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Issue 22 October 2012

OLYMPIC GAMES Meet the 2012 Olympic Champions Firsts for women in London p. 3 p. 8

oie de vivre for SouthAfricas J lightweight mens four p. 10 Alone together rowing for Portugal p. 12 Bond of brothers Martin & Valent Sinkovic p. 14

Quintessentially English thesuccess of Leander Club p. 16 PARALYMPIC GAMES Fast times in Paralympic rowing ROWERS OF THE FUTURE Germanys golden girl Julia Lier UNIVERSITY ROWING A generation inspired HEROES OF THE PAST A lifetime for rowing: Ricardo Ibarra HEALTH p. 28 p. 25 p. 23 p. 18

One goal for Oksana Masters p. 21

M e m ories f rom Lon don

Competitive in the face of cancer one rowers story p. 29

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Issue 22 October 2012

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Womens Pair (W

2-)

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Womens Quadruple sculls (W4x)


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w/ 2012 Harry Ho

and Helen Glover (l) g (r) of HeatherStannin e first Britain are th Great wers to win British female ro Olympic gold.

Mens eight (M8+)


asKuffner, Filip Adamski (b), Andre ximilianReinelt, EricJohannesen, Ma Mueller, Richard Schmidt, Lukas KristofWilke(s) FlorianMennigen, Germany and cox MartinSauer of n Dorney regatta racing on the Eto 12 Olympic course at the London 20 y were soon to Games where the win gold.

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Issue 22 October 2012

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2012 Harry How/Getty Images

Meet the 2012 olympic champions

Kateryna Tarasenko(l), Nataliya Dovgodko, Anastasiia Kozhenkova and Yana Dementieva(r) of Ukraine sing their national anthem on the podium after winning Olympic gold.

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Mens double sculls (M2x)

> Meet the 2012 olympic champions


lightweight M 4-) ens Four (lM

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pions Olympic Cham llivan (r) and Joseph Su (l) from Nathan Cohen and show off New Zeal al. their gold med

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Womens eight (W8+)

u (s), Lawrence Ndlov ew Brittain and Matth JohnSmith, e on (b) celebrat JamesThomps ricas first ever h Af winning Sout edal in rowing. Olympic gold m
The United States womens eight celebrate winning Olympic gold after an Olympiad of unbroken wins.

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2012 Harry How/Getty Images

Karl Schulze (b), tzSchoof PhillippWende, Lauri nn (s) of and TimGrohma ssing Germany celebrate cro mens the line first in the 2012 quadruple sculls at the . Regatta Olympic Rowing

Unbeaten on the international stage since 2009, Eric Murray(l) and Hamish Bond (r) of New Zealand claim gold at the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta.

Mens Quadruple sc
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ulls (M4x)

Womens double sculls (W2x)


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Great Britains most medalled female rower, KatherineGrainger(r), finally wins Olympic gold with crewmate AnnaWatkins.

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> Meet the 2012 olympic champions

Mens Pair (M2-)

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Mens Four (M4-)
2012 Phil Walter/Getty Images

> Meet the 2012 olympic champions

Alex Gregory (b), Pete Reed, Tom Jam es and Andrew Triggs Hodge (s) claim the fourth Olympic victory in a row for Great Britain in the mens four.

eland (s) and Katherine Cop itain (b) of Great Br SophieHosking ing 2012 Olympic m celebrate beco on Dorney. hampions at Et C

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Mens single sculls (M1x)


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Five-time World Champion Mahe Drysdale of New Zealand adds Olympic gold to the Olympic bronze medal he won in Beijing.

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alter/G 2012 Phil W

etty Images

omens lightweight W

double sculls

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> Meet the 2012 olympic champions


ens do lightweight M uble sculls (l M2x)
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ussen (b) g, Mads Rasm bronze in Beijin lympic gold at After winning Denmark win O us Quist (s) of and Rasm London2012.

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 =7 =7 9 10 =11 =11 =11 =11 =15 =15 =15 =15

2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta Medals Table by Placing Country Gold Silver Bronze GBR 4 2 3 NZL 3 0 2 GER 2 1 0 DEN 1 1 1 CZE 1 1 0 USA 1 0 2 RSA 1 0 0 UKR 1 0 0 AUS 0 3 2 CAN 0 2 0 CHN 0 1 0 CRO 0 1 0 FRA 0 1 0 ITA 0 1 0 NED 0 0 1 GRE 0 0 1 POL 0 0 1 SLO 0 0 1

Total 9 5 3 3 2 3 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 48

Womens single sculls

(W1x)
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After 12 years of international competion, Mirka Knapkova of the Czech Republic finally win s her first Olympic medal gold - at London 2012.

Rank 1 2 3 =4 =4 =4 =7 =7 =9 =9 =9 =9 =9 =9 =9 =9 =9 =9

2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta Medals Table by Total Country Gold Silver Bronze GBR 4 2 3 AUS 0 3 2 NZL 3 0 2 GER 2 1 0 DEN 1 1 1 USA 1 0 3 CZE 1 1 0 CAN 0 2 0 RSA 1 0 0 UKR 1 0 0 CHN 0 1 0 CRO 0 1 0 FRA 0 1 0 ITA 0 1 0 NED 0 0 1 GRE 0 0 1 POL 0 0 1 SLO 0 0 1

Total 9 5 5 3 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 48

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2012 Harry How/Ge tty

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Firsts for women in London


the london olympic games marked the tenth time that women have rowed at the olympic games. at the Montreal olympics in 1976 womens rowing was seen for the first time with six rowing events on the olympic programme. today the number of events remains the same but with the lightweight womens double sculls and the womens quadruple sculls replacing the four and the coxed quadruple sculls. In London a number of firsts were achieved in the female boat classes. The Olympic host nation Great Britain led these achievements. When Heather Stanning and Helen Glover crossed the line first in the womens pair they had won the first ever Olympic gold medal for GreatBritain in womens rowing. Thus began a run of unprecedented success for British femalerowers. The following day, the British womens double sculls of Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins also won gold. Grainger is Great Britains most medalled female rower at Olympic and World Championship levels and in London her quest for Olympic gold finally came to fruition. On the last day of Olympic finals, the British lightweight womens double sculls of Katherine Copeland and SophieHosking made the British womens gold medal tally equal three. This helped place Great Britain at the top of the Olympic rowing medals table. It also signalled the progression of the female British rowing squad, with the mens squad winning only one Olympic gold medal in comparison.
Alexandra Tsiavou (r) and Christina Giazitzidou(l) of Greece on the podium with their bronze medal at the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta. Issue 22 October 2012

Greek rowing has come a long way in recent years. At the 2004 Athens Olympics the lightweight mens double sculls became local heroes when they scored the first Olympic rowing medal ever for Greece, a country that prides themselves in their extensive rowing history. Two Olympic Games later, at Eton Dorney, Greeces ChristinaGiazitzidou and Alexandra Tsiavou pulled off a first for Greece when they medalled in the lightweight womens double sculls. Tsiavou and Giazitizidou had achieved the first ever Olympic rowing medal for Greek women. The Czech Republic has had varying Olympic success with most of it surrounding VaclavChalupa and Ondrej Synek in the mens single sculls. The Czechs, however, had never won an Olympic medal in womens rowing. That all changed on the waters of Eton Dorney through a woman named Mirka Knapkova. Not only >

Katherine Copeland (s) and Sophie Hosking (b) of Great Britain on their way to winning gold in the lightweight womens double sculls at the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta.

2012 Harry How/Getty Images

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> Firsts for women in london


Yana Dementieva, foreground, Anastasiia Kozhenkova, NataliyaDovgodko and KaterynaTarasenko of Ukraine celebrate their Olympic win in the womens rowing quadruple sculls at the London 2012 OlympicGames.
/ Getty Images

2012 Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

(s) won Great Britains first Helen Glover (b) and Heather Stanning medal in rowing at London 2012.

ever Olympic gold

> did Knapkova make Czech history by scoring the first ever medal in Olympic womens rowing for her country, but she ensured that the medal was extra special by making it gold. After 12 years of international competition in the prestigious womens single sculls, Knapkova had finally made the Olympic podium. When Poland crossed the finish line at the London Olympics in the womens double sculls, Julia Michalska and Magdalena Fularczyk did not hide their delight. The duo had become the first Olympic medallists for Polish womens rowing in 32 years and the second medal ever. Michalska and Fularczyk had followed in the footsteps of Malgorzata Dluzewska and Czeslawa Koscianska, the 1980 Olympic silver medallists in the womens pair. For Michalska and Fularczyk their bronze medal turned out to be the sole medal for Polish rowing at the London Olympic Games.

There are always many stand-out moments at the Olympic Games and Eton Dorney will be remembered for many unique moments including those of rowings female athletes.
Melissa S. Bray

Udby Erichsen Czech Republic, silver medallist Fie ens Gold medallist Mirka Knapkova of the of Australia on the podium of the wom Crow of Denmark and bronze medallist Kim single sculls at Eton Dorney.

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Ukraine has had a rocky history when it comes to Olympic rowing, but this was all put behind them when they won the womens quadruple sculls. Ever since independence in 1991 Ukrainian rowing has chosen to focus on the quad. They began by finishing second at the Atlanta Games in 1996, then fourth in 2000. In Beijing, they finished fourth again. But Olympic gold had only been a matter of time: at Eton Dorney the quad of Kateryna Tarasenko, Nataliya Dovgodko, Anastasiia Kozhenkova and Yana Dementieva scored their nations first ever Olympic rowing gold.

2012 Natacha Pisarenko - IOPP Pool

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Joie de vivre for South Africas lightweight mens four


there is nothing like the thrill of a tight finish, especially when its the final at the olympic games and especially when the unanticipated occurs. this was the vibe when south africas lawrence ndlovu, Matthew Brittain, JamesThompson and John Smith flew over the line first in the lightweight mens four in london. The crew has since made numerous celebrity television appearances and their medals have accompanied them. Ndlovu can list Miss Earth, Top Billing and SuperSport not to mention racing Ferraris for a TV show.
South Africas lightweight mens four racing their heat at the 2012 Olympic Games.

Most eyes were not focused on the South Africans, instead most had been trained on three other boats the Danes, hoping to defend their Olympic title, the home favourites Great Britain and the Australian reigning World Champions. But as the South African head coach Roger Barrow and lead coach of the four Paul Jackson followed the race on their bicycles, their eyes were firmly fixed on the green and yellow suited crew. At the finish the crew paused. They had just achieved the first ever Olympic rowing gold for South Africa. As the crew sat in their boat enjoying the moment little did they realise that a storm had erupted in South Africa. The nation, buoyed by the gold medal result was going wild in a way normally reserved for their national rugby team.

We were completely blown away, says Barrow. The crew had been on the front page of every paper in the country. And on their return the interest had not diminished. There was massive media interest at the airport when we got back to South Africa. There were thousands of people at the airport; we needed a police escort, says Barrow disbelievingly. The media interest in the guys is ongoing. It hasntstopped. We brought the airport to a standstill, adds Smith, the youngest member of the crew at age22 and otherwise known as Bean. I could not believe the amount of people.

My neck was so chafed from the strap that I think it nearly bled, says Brittain. Iwore my medal for a night and my neck has not been the same since! adds Smith. The crew were given safety deposit boxes for their medals but Brittain admits it hasnt spent much time there. People are so excited to see it that I usually just keep it in my pocket so that if they ask to see it I can show them. I dont really see the point of keeping it in pristine condition locked away somewhere. This fairytale Olympic ending, however, may have been hard to envisage during the lead up to London. >

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> Joie de vivre for south africas lightweight mens four He would say, dont take yourself too seriously, explains Smith. To us it meant, lets get out and go have some fun. The Olympics is a circus attached to a normal regatta, says Brittain. It was still 2,000m long and against the usual opposition so I didnt make it bigger than that. But that didnt stop me from nearly throwing up in the bus from nerves every time we arrived at the venue. The impact of the results of these four men in South Africa has been phenomenal. The number of 13 to 14 year olds [wanting to row] has tripled at rowing schools, says Barrow. The four all plan to keep rowing. Earning a gold medal also earned each of the crew a traditional South African gift - a cow. Smith and Thompson chose to turn their cows into biltong dried beef strips. Its a lot of meat, says Smith. Ndlovu has named his cow Missy and he plans to keep her and have more. Brittain has called his cow London and plans to barbeque her in a couple of years, hopefully after she has had a couple of calves, he adds.
Melissa S. Bray

> Barrow explains: My plan has been to develop a lightweight mens four ever since 2009. I decided that in the lightweight mens double we were too far off the pace. In 2010 I approached Paul (about coaching the four) as hes much more experienced [than me]. He became involved as the lead coach of the boat.

The pool of rowers started as eight and ended up as six with the final crew selecting itself because of injuries. Matthew had to have surgery in 2010, then Lawrence had a problem of tendonitis in his For the final each crew member experienced the wrist, explains Barrow. The most experienced race in their own unique way. member of the crew, Ndlovu, has had to battle illness and injury throughout his rowing career. I always knew we had a chance (to medal), says As well as needing an operation for tendonitis Brittain. It was the greatest moment of my life Ndlovu was diagnosed with asthma ten years to look up at the scoreboard and see 1. RSA. ago and has also had back problems. Coming into the last 100m, Matthew behind The Olympic line-up was only formed six months me was screaming, Yes! Yes! Yes! I thought to before London. The crew then raced at the myself we have this thing by half a length, but Memorial DAloja in Italy where they won all of after watching the race later it was on the line, their races. The line-up was thus set. says Smith who will never forget feeling like a god at the end of the race. Barrow designed the preparation for London to be as problem-free as possible. He thus set a number I knew we had a chance at getting a medal, says of training camps not only for the training but to Ndlovu, who attributes his start in rowing to his also keep them away from other people and the mentor and former principal, the late Tom Price. potential for illness and to monitor their training When we came into the last 500m I believed we to reduce the chance of injury. were going to get gold. As the crew were all first-time Olympians, We knew they had a good sprint, says Barrow. Barrow and Jackson were very much aware of Going into the 1,000m we thought that they could the pressure the four would be under. Jackson medal if they were within a length of the leaders. talked to the crew about joie de vivre. At the 1,000m mark the crew were within a length and, in fourth place, they were closing on the leaders. The joie de vivre had kicked in.
Issue 22 October 2012

Lawrence Ndlovu(s), JohnSmith, MatthewBrittain and JamesThompson (b) of South Africas lightweight mens four celebrate winning their nations first ever Olympic gold medal in rowing at the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta.
2012 Damien Meyer/Getty Images

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Alone together rowing for Portugal


When it comes to the olympic games, Portugal has mainly known success in athletics. it is in this sport that the nation won all of its olympic gold medals to date four since Portugal started taking part in the games in 1912. If Portugals lightweight mens double sculls of Nuno Mendes and Pedro Fraga win an Olympic medal one day, it would be a first for Portugueserowing. Mendes and Fraga are not what you would define as standard Portuguese guys. They dont play football. Mendes has rowed since age 10 while Fraga started as a 14-year-old. With two Olympic Games under their belts, Mendes and Fraga are looking to work towards their third participation. They have, however, a few obstacles to overcome along the way. Fraga and Mendes began rowing together eight years ago when they met at the same club. That year, in their first major international regatta, the World Under 23 Regatta, they finished second. The duo have persevered together ever since racing at the Beijing Olympics where they finished eighth. At the London Games they stepped up to the A-final and finished fifth. We were happy with the result, says Mendes. Our own goal was to reach the A-final and we came fifth, so it was not too bad. It was one of the best results of a Portuguese team during the Olympics, adds Fraga who says the press were interested in them because of this. Portugals sole Olympic medal in 2012 was in canoeing. This has made the interest in water sports increase a bit, says Fraga. The profile of rowing in Portugal is one of their challenges. In 2010 Portugal hosted the European Rowing Championships in Montemoro-Velho and, says Fraga, that helped it to grow. But compared to other sports its still a >
Nuno Mendes (l) and PedroFraga (r) pose with oars in the boatpark at the 2012 Samsung World Rowing Cup in Belgrade, Serbia.

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> alone together rowing for Portugal


Pedro Fraga (b) and NunoMendes (s) of Portugal racing in the heat of the lightweight mens double sculls at the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta.

rowers from Great Britain, Denmark, Norway and Sweden who go there to train, often during the European winter. For Ahrens, the future of Portuguese rowing is uncertain as the Portuguese Rowing Federation is facing financial difficulties. Fraga and Mendes are doing ok because they are coached by MarkEmke from Holland, says Ahrens. Emke has been coaching Fraga and Mendes since 2011 and is concerned about the financial situation of the national federation. We hope that this main problem will be solved in the next few months. We have some ideas about our training approaches for the next year and are pretty confident that we can go on, says Emke who formerly coached for the Dutch national team. [Rowing at] Rio 2016 would be nice, says Mendes, but the future of high performance in Portugal is still unclear. Arguably Fraga and Mendes can be considered the most successful Portuguese rowers: they have now competed at two Olympic Games, have medalled three times at the European Rowing Championships and also have one World Rowing Cup medal and two under-23 silvers. Since last year the duo were training out of a big football club, Sporting Clube de Portugal, who want to invest in rowing. Fraga and Mendes are their first rowers.
Melissa S. Bray

> bit unknown. People are more interested in football and the Olympic Games are all aboutathletics. Portugal can claim a lengthy rowing history. The history of its oldest rowing club, the Lisbon Naval Club, goes back to 1856. It remains the largest club in a country where there are about 30 rowing clubs. In the early days of rowing it was associated with Portuguese royalty and social elite. After establishing itself in Portugals capital city of Lisbon, rowing spread to Porto and Figueira da

Foz. The most flourishing era for rowing was during the 1930s through to the 1950s. Currently the main regatta in the country is the National Championships, attended by about 300 rowers. Internationally, the best result in rowing was in 1994 when the lightweight mens quadruple sculls took bronze at the World Rowing Championships in Indianapolis, USA. Luis Ahrens raced in that boat and has remained involved in rowing through the Avizaqcua Team Centre in Aviz, Portugal. The centre hosts a number of top rowers including

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Bond of brothers Martin & Valent Sinkovic


Martin and Valent sinkovic wrote themselves into croatian rowing history this summer when they won olympic silver in the mens quadruple sculls. Becoming an olympic medallist is special no matter who you are, but becoming one alongside your brother is even more so. Between them, Martin and Valent Sinkovic have an impressive collection of 38 medals from the junior, under-23 and senior World Rowing regattas. Since 2008, Croatias priority boats at international regattas have included the brothers. Two-time under-23 World Champions in the mens quadruple sculls, in 2009 and 2010, they went on to win their first senior World Championship title in this boat class in 2010. In 2012 they also became European Rowing Champions in the mens double sculls after a ten-day post-Olympic break. Its very special being a part of a family with two elite rowers. Both of us know that we can always count on each other, we always know what our goals are and what we have to do to reach them, Martin explains. Other people often cant understand why we practice so much, Rivalry naturally exists between the brothers how we stay motivated, why we dont miss going it always has. But its something they see as out with our friends more often. But we know positive. Each one of us likes to be the one how much we love rowing, especially together, who will win, Valent points out, but the one and thats why we dont miss living the life of that loses is happy for the other. Its nicer to get normal people. beaten by your brother than by someone else! They believe that rivalry brings them closer to Where did it all begin for the Sinkovic brothers? their mutual goals. The duo are more likely to be Their eldest brother, Matija, was the first person found in a boat together than racing side by side. in their family to take up rowing. At that time That is the feeling we love most, says Valent. Martin wasnt involved in any other sports, so he decided to join his brother at their local rowing The sense of trust between these siblings is club. From the first time Martin sat in a boat he evident. Rowing together, they can almost > was hooked. Until then, Valents sport of choice had been football until he sustained an injury that forced him to stop playing. Igot injured so I decided to try rowing because both of my brothers loved it, he says.

Valent Sinkovic(s), DamirMartin, MartinSinkovic and David Sain(b) of Croatia competing in the mens quadruple sculls semifinal at the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta.

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> Bond of brothers Martin & Valent sinkovic

> read each others minds and predict how the their medal was a rare experience. That was a other will react. We always know that we can very special moment in our lives and we are happy count on each other, says Martin, and that the that we could experience it together, says Martin. other one will never let the other down. Their Our parents were watching the race from the commitment to each other as brothers and grandstand and it was really nice to share that teammates is incredibly strong. The only difficulty moment with them. that comes with rowing together is the fear of letting the other down. We always want the boat Rowing is still a small sport in Croatia, so to go as fast as possible, so when it isnt going so becoming Olympic medallists didnt result in well, we get more nervous than if we were to row the Sinkovic brothers being instantly recognised with other people, Valent explains. on the streets of Zagreb. However, their success has not gone unappreciated. A lot of kids from Standing together as brothers on the podium at our rowing clubs are very proud and excited that the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta and receiving Croatia has Olympic medallists in their sport and

that they can see how we train and learn from us. There has been bigger interest in rowing in schools since the Olympics, says Martin. The brothers hope that their result will have an impact on future generations of young Croatians aspiring to become Olympic medallists. We hope that future generations will have better conditions than we now have and that there will be more money so they can buy new boats and things like that, says Martin. We hope Croatia will get more medals in the future.
Lisa Hayden

Valent Sinkovic.

Martin Sinkovic

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leander club, the most successful rowing club in British history, is perched on the bank of the river thames in Henley-onthames, great Britain. nicknamed the Pink Palace by the general public and members alike, the club delights in quintessentially english rowing traditions off the water and remarkable success on the water.

Before the London 2012 Games, Leander Club had L e a n d e r won 99Olympic medals. By the end of the Games, Club Press the club had reached a total of 112. Nearly half of Officer Robert Treharne Jones explains that the GB Rowing Team competing at the London the entire raison detre of Leander is to place 2012 Games was composed of Leander athletes. as many of our athletes as possible into the GB team, and weve been very successful in this Leander Club has also been home to well-known policy. Our athletes, members, visitors and names in rowing history, such as five-time corporate sponsors all share the same core values Olympic gold medallist Steve Redgrave, four- of teamwork, discipline, commitment, success time Olympic Champion Matthew Pinsent as well and ultimately winning. as TimFoster, JamesCracknell and a wealth of other international British rowers. Double Olympian Tom Solesbury, who placed fifth in the mens quadruple sculls at Eton

Dorney this year, explains why, in his eyes, Leander Club has been so successful. For me, the support from Leander has been fantastic in so many ways. While I was injured in 2010, Leander was a great place for me to train, with a top quality gym and some good coaching when I started to get back on the water. Ive also been very lucky that for the last two years the Leander head coach, Mark Banks, has also been my coach in the quad. He is an excellent coach who gives everything for his crews, both for GB and for Leander. >
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Quintessentially English thesuccess of Leander Club

Leander Club at Henley-onThames, Great Britain.

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> Quintessentially english the success of leander club

> The unbeatable Anna Watkins, who won Olympic gold in the womens double sculls with Katherine Grainger also calls the club home. Its provided a great base - we do the majority of our training at national squad headquarters nearby but I train there over Christmas and for club events. Its run very professionally and isnt stymied by politics in the way that some clubs can be. I can just drop in anytime and do a good weights session or whatever I need to do; it makes life easier for athletes, which is what we need trying to do the British squad training programme! Leander Club also prides itself in developing future Olympians, with seasoned Olympians like Watkins spending time at the club to get to know them, share experiences and give advice. Under23 and senior World Champion KierenEmery trains full time at the club. Rachel Gamble-Flint, who missed out on Olympic qualification in the womens single sculls this year, is another prospect for the future. Having previously rowed at school, Gamble-Flint joined Leander Club when she was 18 and puts her subsequent success down to the facilities available to her. I hope the manner in which Leander has already contributed towards my rowing career will allow me to continue improving and achieve my Olympic ambitions, Gamble-Flint states. The work ethic at the club is excellent. The nature of our training programme and sport doesnt allow for us to be anything less than fully committed. Leander has

always had a reputation for producing the best results, which therefore has attracted the best to join. The professional structure and programme in place then allows athletes with potential and the desire to work hard to fulfil what they are capable of. The environment is very professional, but also with room for fun. Treharne Jones tells World Rowing: Our clubhouse activity is focused on generating as much revenue as possible to fund the Leander Development Academy programme, the purpose of which is to gain places for the GB team at Rio 2016 and beyond. Despite being a British Rowing success factory, athletes and staff at Leander stress that

the atmosphere is key. The atmosphere is friendly and welcoming, says Solesbury. I think outsiders often think that Leander can be a bit stuffy but everyone involved with the club wants to help the athletes and that makes for a fantastic atmosphere. Watkins adds: Its for people who want to see how far they can take their rowing, so its competitive and of a high standard but very sociable too. The club was founded in 1818 and since 1980, has produced around 400 international athletes. Leander is used as a venue for meetings, corporate events and special occasions and during the annual Henley Royal Regatta plays host to hundreds of members and visitors alike.
Laura Fell Robert Treharne Jones

A mens eight crew from Leander Club racing in the Ladys Plate at the Henley Rowing Regatta.

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Fast times in Paralympic rowing


a total of 96 athletes from 23 nations took part in the second edition of the Paralympic rowing regatta. Adaptive rowers from Argentina, Portugal, NewZealand and Ireland raced for the first time on the Paralympic stage while France, Germany and Russia took home their nations first Paralympic medals in rowing. While Brazil and Ukraine had entries in every boat class, Belarus, China, France, Great Britain, Russia and the United States of America had entries in three. China topped the medals table in a regatta which saw adaptive World Best Times smashed on the first day and remarkably close finishes in the finals. Chinas Cheng Huang, who made his international debut in 2012, surprised his competition, setting a World Best Time of 4:45.02 in the heats and in the final powering away from the rest of the field to win Paralympic gold over the 1,000m distance. ErikHorrie of Australia and Alexey Chuvashev of Russia performed strongly to claim silver and bronze respectively. That the 2008 Paralympic Champion and four-time World Champion TomAggar of Great Britain finished outside of the medals was perhaps most indicative of the vast development of adaptive rowing. For Horrie, winning Paralympic silver meant more than just a medal: Never mind the medal honour, putting on the gold and green hoody I cant explain, unless youve represented your country, the honour. Also, the messages that I receive from young kids, saying: Youve inspired me, Ican do whatever I want to now - those are the things that really matter. Alla Lysenko continued to raise the bar in the AS womens single sculls. Untouchable, she set an adaptive World Best Time in the heats and won gold by eight seconds. Behind her in the final, Nathalie Benoit of France won silver and a fight between three boats was on for bronze. At the line, 2008 Paralympic silver medallist LiudmilaVauchok of Belarus, who is also a multi Winter Paralympic Champion, won bronze, leaving Claudia Santos of Brazil and Moran Samuel of Israel out of the medals and vowing to come back > to fight in Rio.
Xiaoxian Lou and TianmingFei of China celebrate winning gold in the TA mixed double sculls at the 2012 Paralympic Rowing Regatta.
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> Xiaoxian Lou and Tianming Fei, the Chinese TA mixed double sculls, also redefined speed, setting a blisteringly fast time of 3:54.92 in the heats to qualify directly for the final, in which they won gold and defended the 2008 Paralympic title won by fellow countrymen Yangjing Zhou and Zilong Shan. For Fei, Chinas success had far-reaching effects: I hope Paralympic rowing will become better and stronger because of Chinas success in rowing. Frances Perle Bouge and Stephane Tardieu capitalised on a strong season to win silver and Oksana Masters and Robert Jones of the United States of America, a new pairing making their international debut this season, won bronze

just 0.2 seconds ahead of GreatBritain. French athlete Bouge felt sure that this could have a positive effect on adaptive rowing in her home nation: Two medals for France is great for the country and encouraging for the sport. In the heats of the LTA mixed coxed four, Germany smashed the previous World Best Time to win their heat in 3:15.91, but it was not enough to win gold >

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Erik Horrie of Australia (l), Cheng Huang of China and Alexey Chuvashev of Russia (r) celebrate their medals in the AS mens single sculls at the 2012 Paralympic Rowing Regatta. Issue 22 October 2012

Great Britains Pamela Relph(b), Naomi Riches, David Smith, James Roe (s) and Lily van den Broecke (c) greet the crowd of spectators after winning gold in the LTA mixed coxed four at the 2012 Paralympic Rowing Regatta.

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ParalyMPic gaMes

> Fast times in Paralympic rowing

Great Britians LTA mixed coxed four.

> in the final. In a thrilling race to the line, prerace favourites Great Britain secured gold on home waters in the final race of the regatta and Germany won silver. A decision about changing the racing distance from 1,000m to 2,000m for adaptive rowers will be made at the 2013 Extraordinary Congress in Copenhagen in February, 2013.
Laura Fell

Alla Lysenko of Ukraine rowing to gold in the AS womens single sculls over Nathalie Benoit of France at the 2012 Paralympic Rowing Regatta.

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ParalyMPic gaMes

One goal for Oksana Masters


resilience, persistence and determination. these three words best describe oksana Masters, a 23-year-old adaptive rower from the usa who won bronze at the 2012 Paralympic rowing regatta in the ta mixed double sculls. it was her first year of rowing internationally. Born in Ukraine, Masters lived in an orphanage I love the fact that inside the boat its so painful, until the age of seven before being adopted by so intense and so hard-core, says Oksana, but a single mother from the USA. Masters was born on the outside it looks so smooth and effortless with hand and leg deformities that may have been and so graceful. due to radiation exposure. Not long after being adopted, at ageeight, her first leg was amputated, Masters moved away from home, from her friends and then at age 14 her second leg was amputated, and her family, to pursue her dreams. to help reduce the pain. Its been a really long journey. Its been six years Masters makes it clear that as an adaptive that Ive been trying to get to this point, so to rower she does not want sympathy: Hopefully, actually be here is crazy. Its been hard. I realised if people wont think, oh thats such a pity, Im so I really wanted to be here, I would have to make a sorry, and instead look at us as the same. Just sacrifice. About three years ago, when I was trying because Idont have legs does not mean there is to do this it was hard because I was in school and a different level of our competitiveness in sport. Ihad a full time job too. I had to give up something. As an athlete, we all have something in common. A job will always be there, school will always be We all have one goal, everyone does the training. there, but my body is not always going to be able to handle this level of competition. It was big leap My past is my past, continues Oksana. Its been of faith, and its paying off. my life and I dont know anything different. In competition I use it to my advantage. I dont quit When Masters tells World Rowing her training as easily. Its given me an extra push in the boat. schedule, it becomes clear she did not have Its given me a level of aggressiveness. much time for anything else. She and her partner RobertJones spend 90 minutes to two hours Masters started rowing when she was 17. I just on the water every morning. On Tuesdays and fell in love with it from the minute I got onto the Thursdays, the mixed double goes out on the water, she explains. water again in the afternoon. On Mondays, >
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2012 Paralympic bronze medallist, Oksana Masters (USA)

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ParalyMPic gaMes

> one goal for oksana Masters

> Wednesdays and Fridays, the afternoon is spent doing strength training in the gym, and on Saturdays they do a long row. Sunday is a day off to rest and recover. Speaking before the Paralympic Rowing Regatta started, Masters said: Rob and I have been rowing together for less than a year. We have a really good dynamic in the boat. We want to win gold; we want to race the best race possible. Its going to be a really good competition. Everyone here has been asking who are your top competitors? Its everyone. Everyone has worked equally as hard and wants the same thing. Was she nervous? No. When you know youve trained and done everything you can, when you know youve walked off the water or out of the gym knowing there is not one thing you would change about that practice, its a really good feeling. Im anxious to know, after almost a year of training with Rob, what we can do and what all the work means. At the 2012 Paralympic Rowing Regatta, the competition was fierce. France got the better of the British in the first heat of the TA mixed double sculls, setting a new World Best Time of 4:00.00. But in the following heat, defending World Champions China blasted out from the start and crossed the line with some advantage over the rest of the field in an astonishing 3:54.92. Masters and Jones were second in 4:01.00 and

had to prepare themselves to face the repechage. Masters stayed pragmatic in her approach: Wehave got to be faster and stronger tomorrow. In the final, the racing was unbelievably close. Masters and Jones beat Samantha Scowen and Nicholas Beighton of Great Britain by 0.2seconds to clinch the bronze medal. Masters joy and enthusiasm after winning a Paralympic bronze medal was unbound: I thought we came fourth. I am speechless, this is unreal. Iam just going to live in this moment right now and see what happens. I am definitely going to enjoy it, take it in and celebrate with the rest of our crew. Asked about Rio, she replies: Rowing will always be in my life. I would love to go to Rio. I dont know what the realistic side of going to Rio is. Whether I go or not, I will never stop rowing. The Paralympic Games and the growth of adaptive rowing means a lot to Oksana: Awareness will grow. More people with a disability will say Ican become an athlete, my life isnt over. Its going to be great for the general public too. They will realise that we are not just somebody who looks different we are people with talent. I hope my story, or increased awareness about the Paralympics, can inspire people.
Laura Fell

Stephane Tardieu and Perle Bouge of France (l), Xiaoxian Lou and Tianming Fei of China and Oksana Masters and Robert Jones of the United States of America celebrate their medals in the TA mixed double sculls at the 2012 Paralympic Rowing Regatta.
FISA

Oksana Masters (b) and Robert Jones (s) of the United States of America racing in the repechage of the TA mixed double sculls at the 2012 Paralympic Rowing Regatta at Eton Dorney, Great Britain. Issue 22 October 2012 22

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roWers oF tHe Future

Germanys golden girl Julia Lier


Julia lier is one of rowings up-and-coming young athletes. the long and lean lier, who stands at 182cm, has a medal collection that puts her in a league of her own.
Detlev Seyb / MyRowingPhoto.com

World rowing: How were you introduced to rowing? Julia lier: I started rowing while I was in primary school. My friends parents used to have a bar/ restaurant in a boathouse so I spent a lot of time there. Eventually I decided to start rowing. My first rowing club was an old East German club. Wr: What made you want to take rowing to a competitive level? Jl: I really wanted to row in competitions and as my old club didnt have the capacity they sent me to the Sportschulen Halle (a sports school supported by the German Olympic Committee) when I was 13. To begin with I only trained around two or three times per week and I started racing at some small regattas. But as I was always pretty tall and big, after one year I was asked if I would like to increase my training. I actually wanted to do dancing! I think I have a good sense of rhythm but unfortunately I was just too inflexible for dancing because I was so robust.

Julia Lier (l) wins gold at the 2011 World Rowing Under 23 Championships in Amsterdam, the Netherlands with LisaSchmidala, Marie-CatherineArnold and UlrikeToerpsch.

Aged 21, Lier already has an exceptional five World Championship titles to her name (two from the junior level and three from the under-23 level) and, for the first time in 2012, she established herself as a strong single sculler, winning gold in this boat class at the World Rowing Under 23 Championships in Trakai, Lithuania. As we enter a

new Olympic cycle, her name is likely to be heard of a lot more. World Rowing caught up with Lier to learn a little more about this German sculler who keeps getting faster.

So I continued going to the Sportschule until my secondary school certificate. I trained twice a day there and my days mainly consisted of rowing and school. I enjoyed my time there quite a lot as we had an awesome training group with a really nice atmosphere. I was the only girl in the group but they all respected me. >

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roWers oF tHe Future

> germanys golden girl Julia lier

> Wr: How did you progress after that? Jl: In 2006 I went to the German rowing competitions for boys and girls from 12-14years (skills based competitions) and I started competing in the quad. I changed into the junior category after that and rowed mainly in the quad and in the double, which I already really liked. Then I started to row in the single because I always was very strong and tall. WR: What difference do you see between the under-23 and senior categories? Jl: Well, I was a bit surprised about the difference to be honest. You really realise just how much more experienced the other rowers are [at the senior level]. Especially if you consider, for example, somebody like Ekaterina Karsten!

Ithink that acquiring the experience of racing, especially at an international level, is what makes the difference. Wr: Have you decided on a career path outside of rowing? Jl: I am going to be a physiotherapist. When I was rowing as a junior I realised I was really interested in this subject as well as working together with athletes. It is just an easy-going and relaxed atmosphere, so I researched jobs in this area. I started to study physiotherapy in 2009 but had to take a break in 2010 because of my rowing career. After this rowing

season Iwould like to focus more on my education and finishit. Wr: What are your plans for the future? Jl: Right now I definitely want to try to qualify for Rio 2016. This year I tried to qualify for London 2012 but unfortunately I missed out. I think it was just one year too early and I didnt really have enough time to prepare properly. But Im still very young so I will try hard to make it to the next Olympic Games. Id like to continue training at a high level.
Lisa Hayden/Christine Jacobsen

Germanys Julia Lier racing in the heats of the under23 womens single sculls at the 2012 World Rowing Under 23 Championships in Trakai, Lithuania.

Chris Lee/Getty Images 2012

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uniVersity roWing

A generation inspired
the 2012 london olympic games did not just provide entertainment for sports fans worldwide - they inspired a generation of young athletes. At the Closing Ceremony of the Games, Lord Sebastian Coe, chair of the London 2012 Olympic Organising Committee (LOCOG) said: We saw new local and international sporting heroes and role models emerge in London. This is the legacy of inspiration we were looking for. Rowing heroes were made at Eton Dorney and the youth of our sport can look up to these athletes who performed at an awe-inspiring level during the Olympic Rowing Regatta. The effect of this inspiration was already visible at the 2012 World University Rowing Championships held in Kazan, Russia. World Rowing spoke with university athletes competing in the same boat class as the one their nation claimed Olympic gold in at the London Games. lightweight Mens Four In the final strokes of the lightweight mens four A-final at the London Olympic Games, no one could predict which crew would cross the line first. Making history, the South African crew powered through their competitors to become Olympic Champions and win their nations first ever Olympic gold medal in rowing.
Issue 22 October 2012

The enhanced pride felt by all South African rowers since that day was particularly evident in the lightweight mens four crew racing in Kazan. It was extra special for Chase Hyde, ServaasCrowther, Cameron Hoey and MatthewShaw to be competing internationally in the same boat class as the one in which their countrymen took Olympic gold. The weekend after the four won gold we had a really great training session, Hyde said. We achieved great times that weekend, Crow added. Shaw agreed: It put us in a really positive mindset: if they did it, why cant we? A big boost to this University of Cape Town four came two weeks before they set off to

Kazan when Paul Jackson, coach of the Olympic lightweight four, spent some time with them on the water. Hoey said: It was really good to have such an experienced coach one who has earned a crew gold at the Olympics give us some advice. They have been our role models in the past and are even more so now that they have earned their gold, Hoey explained. The four aspiring student rowers met their heroes before they travelled to Kazan. They told us to hold nothing back, to do our best because we are fast enough, says Hoey. The South African crew went on to finish fourth at the World University Rowing Championships. >

(L-R) South Africas lightweight mens four of Servaas Crowther, ChaseHyde, MatthewShaw and Cameron Hoey at the 2012 World University Rowing Championships in Kazan, Russia.

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uniVersity roWing

> a generation inspired

> Womens double sculls Leading up to the 2012 Olympic Games, Great Britains womens double sculls was one of the most talked about crews. The boat included the nations most medalled female rower, KatherineGrainger. Grainger has long been a role model for young athletes, heading up the increasingly strong womens squad in the British Rowing team. Although she achieved exceptional results at the World Championship and Olympic levels in previous years, Grainger was still chasing Olympic gold. On 3 August 2012 she finally claimed the long-awaited top honours with partner AnnaWatkins.

Watching the womens double sculls A-final at Eton Dorney had a profound effect on Whittakers ambition: It was so nice to see Katherine win gold because it has been a long time coming for her. Not everyone has instant success, but if you work hard eventually you will get what you want. Her success has made me really passionate about wanting to do well.

outings on a Start camp it was a bit wobbly! Nobody would have thought that they would be Olympic gold medallists in four yearstime. The success of Grainger and Watkins has compounded the belief Whittaker and Bennett have in their own abilities and has inspired them to aim high. Id like to be at Rio and get a medal, Whittaker says without hesitation. >

Great Britain finished sixth in the A-final of the womens double at the 2012 World University Rowing Championships.

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Detlev Seyb/MyRowingPhoto.com

Bennett also referred to Great Britains first ever female Olympic gold medallists in rowing, Helen Glover and Heather Stanning. Like Bennett, they began their rowing career having being identified through the British talent identification At the 2012 World University Rowing Champi- programme Sporting Giants onships, British rowers Phillippa Whittaker of and then moving on to British Loughborough University and Karen Bennett of Rowings Start programme. St. Marys College Twickenham raced in the same I remember one of their boat class as their Olympic heroes. [Glover and Stanning] first

uniVersity roWing

> a generation inspired

> MensSingle Sculls Coming into the 2012 Olympic Rowing Regatta, the mens single sculls was one of the most hotly contested events. Mahe Drysdale, the NewZealander with five World Championship titles in this boat class, was considered the favourite until a bike accident prevented him from racing the final stage of the 2012 Samsung World Rowing Cup in Munich, Germany. When he was again seen racing at Eton Dorney it was clear Drysdale was back on top form. He proved this by earning Olympic gold. The University of Waikatos Matthew Glenn raced to bronze in the mens single sculls in Kazan.

Glenn says: It was pretty awesome watching the NewZealand crews perform [in London]. Now its my turn and Ive just got to step up. Glenn watched Drysdales Olympic final knowing that in a few weeks time he too would line up at the start of an international regatta in that same boat class. Mahe had just been knocked off his bike and so I didnt really know what would happen, says Glenn. But going into the second half of the race Drysdale started to win and that was pretty good! I was freaking out in the last 500m, just not wanting him to get passed!

Glenn feels as though the success of the NewZealand team in London is an example to him as a young, aspiring athlete. Its pretty sweet to think Ive been racing Mahe and Joseph (Sullivan) and Nathan (Cohen) when they were training in singles over the summer and that now theyre Olympic Champions. Its now hopefully my turn to represent New Zealand on the podium.And Glenn did just that, finishing with a bronze medal.
Lisa Hayden

Detlev Seyb/MyRowingPhoto.com

After the success of NewZealands MaheDrysdale at the 2012 Olympic Games, single sculler MatthewGlenn was looking forward to representing his nation on the podium at the 2012 World University Rowing Championships.

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Heroes oF tHe Past

A lifetime for rowing: Ricardo Ibarra


When ricardo ibarra passed away last year the outpouring of admiration was immense. His life finished far too soon. Just after being awarded the 2011 World rowing award for distinguished service to international rowing, ibarra died. He was 61. As was the nature of his character, Ibarra remained working in his beloved sport until the end. While his friends gravitated towards football, Ibarra began rowing as a 17-year-old in his home country of Argentina. Five years later he was on his way to the Munich 1972 Olympic Games where he raced in the mens double sculls. At these same Games, one of Argentinas most successful rowers ever Alberto Demiddi won silver in the mens single sculls. A year later when Demiddi retired from top level rowing Ibarra took over as Argentinas best single sculler and in 1975 his talent was recognised when he finished first at the Pan American Games. Thus began a run of single sculling success that saw Ibarra remain the Pan American single sculling champion for the next two Games. Ibarra again competed at the Olympic Games in 1976 in the single, finishing with an admirable sixth-place on rowings biggest stage. Some say that Ibarra was in his prime leading up to the Moscow 1980 Olympics when he won the Diamond Sculls at the Henley Royal Regatta in Great Britain, but Argentinas boycott of these Games did not allow Ibarra to achieve an Olympic result that year. Still Ibarra continued as a competitive rower and at the Los Angeles 1984 Games he carried the flag for his country at the Opening Ceremony. At these Olympics he finished fifth in the single.
Issue 22 October 2012

Ibarras impressive rowing career earned him the Olimpia de Plata eight times, an annual award in Argentina with the winner determined by Argentine sports journalists. A couple of years out from retiring as an elite athlete Ibarra started working for the International Rowing Federation, FISA, as the development consultant for Latin America. I was hired to give coaching courses in the technical area and then I started working with national teams, Ibarra said, indicating the diversity of his role.

In Argentina and South America in general he introduced new training concepts, says Borchi, These changes brought us greatresults. FISA Continental Representative for North America Eduardo Palomo first heard about Ibarra when he read about him in David Halberstams book The Amateurs. Palomo met Ibarra in 1992 when he was competing at the Canadian Henley in the single.

He encouraged me to train and gave me a threeHis years as a coach and development consultant month training programme. He asked me to saw Ibarra make a difference in rowing for many Latin complete all of my training schedule and if I did American countries including Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, that he assured me I would medal in the next Chile, Guatemala and Argentina. While coaching in [PanAmerican] Games and would be one the of the Chile, two of his athletes, Christian Yantani Garces fastest rowers in Latin America, describes Palomo. and Miguel Cerda Silva won the 2002 World Rowing If I wasnt willing to do it he told me not to waste his Championships in the lightweight mens pair. time because he knew how to make champions. South American coach Osvaldo Borchi first met Ibarra as an 18-year-old and thus began a lifelong friendship. He was very dedicated, a very hard worker and he had a passion to set a goal and to stand out as a single sculler, says Borchi. He dedicated his life to rowing. As a coach, Borchi says Ibarra was very good at convincing people and was able to motivate rowers to give 100 per cent. I didnt know him as an athlete but I heard stories from his friends in Argentina of the amount of hours he dedicated to train, says Palomo. Ibarra was married to his high school sweetheart, Nora. They had two boys. Ricardo was a proud father. During training camps and regattas he would share a great deal about his wife and kids plans, says Palomo. He was always a coach on the water and in life.
Melissa S. Bray

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Competitive in the face ofcancer one rowers story


With a medal swinging from her neck nadazeda slavikova of the czech republic is happy. not only had she won her race after a very narrow second place in her previous race, she had also beaten the one thing that could have prevented her from even competing at the World rowing Masters regatta in duisburg, germany cancer. After experiencing pain in her shoulder and back since January last year, which were first dismissed as training pains, the 54-year-old was diagnosed with stage three Hodgkins Lymphoma in August 2011. Slavikova resolved to beat the illness and do so with exercise. For most this would mean a few light training sessions a week but Slavikova ran a marathon in May, just two months later.

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Igor Meijer / FISA

I survived! Slavikova laughs. Then, I started full rowing training again. I started to compete in June and was training in the single sculls again in July. When I was first diagnosed I asked the doctors After that, I decided to enter the World Rowing if I could still row. The doctors told me I would Masters Regatta and exercise as usual very hard. be tired and that it was up to me. Thats when I did a four-day training camp in mid-August and I decided. I said If its not forbidden, Id rather since then I really began to find my form for this not wait in bed at home for death. I want to row. regatta. I knew I had to relax, in case my body When it was possible, I ran and I rowed. couldnt accept the training load. I followed my body. What my body said, I listened to, and did The Czech sculler completed a course of what I could. chemotherapy from October to December 2011 and was given the all-clear from her doctors in There were testing times when Slavikova could not March this year. This meant she could throw row, due to side effects from the chemotherapy. herself back in to training. In the ten days after finishing chemotherapy, pins and needles in her hands stopped her from rowing I couldnt start rowing hard immediately, my body as she could not hold her blades properly. Instead, didnt respond well to it. I started step by step. she went running. > Idid what my body could.

Nadazeda Slavikova of CVKL Pardubice, Czech Republic, at the 2012 World Rowing Masters Regatta in Duisburg, Germany.

HealtH

> competitive in the face of cancer one rowers story

> I also had problems with my stomach and so on, but I tried to fight it. I didnt want to wait. I wouldnt let it beat me. Now, Slavikova rows four times a week, runs three times a week, and does strength training in the gym twice a week a pretty demanding schedule. In the winter she also goes cross-country skiing.

socialising were also key aspects of rowing, more specifically her health as Slavikova states: Im not needed at home and this is a message she anymore, so have time to row. I have friends wishes others to hear. within rowing and it clears my mind, it allows me to relax. Also, it keeps me slim and fit! I think exercise is good for people who are ill. You use your It is clear rowing will always be part of Slavikovas muscles. You are weak after the life. Having started rowing at age 15, she stopped illness and if you dont do anything, you could In her second race at the World Rowing Masters at 21 and soon after had the first of her three get worse. You should do something to keep Regatta, Slavikova won: I had some steering children. Making her comeback when she was your body in good shape and to be fit. It helps if problems in my first race, so it feels great to have 40, she has not stopped since. you wish to get back into the sport, you will get won now. It is my first medal in the single sculls back sooner than if you dont do anything. You at the Masters Regatta. I didnt think I would win Rowing makes me feel great, Slavikova explains. should treat cancer like bad influenza or angina a medal, but there was some hope. My goal was When you push the boat, this feeling is great. It is you can beat it. to finish the race and keep up with everyone and also so social. When I exercise in my single, Ipass instead I won! I have been patient so far, waiting many cottages where my friends live, so Ican Laura Fell for medals, and now has to be my time. I will race stop to talk to them. It is not lonely training. It is the Masters Regatta again nice to be in a group of rowers and maintain good next year. Ialways finish friendships as you get older. It was also so helpful second, but now Ihave when I was ill. Everyone was so helpful and kind, won finally. Iam happy. helping me with my boat. Nobody would leave my side. I could speak openly about my illness What became clear when with them and that really helped. speaking to a variety of masters at the regatta is that Despite her illness, Slavikova remains competition is still one of the most important overwhelmingly positive about the factors fuelling these rowers. Staying fit and impact of exercise on her life and

A view of crews training on the regatta course at the 2012 World Rowing Masters Regatta in Duisburg, Germany.

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Igor Meijer / FISA

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FISA is the governing body of the sport of rowing and the oldest international sports federation in the Olympic movement. Based in Lausanne, the Olympic capital, FISA has 137member federations worldwide, organises World Championships, Olympic Regattas and World Cups and promotes all forms of rowing. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily the opinions of the FISA Council. Reprints permitted with acknowledgement of source. Publisher FISA communications Manager Dbora Meier-Feutren World rowing Journalist Melissa S. Bray communications coordinator - social Media Laura Fell communications coordinator - Website Lisa Hayden contributors Christine Jacobsen Fisa Maison du Sport International Avenue de Rhodanie 54 1007 Lausanne Switzerland Tel: +41 21 617 8373 Fax: +41 21 617 8375 info@fisa.org

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Cover: 2012 Harry How/Getty Images, 2012 Ezra Shaw/Getty Images, 2012 Damien Meyer/Getty Images, 2012 Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images and FISA