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VOTERS’ GUIDE

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012

13A

35TH ASSEMBLY DISTRICT
Patrick Tjugum
Party: Independent Age: 47 Family: Wife, Roxanne; three children Residence: town of Nokomis Education: Bachelor’s degree in Patrick political science, University of Wis- Tjugum consin-Stevens Point Career: Louisiana Pacific Corp. Tomahawk Mill Question 1: What new policies would you pursue to help get Wisconsinites back to work? Obviously we need to try to attract more small- to medium-sized manufacturing companies that pay a family-supporting wage. The state has to stop cutting the transportation aid payment. These payments help offset the cost of county and municipal road construction, maintenance, traffic and other transportation-related costs that are needed if we want to attract and keep businesses in the district. Question 2: Name at least one specific piece of legislation you’ll work to pass in 2013 if you are elected. We need to have a new formula for school funding. Taxpayers in the majority of Wisconsin school districts (74 percent) are worse off under the new state financing formula than under the old rules. The next legislative session needs to look at and discuss the proposal “Fair Funding for Our Future” submitted by state Superintendent Tony Evers. The economic impact of this plan is that school districts will receive more state aid and the proposal will deliver an even bigger school property tax reduction than when the state instituted the two-thirds funding in 1995. Question 3: What should voters know about you that will help them make a decision? Every election cycle we hear candidates say they can “cross the aisle” to collaborate with members of the other party; they are attempting to downplay their loyalty to rigid party platforms. I am truly the only independent candidate for the 35th Assembly District. I have no party-planned vote. I will listen to the ideas expressed by all sides of an issue and engage in thorough discussion. While reflecting on the principles of the proposed bills, and pairing it with feedback received from the district’s residents, I can make decisions that are appropriate for our area.

Mary Czaja
Party: Republican Age: 49 Family: Two children; two step-children; three grandchildren Residence: Tomahawk Education: Tomahawk High School, 1981; Bachelor’s Mary degree in economics and finance, minor in animal science, Czaja University of Wisconsin-River Falls, 1986 Career: Own and operate C.I.S. Insurance Group, bought in 1988; coowned Four Seasons Motel in Tomahawk, 1996 to 2002 Question 1: What new policies would you pursue to help get Wisconsinites back to work? Wisconsin made enormous strides last session balancing the budget and wiping out a multibillion-dollar deficit. However, there are definitely too many of our friends and neighbors still looking for work. As a small business owner, I understand that we need to get government out of the way so the private sector can create jobs. We also have to improve and restructure Wisconsin’s worker training programs to match the employment needs of businesses with the skills of our workforce. One promising opportunity is Wisconsin Workers Win, a new pilot program in select counties that allows certain qualifying individuals collecting unemployment benefits to get job training from employers seeking to hire. This initiative can help the unemployed, especially the long-termed unemployed, transition back into the workforce. Question 2: Name at least one specific piece of legislation you’ll work to pass in 2013 if you are elected. The Legislature missed a huge opportunity last session by failing to pass a bill to streamline mining regulations in Wisconsin, which would’ve allowed for the creation of thousands of jobs, including many good-paying union jobs right here in the Northwoods. The state’s mining laws are antiquated and burdensome and fail to account for different types of mining. This has made the state unattractive to mining companies looking to grow and create jobs in the state, despite Wisconsin’s rich iron ore deposits. If elected, I will make the passage of an environmentally sound iron mining bill a top priority. And I would be willing to work with anyone of any party who shares my commitment to bringing good jobs to the Northwoods. Question 3: What should voters know about you that will help them make a decision? As I’ve gone door-to-door in my district, the voters’ top priority is clearly jobs and the economy. As a small-business owner, I have firsthand experience creating jobs. We need to cut red tape and unnecessary bureaucracy so employers can concentrate less on needless paperwork and more on expanding their businesses and hiring. I also have experience balancing budgets and identifying and cutting wasteful spending. Wisconsin has generous welfare benefits, but that makes the benefits a target for cheats. I will work across the aisle to find ways to curb waste, fraud and abuse so that taxpayers can save more of their paycheck.

Kevin Koth
Party: Democratic Age: 52 Family: Wife, Kim; three daughters, Jessica, Jamie and Jenna Residence: town of Bradley Education: Tomahawk High School graduate Kevin Career: Thirty-four years as semi chemical operaKoth tor at Packaging Corporation of America, Tomahawk paper mill; 10 years on Bradley Town Board, including the last three as chairman Question 1: What new policies would you pursue to help get Wisconsinites back to work? Wisconsin has lagged behind the nation as a whole on job creation over the past two years. That’s why creating family-supporting jobs and strengthening our middle class will be my top priority. First, the state should explore policies that reinvest in our local small businesses. Small businesses are a critical foundation of the Northwoods economy. Second, we must strengthen our technical college system. Technical colleges sustained a $71 million cut in funding in the current budget. Tech colleges are critical to getting people back to work in the Northwoods by closing the skills gap and training students for the 21st century economy. Question 2: Name at least one specific piece of legislation you’ll work to pass in 2013 if you are elected. We must re-examine the school funding formula. The most recent budget took away $1.6 billion in funding from public schools. These cuts were compounded by an increase of more than $300 million in funding for private voucher schools in southeastern Wisconsin that operate with little or no accountability or oversight. My opponent supports that shift, but I strongly feel that’s not a responsible use of public tax dollars. The Northwoods has unique characteristics, particularly high property values and low incomes, which prevent our school districts from receiving state aid. I will work with other Northwoods legislators to ensure that our school districts are receiving the funding necessary to allow our children to succeed. Question 3: What should voters know about you that will help them make a decision? I am running for 35th Assembly District because Wisconsin has never been more divided. It’s time we set aside partisan differences. I have experience bringing people together, and I want to be part of the solutions that restore Wisconsin’s tradition of working together. At the end of the day, I will be accountable only to one group: the people of the district. I’m a lifelong resident of the Tomahawk area. My wife, my three daughters and I are all proud graduates of the Tomahawk School District. I understand the values and challenges facing the folks of the Northwoods. I will work tirelessly to bring the voice of the Northwoods to the Capitol.

LINCOLN COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY
Sidney Brubacher
Party: Democratic Age: 55 Family: Wife, Jennifer; son due in November Residence: Merrill Education: Edgar High School, 1975; bachelor’s degree in history, University Minnesota; J.D., Northern Illinois University of Law Career: Assistant district attorney in Marathon County for six years; private practice for two years; U.S. Navy, seven years Question 1: What are the most important qualities for a district attorney to possess? A) Honesty, B) Ability to know what a case is worth, C) Ability to Sidney work with others, Brubacher D) Organizational skills and E) Experience. Question 2: Name a problem you will solve if you are elected. The deplorable relationship that the district attorney’s office has with law enforcement.

Don Dunphy
Party: Republican Age: 61 Family: Wife, Ruthann; three children Ellen, 26, Jacke, 23, and Bridget, 21 Residence: Gleason Education: Bachelor’s degree in History, University of WisconsinStevens Point; J.D., Marquette University Law School Career: Admitted to Wisconsin Bar in 1986; private practice 1986 to 1991; assistant corporation counsel, Lincoln County, 1991 to 2004; Lin-

coln County District Attorney, 2005 to present Question 1: What are the most important qualities for a district attorney to posDon sess? Dunphy The most important qualities in a district attorney are an ability to stay calm under pressure, a willingness to work hard, the flexibility to compromise when necessary and a recognition that you can’t win every case.

Question 2: Name a problem you will solve if you are re-elected. In my next term, I will remain focused on the abuse and sale of illegal drugs. This is a problem worthy of close attention, not only because of the harm drugs do to users but also because of the many other crimes committed by people to get drugs or the money to buy them. I am not naïve enough to believe that drugs can be eliminated from the community. I will, however, continue to work closely with law enforcement and to seek jail or prison for dealers.

LINCOLN COUNTY CLERK
Christopher J. Marlowe
Party: Republican Age: 44 Family: Wife, Andrea; children Megan, 16, Emma, 8, Ty, 6 Residence: Merrill Education: Attended University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; Northcentral Technical College Career: Former retail business owner; paper industry Question 1: What are the most important qualities for a county clerk to possess? Integrity, superior communication skills, and being detail-orientated are the most important qualities a county clerk should possess. Chris Question 2: Name Marlowe a problem you will solve if you are elected. A problem I will continually address while in office is identifying areas for improved efficiencies in the services provided by the county.

Sheila Pudelko
Party: Republican (write-in) Age: 58 Family: Two adult children; one daughter-in-law; two granddaughters Residence: Town of Harrison Education: D.C. Everest High School; University of WisconsinGreen Bay; certified municipal clerk and certified municipal treasurer Career: Current Lincoln County Clerk, former longtime clerk for village of Rothschild

Question 1: What are the most important qualities for a county clerk to possess? Honesty; integrity; patience; ability to multitask; excellent Sheila customer service Pudelko skills giving him or her the ability to work well with all people and treat everyone with the respect they deserve; have a vast governmental knowledge base, including election administration

and governmental budgeting and accounting; ability to work well with other departments, all County Board members and officials from other governmental entities. Question 2: Name a problem you will solve if you are elected. I will continue to make your tax dollar and mine work the hardest it can for us. We need to continue to look for ways to work more efficiently together. I will continue to work on improving the service and services you receive from the County Clerk’s office.

CARTOONS

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