Group 1 Project Reflection

Claire Burgoyne, Jerry Mah, Steven Siebold October 8, 2011

The group presentation was a challenging yet rewarding project. As described in the course outline, this project was an “ill-defined, realistic learning situation (UBC Faculty of Education 2011)” which left decisions regarding content and format largely up to the three members of our group. Tuckman’s (1965) ideas regarding the group process provides a framework to describe one of our key learnings from this assignment, which centred on understanding the group process in creating a collaborative product. Storming - In our first meeting, we reviewed the criteria for the assignment and each presented our interpretation of the expectations. We were somewhat confused as to the parameters of the assignment and where to start. There were some diverging opinions in terms of which tools to use (PB works versus Word Press) and the content and flow of the presentation. We agreed to review relevant material, check in with our course instructor and reconvene. Forming - It was through reflection during this period and receiving helpful feedback to our questions from our instructor, that we were able to begin forming some common understanding. Through shared collaboration, this meeting was more productive as we were able to agree on our overall format and begin adding content for our presentation. Norming - In subsequent meetings we experienced a steady improvement in our work flow and quality of communication. We became comfortable working together, recognizing individual strengths, challenging each other in a spirit of inquiry, and improving our innovation in exploring ideas for our presentation. Performing - In the two weeks prior to the presentation the group process really solidified; we were able to coordinate our efforts and transform our rough draft material into a high quality wiki site and presentation. 1

Group 1 Project Reflection

Claire Burgoyne, Jerry Mah, Steven Siebold October 8, 2011

The week of our presentation began with the opportunity for participants to explore the Wiki independently. This allowed our classmates to view the presentation prior to joining us for an optional synchronous presentation and discussion hosted on a webinar platform. There was a fair turnout for our webinar with just under half the class represented. We included a wiki tour as well as some activities to promote participation of the attendees for which we received positive feedback. There appeared to be some reluctance on the part of the participants to contribute to the discussion period that followed, but after a few initial questions our classmates joined in leading to interesting discussion. We received positive feedback regarding the value of the opportunity to interact with classmates in a live setting; further such opportunities would be of great value within the MET program. After our webinar presentation we held a synchronous debriefing session in Skype where we reflected on the success of this part of our presentation. We also selected Google docs as our mechanism for collaborating on this summary. Responses to our discussion threads on the symposium site began slowly, with the first response occurring two days after the activity had officially begun. Thereafter, we received more visitors with participation increasing as the week passed. There were both interesting and rich comments and questions that occurred within our discussion threads. Throughout the week we responded to posts and updated content on our wiki in response to feedback from the webinar and the discussion board. Comments and questions from both the webinar and the discussion board led us in unexpected directions in terms of relating Cognitive Information Processing (CIP) to other learning theories and techniques. We believe the ensuing discussion was valuable for elucidating both the CIP and its relation to other learning theories.

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Group 1 Project Reflection

Claire Burgoyne, Jerry Mah, Steven Siebold October 8, 2011

References UBC Faculty of Education (2011) ETEC 512: Applications of Learning Theories to Instruction. Accessed on 07/11/2011 at http://met.ubc.ca/met_courses/descriptions/etec512.htm Tuckman, Bruce (1965). "Developmental sequence in small groups". Psychological Bulletin 63 (6): 384–99.

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