliated with BYU that assists students in upholding the school’s Honor Code and promotes the physical and spiritual well-being of the student body. Because the BYUSA sees unsafe driving as a serious threat the the physical well-being of the BYU community they have offered $5,000 to create a communication effort to increase safe driving among the BYU community.
Salt Lake City has recently been rated the sixth most dangerous city to drive in. More than a 1/3 of Utah driving fatalities occurring in 2010 involved college aged adults. Many of those deaths were BYU students. Statistics show that educating publics on safe driving habits significantly decreases fatalities. Obstacles working against efforts to encourage safer driving include: road construction, rushing to get home quicker, driving distractions and inclement weather. Eighty-five percent wear seat belts when driving, but only 74 percent wear seatbelts as a passenger. Of those surveyed, 20 percent use cell phones 2-3 times per week when traveling and 17 percent use it daily. Seventy-four percent spend less than five hours driving per week, while 35 percent drive alone. There is very little awareness of outside safe driving campaigns, with the most well known being about seat belt safety. Majority of single students surveyed claim the motivations for safe driving are to avoid paying for repairs from accidents, avoid tickets, avoid injury and avoid death. Majority of married students surveyed responded that the motivation for safe driving is their family.

Core Problem BYU students show a lack of awareness of safe driving campaigns around Utah, with the increasing number of fatalities and accidents occurring in the area. Students fail to adhere to traffic laws and to be mindful of the importance of following such laws. Failing to address these deficiencies will further exacerbate the problem of unsafe driving and increase the number of accidents and fatalities.

Action Planning

Goal
The goal of the communication effort is to raise awareness and provide sufficient education to motivate the BYU community to practice safe driving habits.

Objectives ● Decrease driving accidents among BYU students by 25% , from 295 to 220 by November 2012. ● Raise awareness of the risk factors in driving by 25% by November 2012. Risk factors include drowsiness, speeding and driving distracted. ● Decrease amount of distract driving from 84% to 50% by November 2012 ● Reduce the amount of passengers not wearing seat-belts from 26% to 10% by November 2012. ● Increase the amount of those who value obeying traffic laws from 85% to 95% by November 2012. ● Reducing the amounts of speeding tickets from 1,943 to 1,575 by November 2012 ● Decrease amount of fatalities from 54 to 30 by November 2012

Key Public: Freshmen residing on-campus
Public Profile ● Demographics: 18-19, single, have meal plans, low income/no income ● Psychographics: LDS, social (constantly around peers) ● Self-interests: school, grades, social life, dating ● Influentials: teachers, friends, RA, Ward leadership, parents ● Prime Information Channels: wards, hall meetings, internet, social networking, bulletin boards in dorms, word of mouth, campus events, e-mail ● Relationship to Client: Probably has the strongest relationship because they participate in BYUSA activities and services the most Messages Primary Message: Your first year at BYU determines your whole experience. Drive safely to ensure you see the rest of it. Secondary Messages: ● Thirty-seven percent of Utah traffic fatalities in 2010 occurred in Salt Lake County and Utah County ● Speeding tickets range from $50 to $400 in price ● Seat-belts significantly reduce the risk of accidents ● The top five driving dangers are Drowsy driving, distraction, aggression, impaired driving, and not using your seat-belt
Primary Message: Welcome to Utah. People here tend to drive differently, so use caution.

Secondary Messages: ● Speeding is the greatest contributing factor in traffic accidents ● Thirt-seven percent of Utah traffic fatalities in 2010 occurred in Salt Lake County and Utah County ● The average cost of a non fatal car accident is $61,600 ● BYU students may only work part time on campus

Strategies and Tactics ● To motivate first year students to use caution when driving, even though they have acquired new freedom, through activities. ○ “I’m free, but I’m responsible” dinner and dance ○ Safe driving and obeying traffic laws iPad contest ○ Posters and collateral material promoting statistics and consequences of unsafe driving. To be posted in residence halls and student eating facilities ○ Freshman safe driving video contest ○ Seat-belt spaghetti in Freshman dining facilities ○ Posters in residence halls and messages given by RA’s at hall meetings ○ “The #1 Cause of Death Among College Students” brochure to be on tables and stands at on-campus staged events and sporting events
● To encourage driving courteously through residential communication. ○ Posters in residential halls ○ “Seatbelt?” air fresheners handed out at sporting events and BYUSA campus activities ○ Safe driving t-shirts ○ Pens promoting safe driving habits handed out at promotional events and at booths at sporting events ○ Fliers stating driving statistics placed in residence halls mailboxes

Key Public: Single students residing off-campus
Public Profile ● Demographics: 18-26, single, low income may have a part time job ● Psychographics: LDS, social, growing more self-reliant ● Self-interests: dating, school, grades, social life ● Influentials: friends, church leadership, parents, teachers ● Prime Information Channels: wards, social networking, Internet, TV, e-mail ● Relationship to Client: Aware of BYUSA and attend some of their events Messages Primary Message: What your family really wants for the holidays....is you.

Secondary Messages: ● During the Thanksgiving and Christmas breaks you are 5 times more likely to be involved in a fatal car accident. ● The most common causes to driving accidents are drowsy driving, distracted driving, not wearing seat belts, and driving over the speed limit. ● The following holiday safe driving tips are from (http://www.iowadot.gov/tips.pdf) ● Before you start your trip, make sure your vehicle is tuned up and in good shape for travel. ● Restrain yourself and your passengers properly in seat belts and car safety seats. Remember, the rear seat is the safest place for children of any age to ride. ● Be flexible in setting your travel plans. Leave early if you can to avoid the peak traffic hours. If snow is predicted during the time you plan to travel, change your schedule. It is better to reschedule your get-together than to risk the lives of traveling family or friends. ● Forty-one percent of fatal traffic accidents are single vehicle crashes. These crashes most often occur during the late night/early morning hours and the late afternoon hours to drivers who are tired, have consumed alcohol, or both. ● Keep your speed down. Give yourself plenty of time and distance to react to the traffic around you. ● Let impatient and aggressive drivers pass you or go through the intersection ahead of you so that you control the situation. Do not pass if you cannot see enough clear road to pass safely. ● If you don’t feel confident with your defensive driving skills BYU offers a safe driving course. Primary Message: Distracted driving is dumb driving. Secondary Messages: ● Because driving requires your full attention, pull off the road if you have to use your cellular phone ● Stay fresh and alert when driving. Take plenty of breaks and do not push your-self to meet an unrealistic schedule. If you get tired, pull off the road into a rest area or business, get out of the car for some fresh air, buy something to refresh you, or just relax until you feel revived. If that doesn’t work, find a motel or campground where you can spend the night. ● Testimonial of woman who’s son was killed by a speeding driver ● In Utah you can be fined anywhere from $90 to $850 dollars for speeding. ● According to a texting while driving simulation study performed by associate professor of psychology at the University of Utah Frank Drews, “People who text message while driving are six times more likely to get into a crash than people who are not text messaging while driving” and that “talking on the phone while driving slows reflexes by about 9 to 10 percent, much less than that of text messaging.” (ZF Dec 16 2009) ● The average length that your eyes are off the road while you text while driving is equal to the length of one football field and an average of a few seconds. ● People who are distracted at the wheel are more likely to cross over the center lines. Crossing over the center lines can cause death to you and your family as well as the people in the oncoming vehicle.

● Accidents resulting in injury or death from texting can be charged with a felony, and up to $10,000 in fines and 15 years in prison.

Strategies &Tactics ● Motivate single off-campus students to drive safely during the holiday season through staged events and contests. ○ A video contest where students create a 30 second video to promote safe driving during the holidays. The winner will receive a $100 dollar gift card to the BYU Bookstore and have their video shown at a BYU football game as well as online on BYU’s website. All videos are to be submitted through a BYUSA Safe Driving channel established on YouTube. ○ A smashed up car will be displayed at Brigham Square the weeks before Thanksgiving and Christmas break. On both side of the car there will be posters promoting safe driving during the holidays and “The #1 Cause of Death Among College Students” brochure ○ At designated locations in both Logan and St. George there will be “safe driving pit stops.” At these locations free hot chocolate and popcorn will be given out as well as fliers promoting safe driving. There will also be notices of weather and traffic conditions. ○ At the BYU football and basketball home games closest to Thanksgiving and Christmas break there will be a booth set up near the student entrances to the arenas. The booth will distribute free popcorn and messages promoting safe driving during the holidays. ○ The week previous to Thanksgiving break BYUSA will sponsor a “Holiday Safe Driving Dance.” Safe driving materials will be distributed at the dance. To be admitted into the dance you must sign your name to the safe driving pledge.
● Motivate single off-campus students to not drive distracted through social media ○ Establish a “Safe Driving” Facebook page affiliated with BYUSA’s Facebook page. ○ The “Safe Driving” Facebook page will include links that connect to other safe driving campaigns such as Zero Fatalities and Don’t Text and Drive. ○ For “liking” the safe driving Facebook page or “following” safe driving on Twitter, students will be entered in to receive a $100 giftcard to the bookstore or a basketball signed by Jimmer Ferdette. ○ Periodic messages will be sent out over Facebook promoting driving without being distracted. ○ Periodic messages will be sent out over Twitter promoting driving without being distracted. ○ On the “Safe Driving” Facebook page there will be an opportunity for students to electronically sign a safe driving pledge. There will also be a running ticker recording the amount of pledges received. ○ All press releases will also be distributed through Facebook and Twitter.

Key Public: Married students
Public Profiles ● Demographics: Makes up 25% of entire student body, live off-campus, between ages 19-28, low income ● Psychographics: LDS, attending BYU to achieve a good education, young families, the majority are recently married, spend time with spouses and children, social, involved in church activities ● Self-interests: Want to keep family safe, want a secure, happy and healthy future with their family ● Influentials: Parents, spouses, President Samuelson, faculty members, BYUSA officers, church leaders ● Prime Information Channels: News media, Internet, BYU TV, Utah radio channels, on campus print resources and communication. ● Relationship to Client: Married students have a general understanding of BYUSA. They generally have been at school for longer periods of time than most students and know all the services that BYUSA provides. They do not volunteer their time or attend as many on-campus events as often as other publics. Messages Primary Message: The future of your family lies in the hands on the wheel. Don’t put an end to that future: drive safe. Secondary Messages: ● Traffic accidents are three times more likely to cause a fatality than any other Utah road. ● Thirty-seven percent of Utah traffic fatalities in 2010 occurred in the Salt Lake County and Utah County. ● According to Lieutenant Rick Delion of the Utah Department of Public Safety, “There is nothing sadder than arriving at the scene of a 10-85 Echo to learn that a young couple and their children are involved. 10-85 Echo is emergency medical code for ‘obvious fatality.’” ● Utah highway I-15 is the most dangerous state road in Utah. ● Young families are the most important social unit in society because of the promise that your parenting brings to the future of your community. The loss of any of your family members, including yourself, could cause great hurt to the fabric of society. ● You should drive with caution, with plenty of sleep, and with your seat-belt on because you could compromise the lives and safety of your family if you do not.
Primary Message: Distracted driving is the cause of the highest amount of traffic fatalities in Utah each year. The most dangerous distractions are cellphone use and eating while driving. Secondary Messages:

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Salt Lake and Utah County account for 37 percent of traffic fatalities in all of Utah in the year 2010. Crashing on the highway is painful for you, your family, and your friends. Driving distracted could be fatal or cause serious injury to you and to others in your car. Eating while driving is distracting and very dangerous because it takes your eyes and attention off the road Pull over at a rest-stop to eat, you will protect your family. On September 22, 2006, 19-year old Reggie Shaw's sports SUV suddenly drifted across the center lines into the oncoming lane. His car was no match for the small, four-door Saturn heading directly at him. Shaw's car clipped the back end bumper of the oncoming vehicle, causing it to swerve broadside across the center lines into the pick-up truck following Shaw. Reggie Shaw did not purposefully cross into oncoming traffic, and what was worse, was not even aware of the situation. He was preoccupied with texting on his cell phone and ultimately was the cause of the deaths of two innocent men with wives and families waiting for them at home. This story is just one example of many of the dangers of driving distracted. For the full story and many other accounts and statistics, visit ut.zerofatalities.com. According to a texting while driving simulation study performed by associate professor of psychology at the University of Utah Frank Drews, “People who text message while driving are six times more likely to get into a crash than people who are not text messaging while driving” and that “talking on the phone while driving slows reflexes by about 9 to 10 percent, much less than that of text messaging.” The average length that your eyes are off the road while you text while driving is equal to about four seconds and equal to driving the length of one football field blindfolded. People who are distracted at the wheel are more likely to cross over the center lines. Crossing over the center lines can cause death to you and your family as well as the people in the oncoming vehicle.

Strategies & Tactics ● To motivate married students to drive cautiously to protect their families through the use of news media. ○ KSL Radio PSA with written script of a young wife and/or mother coming home to a phone message from her husband telling her to go to the hospital because he was in a horrible accident and their child is injured. The PSA can end with the statistic that improper seat-belt usage and distracted driving are the cause of the highest amount of traffic fatalities in Utah each year, and that young families are not immune to these accidents ○ PSA on BYU TV emphasizing safe driving techniques ○ Press release in The Daily Universe emphasizing safe driving techniques by providing “tips for safe driving.” ○ PSA on BYU TV during football and basketball seasons of Zero Fatalities’ first TV spot commercial of highway crash scene that says, “Your friend. Your

wife. Your child. Your responsibility. Drowsy driving, distracted driving, aggressive driving, impaired driving, not buckling up.” ○ Write an article for BYU’s website. Submit to BYU’s Media Relations Manager for University Communications Michael Smart. ○ Post link to the winning video of the video contest on BYU TV’s website. ● To educate and motivate students to learn the importance of using seat-belts and car-seats while driving through on-campus communications. ○ Make fliers available at testing center exit during finals weeks. The fliers will include a QR code that takes them directly to the campaign facebook page. ○ Hang poster of testing center bulletin board at test exit encouraging safe driving. Post it during finals weeks. Include QR code. ○ Place fliers in the library and Wilkinson Center center-piece table ads. ○ Banners at the Law and Business buildings ○ Posters at Student Health Center ○ Distribute “Seatbelt?” air freshener at married housing ○ “The #1 Cause of Death Among College Students” brochure to be on tables and stands at on-campus staged events and sporting events

Key Public: Faculty and Staff
Public Profiles ● Demographics: 25-65, financially stable, employed by the university, single and married ● Psychographics: family-oriented, LDS, career-minded, follow the honor code ● Self-interests: students success, own research and publications, job security, family, time ● Influentials: peers, supervisors, administrators, First Presidency ● Prime Information Channels: faculty meetings, newsletters, email, internet, word of mouth ● Relationship to Client: little or no connection to BYUSA Messages Primary Message: There are 30,539 reasons why you should drive safely. Set the example for your students. Secondary messages: ● Drivers in Utah caught texting face penalties up to three months in jail and as much as $750 in fines. ● Accidents resulting in injury or death from texting can be charged with a felony, and up to $10,000 in fines and 15 years in prison.

● Majority of faculty commute from locations outside of Provo, using highway I-15 - the most dangerous road in Utah, where accidents are three times more likely to cause fatalities than other Utah roads. ● 37 percent of Utah traffic fatalities in 2010 occurred in Salt Lake County and Utah County.

Strategies and Tactics: ● To motivate faculty to practice safe driving habits through the Internet. ○ Twitter account with updates of road conditions. ○ Weekly email with safe driving tips and personal story of a BYU faculty member’s account of an accident related to them or family member or friend. ○ Blog with personal stories in a Chicken Soup for the Soul way or sharing both inspiring stories of miracles on the road and horror stories of warning to practice safe driving. ○ Faculty webpage with updates on road closures, construction, carpool information, faculty goals to educate students on better habits in driving, and monthly incentives. ● To motivate faculty to practice safe driving habits, encourage students to implement habits, and educate faculty and staff through events. ○ Faculty meetings promoting safe driving. ○ In-service training days where faculty can come up with department goals of improved safe driving. ○ Instruction event taught by a Zero Fatalities representative. ○ Luncheon with a driving theme and “The #1 Cause of Death Among College Students” brochure available on tables. ○ Driving etiquette dinner. ○ Department meetings discussing ideas for implementing into lessons. ○ Drive Safely work week, with each day being a different topic, with activities to launch the week, one day for if you are the driver, one day if you are a passenger, one day if you are a pedestrian or biker, and the last day on how to be a role model. ● To motivate faculty and staff to practice safe driving habits and educate students through workplace media. ○ Information packet of secondary messages and statistics. ○ Brochure of safe driving information. ○ Curriculum packet with teaching ideas. ○ News release posted in the kitchens. ○ Seat belt reminder printed on car freshener. ○ Gas vouchers given each semester in a drawing qualified by no points on license, no accidents, etc. ○ Safe driving tips in each issue of the employee newsletter. ○ Online safe driving page from the University website.

Calendars and Budgets _______________________________________________________________

Evaluation
Objective 1 Criteria: Two-hundred and twenty driving accidents among BYU students within the next year. Tool: Check the BYU police records halfway through the campaign and again at the end of the campaign and compare the progress to the original results. Objective 2 Criteria: Eighty percent of drivers are aware of the risk factors in driving. Tool: Survey the awareness of driving risk factors halfway through the campaign and again at the end of the campaign and compare the progress to the original results. Objective 3 Criteria: Fifty percent of drivers drive distracted. Tool: Distribute a survey halfway through the campaign and another at the end, and compare results to information collected at the beginning. Objective 4 Criteria: Ten percent of passengers do not wear seat belts. Tool: Distribute a survey halfway through the campaign and survey again at the end of the campaign, then compare the progress to the original results. Objective 5 Criteria: Ninety-five percent think obeying traffic laws is important. Tool: Survey feelings towards traffic laws halfway through the campaign and again at the end of the campaign, then compare the progress to the original results. Objective 6 Criteria: Around 1,575 speeding tickets given within the next year. Tool: Check in with the BYU Police Department halfway into the campaign and again at the end of the campaign. Compare the progress to the original results. Objective 7 Criteria: Thirty fatalities among the BYU community within the next year. Tool: Check in with the BYU Police Department halfway into the campaign and again at the end of the campaign. Compare the progress to the original results.

Survey _________________________________________________________________
Marital status?
• •

Married Single

How often do you drive alone?
• • • • • • •

Never Less than Once a Month Once a Month 2-3 Times a Month Once a Week 2-3 Times a Week Daily

How many hours per week do you spend driving?
• • •

0-5 5-10 10+

What is the most likely reason for you to drive above than the speed limit? How often do you use your cell phone when driving? (texting, chatting, as a GPS, etc.)
• • • • • • •

Never Less than Once a Month Once a Month 2-3 Times a Month Once a Week 2-3 Times a Week Daily

How often do you wear your seat belt when driving?

Never

• • • •

Rarely Sometimes Frequently Always

How often do you wear your seat belt as a passenger?
• • • • •

Never Rarely Sometimes Frequently Always

How do you feel about the importance of obeying traffic laws?
Importance % Scale 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Name a safe driving campaign central to Utah drivers. What motivates you to be a safe driver?

Works Cited
_____________________________________________________________________ Elliot, H. (2009, January 21). Most dangerous times to drive. Forbes. Retrieved November 5, 2011 from http://www.forbes.com Dakss, B. (2009, February 11). Winter driving: Facts from fiction. CBS News. Retrieved November 12, 2011 from http://www.cbsnews.com Fortin, B. (n.d.). Speeding ticket facts:interesting speeding ticket facts & statistics you don't see everyday.. Retrieved from http://www.trafficticketsecrets.com/speeding-ticketfacts.html Safe-driving tips for the holidays. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.iowadot.gov/tips.pdf T., D. (2010, May 05). Personal stories and comments by members of crashprevention.org. Retrieved from http://www.crashprevention.org How much will my car insurance rates rise after an accident? (2011). Retrieved November 29, 2011 from http://www.best-insurance-deals.net Virginia Tech Transportation Institute. (2009, July 29). New data from virginia tech transportation institute provides insight into cell phone use and driving distraction. Retrieved October 22, 2011 from http://www.vtnews.vt.edu/articles Utah Zero Fatalities. (2006). Zero fatalities utah. Retrieved from http://ut.zerofatalities.com Personal contact with BYU's Police Department Lieutenant Arnold Lemmon Personal contact with Jane Putnam of the Zero Fatalities Program Byu demographics. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://yfacts.byu.edu/viewarticle.aspx?id=135 Parrish, H. M. (2009). Causes of death among college students. Public Health Reports, 71(11), 1081- 1085. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/

Ten Tactics Flier

What your family really wants for the holidays, is you... Safe Driving Tips
Buckle Up!
Did you know that 40% of traffic deaths are because people don't wear seat-belts? It's the #1 cause of death on the road.

Slow down!
Did you know that you only save an average of 3 minutes when you drive 10 mph over the speed limit?

Drop the phone!
Did you know that cell phones are the # 1 thing that distract drivers?

Drive safe this holiday season.

See stats and stories at byusa.byu.edu

Brochure

THE #1 CAUSE OF DEATH AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS...

…Car Crashes

Don't be a statistic, drive safe.
Safety on the road is one of the most important responsibilities we have in this community. In 2010, more than 250 traffic fatalities occurred. Fifty-four of those were your peers; college-aged students in Utah. That is 54 too many. So what is the cause all these tragedies? Three unsafe driving habits: 1. Not wearing a seat-belt

2. Speeding 3. Driving distracted

What to do
Be smart. Wear your seat-belt, don't speed, and put distractions out of reach. Visit BYUSA on Facebook for more information and to take the “Safe Driving Oath.” Visit Zero Fatalities online to see what you can do to help Utah drive safe. Visit the Click it or Ticket website and see how you can help keep the BYU community safe.
publicsafety.utah.gov/highwaysafety/clickit.html

Download AT&T's DriveMode. This app. shuts off texts and calls once you enter your car. It could save your life.

BYU/SA
St ud e nt S e rvice A sso cia t ion 3400 WSC BYU Campus byusa@byu.edu Visit our website for more information www.byusa.byu.edu

Seat-belts

Wearing your seat-belt is the first and most important thing to do while driving.
• •

Improper seat-belt usage caused 89 deaths on the road in the year 2010. More than 90 percent of all motorists believe seat-belts are a good idea, but less than 14 percent actually use them. Safety belts reduce the number of serious traffic injuries by 50 percent and fatalities by 60-70 percent. All accidents and fatalities happen with 25 miles of your home. Wear a seat-belt.

Speeding

Speeding is the number one cause of car accidents among college-aged students.
• • • •

When you speed, you put all other drivers at risk, as well as passengers in the car Speeding was the cause of 70 deaths in Utah in the year 2010 There were 35 deaths on I-15 last year. Speed was the main cause. You only save about three minutes when you drive ten mph over the limit. It's not worth the risk. Just leave earlier!

Distractions

Driving distracted is dumb.
• • •

If you text and drive, you are six times more likely to get in a car accident. Talking on the phone while driving slows reflexes by nine to ten percent. Your eyes are off the road for an average of four seconds when texting. It's like you're driving the length of a football field blindfolded. Accidents resulting in injury or death: charged a felony, and up to $10,000 in fines and 15 years in jail. Just being caught texting is a $750 fine.

Blog Page and Post

DRIVE SAFELY: A BYU blog committed to safe driving
Monday, December 5, 2011

Life is too short...don't make it shorter by distracted driving
In April 2005, most of the month consisted of 60-70 degree weather...that is until Saturday the 23rd. This is where the nice weather ended and my story begins...the story of one young, stupid, unlucky, 19 year old. My name is Ryan Moss, currently 21 going on 22. I Graduated from Brighton in 03'. At the time of my accident, I was 19, the great age where the young adult population thinks & feel that they are invincible. I am here to tell you that you aren't invincible by any means, no matter how old or young you may be.

I am happy to say, I am one of the few lucky people who have owned a SRT-4. I had a black 2005 SRT-4 with the "normal" bolt-ons & turbo kit. To say the least, it was quick. I purchased this car on December 29th, 2004...meaning this car was not even 4 months old when it was totaled. The day started out with overcast skies and had a couple scattered rain clouds. There was a warning in effect for freezing rain later that night. Since I bought the car, I treated it like I would a child. I was very partial to let people driving it, but for some reason, I did not feel like driving my car at all that day. I guess I should've listened to that "little voice". 3 of my friends and I planned to meet a few girls at an Applebee's restaurant, off of Milford Rd. & I-96, for a late lunch that afternoon...the last place that I can fully remember before my accident. The restaurant was about 15 minutes away from my friend Garrick's house, where we all met to car pool. My friend Adam and I rode in my car, in which I let/made him drive. Garrick and my other friend, Joe, took Joe's 98' GSX. While we were eating lunch, we all noticed a hostess checking me out. We finished our lunch and planned on heading back to Garrick's house which was in Brighton. I handed Adam my keys again, and told him I'd be out in a second...I stopped and talked/ flirted with the hostess a little. (Yes, I got her number!) Adam decided that he'd start my car but let me "show off" my car and let me drive out of the parking lot and back to Garrick's. I walked out the door and saw Adam buckled up in my passenger seat, so naturally I hopped into my driver seat. We proceeded to pull out of the parking lot onto the main road, which is the very last memory I had of that day.

Once on the main road, the entrance to the expressway is about 100 yards or so. Once we were on the expressway, a silver 2000 Camaro SS drove by in the left hand lane. This happened just as it started to sprinkle, and I mean it was barely doing that. I quickly caught up the Camaro with Joe and Garrick following behind. I noticed the very cute, young blonde in the passenger smiling...so I decided to give you a little more to smile about. I was in the center lane and the Camaro was in the left...I downshifted and decided to edge him on to a harmless run on the expressway...a race, to be technical. If you know anything about SRT-4s, you know they are COMPLETE torque monsters! When I downshifted, I decided to drop it into 3rd, rather than 4th. My wheels spun for about a second then caught traction. We immediately went from 70mph to a good 95+mph...and seeing that I was actually pulling

on him, I decided to keep it going. A car was up ahead of me, so it was either quit or pass the car on the right; I went for the pass. Just as I passed the car, my car hydroplaned and I let off the gas which brought our speed back to the 70-75mph range. At that moment, my ass-end literally floated to the sideways, and we were sliding sideways down the expressway doing 70mph. We quickly caught a dry patch of pavement which sent us off the right side of the expressway down into a ditch...and sent the car airborne crashing through a young tree. This tree shoved the FMIC into the block and stalled the car out...no power steering or brakes. When the car landed, I somehow managed to turn the car to the left so it was parallel with the expressway. Because of the low profile tires, the tire blew and the rim dug into the ground...at the same exact time we crashed into a pile of brush. The combination of the 2 sent the car into a roll. When the car landed, it did not land flat on the roof but instead landed right on the driver's side A-pillar bringing the roof down to steering wheel level. Just as you might think, my face met the roof. For all of you who do not know me, I'm 6'5, so I literally "face planted" into it. The car rolled another 4.5 times, sliding about 30 or so yards on its roof. To say the least, Adam and I were lucky at this time because the car stopped in the middle of a "U" of trees. Adam opened his eyes to the amazement of what just happened and quickly looked over to me. He saw a vision that is said to be one of the worst things ever seen or imaginable...I was hanging lifeless from my seat, bleeding out of every orifice on my face, with the size of my head comparable to a NBA basketball. He crawled out of his window, which was still full shape, to check if the car was on fire and call 911. To his amazement, the car was not on fire and his feelings & emotions were overwhelmed with adrenaline and fulfilling his need to save my life.

Joe and Garrick came running to my car. Garrick tended to Adam and Joe jumped into my car to try tending to me. I was unconscious, so Joe cautiously awoke me. I apparently started twisting and moving around but with the sight of my injuries, Joe yelled at me to stop moving. I listened to him as if I was a toddler playing some sort of game. When the paramedics arrived, they immediately called for a Med-Flite. The firefighters and paramedics encountered the biggest decision...cutting the door apart to pull me out as safely as they could, or pull me out from the back window on the driver side. They decided to exit me through the rear due to time and the sustained injuries (the massive amount of blood loss being the biggest at the time). Within 5 minutes of take-off, the Med-Flite returned to the hospital to the weather that took a sudden turn for the worst, It was now showering a mixture of snow and freezing rain with large gusts of wind. The officers arrived to close all 3 lanes of the highway. The paramedics were nervously arguing if they were to transport me to the University of Michigan hospital that was about 20-30 minutes (normal driving) away or Beaumont Hospital that was approximately 40 minutes away. They decided to go with Beaumont because of the better trauma center the hospital had. Part of the decision to do so, was to stop at a class 3 (1 being the most extreme/best) trauma hospital on the way to start initial assessments to my injuries.

Joe finally found my cell phone at this time and told me mom where I was being transported, leaving out the decision to transport me to Beaumont afterwards. My mom knew that the Providence Hospital was not a serious hospital and expected that outcome of me. First, the doctors cut a tracheotomy into my throat to allow my to breath since my mouth (along with me eyes) were literally swollen shut to the point I was barely able to breath. After a couple CT scans, MRIs, and X-Rays, the doctors finally knew what they were dealing with. In all, I had collapsed my right lung, fractured my C5 &C6 (mid-lower neck) vertebrate and misplaced my C7(lower neck) vertebrate posterior by ~1/2 cm, and massively bruised my T-Spine (the part of the spine that starts at shoulder level & ends midway down your shoulder blade) as well. I had lost approximately 3.5-4 (~1/2 of my total blood in my body) pints of blood by this time and knew they had to go internally to stop the bleeding. The worst was just now being learned...I separated my upper jaw literally into 2 pieces (top-bottom), fractured both eye sockets, and separated my front 1/2 of my face away from the skull. I also pierced my upper sinus cavity as a result to the broken/smashed/misplaced facial structure. My mom arrived and kindly did what any mother would do, ask to see her son. They denied the request at first without any explanation knowing the way I looked and realizing her emotions weren't of a parent that knew the truth of what happened. After a lot of screaming, the doctor came out to my friends and family and explained all of my injuries. My mother's body literally went limp as a result of the doctor's sentence "There is not an expected outcome of his injuries that he will survive through the night". This compiled her heart because 9 months earlier, our family lost my father (her ex) to a work accident. Knowing I had to get to Beaumont very quickly, 5 State Troopers made the decision to lead the ambulance down the highway in a "flying-v" formation, clearing away traffic.

I arrived at the hospital with another pint loss of blood. Another pint or even less, I would be dead. I was rushed into surgery right away. I had undergone the first of 3, 8 hour facial reconstructive surgeries. Within the time of prepping me and stopping the bleeding, I lost another half pint of blood...the total being 5.5 pints (~2/3 total blood loss). Over the next 5.5 weeks I was in the hospital, I had 3 'L' plates surgically placed in my mid-face structure secured with 17 screws. I also had an egg shaped plate placed into my right eye socket. Because of the injuries sustained to my upper jaw, my mouth was wired shut for a total of 9.5 weeks. I wore a neck brace for a total of 12 straight weeks then had another month of wearing it whenever I was in a car. When I was first discharged from the hospital, I was walking with a cane, wearing an eye patch (I had major double vision in my right eye) and had to wear my neck brace. It was not fun being 19 and going shopping with your mother a month later having kids point at you and giggle/laugh or ask their parents why you were so "different". I hated myself and my actions at this point in life. I lost a total of 46 pounds within the 5.5 weeks I was admitted into the hospital. In total, I've undergone over $50,000 worth of dental work...18 root canals, 23 crowns, 1 extraction/implant, and a gum surgery where they literal had to slice my gums and pull them down to meet

my teeth. A year later to the day, I was discharged again from Beaumont from the surgery I had that included 6 screws, 2 rods, and 1 lateral link. It was back to wearing the neck brace for another month. In November of 2005, I had an eye lid surgery that stopped my droopy upper eye lid on my right eye. I was back to wearing a patch for a week.

If thought the physical injuries were bad, they don't even add up to the mental ones. I had to have my mom dress me, shower me, wipe my behind after going to the bathroom, tying my shoes (I could not bend over because of the surgeries), give me my medication, hold my arm while walking to make sure I did not fall over, and most of all...drive me around and make the "rules" that I had once moved away & escaped from. I was helpless again...I felt like a toddler all over again. Add all of that to the fact you know your face looks substantially different...but you're too afraid to look and accept what your carelessness did. You can barely talk to the point people understand you because you jaw is wired shut. You pee the bed again from the side effects from the medication and having a total of 3 catheters in & out of you in 5.5 weeks. Not done? How about the loss of an estimated 4-6% of your brain? That sounds about right. All of this with the guilty conscience of stupidity, immaturity, and the thought of being invincible. All for what...to show off to a girl. Was it worth it? I'll answer that in a bit...

So you might be wondering what happened to Adam, if anything. He walked away with only 5 stitches and some embedded glass in his scalp. I thank the Lord everyday that is was me and not him. I started driving again in October of 2005 and am now just getting back to working again (February 2007). My day-to-day life is 99% the same as before but I do at time have hard time remembering certain words when talking. I also combine words at times (example: instead of yellow hummer...it came out yummer). My short term memory is quite bad and my multi-tasking skills are pretty much non-existent. I was currently 6 weeks away from graduating Pennsylvania Culinary Institute when I got into my accident and cannot go back and finish due to my neck injuries and the lack of multi-tasking skills. I'm still in a struggle with my (car) insurance company every week for what they are to pay or not. Luckily I do not have to pay any accident related medical expense for the rest of my life due to having coordinated medical insurance on my car insurance when I got into my accident. I am also yet to get back into any college/ university but am planning to start in the fall semester going towards one of 3 career possibilities at this time (nurse, elementary teacher, or liberal arts degree towards an HR job). So, do I regret everything?

There is a part of me that regrets my stupidity and my actions, yes, but everything that I have learned and come-to-be in the outcome of everything, never! I have matured more than anyone could deem possible and have really realized what the true meaning of life really is. I thank God everyday for sparing my life to the despair of my doctors, nurses, friends, and family to this day. I could go on and on about this story and go more in depth about what I've learned, but just know that life IS too short and is even more valuable...to not only you, but others around you. If any of this made you think, please keep racing and speeding to the track. The results of injury to yourself or others are not worth the small amount of adrenaline and excitement one gets lining up next to an opposing driver on the street. Just like anything and everything in life, there is a time and place.

Thank you, Ryan Moss ryancmoss@yahoo.com

Gas Voucher

YouTube Channel

Radio PSA
Christian Jones Radio Ad Copy Client: Spot: Writer: BYUSA :106.5 “Drive Safe for your Family” Christian Jones

SFX: Car driving BILL: (cautiously) Hey Jack, you want to take a little break from the wheel, your looking pretty tired.

JACK: (tiredly) No no, were already late, my family will be waiting up for me, man, I cant wait to see them. B: Okay, your call. J: Just one more hour, I can make it…. SFX: Dreamy music as Jack slips into a day dream Female Child: (excitedly) Mommy, mommy! When will daddy get here? Jack’s Wife: (worriedly) Any minute now darling, any minute now…. SFX: Phone ringing J W: That’s probably your daddy right now explaining why he is late. SFX: Picking up the phone J W: Hello? Police Officer: Mrs. Williams? J W: Yes? Who is this? P O: (sadly) This is Officer Johnson, Mrs. Williams, I am afraid I have some bad news about your husband…. J W: (shocked) No….. but…. (sobbing) No please no…. SFX: Dreamy music as Jack comes out of a daydream. J: Hey, ummm Bill?

B: Yeah? J: I’m feeling a little too sleepy to keep driving; I’m going to pull off at the next exit, mind taking over the wheel? B: No problem, good idea. NARRATOR: Please drive safely. Your family depends on you. A message from the Brigham Young University Student Association.

News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Contact: Cami Dayley Cmdayley19@gmail.com 555 N 555 E Provo, UT 801-555-5555 BYUSA Promotes Safe Driving Across Campus Provo, UTAH – November 1, 2011 – BYUSA is promoting safety among their students when driving on the road to decrease road accident statistics and promote safety in Utah. Recognizing the danger that Utah roads can present to BYU students, BYUSA has launched a full campaign encouraging their students to drive safely and cautiously. A series of promotional material full of facts about safe driving is being released to students this week. Along with these are activities and contests that students can participate in to form life-long safe driving habits. “Safety of students on the roads is always a concern for me” Cecil O. Samuelson, president of BYU said.

“It will be good to know that they (the students) are getting the information they need so they can drive safely.” BYUSA is the student service organization associated with Brigham Young University. They are located in the Ernest L. Wilkenson Student Center on campus. ###

Poster

Air Freshener

BYUSA Safe Driving Facebook Page

Key Public Strategy: to motivate married students to drive cautiously to protect their families through the use of news media Tactics:

Married Students

Month Week

Nov. 1 2

3

4

Dec. 1 2

3

4

Jan. 1 2 3 4

Feb. 1 2 3 4

March 1 2 3 4

April 1 2 3 4

May 1 2 3 4

June 1 2 3 4

July 1 2 3 4

Aug. 1 2 3 4

Sept. 1 2 3 4

Oct. 1 2 3 4

Detail

Per Item Cost

Total Projected

Sponsored Credit

Actual Projected

KSL Radio PSA BYU TB PSA Daily Universe press release Football and basketball BYUTV PSA BYU website article post winning video on BYUTV's website

''' X---------------X--------------

-----X -----X ''''X X-----------X-X ---------------------

''''''''''X Strategy Subtotal

air time costs $100/day air time costs $200/day no cost air time $500/game BYUSA Volunteer BYUSA Volunteer

$100 $200 $0 $500 $0 $0

$1000 $2000 $0 $10000 $0 $0

$1000 $2000 $0 $10000 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Strategy: to educate and motivate students to learn the importance of using seatbelts and carseats while driving through print resources Tactics: Fliers at testing center during finals Poster in testing center Fliers in library and wilk center piece banners at law building and tanner building student health center "seatbelt?" car freshener

'''X X-X X----X X----X '''''''X-----------''X

''''''''''''''X ''''''X-X X---X X---X ""''X Strategy Subtotal Public Subtotal

paper 20,000 @ .05/ea 1 @ $150//ea 4 @ 30,000 @ .05/ea 2 @ $150/ea 1 @ $150/ea 30,000 @ .50/ea

$0.05 $150 $0.05 $150 $150 $0.5

$100 $150 $1500 $300 $150 $15000

$0 $150 $1500 $0 $0 $15000

$100 $0 $0 $300 $150 $0 $550 $550

X

Key Public

Single off-campus students

Month Week

Nov. 1 2

3

4

Dec. 1 2

3

4

Jan. 1 2 3 4

Feb. 1 2 3 4

March 1 2 3 4

April 1 2 3 4

May 1 2 3 4

June 1 2 3 4

July 1 2 3 4

Aug. 1 2 3 4

Sept. 1 2 3 4

Oct. 1 2 3 4

Detail

Per Item Cost

Total Projected

Sponsored Credit

Actual Projected

Strategy: Motivate single off-campus students to not drive distracted through social media Tactics: “Safe Driving” Facebook page Facebook messages $100 bookstore giftcard contest through sporting events Twitter messages Safe driving pledge Press releases through facebook and twitter

X X----------> (ongoing) X----X X---X X----X X----------> (ongoing) X----------> (ongoing) Strategy Subtotal

BYUSA volunteer time BYUSA volunteer time giftcard 2 @$100/ea BYUSA volunteer time online - no cost PR effort time

$0 $0 $100 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $200 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $200 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Motivate single offcampus students to drive safely during the holiday season through staged events and contests. Tactics: Video contest to be aired at football games Pit stops in St. George and Logan Road safety booth at football and basketball games Holiday Safe driving dance X '''''''X X------------''X air time at 2 @ $500/ea food 2,000 @ $5/ea BYUSA volunteer time food and decorations donated Strategy Subtotal Public Subtotal $500 $5 $0 $0 $1000 10000 $0 $0 $1000 $10000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

''X -X

Key Public Strategy: To motivate first year students to use caution when driving, even though they have acquired new freedom, through activities.

Single on-campus students

Month Week

Nov. 1 2

3

4

Dec. 1 2

3

4

Jan. 1 2 3 4

Feb. 1 2 3 4

March 1 2 3 4

April 1 2 3 4

May 1 2 3 4

June 1 2 3 4

July 1 2 3 4

Aug. 1 2 3 4

Sept. 1 2 3 4

Oct. 1 2 3 4

Detail

Per Item Cost

Total Projected

Sponsored Credit

Actual Projected

Tactics:

"I'm free, but I'm responsible" dinner and dance safe driving and obeying traffic laws iPad contest posters and collateral material freshman safe driving video contest seatbelt spaghetti in dining facilities posters in residence halls

''X X----X X-----------X---X ''X X-------> (ongoing) Strategy Subtotal ---------X X-------------X

food and decorations donated 1 @ $500/ea 50 @ $10/ea BYUSA volunteer time regular cost of food 50 @ $10/ea

$0 $500 $10 $0 $0 $10

$0 $500 $500 $0 $0 $500

$0 $500 $300 $0 $0 $300

$0 $0 $200 $0 $0 $200 $400

Strategy: To encourage driving courteously through residential communication Tactics: Posters in residential halls Car air freshener reminders safe driving t-shirts pens promoting safe driving habits fliers stating driving statistics

X-----> (ongoing) ''X ''X X---------X----------

X-----X --------X --------X

X

X '''''X

50 @ $10/ea 7,000 @ .50/ea 7,000 @ 3./ea 10,000 @ .10/ea 10,000@ .05/ea Strategy Subtotal Public Subtotal

$10 $0.5 $3 $0.1 $0.05

$500 $3500 $21000 $100 $50

$300 $3500 $21000 $0 $0

$200 $0 $0 $100 $50 $350 $750

Key Public

Faculty

Month Week

Nov. 1 2

3

4

Dec. 1 2

3

4

Jan. 1 2 3 4

Feb. 1 2 3 4

March 1 2 3 4

April 1 2 3 4

May 1 2 3 4

June 1 2 3 4

July 1 2 3 4

Aug. 1 2 3 4

Sept. 1 2 3 4

Oct. 1 2 3 4

Detail

Per Item Cost

Total Projected

Sponsored Credit

Actual Projected

Strategy:To motivate faculty to practice safe driving habits through the Internet. Tactics: Twitter updates of road conditions. Weekly email with safe driving tips and BYU faculty story Blog with personal stories. Faculty webpage with updates

X-------> (ongoing) X-------> (ongoing) X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X X'''X X Strategy Subtotal

BYUSA Volunteer time BYU faculty time BYUSA and Faculty timeVolunteer time BYUSA and Faculty timeVolunteer time

$0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Strategy:To motivate faculty to practice safe driving habits, encourage students to implement habits, and educate faculty and staff through events. Tactics: Faculty meetings promoting safe driving. In-service training days Instruction event taught by a Zero Fatalities representative. Luncheon with a driving theme. Driving etiquette dinner. Department meetings discussing ideas for implementing into lessons. Drive Safely work week

X--------> (ongoing ''''''' X ''''''' X ''X

''''''' X

''''''' X

''''''' X ''X

''''''' X

''''''' X

''''''' X

''''''' X

''''''' X ''''''' X

''''''' X ''X

''''''' X

''X X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X 1 '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X '''''''''''''X X Strategy Subtotal

$500 for food $500 for food and $150 decorations

$500 $650

$200 $250

$300 $400

Strategy:To motivate faculty and staff to practice safe driving habits and educate students through workplace media. Tactics: Information packet of secondary messages and statistics. Brochure of safe driving information. Curriculum packet with teaching ideas. News release posted in the kitchens. Seat belt reminder printed on car freshener. Gas vouchers Safe driving tips newsletter. X X X X ''''''''''''X ''X X '''X X X X ''X ''X ''X ''''''''X ''X ''X ''X ''X ''''''''X ''''''''X ''''''''X ''''''''X ''''''''X ''''''''X ''''''''''''' X X X """"""""X """"""X ''X ''''''''X ''X ''X Strategy Subtotal Public Subtotal Seat belt reminder air fresheners Gas vouchers 0.36 100 each $720 $400 $720 $400

Key Public Strategy: to motivate married students to drive cautiously to protect their families through the use of news media Tactics:

Married Students

Detail

Per Item Cost

Total Projected

Sponsored Credit

Actual Projected

KSL Radio PSA BYU TB PSA Daily Universe press release Football and basketball BYUTV PSA BYU website article post winning video on BYUTV's website

air time costs $100/day air time costs $200/day no cost air time $500/game BYUSA Volunteer BYUSA Volunteer

$100 $200 $0 $500 $0 $0

$1000 $2000 $0 $10000 $0 $0

$1000 $2000 $0 $10000 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Strategy Subtotal Strategy: to educate and motivate students to learn the importance of using seatbelts and carseats while driving through print resources Tactics: Flyers at testing center during finals Poster in testing center flyers in library and wilk center piece banners at law building and tanner building student health center "seatbelt?" car freshener Strategy Subtotal Key Public Single off-campus students Strategy: Motivate single off-campus students to not drive distracted through social media Tactics: “Safe Driving” Facebook page Facebook messages

paper 20,000 @ .05/ea 1 @ $150//ea 4 @ 30,000 @ .05/ea 2 @ $150/ea 1 @ $150/ea 30,000 @ .50/ea

$0.05 $150 $0.05 $150 $150 $0.5

$100 $150 $1500 $300 $150 $15000

$0 $150 $1500 $0 $0 $15000

$100 $0 $0 $300 $150 $0 $550

BYUSA volunteer time BYUSA volunteer time

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

Key Public

Married Students $100 bookstore giftcard contest through sporting events Twitter messages Safe driving pledge Press releases through facebook and twitter

Detail giftcard 2 @$100/ea BYUSA volunteer time online - no cost PR effort time

Per Item Cost $100 $0 $0 $0

Total Projected $200 $0 $0 $0

Sponsored Credit $200 $0 $0 $0

Actual Projected $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Strategy Subtotal Motivate single offcampus students to drive safely during the holiday season through staged events and contests. Tactics: Video contest to be aired at football games Pit stops in St. George and Logan Road safety booth at football and basketball games Holiday Safe driving dance Strategy Subto Key Public Strategy: To motivate first year students to use caution when driving, even though they have acquired new freedom, through activities. Tactics: Single on-campus students air time at 2 @ $500/ea food 2,000 @ $5/ea BYUSA volunteer time food and decorations donated $500 $5 $0 $0 $1000 10000 $0 $0 $1000 $10000 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0

"I'm free, but I'm responsible" dinner and dance safe driving and obeying traffic laws iPad contest posters promoting activities freshman safe driving video contest seatbelt spaghetti in dining facilities posters in residence halls

food and decorations donated 1 @ $500/ea 50 @ $10/ea BYUSA volunteer time regular cost of food 50 @ $10/ea

$0 $500 $10 $0 $0 $10

$0 $500 $500 $0 $0 $500

$0 $500 $300 $0 $0 $300

$0 $0 $200 $0 $0 $200 $200

Strategy Subtotal

Key Public Married Students Strategy: To encourage driving courteously through residential communication Tactics: Posters in residential halls Car air freshener reminders safe driving t-shirts pens promoting safe driving habits fliers stating driving statistics Strategy Subtotal Public Subtotal

Detail

Per Item Cost

Total Projected

Sponsored Credit

Actual Projected

50 @ $10/ea 7,000 @ .50/ea 7,000 @ 3./ea 10,000 @ .10/ea 10,000@ .05/ea

$10 $0.5 $3 $0.1 $0.05

$500 $3500 $21000 $100 $50

$300 $3500 $21000 $0 $0

$200 $0 $0 $100 $50 $350 $550

Key Public Faculty Strategy:To motivate faculty to practice safe driving habits through the Internet. Tactics: Twitter updates of road conditions. BYUSA Volunteer time Weekly email with safe driving tips and BYU faculty story BYU faculty time BYUSA and Faculty Blog with personal stories. timeVolunteer time BYUSA and Faculty Faculty webpage with updates timeVolunteer time Strategy Subtotal Strategy:To motivate faculty to practice safe driving habits, encourage students to implement habits, and educate faculty and staff through events. Tactics: Faculty meetings promoting safe driving. In-service training days Instruction event taught by a Zero Fatalities representative. Luncheon with a driving theme. regular faculty meeting time and staff Safety speaker zero fatality volunteer time 3,000 meals @ $5.00/ea

$0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0 $0 $0

$0 $1,000/speaker $0 $15000

$0 $2000 $0 $15000

$0 $2000 $0 $15000

$0 $0 $0 $0

Key Public

Married Students Driving etiquette dinner. Department meetings discussing ideas for implementing into lessons. Drive Safely work week

Detail 3,000 meals @$7.00/ea regular department meetings gas vouchers 3,000 @.05/ea

Per Item Cost $21000 $0 $0.05

Total Projected Sponsored Credit Actual Projected $21000 $21000 $0 $0 $150 $0 $0 $0 $150 $150

Strategy Subtotal Strategy:To motivate faculty and staff to practice safe driving habits and educate students through workplace media. Tactics: Information packet of secondary messages and statistics. Brochure of safe driving information. Curriculum packet with teaching ideas. News release posted in the kitchens. Seat belt reminder printed on car freshener. Gas vouchers Safe driving tips newsletter. 21,000 pages @ 0.05/ea Cardstock 4,000 @.10/ea 21,000 pages @ 0.05/ea 100 pages @ 0.05/ea 4,000 @ 0.36/ea 3,000 @.05/ea 4,000@ .05/ea $0.05 $0.1 $0.05 $0.05 $0.36 $0.05 $0.05 $1050 $400 $1050 $5 $1440 $150 $200 $1000 $200 $1000 $5 $1440 $0 $200

$50 $200 $50 $5 $0 $150 $0 $405 $555

Strategy Subtotal Public Subtotal