Table of Contents 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Features
Two Keys to Great Grilling: Marinades and Rubs 14 
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD 
 

Columns  
What’s Cooking?  3
 

Marinades and rubs have a long  standing tradition when it comes  to grilling, and for good reason.   

Find out what’s up with the Vegan  Culinary Experience this month.   

The Flavor of Summer in the  Desert – Mesquite! 24 
By Liz Lonetti 
 

Southwest Meets Spain:    On the Grill 17 
By Chef Philip Gelb 
 

Chef Phil does paella the  traditional way.  On the grill!   

Learn all about the joys of  mesquite beans and mesquite  flour!   

Bring Back the Pushup  26 
By Barry Lovelace 
 

Summer Celebrations  19 
By Chef Mayra 

  Get some great meal ideas for  your grilling extravaganza.   

Get strong, lean muscle using  simple resistance training.   

Living Green:   Compassionate Summer  The Secrets of Smoked Salts  Grilling 28  By Christine Watson  22 
By Chef Jason Wyrick 
 

Learn how to make gourmet  smoked salts right in your own  backyard.             

  The Compassionate Nutritionist  gives her tips for summer grilling  and a great Mediterranean  sandwich to go with them.   

Marketplace  8 
 

Get connected and find out about  vegan friendly businesses and  organizations. 
 

Recipe Index  49 
 

           
On The Grill

A listing of all the recipes found in  this issue, compiled with links.    see the following page for  interviews and reviews… 

August 2009|1

 

Table of Contents 2 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Interviews
Interview with Raw Chef  Angela Elliott 30 
 

Reviews 
Restaurant Review:  Macy’s European  Coffeehouse, Bakery, and  Vegetarian Restaurant  41 
By Madelyn Pryor 
 

Angela specializes in making raw  food simple and accessible  without compromising on flavor.   

Interview with Josh Hooten  of Herbivore 33 
 

Josh is the co‐owner of Herbivore  clothing store and magazine and  one of the long‐time luminaries of  the vegan community.   

Located in the heart of Flagstaff,  Macy’s is a quaint, fun vegetarian  coffee house with a great selection  of coffees and teas and an eclectic  array of menu options. 
 

Featured Artist 
 

Product Review:  So  Delicious Coconut‐based  Yogurt 43 
By Madelyn Pryor 
 

Apollo Poetry, the Traveling  looking to avoid soy or simply for a  Poet 38  rich, decadent taste that isn’t 
loaded with calories.  Apollo Poetry is a nationally    renowned, award‐winning poet on  Book Review:  The Vegan  a journey to bring art and  Table 45  compassion to the masses.  By  Madelyn Pryor      Entertainment at its finest, this is  the go‐to book when you’ve got  vegetarian and non‐vegetarian  guests alike. 
   

The perfect yogurt for those 

Book Review:  Vegan Scoop  47 
By  Madelyn Pryor                   

  Exotic ice creams.  Low‐calorie  desserts.  Easy‐to‐follow recipes.   What’s not to like?   

On The Grill

August 2009|2

 

The Vegan Culinary Experience
                          On The Grill       August 2009   
                          Publisher    Jason Wyrick                                  Editors     Eleanor Sampson,                                                   Carolyn Mullin,                                                  Madelyn Pryor             Nutrition Analyst     Eleanor Sampson                         Web Design    William Snell & Jason Wyrick                            Graphics     Alex Searcy & Jason Wyrick             Video Production    Kristen Mozafarri                             Reviewer    Madelyn Pryor      Contributing Authors    Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Jill Nussinow                                                 Mayra “Dr. Flavor”                                                 Liz Lonetti                                                 Sharon Valencik                                                 Philip Gelb                                                 Barry Lovelace                                                 Christine Watson 

What’s Cooking?
Grilling shouldn’t just be limited to  summer, despite tradition!  The smoky  aroma of the different woods, the  roasted, caramelized flavors of the  different veggies, the tangy, powerful  flavors of the different rubs and  sauces.  All of these combine to make  a truly sensual culinary experience and  the primary reason grilling happens to be my favorite way to  prepare meals.  It also makes a great excuse for a social gathering  which itself is a great excuse to show off just how good vegan  cuisine can be.  In this issue, you’ll learn some basics, some  gourmet goodies, desserts, and ways to please your meat‐eating  grilling companions.    Look for more changes in the coming issues as we expand the  Vegan Culinary Experience to include interactive content and more  columns.  We’re also working on a print version of the magazine,  so for those of you crazing the smell of paper and ink that only  comes with printed text, it’s several months off, but it’s on the  way.  Until then…    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well!         

 
                Photography Credits  

                  Cover Page     Cathy Fisher   
                Recipe Images     Jason Wyrick                                                 Milan Valencik of                                                  Milan Photography    Smoked Salts                      Jason Wyrick    Brazier, Mesquite,             GNU Free Documentation  Screwbean, Fire Pit            License    Bananas                            Creative Commons                      Apollo Poetry   Courtesy of Apollo Poetry                     Angela Elliott   Courtesy of Angela Elliott   Josh Hooten & Apparel   Courtesy of Josh Hooten and                                                Herbivore    So Delicious Yogurt            So Delicious Website  Macy’s Interior                   Macy’s Website                                        
 

             

On The Grill

August 2009|3

 

Contributors
Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen ‐ Jill is a Registered Dietitian and has a Masters  Degree in Dietetics and Nutrition from Florida International University. After graduating, she  migrated to California and began a private nutrition practice providing individual consultations  and workshops, specializing in nutrition for pregnancy, new mothers, and children.  You can  find out more about The Veggie Queen at www.theveggiequeen.com.  

      Jason Wyrick ‐ Chef Jason Wyrick is the Executive Chef of Devil Spice, Arizona's vegan catering  company, and the publisher of The Vegan Culinary Experience. Chef Wyrick has been regularly  featured on major television networks and in the press.  He has done demos with several  doctors, including Dr. Neal Barnard of the PCRM, Dr. John McDougall, and Dr. Gabriel  Cousens.  Chef Wyrick was also a guest instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program.  He has  catered for PETA, Farm Sanctuary, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Google. Visit Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.devilspice.com and www.veganculinaryexperience.com.  

Madelyn Pryor ‐ Madelyn ‘the Reviewer’ Pryor is one of Amazon.com’s top 1500 reviewers,  and a certified Vine Voice. She also gets several requests every day to review books,  movies, and graphic novels from various publishers including Harper‐Collins. That means  that people really want Madelyn’s advice and opinion, which is fine with her, because it  makes it that much easier for her to enact her plans for world domination. Those plans  currently involve taking a break from her Masters of Psychology program to be the Sous  Chef for the Vegan Culinary Experience. You can reach her at                                      madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.     Eleanor Sampson – Eleanor is the editor for The Vegan Culinary Experience, author, and an  expert vegan baker with a specialty in delicious vegan sweets (particularly cinnamon rolls!)   You can reach Eleanor at Eleanor@veganculinaryexperience.com.                    
On The Grill August 2009|4

Contributors
  Mayra “Dr. Flavor” - Chef Mayra has been in the “healthy eating and cooking” industry for  over 11 years and has certifications in sports nutrition, macrobiotic cooking, vegan and  vegetarian, holistic, and feng shui cuisine. She started her career as a cook by learning and  experimenting with French, Caribbean, Southern, Cajun, and West African cuisine.   Chef Mayra is a chef instructor and conducts a variety of classes and demonstrations geared  towards vegan athletes, personal trainers, and anyone who would like to live a healthier life.  “Dr. Flavor” can make healthy cooking easier by becoming your personal chef!    Visit Chef Mayra at www.mychefmayra.com or call her at 702‐372‐4709.      Liz Lonetti ‐ As a professional urban designer, Liz Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and socially.  She graduated from the U of MN with a BA in  Architecture in 1998. She also serves as the Executive Director for the Phoenix Permaculture  Guild, a non‐profit organization whose mission is to inspire sustainable living through  education, community building and creative cooperation (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).   A long time advocate for building greener and more inter‐connected communities, Liz  volunteers her time and talent for other local green causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys  cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing great food with friends and neighbors,  learning from and teaching others.  To contact Liz, please visit her blog site  www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan .        Sharon Valencik ‐ Sharon Valencik is the author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan  Desserts. She is raising two vibrant young vegan sons and rescued animals, currently a rabbit  and a dog. She comes from a lineage of artistic chef matriarchs and has been baking since  age five. She is working on her next book, World Utopia: Delicious and Healthy  International Vegan Cuisine. Please visit www.sweetutopia.com for more information, to ask  questions, or to provide feedback.          Chef Philip Gelb ‐ Philip Gelb was born and raised in Brooklyn NY. He ended up in Florida  where he received a BA in cultural anthropology and did graduate studies in  ethnomusicology.  For the last decade he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area where he  works as a professional musician and music teacher as well as a vegan chef. As a musician he  has performed all over the United States and in Japan, Europe and Canada.  5 years ago he  started In the Mood for Food, a vegetarian personal chef and catering company.  He has  been vegetarian since 17 and after becoming vegan 4 years ago, he changed his business to  strictly vegan cuisine. Although totally self taught as a chef, he is a very popular vegan  cooking teacher, hosting monthly classes.  His other interests include hiking, travelling, and  he is an avid film buff. Of course, he loves cooking, especially for friends as well as professionally. Visit Phil at  www.myspace.com/InTheMoodforFood.   

On The Grill

August 2009|5

Contributors
Barry Lovelace ‐ Barry Lovelace is a vegan fitness coach specializing in the functional training  of athletes.  He is the owner of FitQuest Fitness in Allentown, PA, and frequently produces  routine fitness podcasts at his site www.barrylovelaceblog.com.            Christine Watson ‐ Christine Watson, MS, RD, has been teaching nutrition, health and  wellness since 1992. She is a registered dietitian, nutritionist, and certified wellness coach. As  the owner of Compassionate Nutritionist, LLC, Christine’s goal for her clients is to help them  incorporate healthy vegetarian eating and green living practices into their busy lives. To  learn more about the services and products offered by Christine and subscribe to her  “Compassionate Living” ezine where you’ll receive a FREE copy of her Healthy & Eco‐ conscious 7‐day Menu w/recipes included, visit the company website at  www.CompassionateNutritionist.com  or email Christine at  Christine@CompassionateNutritionist.com.     

On The Grill

August 2009|6

About the VCE
The Vegan Culinary Experience is an educational vegan culinary  magazine designed by professional vegan chefs to help make  vegan cuisine more accessible.  Published by Chef Jason Wyrick,  the magazine utilizes the electronic format of the web to go  beyond the traditional content of a print magazine to offer  classes, podcasts, an interactive learning community, and links to  articles, recipes, and sites embedded throughout the magazine to  make retrieving information more convenient for the reader.     The VCE is also designed to bring vegan chefs, instructors,  medical professionals, authors, and businesses together with the  growing number of people interested in vegan cuisine.    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well. 

Become a Subscriber
Subscribing to the VCE is FREE!  Subscribers have access to our Learning Community, back issues, recipe  database, and extra educational materials.    Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCESubscribe.htm to subscribe.   
*PRIVACY POLICY ‐ Contact information is never, ever given or sold to another individual or company 

 

Not Just a Magazine
Meal Service 
The Vegan Culinary Experience also provides weekly meals that coincide with the recipes from the magazine.   Shipping is available across the United States.  Raw, gluten‐free, and low‐fat diabetic friendly options are  available.  Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEMealService.htm for more information.   

Culinary Instruction 
Chef Jason Wyrick and many of the contributors to the magazine are available for private culinary instruction,  seminars, interviews, and other educational based activities.  For information and pricing, contact us at  http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEContact.htm.  
 

An Educational and Inspirational Journey of Taste, Health, and Compassion 
On The Grill August 2009|7

Marketplace
Welcome to the Marketplace, our new spot for  finding vegetarian friendly companies, chefs, authors,  bloggers, cookbooks, products, and more!  One of the  goals of The Vegan Culinary Experience is to connect  our readers with organizations that provide relevant  products and services for vegans, so we hope you  enjoy this new feature!      Click on the Ads – Each ad is linked to the appropriate  organization’s website.  All you need to do is click on  the ad to take you there.    Become a Marketplace Member – Become connected  by joining the Vegan Culinary Experience  Marketplace.  Membership is available to those who  financially support the magazine, to those who  promote the magazine, and to those who contribute  to the magazine.  Contact Chef Jason Wyrick at  chefjason@veganculinaryexperience.com for details!   

Current Members 
  Rational Animal  (www.rational‐animal.org)   Farm Sanctuary  (www.farmsanctuary.com)   GoDairyFree.org and My Sweet Vegan  (www.godairyfree.org)   Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen  (www.theveggiequeen.com)  Marty Davey, MS, RD  (www.martydavey.com)  Chef Mayra “Dr. Flavor”  (www.mychefmayra.com)   Sweet Utopia  (www.sweetutopia.com)   In The Mood for Food  (www.myspace.com/inthemoodforfood)    The Phoenix Permactulture Guild  (www.phoneixpermaculture.org)   Milan Photography  (www.milanphotography.com)   Raw Spirit Festival  (www.rawspirit.com)  
On The Grill August 2009|8

Marketplace
                                                                                         

www.mychefmayra.com chef@mychefmayra.com Call 702.372.4709
Eating vegan doesn't have to be boring. In fact, it is the most exciting way to eat! Fresh and  organically grown plant‐based foods are among nature's most healthful and delicious gifts. 

Private Chef Mayra provides**Baby Food Classes** plus these healthy services. ☺"A Seduction of the Senses" ☺ A flavor fusion to seduce your palate ☺ Private & Public Cooking Classes ☺ Sport Nutrition information-cooking tips. ☺ How to prepare foods as a Vegan or Vegetarian ☺Vegan Desserts & Meal delivery ☺ Guidance and coaching for healthy eating for you and your family Hire Chef Mayra Mention this ad and Save 25% on your next Private Service

On The Grill

August 2009|9

Marketplace
                                                 

           
On The Grill August 2009|10

Marketplace

                                       
On The Grill August 2009|11

Marketplace
                                                                                         
On The Grill August 2009|12

Marketplace
   

On The Grill

August 2009|13

Two Keys to Great Grilling: Marinades and Rubs
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™
 

Grilled Asian Squash Salad
Serves 4   
This was inspired by a rub made by Chef Jeffrey Beeson at The Point Hilton Resort at Tapatio Cliffs in Phoenix, Arizona. He grows all the herbs and spices in his garden. “We go to the store and still come out with a terrific product that can be rubbed onto meat, fish, poultry, or even tofu before grilling. It also makes a good daily spice blend.” You can also do this with paprika instead of chilies, and omit the cayenne, for a milder blend. You can also add toasted and ground sesame seeds to make it richer, but it won’t last longer. 1‐2 dried chilies (depending on size), cut into  pieces – use ancho or pasilla or any that you like  (or you can use a good pure chili powder, not  spice, which has other spices added)  1 ½ tsp. cumin seeds, toasted  1 tsp. coriander seed  1 tbsp. garlic granules or 2 tsp. garlic powder  ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper  1 tsp. oregano  1 ½ tsp. onion powder  1 ½ tsp. thyme  1 tsp. rosemary (optional)  1 ½ tsp. black pepper (optional)  2‐3 tsp. sucanat or brown sugar    Combine all ingredients except sugar in a spice  grinder or blender.  Blend until smooth.  
  © 2008 The Veggie Queen™  www.veggiequeen.com 
On The Grill

Something about putting food over fire makes it  taste great, most of the time. Perhaps childhood  memories of cooking outdoors, or something  deeply ingrained in our genes about cooking with  fire, which at one time was the only way, leads to  the “thrill of the grill.” Often, though, people tell  me that their vegetable or vegan grilling experience  wasn’t as good as they thought that it could be  because their food was dried out. My two  solutions: marinades and rubs.  We can take a lesson from meat‐eaters when it  comes to marinades, which are used often for a  few  reasons: to infuse flavor, to keep the food  from drying out and to tenderize  No tenderizing  necessary with vegan proteins but they still benefit  from added flavor and moisture. Marinades  produce favorable results with tofu, tempeh and  seitan and with a number of absorbent vegetables  such as summer squash and eggplant.   While I like to make my own marinades, using a  bottle of store bought marinade is just fine. Often,  your favorite vinegar‐based, non‐creamy dressing  will do. You can enliven it with some fresh chopped  herbs of your choice. My favorite marinade herbs  include parsley, oregano, cilantro, basil, mint,  tarragon and savory, depending upon what flavor  profile I am seeking, and what I am marinating.  Using dried herbs is fine and I often use dried in the  marinade and add fresh, chopped herbs to the dish  after they’ve been grilled. 
August 2009|14

How long should you marinate?   The length of time in the marinade depends upon  the food and how much marinade it will absorb.  Eggplant, which is most sponge‐like, will suck up  the marinade rather quickly so be careful with how  much marinade and the length of time, as well as  how much tamari, Bragg’s liquid amino acids or soy  sauce you add. Too much makes a dish  unpalatable. Generally, marinating for at least 15  minutes and up to 1 hour is sufficient to infuse  flavor into tofu, seitan and other vegetables,  including mushrooms. Tempeh’s firm texture  allows for longer marination. I like to steam or  simmer tempeh before marinating it to allow for  better absorption. When I do my Grilled Asian  Squash Salad (recipe below), I usually marinate for  30 minutes to 1 hour but have done so for as little  as 15 minutes. A lot depends upon how prepared I  am at grill time.  One of the nice things about vegan marinades is  that they can be reserved to use for adding  moisture to the grilled dish. I often reserve the  marinade in case I want to use it afterwards or  brush grilled items with it. You can also taste your  marinade as you go along, which is not possible  with meat‐based marinades.   What’s The Rub?  If you’ve never used a rub before, it’s a great way  to add lots of flavor to veg options. You actually  coat the food with a bunch of mixed spices and let  it sit to absorb the flavors. Rubs work best with  moist foods so don't work well on dry vegetables  such as green beans or carrots.   What I love about rubs is that you can buy them  premade, such as those from WholeSpice  http://www.wholespice.com (BBQ spice rub, chili  BBQ spice rub or Jerk seasoning to name a few) or  you can easily make your own from spices that you 

Herb and Chile Rub
Makes ¼ cup   
When the squash is prolific, you always need another way to serve it. This dish is especially easy and delicious. Even people who say they don’t like squash usually find it irresistible.   1 tbsp. olive oil  1 tsp. toasted sesame oil  2 tbsp. rice wine vinegar  1 tbsp. reduced sodium tamari or Bragg’s liquid  amino acids  4 summer squash of any kind, quartered  lengthwise  1 large onion, cut into rings  3 tbsp. chopped herbs, such as cilantro, Thai  basil, or parsley  2‐3 cloves of garlic, minced  1 tsp. grated ginger  Salt and pepper to taste    Combine olive oil, sesame oil, vinegar, and half  the garlic and ginger in a bowl or zippered bag.   Mix in squash, onion, and herbs.  Let marinate at  least 30 minutes to 1 hour.  Remove vegetables,  and reserve marinade.    Place veggies on a screen or basket on your grill  over hot coals or gas (or inside on a grill pan).   Grill for 3‐4 minutes on each side, turning the  vegetables carefully.    Once the squash is grilled, cut it into bite‐size  pieces.  Mix with cooked onion rings, reserved  marinade, and remaining ginger and garlic.  Add  salt and pepper to taste.  Garnish with chopped  cilantro or other herbs.  Serve as is or cool to  room temperature.  From The Veggie Queen: Vegetables Get the Royal Treatment by Jill Nussinow, MS, RD 
© 2007 The Veggie Queen™  www.veggiequeen.com 

already use.  A rub can change a vegetable from  ho‐hum to exciting.    

On The Grill

August 2009|15

What Are They?  Generally, they are a mixture of spices and dried  herbs mixed with sugar and/or salt. I usually omit  both the sugar and salt. They are used to coat  foods before grilling, often by brushing or rubbing  the food with a bit of oil. If the food is moist, such  as tofu, seitan or steamed tempeh, no oil is  necessary. I omit the sugar because it can  sometimes burn or cause the food to stick to the  grill.   You do not need to let the rub sit on the food, but  it’s fine if you do. Rubs add a burst of flavor, which  enhances grilled foods. Rubs also work well for  roasting, broiling or general seasoning.  Spice rubs  make wonderful holiday gifts, especially since you  can personalize each blend, adding ingredients that  friends or family like, and omitting those that they  dislike. This simple Chili Rub keeps well in glass.  Remember not to store salt in metal containers, as  it will corrode them.  Enjoy your summer cooking outdoors. 
   

The Author 
Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie  Queen ‐ Jill is a Registered Dietitian  and has a Masters Degree in Dietetics  and Nutrition from Florida  International University. After  graduating, she migrated to California  and began a private nutrition practice  providing individual consultations and  workshops, specializing in nutrition for pregnancy, new  mothers, and children.  You can find out more about The  Veggie Queen at www.theveggiequeen.com.    

                   
On The Grill August 2009|16

Southwest Meets Spain: On the Grill
with Chef Philip Gelb
 

Grilling! Food tastes good, cooked outdoors over  coals or wood. This is a simple fact of life  recognized by all cultures on all continents.   Barbecue is easily mistaken as something for  carnivores only; however there is a multitude of  ways to prepare delightful vegetables on a grill.     Corn is one of North and Central America’s great  contributions to the global culinary diet. It is high in  nutrition, fairly easy to cultivate and easy to  prepare in an infinite variety of ways. This staple of  the diet of Native Americans is now found in  “traditional” diets all over the world.  Please only  use locally grown organic corn! Otherwise you are  using and thus supporting the farming of  genetically modified corn, which is one of the most  misused of all seeds. Corn is one of the easiest  vegetables to use on the grill, caramelizing the  kernels to a delightful flavor. These can be eaten  simply by themselves or with some pesto or made  into corn salads which can then be stuffed into  peppers...well, you get the point. Take an idea and  run with it.    A general rule is to provide one ear of corn per  person. To prepare, submerge each ear of corn in  its husk in water for one hour to hydrate it.   Carefully lift the husk and brush with olive oil and  dust lightly with Himalayan red salt. Rewrap husks  around the ears.  Place on grill, over warm coals  and cover, for 15 minutes, turning every 5 minutes.  The husks will char but the corn on the inside will  be ok but do not overcook.  Be careful in removing  from the grill as it will be very hot!! From here,  simply remove the rest of the husk and eat, or add  a bit of salt and pepper and perhaps more olive oil.  Or, you can brush with a cilantro pesto!     

Cilantro pesto 
  Ingredients  2 cups cilantro  2 cloves garlic  1/2 cup roasted walnuts  1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil  1 tsp sea salt  black pepper to taste    Instructions  Place all ingredients in a food processor and   process until smooth.     Raw Version (optional)  Do not toast the walnuts.     

Paella for Puyol 
In honor of an amazing season for the incredible  football (soccer) team FC Barcelona had ‐ winning  the Spanish title, the Spanish cup and the European  Championship ‐ I would like to offer this dish for  team Captain, Carles Puyol. Arguably one of the  greatest defensive players in this world, this  Catalonian football player has been an integral part  of this team and the Spanish national team for over  a decade. Historically, FC Barcelona has been a very  progressive team beginning when they went up  against Franco during and after the Spanish civil  war. In recent years, rather than take huge  amounts of money from corporate sponsors in  exchange for putting that corporation on their  uniform, FC Barcelona set a new standard by  paying UNICEF so they can put UNICEF on the  team’s uniforms.         
August 2009|17

 
On The Grill

Ingredients  1 cup bomba rice  2 cloves garlic  1 onion, chopped  1/2 cup fresh peas  Ingredients, continued  1 red pepper, julienned  ½ pound tempeh, cut in strips  A few pinches saffron  2 tbsp olive oil  ½ dry cup white wine  1 tsp sea salt  3 cups stock  Black pepper to taste    Instructions for the paella  Place paella pan on grill, add olive oil,   saffron, salt and onions and sauté for 3   minutes, add garlic, peas, and red pepper   and sauté 2 more minutes. Add rice and   sauté 1 minute and then add the wine.   Simmer till evaporated and then add the   stock. Cook for 25 minutes or till water is   evaporated and rice is fluffy.    For the tempeh   Grill tempeh slices till browned on each  side. Place tempeh slices on finished paella.   

Instructions  Grill the corn as noted above.  Wrap the peppers in  foil and place on grill for half hour. Remove from  foil and peel and remove seeds and chop finely.  Combine all ingredients in bowl and stir gently. Let  sit for an hour for ingredients to blend.    The Author    For the last decade, Phil has lived in  the San Francisco Bay Area where  he works as a professional  musician and music teacher as well  as a vegan chef. As a musician he  has performed all over the United  States and in Japan, Europe and  Canada.  Five years ago he started  In the Mood for Food, a vegetarian personal chef  and catering company.  He has been vegetarian  since 17 and after becoming vegan 4 years ago, he  changed his business to strictly vegan cuisine.  Although totally self taught as a chef, he is a very  popular vegan cooking teacher, hosting monthly  classes.  His other interests include hiking,  travelling, and he is an avid film buff. Of course, he  loves cooking, especially for friends as well as  professionally.  You can reach Chef Philip Gelb at  www.myspace.com/inthemoodforfood.    

Grilled Corn Salad 
  Ingredients  4 ears corn  1 red bell pepper  1 orange bell pepper  1 serrano pepper  1 poblano pepper  1 jalapeno pepper  3 limes  1 tsp sea salt  3 tbsp olive oil  2 tbsp chopped cilantro  1 tbsp chopped sage  2 scallions, chopped         
On The Grill August 2009|18

Summer Celebrations
by Chef Mayra 
 

  Hello everyone! How is your summer, having fun? I  am so excited about this month’s theme…. grilling.  But, let me start by confessing that when I get  invited to an “outdoor party” the question of  “What do you eat?” comes my way quite a bit. I  answer, “A vegan beer, a plant‐based burger, fresh  veggies, corn on the cob (grilled) and a homemade  apple pie a la mode.” I just love the reaction that I  get and the expression on their face as they think  “Ooohhh, that sounds good… I want some of that.”  I just love it!      Whenever people gather at summer celebrations  like the 4th of July, there is often a focus on  informal patio dining with an abundance of food.  What kind of food? Barbeque, of course! The  mention of an old‐fashioned 4th of July celebration  easily conjures up images of friends and family  chatting, joking, and teasing the man of the house  who dons an apron and tends the smoke‐spewing  barbecue. With metal tongs firmly in hand, he  dutifully turns the hamburgers, steaks, hot dogs,  sausages, or shrimp until flames shoot upward and  the food is well charred. But, let's leave that old‐ fashioned image behind, and step out onto the  patio of the vegan household to see what's cookin'  for a good old summer grilling fun. The vegan  gathering of family and friends pays homage to its  furry friends, the animals, by letting them roam  free, while the barbecue sizzles with some tasty  treats of the season. 
On The Grill

  Though people unfamiliar with the vegan table  consider it very limited, it's actually quite the  opposite. With so many possible choices of  excellent dishes, the host and hostess have the  challenge of narrowing them down to just a few  special recipes that take advantage of the outdoor  grill. The vegan choices for the barbecue can also  include succulent “hamburgers”, “steaks”, “hot  dogs”, “sausages”, and “shrimp” made from plant‐  based ingredients. But instead of offering you  mock‐meat fare, I departed to offer you some  extraordinary alternatives for your meal. Here is  what I’ve chosen for a sample celebration menu:    Appetizers   Dr Flavor Super Island Chiller   A Tasty Marinated Tofu Fingers with Spicy  Peanut Sauce (will be available in the recipe  section)    Entrée   Tossed Salad with Spicy Coconut Curry   Dressing   Grilled Tempeh Chipotle “Steak” (will be   available in the recipe section)   Grilled Garlic‐Veggie Skewers  Grilled Red Onions with Lime  Grilled Corn on the Cob with Paprika 

August 2009|19

Dessert                 Nutty Chocolate Frozen Bananas    

finely minced   1/4 teaspoon black pepper   1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper   1/8 teaspoon guar gum ** 

With just a few creative touches you can turn the  patio into a great summer party. Some vegan beer  Combine all the ingredients in the blender and  and wine and you will have the best party.  process until the garlic and ginger are completely  However, careful planning is part of any successful  incorporated and the dressing is smooth. Pour into  party. Many dishes can be prepared a day or two  a narrow‐neck bottle for easier pouring and chill.  ahead, making the party  To serve, shake well.   Here's an ideal starter that quells the hunger day as enjoyable for the  pangs, yet leaves plenty of appetite for the * Choose a coconut milk  home chef as well as the  festive delights that follow. Because two containing at 5 to 8 grams  guests. Make‐ahead  servings fill the blender, you may want to of total fat for a good  dishes include the  prepare several batches ahead and chill them in consistency and flavor.  Curried Coconut Salad  pitchers if serving a crowd. Alternatively, have Avoid the higher fat  Dressing, the Grilled  plenty of ingredients on hand and make them content varieties. They will  Tempeh Steaks (made  to order. produce a heavier dressing  from fermented  with overpowering flavor.   soybeans and available at  Dr. FLAVOR’S SUPER ISLAND CHILLER  natural foods markets),  Yield: 2 delicious servings   ** Guar gum is a fine  the Spicy Peanut Sauce,  powder made from the  and even the Marinated  Flesh of 2 ripe mangoes   seeds of a legume called  Tofu Fingers. Both  1 1/4 cups unsweetened pineapple juice   cluster bean that grows in  desserts, including the  1 cup ice cubes   India. The powder is an  Chocolate Sauce, can be  1/2 cup firm silken tofu   excellent thickening agent  made the day before,  1/4 cup coconut milk   that requires no cooking.  too.  1/4 cup maple syrup   The powder is on the  (FDA's GRAS list). Used in  Here's a light dressing  Combine all the ingredients in a blender and  small quantities it is  that promises not to  process until smooth and creamy. Pour into old‐ considered completely  cover up the fresh,  safe. Guar gum is available  sweet flavors of your  fashioned glasses.  in natural food markets.   crisp tossed salad.  Instead, those crunchy veggies will show‐off their  To send chocoholics into ecstasy, purchase a good  best with a topping that compliments their  quality of dark chocolate and prepare the easiest  earthiness.   sauce you've ever made. A few simple  preparations the day before serving puts this  SPICY COCONUT CURRY DRESSING  sinfully delicious treat into the category of nearly  Yield: 1 3/4 cups     trouble‐free. Then, when the crowd is ready for  dessert, simply warm the chocolate sauce over  1 1/3 cups coconut milk*   low heat until it is completely melted.  1/4 cup  plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice   2 teaspoons mirin (Japanese sweet cooking    wine)   NUTTY CHOCOLATE FROZEN BANANAS  3 large cloves garlic, crushed   Serving: 6 servings   1 1/4 teaspoons curry powder   1 teaspoon salt   3 ripe bananas   1/2‐inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and 
On The Grill August 2009|20

1 cup raw walnut pieces   6 ounces or squares unsweetened dairy‐ free dark chocolate   1 1/4 cups organic sugar   1/2 cup boiling water   6 sturdy wooden skewers 

Holding the skewered banana firmly, roll it in the  sauce to coat, then immediately roll the banana in  the coarsely ground nuts. Then, enjoy chocoholic  nirvana. I sure do!!  ‘Til the next Month…….    Stay Green, Lean and Sexy…With an “Animal  Free” lifestyle     Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr. Flavor  The Author 
Chef Mayra has been in the  “healthy eating and cooking”  industry for over 11 years and  has certifications in sports  nutrition, macrobiotic cooking,  vegan and vegetarian, holistic,  and feng shui cuisine. She  started her career as a cook by  learning and experimenting with French, Caribbean,  Southern, Cajun, and West African cuisine.   Chef Mayra is a chef instructor and conducts a  variety of classes and demonstrations geared  towards vegan athletes, personal trainers, and  anyone who would like to live a healthier life. “Dr.  Flavor” can make healthy cooking easier by  becoming your personal chef!  Visit chef Mayra at  www.mychefmayra.com or call her at 702‐372‐ 4709. 

TO PREPARE THE BANANAS, peel and cut them in  half crosswise. Insert a wooden skewer deeply into  the center of the cut end of each of the bananas,  and place them on a metal baking pan. Freeze the  bananas for several hours or overnight.  TO PREPARE THE NUTS, coarsely grind the walnuts  in a hand‐crank nut mill or place them in a zipper‐ lock plastic bag and pound them with a hammer.  Place them into a wide mouth bowl and set them  aside.  TO PREPARE THE CHOCOLATE SAUCE, melt the  chocolate squares in a 1‐quart (1 liter) saucepan  over very low heat, stirring frequently.  Place the organic sugar into a 2‐or 3‐cup  measuring cup. Pour the boiling water over the  sugar and stir to dissolve the sugar completely.  When the chocolate is completely melted, turn  off the heat, and add the sweetened water,  stirring until the chocolate develops a shiny,  smooth consistency.  TO SERVE, bring the prepared nuts to the table.  Pour the chocolate sauce into a wide mouth bowl,  place the frozen bananas on a serving platter, and  bring them to the table. 
On The Grill

 

August 2009|21

The ecre of T e Se ets o Smok S t ked Salt
By B Chef J Jason Wy   yrick
 
I disc covered the h heady flavor o of smoked salt several  years s ago while I w was living in F Fort Worth, T Texas and I  have been entranced not only by the differe ent woody  arom mas, but by their myriad us ses ever since e.  Apple  wood d salt, hickory y salt, alder w wood salt.  Could I make  these e myself?  Could I use cher rry wood?  Pe erhaps  mesq quite?  The ne eed to know w was insatiable.  A quest  was u undertaken.  Answers wer re found.  Culinary  perfe ection was ac chieved.  And now it’s time e to pass  those e secrets on t to you.    For this endeavor, you’ll need a coarse sea salt, a  smok ker or grill, an nd cheeseclot th.      Preparing Your Sa alt  First, , choose a coa arse grain salt, one that ge enerally  belon ngs in a salt g grinder.  At the very least, t the grain  should be 1/16”.  The larger sa alt crystals lea ave more  room m for the smoke to move b between them m and the  smok ky particles st tick to the larger crystals b better than  the fine crystals.  Wrap the salt t in cheeseclo oth or some  other fine mesh container or la ay it on a fine e mesh sheet.   I find d it works best if I leave an opening in th he top of the  cloth h or mesh.  Ba asically, you’re placing the salt in a  conta ainer that will sit on the gr rill and you w want to leave  as much salt expo osed to the sm moke as possi ible.      Choo osing Your Wood  My tw wo favorite w woods to use are apple wo ood and  mesq quite wood.  T They’re both incredibly ve ersatile and  have flavors that a aren’t too delicate and are en’t too  stron ng.  Mesquite is great for S Southwestern n style  cooking and apple e wood is per rfect for chilie es and  crust ting tofu, seitan, and mush hrooms.  I also o like using  hicko ory smoked sa alt for BBQ an nd have made e alder wood  smok ked salt and c cherry wood s smoked salt.       
On The Grill

The Right Tempe erature  The best smoking g temperature e is around 12 20 degrees F  and you don’t wa ant the heat to go above 225 degrees F.   The smoky resin l left on the salt will burn of ff and you’ll  be le eft with salt that tastes mu uch like, you g guessed it,  regu ular salt.  Cool ler smoke also leaves a sm moother,  more e full‐bodied taste.      w Long Do I Do o That?  How Plan on smoking y your salt at le east four hours, preferably y  for a a full day.  You u will occasio onally need to o tend your  fire t to make sure the coals kee eps smoking a and the  longer you leave your salt over the smoldering wood,  more intense e the flavor will be.  I usually tend the  the m wood once an ho our for the firs st eight hours s or so and  then n let the heat die down, taking the salt o off the grill  the n next day.  Thi is allows the s salt to pick up p enough  smoky resin to create a strong g flavor.  If the e flavor is not t  stron ng, it tends to o get lost in th he food and t the salt  acqu uires the flavo ored resin ver ry slowly.    Store Your Goods s  The salt will quick kly lose its flavor if it’s constantly  expo osed to air, so o store this in an airtight co ontainer.   Smo oked salts tend to accumulate a bit mor re moisture  than n regular salt, so choose a g glass container over a 
August 2009|22

metal one.  Metal containers may start to corrode  because of the moisture.      Quick Tips  • Don’t smoke your salt with other foods in most  cases.  The salt will pick up the flavor of that  food, but it won’t pick up all the nice flavors.  It  tends to pick up the acrid ones more than the  mellow, pleasant ones.  • Soak your wood by submerging it in water for  about an hour if they are wood chips and two to  three hours if you have small logs or coals.  This  makes the wood smolder in the grill and makes  for a smoother smoke.    • The darker your salt once its finished, the more  smoky flavor it will have.  A full day of smoking  should leave you with a caramel‐colored salt.  • Place a small cast iron pot of water in the grill to  keep the grill slightly moist.  The small amount  of moisture this generates will help the smoky  resin better stick to the salt crystals.  • Stir the salt every 2‐3 hours so that the smoke  more evenly coats the salt.  • Grind your salt once it is finished smoking and  has cooled for a finer salt.   

The Author  Chef Jason Wyrick is  an award winning  vegan chef and the  owner of Arizona's  only vegan catering  company, Devil  Spice. Serving the  state since 2004 as both a caterer and a prolific  vegan culinary instructor, Chef Jason has garnered  local and national attention. He was chosen as  vegcooking.com's October, 2005 Chef of the Month  and has been featured in the Arizona Republic and  on ABC's local morning show, Sonoran Living Live.  Formerly a diabetic, Chef Jason approaches vegan  cuisine from both a health and ethical standpoint  with an eye for taste and simplicity.   
 

                                         
On The Grill August 2009|23

The Flavor of Summer in the Desert – Mesquite!
By Liz Lonetti
Summer is here in Phoenix!  Our temperatures  have soared past 110º this week and we had to  switch from evaporative coolers to AC.  That switch  of cooling methods is the least pleasant indicator of  summer.  I prefer to focus on the natural indicators  around me – namely what is growing that I can use  for dinner!  The HOT season here in Phoenix is  actually a very productive time of the year and I am  amazed at the variety of what not only survives, but  thrives in this season in the desert.    First and  foremost is the  Mesquite  Harvest.  Just  before and after  the monsoons,  our native tree  pods will ripen  up and drop  Screwbeans from the trees.   Now is the time to get out there and gather them  up!  Mesquite beans taste a bit like a cinnamon  mocha with hints of lemon – depending on what  type of tree you have.  Each tree will have slightly  different flavor and the Velvet, Honey and  Screwbean Mesquite trees produce the sweetest  pods.  Non‐native Chilean Mesquites have pods  that are too bitter to eat, but would probably work  fine for smoking on the grill.  Mesquite flour is  naturally gluten free and has a low glycemic index.   It is a low sugar, high fiber, low fat food and has a  higher antioxidant concentration than Rice, Corn or  Wheat flour.  Not bad for a food source that grows  for free everywhere here in the desert!    You'll want to taste test your local beans to  determine if they are sweet enough to gather for  making in to flour (you'll know if the tree is sweet  or bitter by just chewing the pods, but watch out 
On The Grill

for the rock hard seeds!)  The best way to harvest  mesquite pods (and carob pods if you are lucky  enough to be around one of those beautiful non‐ native trees) is to let the pods become fully dried  on the tree.   Spread out  your tarps,  old sheets,  frost cloths,  canvas or any  large fabric  rolls under  the tree you  Mesquite leaves and branch will harvest.    Gently shake the branches or tap the beans with a  long pole.  They should readily fall off the tree if  they are fully ripe.  If not, don't pull them off the  tree.  Wait a few more days for them to be FULLY  dry and they'll easily drop off the tree.  You should  make every attempt to not damage the tree.    You will then pick through the collected beans,  removing twigs, dirt, bad pods or other debris and  spread them out on the driveway in the sun.  This  will drive off any bugs that you might have  collected and will kill any remaining insect eggs  (you don't want to find a swarm of bugs when you  pull out your stored beans!)  You could also put the  beans in your car with the windows up or bake  them at a low setting (160º) in your oven or solar  oven for about an hour or two.  Either way, you'll  have bean pods that are now fully dried, insect free  and ready to store in an airtight container.    The collected beans can be used in a number of  ways.  One is to use your intact beans to replace  mesquite wood to create a smoky mesquite flavor  on the grill.  Just soak the beans in water for about  half an hour prior to use.  Place a small handful  directly on the coals or on the grate if you're 
August 2009|24

cooking with gas.  They should begin to smoke  readily.  The flavors of the mesquite grill are  uniquely suited to pair with the harvest from the  garden right now including squash, peppers and  corn.    Finally, the beans can be ground into a fantastic  flour that can be used in baked goods, as a protein  powder, tea or just sprinkled over meals for added  flavor.  You probably wouldn't want to try to grind  these pods yourself as the seeds are extremely  hard and it is quite possible that you could wreck  your blender, spice or coffee grinder.   The best way  to get a high quality flour is to take your beans to  be ground at a local native foods event.  Here in  Phoenix there will be a milling on Halloween Day  that is sponsored by the Phoenix Permaculture  Guild  (http://phoenixpermaculture.ning.com/events ).  In  Tucson, the Desert Harvesters have an annual  mesquite pancake breakfast event surrounding  their milling that will take place this year on  November 7th.  For more locations around southern  AZ, please check out the Desert Harvesters website:  www.desertharvesters.org/calendar/.                                                 
On The Grill

The Author  As a professional urban designer,  Liz Lonetti is passionate about  building community, both  physically and socially.  She  graduated from the U of MN with  a BA in Architecture in 1998. She  also serves as the Executive  Director for the Phoenix  Permaculture Guild, a non‐profit  organization whose mission is to inspire sustainable  living through education, community building and  creative cooperation  (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).  A long time  advocate for building greener and more inter‐ connected communities, Liz volunteers her time  and talent for other local green causes.  In her  spare time, Liz enjoys cooking with the veggies  from her gardens, sharing great food with friends  and neighbors, learning from and teaching others.   To contact Liz, please visit her blog site  www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan    Resources  www.urbanfarm.org  www.phoenixpermaculture.org   

August 2009|25

Bring Back the Push-Up
by Barry Lovelace
One of the most common questions people ask is  how much weight they should be lifting. They  always want to know if they should be lifting  heavier weights or lighter weights and the reasons  behind each decision. I am a firm believer in lighter  weight and higher repetitions workouts. As long as  you work the muscle to fatigue it will break down  and rebuild and it is in this process that muscles get  bigger and stronger. Lower weight and higher  repetition workouts build muscular endurance,  raises the heart rate and puts much less stress on  your joints; it just makes sense.     All of that being said; the missing link for many  people is body weight training. In other words, why  use weights at all? You can get an incredible  workout and see incredible results from doing  exercises in which the only resistance is your own  body weight.     I know that some of you are already scoffing at this  idea; it goes against everything you think you  know, right? Well let’s not forget that body weight  training is the only training that gymnasts do and  does anyone want to argue about their strength  and the results they get? I didn’t think so.     All too often we see people in the gym struggling to  bench press huge amounts of weight and chances  are that they could not perform even ten push‐ups  done correctly. Notice that I say done correctly.  Plenty of people can do ten push‐ups with their  backs bowed or only coming down half way. The  truth of the matter is that the push‐up is one of the  best over all upper body exercises on the planet  and it gets ignored because the average person  lifting weights has it in their head that they need to  lift actual weights. Well, your body is a weight so  why not use it?   

Another awesome exercise is the pull‐up. Like the  push‐up it works the upper body like a whole, it is  very functional and like the push‐up, the average  person cannot do them. If you are still scoffing at  the idea of incorporating these back to basics  exercises into your routine, I’m confused, unless  you can actually do them and do them correctly. I  mean what is there to scoff at when it is something  that you can’t do. Doesn’t that tell you that it is  something to work on and that it is worthy of your  time? Doesn’t that tell you that it just may be a  missing link in your training?     There are many other exercises that only use body  weight as the resistance and I suggest you learn  more about them but I’m using these two because  most people will know what I am talking about. If  you do push‐ups and pull‐ups you will be working  your rear deltoids, chest, biceps, lats, triceps,  shoulders and core. This is what you want, you  want to get the most that you can out of each  exercise that you do, more bang for your buck so to  speak.     Often in the fitness business we are always trying  to come up with something new and exciting. That  is all well and good and indeed there are endless  possibilities out there when it comes to exercise. 
August 2009|26

On The Grill

But sometimes we need to be reminded of the  tried and true basics. Things like push‐ups and pull‐ ups may have fallen by the wayside for many of us  but the fact is that they work so why not bring  them back?    The Author  Barry Lovelace is a vegan  fitness coach specializing  in the functional training  of athletes.  He is the  owner of FitQuest Fitness  in Allentown, PA, and  frequently produces  routine fitness podcasts at his site  www.barrylovelaceblog.com. 

On The Grill

August 2009|27

Compassionate Summer Grilling
by Christine Watson, MS, RD
  Remember, we eat with our eyes before the food  makes it to our palate!  Let the veggies take center  stage as the entrée and round out the meal by  serving them over pasta, rice or polenta.  You can  also make fabulous tasting grilled veggie  sandwiches‐ portobello mushrooms are my favorite  veggie sandwich maker.  You can choose summer  and/or zucchini squash as well for making grilled  sandwiches.  Served on focaccia bread or pita  bread, the veggies are a sure winner at any  barbeque!    Before you get your grill started, remember that  most vegetarian foods are much more delicate  than meat and also do not contain as much fat.   Therefore, it is very important to keep your grill  clean and well‐oiled before preparing your  vegetables in order to keep them from sticking and  /or falling apart when you try picking them up.      To get you off to a good start, here is one of my  favorite recipes that will surely get noticed at your  next barbeque, and show others that grilling and  eating with compassion for animals, and our  environment, is easier (and tastier) than they may  think!   

    Have you ever been invited to a summer barbeque  to find that there was minimal food items prepared  for the vegan/vegetarian palate?  We’ve all been  there, at some point, and have had to make do  with the pasta salad, coleslaw, or potato salad.   And when you’re a vegan, even these dishes won’t  do.    If you’re a seasoned vegan or vegetarian, you’ve  learned that early preparation is the key to a  successful and fulfilling summer barbeque.   Whether you are the host or the guest, you must  plan ahead to ensure that everyone is well‐ accommodated.  This is not to say that you must  prepare foods with animal products in them if  you’re hosting a summer soirée, but instead do  your best at showing your guests that vegetarian  and grilling can go hand in hand.  And when you’re  a guest, offer to bring a dish that you know  everyone will enjoy and appreciate.  I’ve found that  a beautifully colored salad is a welcomed dish at  most barbeques, as are the traditional baked  beans, potato salad, and coleslaw become the  boring and usual side dishes chosen by most.  
On The Grill

Grilled Mediterranean Vegetable Sandwich 
(serves 6)    INGREDIENTS   1 eggplant, sliced into strips  2 red bell peppers  2 tablespoons olive oil, divided  2 portobello mushrooms, sliced  3 cloves garlic, crushed  4 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise  1 (1 pound) loaf focaccia bread       
August 2009|28

DIRECTIONS  Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).   Brush eggplant and red bell peppers with 1   tablespoon olive oil; use more if necessary,   depending on sizes of vegetables. Place on a   baking sheet and roast in preheated oven.   Roast eggplant until tender, about 25 minutes;   roast peppers until blackened. Remove from   oven and set aside to cool. Meanwhile, heat 1   tablespoon olive oil and sauté mushrooms until   tender. Stir crushed garlic into mayonnaise.   Slice focaccia in half lengthwise. Spread   Vegan mayonnaise mixture on one or both  halves. Peel cooled peppers, core and slice.  Arrange eggplant, peppers and mushrooms on  focaccia. Wrap sandwich in plastic wrap; place  a cutting board on top of it and weight it down  with some canned foods. Allow sandwich to sit  for 2 hours before slicing and serving.       Nutrition Facts:  Servings per recipe: 6   Calories: 356  Total Fat: 14.8g   Cholesterol: 3mg  Sodium: 500mg  Total Carbs:  48.3g  Dietary Fiber: 5.5g              Protein: 9g                                                                                
On The Grill

The Author    Christine Watson, MS, RD, has  been teaching nutrition, health  and wellness since 1992. She is a  registered dietitian, nutritionist,  and certified wellness coach. As  the owner of Compassionate  Nutritionist, LLC, Christine’s goal  for her clients is to help them  incorporate healthy vegetarian eating and green  living practices into their busy lives. To learn more  about the services and products offered by Christine  and subscribe to her “Compassionate Living” ezine  where you’ll receive a FREE copy of her Healthy &  Eco‐conscious 7‐day Menu w/recipes included, visit  the company website at  www.CompassionateNutritionist.com  or email  Christine at  Christine@CompassionateNutritionist.com.    

 

August 2009|29

An Interview with Author and Raw Chef Angela Elliott!
   

What led you to become a raw chef?     I learned about raw food and juicing when I was 15  1/2. Although I knew a lot about raw food, it was  vegan cooking that I enjoyed most until I was  reunited with raw foods after almost dying. I  thought if I were to create amazing, dishes and  desserts, that would be the thing that would keep  me raw and loving it.      What did you do before you became a  chef?  Were you always interested in food?    I have been a chef for many years. Yes, I was  always interested in food. My mom was gourmet  French chef and I used to help her in the kitchen.     Are you formally trained or self‐taught and what  was the process like going from a traditional  American diet to raw cuisine?    Yes, I was formally trained. I have never eaten a  standard American diet, but from vegan to raw  cuisine was quite a bit different. For one thing, I  was a baker and a seasoned cook before going into  100% raw, so at first I missed baking home‐made  breads, pies, and vegan quiche, but then I figured  out how to make raw quiche and raw pies, so that  made the transition more exciting.     

What kind of transformation have you seen in  yourself since becoming raw?    I became more vibrant, more beautiful, sexier,  more alive, energetic, and younger.     What is the key to making delicious raw food?    Fresh herbs and spices, imagination, and always,  always, always keep your pantry and fridge  stocked.     Raw food has a reputation for being laborious  and/or time intensive, but you’ve got a book (Alive  in 5) specifically dedicated to making quick raw  meals.  What is the best tip you can give for  achieving that? If your pantry is stocked, and you  always have something soaking, you are able to  whip up a recipe in very little time. Food processors  help if you are knife skill challenged, because you  can chop something or puree something in seconds  and move onto the next step. For instance if you  were making apple pie, you could make the crust in  seconds in your food processor, place sliced apples  on top, make a sauce, season with cinnamon and  Voila! You have an apple pie! In Alive in Five, I have  the most award winning apple pie recipe ever.           
August 2009|30

On The Grill

Please tell us ab bout your other books!    I am excited abo out my newe est book, The e Decadent  Gour rmet, it is a book devote ed to mouth watering  dess serts that are e completely y guilt free. I In the book,  you w will learn ho ow to make b brownies, ch heesecakes,  and so much mo ore all without using aga ave, maple  syrup, sugar, or honey. The books I have e available  now are The Sim mple Gourme et, a deliciou us guide to  making simple e elegant meals, Holiday Fa are with  Ange ela is a wond derful book t to have on h hand for the  holid days, and A D Diva's Guide e to Juices an nd Cocktails, ,  many of my favo orite juice an nd cocktail re ecipes are  his juicy book k. I have two o more exciting books  in th coming out soon n, Get Naked d and Wear Y Your Food,  A be eauty Manua al that I co‐authored with Shannon  Leon ne, this beau uty book will knock your socks off  and it might just t be the mos st comprehensive guide  eauty out th here. I have b been writing g the book  to be since e I was 16 an nd Shannon has been wr riting her  end of the book for almost a as long, so as s you can  gine there's a lot of grea at info in there. My  imag othe er book, Juicing for Beau uty and Youth is co‐ auth hored with M Marie Pavillard, this book k is the  perfe ect compani ion guide to the beauty book and is  perfe ect for both men and wo omen. I am w working on  4 mo ore books an nd hope to h have them out soon too. .    Wha at do you fin nd yourself m making the m most at  hom me?  (please share the re ecipe!)     I hop pe it is okay to  share two! I eat these  toge ether and WO OW!    icy Asian Style n Spi Dressin ng ½ cu up sesame se eeds  ½ cu up almonds  1 t. m minced ginge er  1 t. m minced garlic  1 T. nama shoyu u 
On The Grill

1 T. miso  ½ lemon, juiced  ¼ T. cayenne  2 da ates soaked ¼ cu up water    nd together.  Serve this m marvelous k kickin'  Blen dres ssing over sa alad of your choice!   
Creme a la Mushroom f M from

Alive in F A Five Makes 3 serv M vings  This s soup is deli ightful,  flav vorful, and e easy to  make   1 cu up whole cre emini mushro ooms  2 cu ups nut milk (your choice e, but make sure it is  unsw weetened, so just soake ed nuts and w water, then  strained.  ½ cu up chopped celery  ¼ cu up chopped fresh parsley  1 T. raw nut but tter  1 t. Himalayan s salt  1 t. e extra‐virgin unfiltered cold pressed olive oil  1/8 t. freshly gro ound black p paper    Clea an the mushrooms, and place them into a  blen nder whole. Add the rem maining ingre edients, and d  proc cess until sm mooth    Wha at items do you stock yo our kitchen with that  you absolutely can’t live wi ithout?    d pressed ex xtra virgin ol live oil, Hima alayan salt,   Cold spices of all kind ds,           

August 2009|31

What advice can you offer aspiring raw chefs and  authors?    Create using your imagination, go wild in the  kitchen, don't be afraid to try something new!  Spice things up all the time, simple doesn't mean  tasteless!     What is on the horizon for you?  What new  projects do you have coming up that you are most  excited about?    In August, I will have my own radio show, so I am  very excited about that!  I am working with some  amazing people to help children. I believe the  children are our future and we must take care of  them any way we can. I am hoping to finally get  together with a filming crew and do a series of  DVD's, which I have been trying to do now for a  couple of years!     Thanks Angela!                                         
On The Grill

Angela Elliott is the author of Alive in Five, Holiday  Fare with Angela, The Simple Gourmet, and more  books on the way! Angela is the inventor of Five  Minute Gourmet Meals™, Raw Nut‐Free Cuisine™,  Raw Vegan Dog Cuisine™, and The Celestialwich™,  and the owner and operator of She‐Zen  Cuisine. www.she‐zencuisine.com    Angela has contributed to various publications,  including Vegnews Magazine, Vegetarian  Baby and Child Magazine, and has taught gourmet  classes, holistic classes, lectured, and on occasion  toured with Lou Corona, a nationally recognized  proponent of living food.         

August 2009|32

  

An Int ew w J h Ho en of n tervie with Josh oote f the Her ore rbivo

Clo ng Comp y othin C pany
    When did you bec come vegan a and what bro ought you to  that? ?    I wen nt vegan in 19 999. I'd been vegetarian fo or a year and  change before tha at. My conver rsion had a lo ot to do with  dog, George. I was in a livin ng situation at the time  my d wher re I had becom me the  primary person w who took  care of him. He was a  pupp py at the time e and  need ded a lot of at ttention  and c care. I was br roke and  work ked a lot and w was very  busy but had to m make big  changes and sacrifices to  make e sure that Ge eorge  was g getting what he  need ded. I did this happily.  At so ome point I st tarted  wond dering why I c cared so  much h about one a animal  and d did things tha at I didn't  really y need to do  (like eat anim mal products) ) that  contr ributed to the e suffering of f others. This  contr radiction star rted to weigh on me and th hen I read  John Robbin's boo ok, Diet for a New America a and I knew I  had t to go vegan. I I wasn't happ py about this r realization as s  I felt like I was abo out to plunge e myself into s some  mona astic, no fun l lifestyle with really boring g food and no  optio ons to eat out t ever again. W What happen ned was  quite e the opposite e.    Was s it an instant t transition or r did it take a awhile and  what do you thin nk was your k key to success s?     It was pretty inst tant. When I k know someth hing and  belie eve it and inte ernalize it, I'm m pretty quick k to act on  thing gs. The suffer ring connecte ed to eggs, mi ilk, leather,  and so forth was ve ery clear to  ery concrete a and real. It  me, ve wasn't easy for me at first, but I  really d didn't feel like e I had a  choice whether to b be vegan or  not. I s simply could n not  contrib bute to the su uffering and if f  I felt lik ke it was too much to take e  on my brain would instantly  conjure e up images o of the  animal ls. I would the en ask myself f  if what tever inconve enience or  social a awkwardness s I was going  throug gh was at all c comparable to o  what those animals s lived with.  nswer is obvio ous. I stuck  The an with it because I k knew it was r right.    I thin nk I was succe essful becaus se I didn’t bea at myself up  when I made mist takes and I le earned how to o cook for  myse elf. This made e me healthie er and gave m me unlimited  optio ons for meals s since I could d just make w whatever I  want ted instead o of relying on r restaurants w with little or  no o options for me e.   

On The Grill

August 2009|33

Herbivore is one of the long time and most well known  vegan companies. Tell us a bit about it and how it got  started?     I'm a graphic designer by trade and at some point in  2002 or so I decided I wanted to get a vegan tee shirt. I  was getting more interested in activism and I was tired  of being the "it's a personal decision and I don't want to  talk about my diet" kind of vegan. So I poked around  and couldn't find a shirt that represented veganism the  way I wanted to represent my veganism. Being from a  punk rock background, I took the D.I.Y approach and  printed up a couple dozen shirts. They went over well so  we did another and another and here we are! We've  always kept our business closely linked to our activism  by donating as much time, product, money, help, etc.  that we can to the groups that we appreciate. We've  worked with so many awesome, committed people over  the years and I am very proud of that. Right before I  started doing this interview I was finishing up a shirt  design for the Farm Sanctuary Walk for Farm Animals,  actually.    At some point it seemed like a good idea to start a  magazine because there was (and still is) a huge hole  where solid vegan/AR media should be. We did that for  5 years before the expense and waste and workload  just ran over me. 3 or so years ago we opened our  storefront which enables us to carry vegan goods from  all kinds of other small companies. We currently reside  in the vegan mini‐mall between Food Fight and  Sweetpea Baking Company, and two doors down from  Scapegoat Tattoo, which is vegan owned and operated.    We published our first book a couple of years ago,  Yellow Rose Recipes by Joanna Vaught and have more  publishing projects in the works.    What sorts of challenges have you faced growing a  vegan business and how did you overcome them?    Money is always a challenge, especially when you aren’t  trying to get rich! We started the company with a credit  card and we intentionally grew really slow. We worked  other jobs for years, which I think was good. A friend of  mine who runs a company told me the worst thing that 
On The Grill

can happen is for you to grow too fast. This was great  advice as we weren't business people and made plenty  of mistakes with limited resources. Had we made more  expensive mistakes or borrowed too much money, we  could have gotten into  a lot of trouble and  probably wouldn't be  here now. So going  slow and learning as  we went was really  good for us. It  certainly made our  mistakes less  disastrous and gave us  opportunity to get  better at this as time  went on. We're still  learning how to run a business, actually. Thankfully lots  of other vegan businesses are supportive and realize  we're all in this together so we've got a great  community of helpful folks like Food Fight Vegan  Grocery, Sweetpea Baking Company, Cosmos Vegan  Shoppe, and the like to talk business stuff with.    This is an exciting time for vegans.  What changes have  you seen in the vegan community and business world  since you started Herbivore?    It is a really exciting time, totally. We've seen a lot of  changes, having been around for a while. I still get  excited when I see new companies popping up. As  opposed to seeing things as competition, I follow the  idea that a rising tide raises all ships. There have been  new animal rights conferences popping up as well,  which I think is great. I think of vegan business as a  means to an end, which is spreading the word about  animal issues. So everything new means more  information is being spread and that is amazing and so  needed.    As far as changes go, there just seems to be so many  more options out there be: shoes, food, books, clothing  lines, etc. It’s nice to not have to just wear running  shoes or stuff from Payless anymore.   

August 2009|34

You’ve created numerous, and I mean hordes, of  different shirts and accessories!  What is your favorite  out of all the ones you’ve done?    Ha! That's funny; I tend to think we introduce new  designs too slowly. We have a bunch of customers who  have almost everything we've made and I feel bad that I  don't grind out stuff faster  to keep them in hip tee  shirts. We toss out a lot of  ideas that we don’t really  love to keep a handle on  expenses and resources  we’re using up. As for my  favorites, I did two shirts as  fundraisers for the SHAC 7  legal defense and prison  support funds. Those mean  a lot to me personally and  the intensity and  meaningfulness of that situation brought out some  good design in me I think. Since they were fundraisers I  felt a lot of pressure to really do my best because the  better the design, the more money would be raised and  the more direct help would go to our friends, the SHAC  7.    I really like the next shirt we're doing actually, I won't  spoil the surprise but the phrase is "Compassion is  Invincible." Readers will have to check our site to see  what that one looks like, I'm really excited about it.    I also really love the button I made that says “Somebody  give the vegan corndog a handclap.” I don’t expect  anybody to think that is as funny as I do.    You’ve done some great fundraisers.  Please tell us  about them and please share with us how people can  get involved with them!    I am always encouraging people to figure out what they  are good at and offer that up as their activism. A good  bit of creativity also goes a long way I believe. So for  me, combining these things has taken some interesting  forms. I rode my bike 600 miles from Portland, Oregon  to Farm Sanctuary in Orland, California and raised 
On The Grill

$12,000 for the farm in the process. That was a lot of  fun and I think it was successful because it took a little  bit of daring, had some drama built into it, and was fun  for people to follow. In Portland we’ve done fundraiser  art shows, we’ve had days at the vegan mini‐mall where  we all donate a percentage of a certain day’s sales. I’ve  done shirt designs for different groups that then get  sold and the money supports  the groups. We always talk  about this stuff on our site, so  people can get involved  through there.    We’re always trying to think of  new ways to support the AR  groups and people we love; it’s  one of the most fulfilling parts  of what we do.    As the publisher of Herbivore  and a prolific speaker, you’ve had a lot of contact with  different people involved with vegan issues.  Is there  one particularly moving story that stands out?    I’ve been really fortunate to meet as many amazing  vegan and animal rights people as I have. Often times  I’ll meet people who are completely isolated, get no  support from friends or family, live in places where  vegan options outside their home are scarce or non‐ existent but they stick with it. Those stories are very  inspiring. Where I live, being vegan is easy and it’s easy  to forget what it used to be like, or what it’s like when  you’re not in the bubble that is Portland. It’s not a  hassle for me at this point in my life, but I remember  when it was and I’m reminded of that when I meet folks  who have a harder time. I admire their tenacity and  guts.    What do you like to eat when you’re at home or are  you an eat‐out type of person?  Do you have a favorite  dish?      Michelle is a great cook and we have dozens of  cookbooks we’re trying to get through so we eat at  home a lot. We tend towards whole foods and healthier  stuff. We garden, so when our kale is going we eat that 
August 2009|35

most days along with grains and roasted vegetables. We  also almost always have a salad with anything we make.  I’m a big fan of tahini‐based dressing so those are in  heavy rotation. We also love to make pizza with tofu  ricotta and pesto. It’s a battle for us to choose between  Isa Chandra Moskowitz’ ricotta or the recipe from the  Real Food Daily cookbook. I go back and forth as to  which I prefer, but you can’t go wrong with either.    For my birthday last year we made double decker  “cheeseburgers” with a veggie burger recipe Michelle  adapted from Veganomicon, Follow Your Heart  cheddar, and barbecue sauce. That was magic, but we  tend towards simpler grains and veggies most nights.    Do you find yourself going for vegan comfort food or  vegan gourmet?    Portland is home to lots of both, a little heavier on the  comfort food, which I prefer. Honestly, sometimes  gourmet feels like modern art to me in the sense that  when it’s good, it’s really really good, but sometimes it’s  just trying too hard and is too self referential. Art/Food  can be challenging, or it can be delicious and satisfying,  or it can be both. I like a little challenge but not all the  time. One of my favorite places to eat in Portland is  Proper Eats and it’s a great mix of gourmet and comfort.  They make an amazing Shepherd’s Pie which leaves you  full and happy, but so does the nut cheese sampler and  raw dessert, so it’s the best of both worlds.   

 

What do you see happening in the next five years in  regards to vegan issues and the vegan community?    I’m hoping the world starts learning lessons from global  warming and things like swine flu. We’ve had mad cow,  bird flu, and now swine flu. That’s the three major  animals people eat. If we did away with animal  agriculture, we could do away with those problems. This  is obvious, but people don’t make the most obvious  changes that will alleviate the problems. Like global  warming for example: the number one cause is animal  agriculture and Al Gore is telling us to change our  lightbulbs. Lightbulbs aren’t going to save us! I hope  people decide to get serious and start adopting lifestyle  choices that will actually matter. I used to think every  little bit helped but I now feel our situation is too dire to  feel good about bringing your own shopping bags to the  market. We’ve gotta get serious and veganism is the  best thing a person can do to affect change. I’ve seen  huge changes in the 10 years I’ve been vegan so  hopefully there is real momentum and we can push  things to a new level. I’m always trying to be better,  more active, and more effective because I think that’s  what it’s going to take for the future to get better.    What does the future of Herbivore look like?  What  sorts of projects do you have coming up?    We are going to keep doing new designs for our  clothing line of course. We’re also working on some  book projects. There will be a couple of anthologies of  content from Herbivore magazine coming out hopefully  this fall. Most of the issues are out of print but the  content is just as relevant as it was when we first  published it so I want to keep that in circulation. I’m  going to start writing a book in the next few weeks that  will hopefully serve as a guide to help people go and  stay vegan as well as to help those already with us to do  it better. It will cover lifestyle issues outside of  veganism as well. I’m hoping it will be a lifestyle guide  for folks trying to be kinder and gentler to animals,  themselves, and the earth, but without losing our sense  of humor and creativity.    I’m also planning a tour that I can only describe as live  tee‐shirt deejaying. I’m going to set up shows and travel 
August 2009|36

On The Grill

to different towns with a handful of compatible designs  and ink colors, then people who come to the event will  pay a certain amount to get in and they will get a tee  shirt at the end of the night that I’ll print while I play  music or someone else does, or something like that. I  haven’t figured it all out exactly and I don’t know if I  have enough arms to do all that but it should be a big  crazy party however it goes down. That will hopefully be  this winter.    What advice can you give new vegan business owners?    Look for the gaps and fill them. Don’t do the same  business you’ve already seen, come up with something  different that will help attract new, different people.  Always identify yourself as a vegan business because  that goes a long way towards normalizing the word and  the lifestyle. Help other vegan businesses with advice,  working together, talking shop, whatever. I tell  everyone who asks me all the secrets of how we do  stuff, where we get things printed, how we do  fulfillment, what events we do the best at, all of it.  We’re all on the same team here and we all have a  common goal, I hope.    I also recommend businesses have AR literature  available if they have a store or shop, and drop leaflets  or brochures from good AR groups in with the orders  they ship. Most AR groups will send you all the free  literature you want, though it helps them if you send a  donation their way because that literature costs them  money to produce. It’s a great way to get info out there  and there is a huge range of literature to choose from  so you can pick the stuff that best suits your approach  and your audiences comfort level.    Thanks Josh!                  

Josh Hooten is co‐owner of The Herbivore Clothing  Company (www.herbivoreclothing.com) with his  partner, Michelle Schwegmann, in Portland, Oregon. He  rides his bike as much as he can, and wants everybody  to plant and eat more Kale. He is also co‐founder of the  Let Live Foundation which puts on the Let Live Animal  Rights Conference (www.letlivefoundation.org)     

On The Grill

August 2009|37

An Interview with Apollo the Traveling Poet
‐ Final Step by Apollo Poetry    ‐ Bracelet of Light by Apollo Poetry  
 

Visit Apollo at  www.travelingpoet.com  
Click on a note to listen to Apollo’s poems 

 Please tell us a bit about yourself and the  Traveling Poet project!     The Traveling Poet project is a pilgrimage around  the world to promote peace and use poetry as a  tool to do so.  It’s to inspire people to travel, to  write, and to live. And to, by any means necessary,  avoid stagnancy. I was your regular kid who went  to college, had a good job, etc…. But I had this itch  inside of me that there was more to life. So I  moved into my van, hit the road, and never looked  back. It’s been a beautiful journey so far full of love  and inspiration.    What inspired you to start the Traveling Poet?    It was a combination of where I was in my life,  combined with a discussion I had with my  roommate, combined with a dream I had one  night.  It was more of a calling than anything else.  So ‘what’ inspired me? I’d say God.    You started in the music industry.  How did you  make the transition to professional poet?    Well, I’ve been writing poetry for 15 years. I’m 25  now, so that means most of my life. The music  industry collapsed, just like every other industry,  and after all the fame, money, and ‘friends’ 
On The Grill

disappeared, I realized that the pen has never  abandoned me. I dug deeper into my poetry and a  whole new world opened up to me.  The funny  thing is that even though I’ve done all these things,  I truly feel like I’m just getting started. I’ve got so  much left to give to the world. It’s all inside of me  just waiting to come out.    Did you always expect to be a professional poet or  was there a life‐changing event that encouraged  you to go in that direction?     I wouldn’t say I’m a ‘professional’ poet.  Those two  words rarely go together. I’d say I’m a struggling  starving artist. Hah. Poetry has probably cost me  more money than it’s made me. (Unlike the music  industry.)  Nobody becomes a poet to make  money.  If that happens through the book I’m  writing or the movie I’m making, that’d be great.   But right now, I’m just grinding it and giving it  everything I got because I know the message is a  lot more important. I know the outcome is a lot  more important than the income.    What themes permeate your poetry?  What  subjects inspire you?    Life!  I never understood the concept of writers  block. The universe has given us an infinite 
August 2009|38

playground to create on.  I think you should be able  to look at ANYTHING and think of a poem about it. I  think we should look at life as if it’s a poem, and we  are just characters. Spirituality has definitely taken  a forefront in my writing as of late. I also love  nature, peace, and love.  Why of course. ☺    How does being vegan play into your art and how  does that affect your audience?    Well, I don’t have poems of me  telling people to go vegan or  anything.  However, I do sneakily  inject health it in my poems. I  believe turning that light on inside  of people to start thinking is the  first step, rather than telling them  what to do. I don’t even classify  myself as anything just yet. When  people ask what my diet is, I just  say ‘Conscious’.  I’m not dogmatic  about my diet. Neither is my fiancé.   If somebody’s diet is 95% vegan,  they can still say they ‘eat a vegan diet’.  It’s harder  for me to be 100% on this trip for the sake of being  respectful. When you’re on the road, and  somebody is hosting you and they surprise you  with a breakfast, you can’t nitpick if there is honey  in your tea or whatnot.  Not only was this meal  made with love, and not only are you starving, but  30,000 kids died that day for not having ANY food.   So I accept what’s given to me with gratitude  without becoming too religious about it.  However,  the healthier I eat on the road, the better I feel and  the better I perform perhaps.    What trials have you had to overcome on your  journey and how have they affected you?    My van has broken down NUMEROUS times. I’ve  ran out of money faster than I expected. And I got  a REALLY bad sunburn!  But I know that they’re all 
On The Grill

part of the journey. If I didn’t have a van, I couldn’t  experience the stress of it breaking down, so why  not be grateful, rather than stressed? Every  stressful moment leads to a beautiful one, so while  I’m going through that perceivably negative  experience, I ‘zoom out’ and look at the bigger  picture, and smile.  There is always a reason to  smile. You just have to look hard enough. As far as  them affecting me, I’ll answer it with this quote. “I  asked God for strength, and he gave  me difficulties to overcome.”    What do you like to eat when  you’re on the road?    Well Larabar and Raw Revolution  are my sponsors, so I’m practically  living off of their bars! It’s my main  food supply, which I know isn’t a  whole complete meal to have every  day. But it’s a super healthy  alternative to just eating what’s  given to me by people who host me.  It keeps me fed on the trip.    Do you have a favorite travel snack you like to  make?      I like the Spirulina Raw Rev Bars cut up in pieces in  a bag filled with granola, nuts, and raisins. Yummy!    What kind of reception do you get from people  when they find out you’re vegetarian?    Pretty open, actually.  But it’s mainly because of  how open I am with them.  Vegetarians sometimes  have an ego complex and we judge people based  on their choices.  I’ve had a vegetarian friend who  would ONLY be friends with other vegetarians. He  said that he can’t imagine what him and a meat‐ eater can possibly have in common and that he’s  much more conscious then they are and less 
August 2009|39

violent.  I kind of smiled at that.  Note to the world!  There ARE meat‐eaters who have done amazing  things for the world and vegetarians who haven’t  (a.k.a HITLER.)   Hah. So I think it’s ridiculous to  judge people based on their food choices.  It’s their  body. It’s their path. I’m not against somebody  eating meat. I personally can’t do it, but that  doesn’t make me better or more enlightened than  somebody who does.  The great thing is that when  someone finds out your vegetarian, you don’t have  to tell them why.  Most of the time, they’ll ask you  out of curiosity, and that’s the only time you should  go on your veggie‐rant! Don’t force it onto people  who don’t want to hear the message. It’s like  talking to a wall.  Just hold space and give love and  don’t judge!    How can people get involved with the Traveling  Poet project?    They can go to my website, TravelingPoet.com, and  fill out a Couch‐Request form (which would allow  me to spend the night at their house as I travel  through their city.) They can sign up to volunteer  within their local poetry communities. They can  make financial donations to keep the journey  going.  Or any other way they feel compelled to  help out.  This trip has been super challenging with  me low on funds, sleeping in my van, etc…But if it  wasn’t for the people, this trip would’ve been over  a long time ago. The entire journey is truly being  held together by random acts of kindness by  complete strangers. And I am very grateful for that.    What advice do you have for aspiring artists?    Create.    Thanks Apollo! 
 

 Apollo Poetry is  a spoken word  artist who has  chosen words as  tools of  inspiration to  bridge the gap  between our cultural divisions and unite us back  into the realization that we are souls having a  human experience.    In 2007, he became the first spoken word artist to  perform at the Billboard Awards.  Apollo's major  appearances include MTV'S True Life, VIBE  Magazine, The WakeUp Show, Source's Unsigned  Hype, Showtime at Apollo, along with  performances at Madison Square Garden &  America West Arena.  Apollo has won the NJ Poetry  Slam, NY Poetry Slam, and the Arizona Poetry  Slam.  Although Apollo had success with slams, he  put the competitive mic down to get more involved  in the community, by performing at retirement  homes, homeless shelters, and other community  based projects.  He can be reached at the www.TravelingPoet.com.     

     

   
On The Grill August 2009|40

        Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor         Macy’s European Coffee House, Bakery &    Vegetarian Restaurant    http://www.macyscoffee.net/     http://www.macyscoffee.net/Merchant2   /merchant.mv     14 South Beaver Street    Flagstaff, Arizona  86001    Phone 928 774 2243    Hours:  Sun – Wed 6am to 8pm                  Thurs – Sat 6am to 10pm       tooth was satisfied, we moved on to getting   Macy’s European Coffee House is a little gem  something more substantial. I had the Veggie  tucked away on Beaver street in Flagstaff. Because  Sandwich, which is normally made with dairy.   it is off the main drag of Milton Street, most  tourists might miss out on this wonderful café.  However, once I said I was vegan the kitchen made  However, for a vegan, it is definitely worth tracking  it with dairy free cream cheese. Delicious! Jason  down, since all the food in Macy’s is vegetarian,  had the chili and the tofu salad. The tofu salad was  with some vegan dishes. At least 90% of the coffee  divine; with the tofu being so well seasoned I was  eating it strait. Since we were vegan, we were  drinks are made to order, with soy available, and  offered a delectable tahini dressing (but anyone  an extra discount if you bring your own mug.   can get the tahini dressing. It isn’t vegan only).    What’s more, the gentleman who brought our food  When you first walk in, you are immediately struck  by the quaint atmosphere. There are tables for 2‐6,  out asked if we would like more tofu, then brought  but there is also a large communal table so if you  us another large portion. We were happy vegans.  The chili was ok, but not as perfect as the rest. It  come in alone, you can leave with new friends.  was fairly bland for our tastes, and benefited from  Once you’ve decided where to sit, you can turn  your attention to what to drink and eat. The drink  some more salt and salsa.   menu alone is glorious. Macy’s offers coffee drinks    for numerous budgets, from a $1.00 for a  Overall, visiting Macy’s makes a lovely excursion  Cappuccino, to 100% imported Kona coffee beans.  for any anyone, but it is especially worth finding if  We had the Café Mexicano, which was generous in  you are vegan. If you see something on the menu  portion and powerful in flavor. There are a wide  that doesn’t look vegan, ask if it can be modified.  variety of drinks available, and just as many food  We found everyone there very accommodating.  options. First, while you order your coffee, you  The prices on the food are reasonable for the  cannot help but notice the mouth watering pastries  portion size ‐ around $6‐8 dollars for most items.  in the case. Being vegan, I am used to looking at  So get going to Flagstaff and check this place out  these coffee house delights with disgust and  for yourself!   wistfulness, because they are normally filled with    animal products, and therefore, they are little  The Reviewer  more than decorative objects. However, Macy’s    has vegan options clearly marked! Jason and I had  Madelyn ‘the Reviewer’  Pryor is one of  the Mango ’cream cheese’ pastry, which was so  Amazon.com’s top 1500  moist, well‐spiced, and delicious that we had to  grab a second one for the road. Once our sweet   reviewers, and a certified 
On The Grill August 2009|41

Macy’s European Coffee House

Vine Voice. She also gets several requests every day  to review books, movies, and graphic novels from  various publishers including Harper‐Collins. That  means that people really want Madelyn’s advice  and opinion, which is fine with her, because it  makes it that much easier for her to enact her plans  for world domination. Those plans currently involve  taking a break from her Masters of Psychology  program to be the Sous Chef for the Vegan Culinary  Experience. You can reach her at  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.    

On The Grill

August 2009|42

Product Review: So Delicioius Coconut Milk Yogurt
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor 
   

Turtle Mountain  http://www.purelydecadent.com/products/coconut_yogurt.html 
Willamette Valley, Oregon  Found at: New Frontier, Sprouts, Whole Foods  Price: Between $1.59‐1.79  Website: http://www.soydelicious.com/products/coconut_yogurt.html     

   

  Most of us are busier than ever before. It seems  that there is little time to breathe, sleep, or eat. It  was one day when I was at the store, stressed out  of my mind, that I spotted a little nutritional and  taste gem: So Delicious yogurt with coconut milk. I  like non‐dairy yogurt, and I like coconut milk, so I  grabbed a few flavors and took off to make a lunch  of it. I am now a yogurt snob and will turn my nose  up at other yogurts. How did a little container of  creamy goodness make me a hater for all  pretenders to the throne? Glad you asked.     This yogurt is so creamy it borders on custard.  Those gross GMO‐dairy‐nightmare yogurts that say  they are thick and creamy can kiss the shelf that So  Delicious sits on, because it beats them to bits. If  you don’t believe me or your taste buds on how  rich and creamy this yogurt is, then grab some on a  spoon and turn the spoon over – the yogurt just  hangs out, confident in its creamy supremacy. Ok,  so I convinced you it is creamy, but you still want  other reasons to hand over your hard earned cash,  right? 
On The Grill

  Well, try the range of flavors available. I know you  might be saying ‘I don’t like coconut’. I invite you to  have your head examined because coconut is one  of the most nutritious foods on the planet, but  even if you still don’t like coconut flavor, rejoice  and be happy. The yogurt comes in blueberry,  passionate mango, chocolate, plain, pina colada,  raspberry, strawberry, strawberry banana, and  vanilla. None of these has an overpowering  coconut flavor, just like no soy yogurt tastes just  like soybeans… ok, a few do but just the bad  brands. You won’t have any of that in this delicious  product. If you have the blueberry flavor, you get  bits of tender, fresh blueberry bursting in your  mouth. It makes you close your eyes and think of  summer. But, maybe you are a masochist and the  fact the yogurt is rich, creamy, and tastes great  isn’t enough incentive. How about health benefits?     So Delicious Coconut Yogurt contains no soy. If you  are trying to avoid soy, or just cut down on your  soy intake, here is a fun way to do so. The entire 6  oz. container has only 130‐170 calories, but 60 are 
August 2009|43

from fat. However, there is some research  suggesting that the fats in coconut milk may help  increase metabolism and that their shorter chains  of fatty acids cause them to be converted into  energy much quicker than other oils. The research  is quite fascinating. Finally, this product is fortified  with B12, Calcium, and Magnesium and has live  probiotic cultures that will make your digestive  tract thank you. So now that you know that it  tastes great, is creamy, and is really good for you  for not a lot of calories, what are you waiting for?  Grab some and blend it with ice and fruit for a  delicious smoothie, or mix it up with some fruit and  granola for a breakfast that will make you the envy  of your 9‐to‐5. Better yet, be revolutionary – just  grab a spoon and eat it directly out of the  container. Your body will thank you.     Nutritional Information for the blueberry flavor  (Complete nutritional information can be found on  the product’s website at  http://www.soydelicious.com/products/coconut_yo gurt.html)    Calories 140   Calories from Fat 60       Total Fat 6g 9%         Saturated Fat 6g 30%         Trans Fat 0g     Cholesterol 0g 0%   Sodium 30mg 1%   Total Carbohydrate 24g 8%         Dietary Fiber 2g 8%         Sugar 20g     Protein 1g         • Vitamin A 0% • Vitamin C 0%   • Calcium 25% • Iron 6%   • Vitamin B12 30% • Magnesium 25%      INGREDIENTS: WATER, COCONUT MILK,  BLUEBERRIES, ORGANIC EVAPORATED CANE JUICE,  PECTIN, CHICORY ROOT EXTRACT, DEXTROSE,  NATURAL FLAVORS, ALGIN (KELP EXTRACT),  MAGNESIUM PHOSPHATE, TRICALCIUM  PHOSPHATE, RICE STARCH, LOCUST BEAN GUM,  AGAR, CULTURE, CARRAGEENAN, GUAR GUM,  DIPOTASSIUM PHOSPHATE, VITAMIN B12.  
On The Grill

Live Active Cultures include: L. Bulgaricus, S.  Thermophilus, L. Plantarum, L. Rhamnosus, L.  Paracasei and Bif. Lactus    The Reviewer    Madelyn ‘the Reviewer’  Pryor is one of  Amazon.com’s top 1500  reviewers, and a certified  Vine Voice. She also gets  several requests every day to review books, movies,  and graphic novels from various publishers  including Harper‐Collins. That means that people  really want Madelyn’s advice and opinion, which is  fine with her, because it makes it that much easier  for her to enact her plans for world domination.  Those plans currently involve taking a break from  her Masters of Psychology program to be the Sous  Chef for the Vegan Culinary Experience. You can  reach her at  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.    

August 2009|44

 

   Book Review:  The Vegan Table 
Author:   Colleen Patrick­Goudreau 
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor 
    The Vegan Table is an epiphany. This beautiful  book is the latest offering from Colleen Patrick‐ Goureau, who is the creative force behind The Joy  of Vegan Baking. (By the way, if you don’t have a  copy of that, add it to your wish list right away – it  rocks!) Just as the Joy of Vegan Baking took the  mystery out of making excellent baked goods, the  Vegan Table helps take some of the stress out of  having friends and family over for some fun  entertaining. I know what you’re thinking, you’re  thinking that you already have friends and family  over for good food, why do you need one more  book?    There are a lot of reasons that Vegan Table makes  a great addition to your bookshelf. First, Patrick‐ Goureau provides a beautiful, well composed book  with lots of elegant pictures. If you’re a cook who  complains that there are seldom pictures in vegan  cookbooks, you’ll love this book. Also, while the  foods and menus are elegant enough to please  anyone, most of the recipes can be done with basic  ingredients that most of us have on hand. I didn’t  come across anything that I couldn’t get at my  local, big name grocery store. The rare item that  can’t be found locally can be readily mail‐ordered.     Sprinkled through the recipes are tips for  entertaining, facts about animal rights, and  suggestions for menus based on seasons. Seasonal  cooking and eating is so much more fun than  forcing something together with imported, not   Author:  Colleen Patrick‐ Goudreau  Publisher:  Fair Winds Press Copyright:  2009  ISBN:  978-1592333745  Price:  $19.99    quite ripe ingredients, and now Vegan Table takes  some of the guess work out of balanced, seasonal  menus.    There are other benefits to this cookbook. All the  recipes are marked with allergen information, and  nutritional information. Of course Patrick‐Goureau  tells you how many servings a recipe makes, so  items can be adjusted up or down.    All in all, this is an excellent addition to any  cookbook collection, and it would make a  welcome, thoughtful gift for anyone. Maybe you  should grab one to use as a host present the next  time someone invites you over for a dinner party.    Highest recommendations.    The Reviewer    Madelyn ‘the Reviewer’  Pryor is one of  Amazon.com’s top 1500  reviewers, and a certified  Vine Voice. She also gets  several requests every  day to review books,  movies, and graphic novels from various publishers  including Harper‐Collins. That means that people  really want Madelyn’s advice and opinion, which is  fine with her, because it makes it that much easier  for her to enact her plans for world domination.  Those plans currently involve taking a break from 
August 2009|45

On The Grill

her Masters of Psychology program to be the Sous  Chef for the Vegan Culinary Experience. You can  reach her at  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

On The Grill

August 2009|46

 

   Book Review:  The Vegan Scoop 
Author:  Wheeler Del Torro 
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor 
    There are few things that can bring as much  pleasure to people as a big bowl of ice cream. From  the time of our childhood, we have fond memories  of sundaes, shakes, and just sitting with an ice  cream container zoning out in front of the  television after a bad break‐up (don’t pretend that  you’ve never done it). Most Westerners transition  to veganism as adults and most of those, including  myself, have stressed that we will never be able to  enjoy ice cream again. Well, never fear, because  Wheeler Del Torro is here!     Wheeler Del Torro’s The Vegan Scoop is a delicious  answer for anyone who loves ice cream. Del Torro  is the founder and owner of Wheeler’s Frozen  Dessert Company and he is a man who knows his  ice cream. The depth of his knowledge is amazing,  and what he shares with us is breathtaking. Not  only are there the basic recipes for chocolate,  vanilla, strawberry and all the basics – at least the  American basics – and dazzles with flavors from  around the globe. Wasabi ice cream may not be for  everyone, but there is a recipe here if you want it!  Vanilla Saffron, Avocado, Black Currant Tea, and  Sweet Curry Coconut are sophisticated enough to  please any gourmet palate, while flavors such as  Chocolate Peanut Butter Swirl, Caramel, Chocolate  Chip Cookie Dough, and Praline Pecan will satisfy  kids of all ages.     I know that at least a few of you will be reading this  and thinking “I don’t want to eat junk food”. Well,  no homemade ice cream is junk food in my opinion 
On The Grill

 

Author:  Wheeler Del Torro  Publisher:  Fair Winds Press  Copyright:  2009  ISBN:  9781592333929  Price:  $19.99   

but the good news is that most of Wheeler’s  recipes have one third of conventional dairy ice  creams, and less than many vegan ice creams.  While loading up on anything daily is unhealthy,  everything in moderation is a wonderful way to  enjoy life.     Not only will this book help you enjoy life, you will  also enjoy making the ice creams and sorbets  included in the book. The recipes are very simple  and easy to follow. Some only take four ingredients  or less, such as the Ginger Beer Sorbet and Peanut  Butter Ice Cream. Also, while some of the more  exotic recipes obviously have more ingredients that  could be hard to find if you live in a small town,  most of the recipes can be made with items from  your local grocery store if it is at least reasonably  stocked.     The only caveat is that you will need an ice cream  maker to make these recipes in their creamy glory,  but ice cream makers can be found online or in any  kitchen store for a wide range of prices, so you’ll be  able to easily find one that meets your needs and  budget. Besides, the small amount of money  invested in the ice cream maker will be made back  quickly by making your own vegan ice cream  inexpensively and easily.     I can’t recommend this book enough. Grab your  own copy, your ice cream maker, a bowl, and a  spoon. Then, get ready to smile because you are  going to be a very happy vegan.  
August 2009|47

The Reviewer    Madelyn ‘the Reviewer’  Pryor is one of  Amazon.com’s top 1500  reviewers, and a certified  Vine Voice. She also gets  several requests every day  to review books, movies, and graphic novels from  various publishers including Harper‐Collins. That  means that people really want Madelyn’s advice  and opinion, which is fine with her, because it  makes it that much easier for her to enact her plans  for world domination. Those plans currently involve  taking a break from her Masters of Psychology  program to be the Sous Chef for the Vegan Culinary  Experience. You can reach her at  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.      

On The Grill

August 2009|48

     

 

Recipe Index 

Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use. 
 

Recipe 

Page
 

 

Recipe 
Smoked Continued  Smoked Potato Korma  Smoked Shepherd’s Pie  Smoked Tapenade  Smoked Cherry Tapenade  Smoked Walnuts with Black Beans  and Corn    Sandwiches  Bruschetta Sandwich  Grilled Mediterranean Vegetable  Sandwich   Smoked Caponata Sandwich  Grilled Summersquash Sandwich    Salads   Grilled Apple & Barley Salad  Grilled Corn and Squash Salad  Grilled Corn Salad  Grilled Asian Squash Salad  Spicy Asian Salad Dressing  Spicy Coconut Curry Dressing    Sweets  Frozen Lemon‐Lime Mini Fruit  Molds  Grilled Rum Peaches in Phyllo  Nutty Chocolate Frozen Bananas   

Page
  136  141  146  150  154        158  28   163  167      171  175  18 14  31  20      179   181 20       

  Grilled  51  Grilled Artichokes and Orzo Pasta  55  Grilled Flatbread with Balsamic Fig     Spread   59  Beer Brats  63  Grilled Potato Calzone  68  Chipotle Seitan Skewers  72  Grilled Tempeh Chipotle Steak  75  Eggplant Sandwich in a Chipotle    Lime Glaze  79 Grilled Burritos  83 Grilled Corn with Potato and Celery  Soup    Grilled Pizza  87  Grilled Plantains with Black Beans  92 and Rice    Grilled Rosemary Polenta  96  Grilled Sunchokes  100  BBQ Sweet Potatoes  104  Moroccan Kebabs with Couscous  108  Panini with Roasted Tomatoes and  113  Arugula        Smoked    Smoked Mushroom and Black Bean  117  Empanadas    Smoked Black Bean Chili  122  Mesquite Smoked Chayote with  126  Chipotle Mango    Smoked Portabella Napoleon  130               

Continued on next page… 
         

On The Grill

August 2009|49

 

       

 

Recipe Index 

Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use. 
 

Recipe 
Miscellaneous  Gnocchi in a Fire Roasted Tomato  Sauce  Fire Roasted Salsa  Roasted Chili and Grilled Mango  Chutney  Stuffed Red Peppers with Mexican  Gray Squash  Red Peppers stuffed with  Southwestern Rice  Summer Risotto with Grilled  Lemons  Asian Fusion Bruschetta  Orange Tapenade Bruschetta  Fire Roasted Cauliflower with  Roasted Garlic and Tomato Sauce  Tasty Marinated Tofu Fingers with  Spicy Peanut Sauce   Crème a la Mushroom   Cilantro Pesto  Paella for Puyol  Herb and Chile Rub  Dr. Flavor’s Super Island Chiller           

Page
  185    190  194    198    203    207    212  216  220    224    31  17  17  15  20         

                         

On The Grill

August 2009|50

 

Grilled Artichokes and Orzo Pasta
Type: Main Dish, Low-fat Time to Prepare: 60 minutes Serves: 4

2 artichokes Olive oil for brushing 1/8 tsp. of salt ¼ tsp. of freshly ground pepper 1 ½ cups of orzo pasta 1/8 tsp. of salt 1 lemon, sliced 1 onion, thinly sliced ½ tsp. of olive oil 1 tbsp. of diced mint leaves Juice of 1 lemon

Ingredients

Instructions

Peel away the outer layers of the artichokes. Slice off the top of the artichokes. Steam the artichokes for about 15 minutes. Slice them in half from top to bottom. Scoop out the chokes. Brush each artichoke with oil. Dress each artichoke with salt and pepper.

Snip the tops of each of the bracts (the “petals”) of the artichokes.

Grill the artichokes for about 10 minutes on each side. Cook the pasta. While it is cooking, slice the onion and dice the mint leaves. Dress the pasta with the salt, mint, and lemon juice. Slice the onion. Saute the onion in the olive oil over a medium heat until it is soft. Stir the onion into the pasta. Top the pasta with the artichokes or chop the artichokes and top the pasta with that.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|51

Raw Version
Trim and prepare the artichokes the same way, but marinate them overnight in ¼ cup of lemon juice, 2 tbsp. of olive oil, and 2 cups of water. Instead of orzo pasta, use cauliflower that has been pulsed in a blender until it is crumbled. Add in a tiny amount of diced red onion and sliced olives.

Kitchen Equipment
Scissors Knife Cutting Board Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Steamer Pot Grill Tongs Brush

Presentation
One interesting way to present this is with the pasta stuffed inside of the grilled artichokes. Another way is with the artichokes placed to the side of the pasta. Either way, I like to add a dash of red to the dish with either crushed red pepper or a couple sliced sundried tomatoes.

Time Management
If you want to save a lot of time, you can simply purchase marinated artichoke hearts and grill those.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|52

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a salad tossed in a light lemon and oil dressing with fresh tomatoes and cucumbers.

Where to Shop
Baby artichokes are often available during the summer at farmers’ markets and gourmet stores. The rest of the ingredients should be easy to come by. Approximate price per serving is $2.50.

How It Works
Trimming the artichoke gets rid of the parts that are difficult to eat as does cutting off the top of the artichoke. In general, the green part of the bract is tough while the yellow part is tender. The artichoke is then steamed so that it cooks all the way through before grilling. If it was only grilled, the outer parts would cook while the inner parts would be too tough or the inner part would cook and the outer part would be overdone.

Chef’s Notes
This is a nice Mediterranean style pasta and a great way to merge the grill with this type of cuisine.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 727.5 (181.9) Fat 5.1g (1.3g) Total Carbohydrates 144.6g (36.2g) Dietary Fiber 12.4g (3.1g) Sugars 9.4g (2.4g) Protein 25.8g (6.4g) Salt 710mg (178mg) Vitamin A 4% (1%) Vitamin B6 22% (5.5%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|53

Calories from Fat 46.0 (11.5)

Vitamin C 68% (17%) Calcium 10% (2.5%) Iron 44% (11%) Thiamin 88% (22%) Riboflavin 40% (10%) Niacin 66% (16.5%) Folate 113% (28.3%) Phosphorous 38% (9.5%) Potassium 26% (6.5%) Zinc 18% (4.5%) Magnesium 41% (10.3%) Copper 38% (9.5%)

Interesting Facts
The choke of an artichoke turns into a thistle when the artichoke matures. Orzo means barley and the pasta is named after its barley shape.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|54

Grilled Flatbread with Balsamic Fig Spread
Type: Side Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 20 minutes

1 piece of flatbread (about the size of a large pita) 4 fresh figs 2 tbsp. of balsamic vinegar ¼ cup of water 1/8 tsp. of salt ¼ tsp. of freshly grated nutmeg ¼ cup of sliced basil

Ingredients

Option: ¼ tsp. of crushed Aleppo peppers Instructions

Light the grill. Blend together the figs, balsamic vinegar, water, and salt. Simmer this sauce on a medium heat for about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and immediately stir in the freshly grated nutmeg. Brush the sauce on each side of the bread. Grill it until it turns crisp (time will depend on how hot your grill is.) Top the finished bread with the basil slices.

Option: Mix in the crushed Aleppo peppers into the sauce as it simmers.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|55

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Sauce Pan Blender Brush Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Tongs or Spatula

Presentation
Individually, this looks nice on a muted green plate. When serving it at a party, you can arrange them in layers with each layer lying diagonally atop the one beneath.

Time Management
Light the grill and then make the spread. That way, you can simmer the spread while the coals are

developing instead of spending the time to make the sauce and then waiting for the coals. After that, it only takes a few minutes to make.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a salad featuring roasted shallots, fresh greens, and a few hot peppers.

Where to Shop
I purchased this bread at Trader Joe’s, along with the balsamic vinegar. The type of bread I used was TJ’s Lavosh bread. You can also use pita bread as long as the pita is not too thick.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|56

How It Works
The balsamic vinegar makes this sauce a bit tangy and gives it a full bodied flavor. The nutmeg

gives it a heady aromatic quality and is added after the sauce is cooked in order to retain its freshness. The basil is added to add both color and a fresh, crisp herbal flavor.

Chef’s Notes
I recently made this for a party I was catering and it was a complete hit! The smokiness from the grill very much complements the dark flavor of the figs and balsamic vinegar and making it an exotic, easy to do, recipe.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 397.9 (99.5) Calories from Fat 15.2 (3.8) Fat 1.7g (0.4g) Total Carbohydrates 86.2g (21.5g) Dietary Fiber 8.9g (2.2g) Sugars 32.4g (8.1g) Protein 9.5g (2.4g) Salt 748.4mg (187.1mg) Vitamin A 14% (3.5%) Vitamin B6 13% (3.3%) Vitamin C 10% (2.5%) Calcium 16%(4%) Iron 18% (4.5%) Thiamin 31% (7.8%) Niacin 24% (6%) Folate 25% (6.3%) Phosphorous 12% (3%) Riboflavin 19% (4.8%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|57

Potassium 17% (4.3%) Zinc 8% (2%) Magnesium 17% (4.3%) Copper 16% (4%)

Interesting Facts
While figs are treated as fruits, they are, in fact, flowers. Edible figs have two growing seasons.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|58

Beer Brats
Type: Main Dish Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 20 minutes + 60 minutes to marinate

4 Tofurky beer brats 1 bottle of nutbrown ale or dark beer 1 tsp. of chili oil 3 tbsp. of brown mustard 1 tsp. of sweet agave nectar 4 large hotdog buns or rolls

Ingredients

Option: 1 tsp. of olive oil instead of the chili oil Option: 1 cup of sauerkraut Instructions

Pour the beer or ale into a shallow bowl. Put the beer brats in the bowl, making sure they get covered with the beer or ale. Allow them to sit for an hour. Once the brats are done marinating, rub them in the oil. Grill them until they are slightly browned all around. Remove the brats and set them aside. Mix the mustard with the sweet agave nectar. Lightly toast the buns. Spread the sweet mustard on the buns and add the beer brats. While they are sitting, light the grill and allow the flames to die down.

Option: Dress each one with sauerkraut.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|59

Kitchen Equipment
Shallow Bowl Grill Tongs Measuring Spoon Stirring Spoon Small Mixing Bowl

Presentation
Put the brats, buns, and mustard separately on a platter with any other fixings you would like to add.

Time Management
These will last several days refrigerated, so if you like these a lot, you can make a big batch for yourself and have them throughout the week. You should probably light your grill about fifteen minutes before the brats are done marinating.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with the same brand of beer or ale in which you marinated the brats.

Where to Shop
I can usually only find the Tofurky beer brats at Whole Foods. Approximate price per serving is $2.00.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|60

How It Works
Marinating the brats in the beer keeps them moist while they are on the grill and infuses them with

lots of flavor. Chili oil is used to give a subtle complexity to the brats. Finally, sweet agave nectar is added to the mustard to create a sweet mustard that accentuates the sweetness of the beer brats.

Chef’s Notes
This recipe is a winner whenever I serve it, even with those who are not vegetarian.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1504.9 (376.2) Calories from Fat 685.1 (171.3) Fat 76.1g (19.0g) Total Carbohydrates 96.8g (24.2g) Dietary Fiber 24.7g (6.2g) Sugars 12.2g (3.1g) Protein 108.1g (27.0g) Salt 3787mg (947mg) Vitamin A 1% (0.3%) Vitamin B6 5% (1.3%) Vitamin C 2% (0.5%) Calcium 37% (9.3%) Iron 34% (8.5%) Thiamin 31% (7.8%) Riboflavin 20% (5%) Niacin 25% (6.3%) Folate 30% (7.5%) Phosphorous 15% (3.8%) Potassium 7% (1.8%) Zinc 7% (1.8%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|61

Magnesium 10% (2.5%) Copper 10% (2.5%)

Interesting Facts
Brats were regulated by German law in 1432, enforcing specific cooking methods and ingredient proportions. Brats were invented in Thuringia, Germany.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|62

Grilled Potato Calzone
Type: Main Dish, Low-fat Time to Prepare: 1 hour 30 minutes Serves: 1

5/8 cup of warm water ½ tsp. of active dry yeast ¼ tsp. of sugar ¾ cup of flour 1/8 tsp. of salt Extra flour for rolling the dough 1 medium sized Yukon gold potato, diced 1 green or red bell pepper, diced ¼ of an onion, sliced thinly 4-6 green olives, sliced 4-6 sundried tomatoes, sliced 2 cloves of garlic, minced ½ tsp. of olive oil

Ingredients

Instructions

Combine the warm water, yeast, and sugar together. If the yeast makes the water frothy, it is ready to use; if it doesn’t, start over with a different batch of yeast. Combine the flour and salt in a mixing bowl. Gently stir in the water, yeast, and sugar until it is thoroughly combined into a dough. Knead the dough until it is silky smooth and elastic. Form the dough into a ball. Place it in a deep bowl and cover it with a towel. Keep it in a warm place and let it rise for an hour. While the dough is rising, start working on the filling. Dice the potato and bell pepper. Mince the garlic.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|63

Slice the onion, olives, and sundried tomatoes.

Saute the onion and bell pepper on a medium heat in the ½ tsp. of oil until the onion is slightly browned. Add the diced potato and minced garlic, continuing to sauté these until the potato pieces are soft. Remove this from the heat and stir in the olives and sundried tomatoes. Once the dough has risen, punch it down and form it into a ball. Form the ball into a disc about ½” thick. Lightly flour a working surface. Roll the dough into a circle about 1/8” thick. Place the filling in one half of the circle, leaving an inch of space from the edge of the filling to the edge of the disc. Fold the disc over into a semi-circle, covering the filling. Pinch the sides closed with the tines of a fork. Bake the calzone on a baking sheet at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes (until lightly golden.)

Light the grill and allow the coals to become white. Grill the calzone, with the grill closed, for about 5 minutes. If you do this, make sure to brush it lightly with olive oil.

Option: Cook the calzone for only 15-20 minutes, just enough that the calzone is not flimsy.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|64

Kitchen Equipment
2 Mixing Bowls Measuring Cup Cutting Board Knife Saute Pan Rolling Pin Fork Oven Baking Pan Stirring Spoon Measuring Spoon

Presentation
There’s nothing fancy about a calzone, but if you want to spruce left-over sliced olives and sundried tomatoes.

up the presentation, you can garnish it with fresh parsley and any

Time Management
You can save a lot of time by using a prepared pizza dough. Check out Trader Joe’s for vegan

pizza doughs.

Complementary Food and Drinks
While this calzone is good enough to stand on its own, it won’t be hurt by a great red sauce. My favorite red sauce is comprised of tomatoes blended with a roasted red pepper and a touch of crushed red pepper.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|65

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients for the calzone should be available at your local market, though you will get

the best price on green olives if you get them at a market with an olive bar. Make sure to check and see if the olives were cured with milk. Approximate price per serving is about $3.50.

How It Works
The dough is allowed to rise because that process allows the gluten to relax from being kneaded and form together, making the dough even more elastic. It also allows the dough to absorb more water without becoming sticky. For the filling, potatoes are used as a base which is enhanced by the sweetness of the onion and pepper and contrasted by the intense flavors of the green olives seal. This helps the calzone rise as it bakes. and sundried tomatoes. The edge of the dough is pressed together with a fork to create a simple

Chef’s Notes
I hadn’t made a calzone without cheese until this one and I was very happy with the way the potatoes created a sticky quality to the calzone. Plus, I love green olives and sundried tomatoes!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 605.2 Fat 6.4g Total Carbohydrates 120.5g Dietary Fiber 8.8g Sugars 13.0g Protein 16.3g Salt 845mg Vitamin A 108% Vitamin B6 46% Vitamin C 479%
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|66

Calories from Fat 57.7

Calcium 5% Iron 40% Thiamin 51% Riboflavin 31% Niacin 48% Folate 49% Phosphorous 24% Potassium 47% Zinc 11% Magnesium 23% Copper 41%

Interesting Facts
Calzone should be pronounced cal-tsone-eh. Scacciata is another Italian food similar to a calzone, but traditionally features more veggies than a calzone, often being vegetarian.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|67

Chipotle Seitan Skewers
Type: Appetizer Time to Prepare: 75 minutes Serves: 6

2 cups of vital wheat gluten 2 tsp. of paprika ¼ tsp. of salt 1 tsp. of onion powder ¼ tsp. of garlic powder 1 tbsp. of tahini 2 tsp. of toasted sesame oil 3 tbsp. of tamari 1 tsp. of sweet agave nectar 1 ¾ cups of water Oil for brushing the seitan ½ tsp. of fresh thyme leaves ¼ tsp. of chipotle powder

Ingredients

Option: Caramel coloring to darken the seitan Instructions

Combine all of the dry ingredients together in a large mixing bowl. Place this mix in a deep baking dish and cover it with foil. Bake it at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Cut the seitan into large bite-size chunks. Skewer them with a metal or soaked wooden skewer. Brush them with oil. Grill them until they become slightly crisped on each side. Add the wet ingredients and mix everything by hand until they are thoroughly combined.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|68

Low-fat Version
You can omit the tahini and toasted sesame oil in the recipe, though the skewers will not be as tender without those ingredients.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Skewers Baking Dish Mixing Bowl Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I like leaving these on the skewers when I serve them, though if you use metal skewers, make sure the skewers have cooled! Of course, these should be produced en masse and served on a big platter, but I wanted you to get an idea of what one looks like with this picture.

Time Management
If you don’t want to make your own seitan, you can purchase it and cut it into cubes. However, it will not have quite the same texture and will be much more expensive. Still, it will save you about fifty minutes.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this over a bed of rice dressed with cilantro and lime. If you need a sauce for it, go with something a bit sweet. BBQ sauce would work well.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|69

Where to Shop
Vital wheat gluten can be found at Whole Foods and Central Market in the bulk bins and

packaged at Sprouts. The rest of the ingredients will also be available at these markets. Approximate price per serving is $2.00.

How It Works
There is just enough chipotle powder in the mix to impart a good amount of heat without being overwhelming. The paprika fills the rest of the peppery flavor out without adding heat. It is important to mix the dry ingredients together first so clumps of spices do not develop in the seitan. The tahini and oil in the seitan keeps it moist and dense as does covering it while it bakes. The seitan is finished off on the grill to acquire a bit more smoky taste and give it a little crispiness.

Chef’s Notes
I love chipotle powder and usually at the very least double the amount used in this recipe, but I

don’t recommend that for most people. It will be painful.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1170.8 (195.1) Fat 21.0g (3.5g) Calories from Fat 189.3 (31.5)

Total Carbohydrates 55.0g (9.2g) Dietary Fiber 1.1g (0.2g) Sugars 0.8g (0.1g) Protein 190.4g (31.7g) Salt 3272mg (545mg) Vitamin A 0% (0%)

Vitamin B6 5% (0.8%) Vitamin C 1% (0.2%) Calcium 3% (0.5%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|70

Iron 9% (1.5%) Thiamin 13% (2.2%) Niacin 9% (1.5%) Folate 6% (1%) Phosphorous 18% (3%) Potassium 7% (1.2%) Zinc 7% (1.2%) Magnesium 9% (1.5%) Copper 14% (2.3%) Riboflavin 5% (0.8%)

Interesting Facts
Chipotle peppers are almost always smoked and dried jalapeños, though the word does sometimes refer to other smoked and dried peppers. Vital wheat gluten is the protein in wheat.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|71

Grilled Tempeh Chipotle Steak
Type: Snack /Main Time to Prepare: 45 min Serves: 6 & marinade makes 2 cups

Ingredients
Marinade

1 ½ pounds tempeh

¾ cup rice vinegar

¾ cup Bragg Liquid Aminos or soy sauce ¼ cup water ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 3 to 4 tbsp. evaporated cane juice 3 tbsp. blackstrap molasses 1 green onion, thinly sliced 8 cloves garlic, minced 1 tbsp. smoked chipotle grind or powder 1 1/2-inch (3.5 cm) piece ginger root, peeled and minced or grated ¼ tsp. plus 1/8 tsp. Chinese five spices powder Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

Score the tempeh on both sides, making shallow diagonal cuts about 1/4-inch apart. Cut the tempeh into 6 portions and spread them out in one layer in a shallow baking dish. turning to coat both sides. Marinate the tempeh in the refrigerator for 24 hours or longer, turning the tempeh several times. Preheat the barbecue and grill the tempeh 4 to 7 minutes on each side. Remove to a serving platter and garnish with the slivered green onion. Save the leftover marinade to use as a dipping sauce for a future recipe. Combine the marinade ingredients in a medium bowl and pour the marinade over the tempeh,

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr Flavor
On The Grill August 2009|72

Kitchen Equipment
Shallow Baking Dish Medium Bowl Knife and Cutting Board Measuring Cups Measuring Spoons Grill Tongs

Complementary Food and Drinks
Freshly squeezed lemonade or limeade.

Beer.

Where to Shop
All the ingredients can be found in your favorite natural or general grocery store

Chef’s Notes
A tasty marinade can raise the status of a simple food like tempeh to a level that deserves to be defined as special or even elegant. By marinating the tempeh the day before you plan to serve, you will be able to prepare this dish in just a few minutes.

Interesting Facts
The best thing about summer is that it’s finally time to get grilling! Grilling outside is really one of America’s past times. Grilling has been going on since fire was discovered, but modern grilling started with the Weber Grill. The Weber Grill was invented by a Chicago man named George Stephen. Stephen tinkered with the idea of the flat open grills of the time, to invent a dome shaped grill that is a part of priceless Americana. Stephen was able to start manufacturing the grill after taking controlling interest in the Weber Bros. Metal Spinning Co. At the time the company was known for making buoys and not much else. They updated the buoy and invented the Weber grill.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr Flavor
On The Grill August 2009|73

In the USA, tempeh has been known only since 1946 with the publication of "Possible Sources of Proteins for Child Feeding in Underdeveloped Countries", in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the 1960s there was new interest in tempeh with research in tempeh at the Cornell University (New York) and at the USDA Northern Regional Research Center (Illinois). In 1961 Mary Otten was the first to begin making tempeh. Great deal of the credit for introducing tempeh to the American public goes to The Farm, a large spiritual and farming community in Summertown (Tennessee). The first commercial tempeh shop was started in 1975 by Mr. Gale Randall in Undadilla, Nebraska. An article by R. Rodale in "Prevention" in June 1977 brought him and his shop national prominence. In the 1980s when the tempeh industry expanded, the media showed new interest and a lot of articles appeared in scientific journals. During 1983 about 1 million commercial tempeh was produced.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr Flavor
On The Grill August 2009|74

Eggplant Sandwich in a Chipotle Lime Glaze
Type: Sandwich Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 4

1 large eggplant, sliced into 4 sections 2 tsp. olive oil ¼ tsp. salt 8 slices whole wheat bread 1 chipotle in adobo sauce, diced 1 tsp. lime juice

Ingredients

Option: ½ tsp. chipotle powder instead of the diced chipotle
2 oz. dark beer or ale 2 tbsp. agave nectar 4 lettuce leaves

Instructions

Light your grill, preferably with mesquite wood or mesquite chips. Toss each of them in the oil and salt. Slice off the stem end of the eggplant, then slice it along the length into 4 equal parts.

Grill the eggplant until it is slightly blackened on both sides. Toast the bread on the grill for 10-15 seconds per side. Set the eggplant and bread aside. Juice a lime until you have 1 tsp. of lime juice. Bring the lime juice, beer, and agave nectar to a simmer in a sauce pan. Add the eggplant to the pan and allow the sauce to reduce around the eggplant until it glazes the eggplant. Place the eggplant and lettuce with the bread and serve.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|75

Low-fat Version
Omit the oil and soak the sliced eggplant in beer for about 1 hour so that the eggplant stays hydrated on the grill.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Large Shallow Mixing Bowl Small Mixing Bowl Sauce Pan Spatula Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Knife Cutting Board

Presentation

For an added touch, I sometimes place the basil on the grill and off. While it will wilt the basil, it will immediate activate the

quickly remove it. It should just touch the hot grill before it comes

wonderful scent of the basil and suffuse the area around the plate with the sweet smell of the herb once its plated.

Time Management
You can get the mix for the glaze ready while the eggplant is grilling.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with the same type of beer used to make the glaze and a side of grilled, chopped potatoes.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|76

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients for this should be fairly common save the agave nectar, which can be found at

Trader Joe’s, Fresh & Easy, Whole Foods, Central Market, & Sprouts. Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.

How It Works
Grilling the eggplant gives it a smoky flavor which complements the smokiness of the chipotle and the dark flavor of the beer. The glaze is a sweet and sour glaze with a beer base to thin it out so that it does not burn before it has time to stick to the eggplant.

Chef’s Notes
This is a very simple, spicy glaze that can even be used as the base for a bbq sauce.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1006.7 (251.7) Fat 17.9g (4.5g) Total Carbohydrates 181.1g (45.3g) Dietary Fiber 22.0g (5.5g) Sugars 43.1g (10.8g) Protein 23.8g (6.0g) Salt 2242mg (561mg) Vitamin A 104% (26%) Vitamin B6 33% (8.3%) Vitamin C 24% (6%) Calcium 42% (10.5%) Iron 61% (15.3%) Thiamin 88% (22%) Riboflavin 61% (15.3%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|77

Calories from Fat 161.3 (40.3)

Niacin 71% (17.8%) Folate 138% (34.5%) Phosphorous 38% (9.5%) Potassium 41% (10.3%) Zinc 18% (4.5%) Magnesium 33% (8.3%) Copper 50% (12.5%)

Interesting Facts
Chipotles are usually smoked, dried jalapenos but sometimes the term refers to any sort of smoked, dried pepper.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|78

Grilled Burritos
Type: Main Dish, Wrap Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 3

1 tbsp. of chopped cilantro leaves 1 clove of garlic, minced 1/8 tsp. of salt 1 tbsp. of chili powder ½ tsp. of cumin powder 1 zucchini, thinly sliced 1 carrot, thinly sliced ½ of an onion, thinly sliced 1 red pepper, thinly sliced 3 tortillas 16 oz. can of pinto beans with liquid

Ingredients

Instructions

Chop the cilantro leaves. Mince the garlic. Simmer the beans with the cilantro, garlic, salt, chili powder, and cumin. While the beans are simmering, slice the zucchini, carrot, onion, and red pepper. Grill the sliced veggies until they have are browned. Remove them and set them aside. Remove the beans from the heat. Mash the beans with a potato masher or fork. Wrap all the ingredients in the tortillas, making sure each side is closed. Lightly grill each wrapped burrito until the tortilla is toasted .

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|79

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Metal Spatula Small Pot Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Knife Cutting Board Potato Masher or Fork

Presentation
I like dressing my grilled burritos with a topping of salsa and a side of avocado arranged on a large lettuce leaf.

Time Management
If you don’t want to spend time with the beans, you can use canned refried beans and simply add the spices to them. They should heat up when you grill the burrito.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of spicy salsa, Spanish rice, and green olives.

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients for this should be readily available at your local market. Approximate price per serving is $3.00.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|80

How It Works
Adding the chili powder, cumin, and garlic turns the pinto beans into chili beans. The liquid is

saved so that the beans can be mashed up and not be too thick. The veggies are there to add extra flavor and texture. The tortilla is then grilled to give it a nice, crispy finish.

Chef’s Notes
I do another version of this in a sauté pan and now I am addicted to burritos that are either crisped on the grill or in the sauté pan.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1184.0 (394.7) Calories from Fat 151.8 (50.6) Fat 16.9g (5.6g) Total Carbohydrates 209.9g (70.0g) Dietary Fiber 38.6g (12.9g) Sugars 16.6g (5.5g) Protein 48.1g (16.0g) Salt 1288mg (429mg) Vitamin A 495% (165%) Vitamin B6 61% (20.3%) Vitamin C 493% (164.3%) Calcium 46% (15.3%) Iron 91% (30.3%) Thiamin 91% (30.3%) Riboflavin 49% (16.3%) Niacin 54% (18%) Folate 206% (68.7%) Phosphorous 94% (31.3%) Potassium 82% (27.3%) Zinc 42% (14%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|81

Magnesium 72% (24%) Copper 78% (26%)

Interesting Facts
Beans have a higher percentage of protein by weight than meat. The original burritos were made with corn, not flour, tortillas.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|82

Grilled Corn with Potato and Celery Soup
Type: Soup Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 45 minutes

2 stalks celery, sliced 4 Yukon gold potatoes, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 tsp. oil ¼ tsp. salt 4 cups water 2 ears corn 1 tsp. oil 1 cup cooked red beans, rinsed ¼ tsp. freshly ground pepper

Ingredients

Instructions

Slice the celery. Chop the potatoes. Mince the garlic. Sauté the celery over a medium heat with the oil and salt in a pot until the celery is soft. Add the garlic and continue sautéing this for another minute. Add the potatoes and water, bringing the water to a simmer. Simmer the soup until the potatoes are soft. Puree the ingredients in the pot. Light the grill. Rub each ear of corn with oil. Grill each ear of corn until they are slightly browned all the way around. Cut the kernels off of the cob. Stir the corn kernels, beans, and pepper into the soup.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|83

Low-fat Version
Omit the oil from the soup part of the recipe and simply boil the celery with the potatoes.

Raw Version
Blend 4 cups of cauliflower with the salt, oil, water, and celery to create the base of the soup. Use sprouted beans and fresh corn.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Soup Pot Stirring Spoon Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Knife Cutting Board

Presentation
This soup has a Southwestern feel to it, so serve it in a bowl reminiscent of that theme. I tend to go for reds, yellows, and light pink colors.

Time Management
Grill the corn while the soup is simmering so that both parts of the soup are done at about the same time.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|84

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of grilled squash dressed with chili powder.

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients for this are fairly common. If corn is not in season, you can roast frozen corn in the oven. Approximate cost per serving is $1.00.

How It Works
Blending the potatoes gives the soup a creamy base with the celery giving it a slightly deeper flavor. The beans add protein and color while the corn adds sweetness, texture, and smokiness.

Chef’s Notes
This is one of my favorite summer soups. I love using grilled corn and it goes great with the heavy potato base.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1954.8 (488.7) Calories from Fat 109.0 (27.2) Fat 12.1g (3.0g) Total Carbohydrates 403.7g (100.9g) Dietary Fiber 63.8g (16.0g) Sugars 16.7g (4.2g) Protein 57.8g (14.4g) Salt 744mg (186mg) Vitamin A 14% (3.5%) Vitamin B6 275% (68.8%) Vitamin C 521% (130.3%) Calcium 33% (8.3%) Iron 104% (26%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|85

Thiamin 127% (31.8%) Riboflavin 54% (13.5%) Niacin 114% (28.5%) Folate 131% (32.8%) Phosphorous 150% (37.5%) Potassium 263% (65.8%) Zinc 51% (12.8%) Magnesium 145% (36.3%) Copper 125% (31.3%)

Interesting Facts
Wild corn has rather small kernels with cobs that are only a few inches long.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|86

Grilled Pizza
Type: Main Dish, Flatbread Time to Prepare: 1 hour 30 minutes Serves: 4

Ingredients

½ cup of warm water 1 tsp. of active dry yeast ½ tsp. of sugar 2 tbsp. of corn meal 1 cup 2 tbsp. of flour 1/8 tsp. of salt 3 tbsp. of olive oil 1 tsp. of oil for oiling the dough ½ cup of GimmeLean soy sausage 1 tsp. of olive oil 1 cup of thick tomato sauce ¼ cup of loosely packed basil leaves 6-8 black olives

Instructions

Mix the yeast and sugar into the warm water, checking to see if the yeast is active (it will be frothy.) Combine the corn meal, flour, and salt in a large mixing bowl. it is all combined. Pour the water/yeast solution and the oil into the dry mix and gently work everything together until

Knead the dough until it is silky smooth and no longer clings to your hands. Roll it into a ball, lightly oil it, and place it in a large mixing bowl. Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rise for 1 hour. While it is rising, break up the soy sausage. Set it aside. Once the dough has risen, punch it down and roll it into a ball. Lightly flour a flat surface. Roll the dough out into a ½” disc. Lay the dough in a deep dish iron skillet, circular baking pan, or pie dish.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|87

Sauté it in 1 tsp. of olive oil over a medium heat until it browns.

Roll the edge over to make the outer part thicker than the inner part. Remove it from the oven and transfer it to a cookie sheet. Spread the tomato sauce on top, followed by the soy sausage, basil, and olives. Light the grill and allow the flames to die down. Grill the pizza until the crust is crispy. Bake it on 350 degrees for 10 minutes.

Option: Continue baking it for another 10 minutes instead of grilling it.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|88

Low-fat Version
Omit the soy sausage and olives and use roasted red peppers, artichokes, and eggplant instead.

Kitchen Equipment
2 Mixing Bowls Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Rolling Pin Baking Pan Grill Metal Spatula Saute Pan Stirring Spoon Towel to cover the dough

Presentation
I prefer to let all my guests see the pizza whole before I cut it into slices as I think it looks very nice and appetizing that way. When ingredients from sticking to the blade and dragging the ingredients across the pizza. you cut it, use a wet knife or a pizza roller. This keeps the

Time Management
Light your grill just before you roll out the pizza. This should give the flames just enough time to die down.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of tomato sauce or garlic oil to dip the crust of the pizza into.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|89

Where to Shop
The GimmeLean soy sausage is available at Sprouts, Whole Foods, and some of the more vegetarian friendly grocery markets. You’ll get the best price on basil at Trader Joe’s. The rest of the ingredients are readily available. Approximate price per serving is $2.00.

How It Works
The dough used in the pizza is a rising dough, which helps make the crust thick and fluffy. It is Without that preliminary cooking, the dough will start to fall through the grill before it cooks into a crust. Baking it without the ingredients also allows the top of the crust to firm up and obtain a crisp texture. If the sauce was put on first, the top of the crust would end up too moist.

important to cook the dough in the oven before placing it on the grill to give it some structure.

Chef’s Notes
A couple friends of mine usually make grilled pizza when I visit and I am addicted to the crispy, smoky quality of this dish.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 917.9 (229.5) Calories from Fat 381.8 (95.4) Fat 42.4g (10.6g) Total Carbohydrates 118.2g (29.5g) Dietary Fiber 5.2g (1.3g) Sugars 0.4g (0.1g) Protein 15.9g (4.0g) Salt 295mg (74mg) Vitamin A 0% (0%) Vitamin B6 6% (1.5%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Calcium 4% (1%) Iron 42% (10.5%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|90

Thiamin 65% (16.3%) Riboflavin 40% (10%) Niacin 49% (12.3%) Folate 61% (15.3%) Phosphorous 18% (4.5%) Potassium 5% (1.3%) Zinc 9% (2.3%) Magnesium 12% (3%) Copper 11% (2.8%)

Interesting Facts
The original pizza was called shield bread and was baked on soldiers’ shields. Traditional Italian style pizzas are almost always made with a thin crust.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|91

Grilled Plantains with Black Beans & Rice
Type: Main Dish, Breakfast, Low-fat Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 4

1 cup of rice 1 red bell pepper, chopped ¼ of a yellow onion, sliced ½ tsp. of olive oil 4 ripe plantains, peeled and sliced lengthways ½ tsp. of olive oil 1/8 tsp. of salt 1 cup of black beans, rinsed 2 tbsp. of chopped cilantro leaves

Ingredients

Instructions

Cook the rice (steam, boil, or boil and bake.) Light the grill and allow the flames to die down. Chop the red bell pepper and slice the onion. Peel the plantains. Cut the plantains in half along the length. Grill the plantains until they have a number of dark brown sections, turning them to grill both sides. Fluff the rice. Stir in the red bell pepper, onion, black beans, and cilantro. Plate the rice. Top the rice with the grilled plantains. Toss them in ½ tsp. of olive oil and 1/8 tsp. of salt. Saute the pepper and onion in ½ tsp. of olive oil over a medium heat just until they are soft.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|92

Low-fat Version
You can omit the oil in the recipe and sauté the onion and pepper in a thin layer of water. However, you will not be able to grill the plantains successfully unless you place them on foil. peel off of foil. Wrap the plantains in foil and then place the foil packets on the grill. Without the oil, the starchy plantains will stick to the grill and fall apart. They are much easier to

Raw Version
Use shredded cauliflower for the rice and either sprouted black beans or sprouted lentils (make sure to soak them for a couple hours.) You may also want to lightly brush the plantains in olive oil for extra flavor. They can be served either fresh or lightly dehydrated.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Metal Spatula or Tongs Knife Cutting Board Pot for the rice Saute Pan Stirring Spoon Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I used an acacia plate in this photograph as it offset all of the other colors rather nicely. Try to keep as many of the plantains intact as possible and allow the red bell peppers to show in the rice.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|93

Time Management
You should be able to get the rice started and the peppers and onions done while your grill is the plantains instead of sautéing them.

prepping. Also, if you don’t want to dirty a pan, you can grill the peppers and onions along with

Complementary Food and Drinks
This goes well with a light tropical fruit soup. Try a mango soup with crisp, green peppers.

Where to Shop
Plantains should be available at most gourmet markets, Mexican markets, Sprouts, Central

Market, and Whole Foods. If you live in the Southwest, they will probably be available in your local grocery store. When purchasing them, look for a skin that has several black marks on it, but doesn’t have large black spots. If there are too many black spots, the plantain will be too soft to survive on the grill. Approximate price per serving is $1.25.

How It Works
Brushing the plantains in oil is important because they are very starchy and will stick to the grill otherwise. Using plantains that have small black spots means they are ripe enough to be sweet, but not so ripe that they are completely soft and won’t remain intact on the grill. The rice and flavor. The pepper is added both for color and texture while the onion is used for pungent sweetness. The cilantro is also added for color and for a fresh green herbal flavor. beans provide a nutritious and filling base for the plantains and will complement their sweet, smoky

Chef’s Notes
This is a variation of two dishes I had in Costa Rica. The first was gallo pinto, which is basically black beans and rice with peppers and onions. The second dish was fried plantains, which I thought would be much better on the grill.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|94

Calories 1755.8 (438.9) Fat 8.0g (2.0g)

Calories from Fat 72.4 (18.1)

Total Carbohydrates 386.2g (96.6g) Dietary Fiber 32.7g (8.2g) Sugars 91.8g (23.0g) Protein 34.6g (8.7g) Salt 336mg (84mg) Vitamin A 210% (52.5%) Vitamin B6 110% (27.5%) Vitamin C 496% (124%) Calcium 12% (3%) Iron 86% (21.5%) Thiamin 92% (23%) Riboflavin 28% (7%) Niacin 69% (17.3%) Folate 216% (54%) Phosphorous 65% (16.3%) Potassium 109% (27.3%) Zinc 32% (8%) Magnesium 94% (23.5%) Copper 63% (15.8%)

Interesting Facts
Platano is the more common name for plantains, bananas, etc. in the Spanish speaking world.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|95

Grilled Rosemary Polenta
Type: Main Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 20 minutes

18 oz. of polenta, sliced 2 tsp. of olive oil ¼ tsp. of salt 4 oz. of red beans or white beans ½ tsp. of sweet agave nectar 1 tsp. of white wine vinegar ½ tsp. of sesame oil 2 tbsp. of water 1 tsp. of coriander seed 6 sprigs of rosemary

Ingredients

Instructions

Slice the polenta. Brush each slice with a bit of olive oil. Sprinkle salt on them. Place them on the grill and lay the rosemary sprigs over them. Flip them after about 8 minutes and let them grill that much longer, relaying the rosemary sprigs on top. While they are grilling, mash the beans with the agave nectar, vinegar, sesame oil, water, and coriander seed, leaving a good deal of texture.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|96

Kitchen Equipment
Grill

Cutting Board Knife Brush Measuring Spoon Spoon to mash the beans

Presentation
Lay the polenta slices at an angle against each other. Top it with cooked rosemary leaves around the polenta.

the bean sauce and then lay a rosemary sprig on top or scatter the

Time Management
Make sure to get all the polenta brushed before you put the slices on the grill. This is also

something that can be made ahead of time and then warmed up in the oven, although it is obviously best when served fresh.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This also goes incredibly well with just a mix of garlic and olive oil and a side of arugula and grilled mushrooms.

Where to Shop
I got this polenta at Trader Joe’s who now has their own brand at a good price with good flavor.

Don’t use dried rosemary in this, either. Make sure to go the produce section and get fresh

rosemary spears! For the sweet agave nectar, try Whole Foods, Sprouts, Wild Oats, Central
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|97

Market, or any other health oriented store.

How It Works
It’s easiest to buy the polenta already shaped into rounds, which means you can’t place the rosemary leaves directly inside it. Laying them over the top of the polenta works just as well, allowing the rosemary to gently suffuse each slice, giving it a more subtle flavor. The salt is added for extra flavor. The sauce is just a bit sweet to complement the grilled flavor of polenta.

Chef’s Notes
There are so many interesting ways to prepare polenta!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 593.0 (148.3) Calories from Fat 96.2 (24.0) Fat 10.7g (2.7g) Total Carbohydrates 102.7g (25.7g) Dietary Fiber 13.9g (3.5g) Sugars 4.7g (1.2g) Protein 21.6g (5.4g) Salt 1193mg (298.3mg) Vitamin A 0% (0%) Vitamin B6 15% (3.8%) Vitamin C 3% (0.8%) Calcium 6% (1.5%) Iron 44% (11%) Thiamin 34% (8.5%) Niacin 22% (5.5%) Folate 80% (20%) Phosphorous 29% (7.3%) Riboflavin 18% (4.5%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|98

Potassium 23% (5.8%) Zinc 15% (3.8%) Magnesium 25% (6.3%) Copper 25% (6.3%)

Interesting Facts
Before corn made its way to Europe, polenta was made with the grain faro or ground chestnuts. Polenta is sometimes served as fast food in parts of Italy.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|99

Grilled Sunchokes
Type: Side Serves: 2 Time to Prepare: 15 minutes

2 sunchokes, sliced 1 tsp. of olive oil 2 lemons, sliced 2 tsp. of white wine vinegar 1 tsp. of olive oil 2 green onions

Ingredients

Option: 2 cups of arugula Instructions

Slice the sunchokes about ¼” thick. Slice the lemons about ¼” thick. Brush the sunchokes with olive oil. Grill them with the lemon slices for 10 minutes, flipping them as necessary. Mix together the vinegar and oil. Put the sunchokes on the plate. Add the sliced green onions. Dress it with the olive oil and vinegar. Cut the green onions.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|100

Kitchen Equipment
Grill

Cutting Board Knife Measuring Spoon Brush Mixing Bowl Mixing Spoon

Presentation
Don’t toss the sunchokes with the green onions, but let them sit on top. Place the grilled lemons along the side. Not only are they tasty, but they look nice against the white of the sunchokes,

Time Management
The sunchokes will grill quickly and are best eaten fresh, so this isn’t something that will go well ahead of time. Of course, since you’ve got the grill going, this is the perfect time to cook a few other foods!

Complementary Food and Drinks
These go nicely with lightly grilled strawberries on the side.

Where to Shop
Sunchokes can be difficult to find as most conventional grocery stores don’t carry them.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|101

However, Trader Joe’s has a great set of them for a good price and you can always try your local gourmet market. All of the other ingredients are common. Note that sunchokes are also commonly called Jerusalem artichokes.

How It Works
Grilling the sunchokes for a short period of time gives them a hint of smokiness, but leaves the fresh flavor mostly intact. Grilling the lemons caramelizes the natural sugars in them, giving them a nice dark citrusy flavor to complement the sunchokes. The vinegar in the dressing brightens the entire dish.

Chef’s Notes
I love the fresh flavor of the sunchoke and its incredible versatility, which can be used as a side, a snack, or even a main course.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 314.6 (157.3) Calories from Fat 81.3 (40.6) Fat 9.0g (4.5g) Total Carbohydrates 52.3g (26.2g) Dietary Fiber 4.8g (2.4g) Sugars 28.0g (14.0g) Protein 6.0g (3.0g) Salt 12mg (6mg) Vitamin A 1% (0.5%) Vitamin B6 12% (6%) Vitamin C 20% (10%) Calcium 4% (2%) Iron 57% (28.5%) Thiamin 30% (15%) Riboflavin 9% (4.5%) Niacin 20% (10%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|102

Folate 10% (5%) Phosphorous 23% (11.5%) Potassium 37% (18.5%) Zinc 2% (1%) Magnesium 13% (6.5%) Copper 21% (10.5%)

Interesting Facts
Sunchokes are called Jerusalem artichokes because someone misheard the Italian word for it, “girasole”, as Jerusalem and that pronunciation spread. Sunchokes are not at all related to artichokes, but are actually a tuber.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|103

BBQ Sweet Potatoes
Type: Side, Low-fat Time to Prepare: 25 minutes Serves: 4

¾ cup of hoi sin sauce 1/8 tsp. of cardamom 1/8 tsp. of crushed red pepper ¼ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper 2 cloves of garlic, minced 4 green onions, sliced 3 sweet potatoes (about 2 pounds), sliced thickly 2 tsp. of toasted sesame oil

Ingredients

Instructions

Combine the hoi sin, cardamom, crushed red pepper, and freshly ground black pepper. Mince the garlic and slice the onions. Mix these into the hoi sin sauce. Slice the sweet potatoes along the length about ¾” thick. Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Boil the sweet potatoes for 4-5 minutes. Shock the sweet potatoes with cold water. Toss the sweet potatoes in the toasted sesame oil. Stir any left-over sesame oil into the hoi sin sauce. Grill the sweet potatoes for 3-5 minutes per side. Remove them from the grill. Dredge them through the sauce. Return them to the grill and grill them another 3-5 minutes per side.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|104

Low-fat Version
Wrap the boiled sweet potatoes in foil and grill them in the foil, omitting the oil.

Raw Version
Instead of using hoi sin sauce, blend together soaked cashews with a touch of miso and a couple dehydrated plums. Slice the sweet potatoes to ¼” instead of ¾” and dredge them through the sauce. Dehydrate them until the sweet potatoes are soft.

Kitchen Equipment
Shallow Mixing Bowl Stirring Spoon Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Knife Cutting Board Grill Tongs

Presentation
I either put these on a platter with wooden skewers in them or lay them on a long, rectangular plate for individual servings.

Time Management
If you’re fast, you can light your grill first, then prep the sweet potatoes and sauce and be done right about the time the flames die down.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|105

Complementary Food and Drinks
These make a good appetizer for a spicy peanut stir fry or even Pad Thai.

Where to Shop
Hoi sin sauce is available at some conventional markets, but you may need to go to an Asian market to find it. The rest of the ingredients should be easy to find. Approximate price per serving is $1.50.

How It Works
Boiling the sweet potatoes decreases the amount of time they need to grill. This is important because if they weren’t prepped by boiling, the surface area of the sweet potatoes might burn before the insides are done. They are then grilled before going in the sauce so that they pick up some smoky flavor without having the sauce on them, which would dry out if grilled too long. The cardamom in the sauce adds a subtle aromatic quality to it while the heat of the crushed red pepper balances out the sweetness of the hoi sin.

Chef’s Notes
This is one of those recipes that I have a hard time sharing!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1335.4 (333.9) Calories from Fat 100.4 (25.1) Fat 11.2g (2.8g) Total Carbohydrates 290.5g (72.6g) Dietary Fiber 33.5g (8.4g) Sugars 130.2g (32.6g) Protein 18.2g (4.6g) Salt 3499mg (862mg)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|106

Vitamin A 0% (0%) Vitamin B6 89% (22.3%) Calcium 17% (4.3%) Iron 32% (8%) Thiamin 34% (8.5%) Niacin 32% (8%) Folate 41% (10.3%) Phosphorous 44% (11%) Zinc 13% (3.3%) Magnesium 46% (11.5%) Copper 68% (17%) Potassium 143% (35.8%) Riboflavin 33% (8.3%) Vitamin C 147% (36.8%)

Interesting Facts
Hoi sin sauce is made from sweet potatoes.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|107

Moroccan Kebabs with Couscous
Type: Main Dish Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 30 minutes + at least 1 hour to marinate

8 dried apricots 1 red bell pepper, chopped ½ of a red onion, chopped 1 large carrot, chopped 1 sweet potato, chopped 3 Roma tomatoes 1 zucchini, chopped 1 tbsp. of ras el hanout 1 pinch of saffron 3 tbsp. of olive oil 2 tbsp. of lemon juice 1 ½ cups of couscous 1 ½ cups of warm water 8 green olives, sliced 1 preserved lemon, sliced 2 tbsp. of diced mint leaves 1 tbsp. of pine nuts

Ingredients

Instructions

Chop the veggies into large bite-size chunks. Toss them with the ras el hanout and saffron. Place them in a plastic bag. Add in the olive oil and lemon juice. Seal the bag and shake it until the veggies are coated. Let this sit for at least an hour at room temperature, but the longer the better (if this sits for more than 2 hours, refrigerate it). Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Remove the veggies from the bag and place them on skewers. Grill each veggie skewer until the veggies are slightly soft (about 2 minutes per side).
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|108

Option: Steam the cous cous for 20 minutes instead of soaking it.
Fluff the couscous with a fork. Dice the mint. Remove the veggies from the skewers. Toss the olives, preserved lemon, mint, and pine nuts into the couscous. Slice the olives and preserved lemon.

Soak the couscous in the warm water.

Top each plate of couscous with the veggies.

Option: Finish off the dish with a tsp. of harissa sauce.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|109

Kitchen Equipment
Knife Cutting Board Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Large Plastic Bag Mixing Bowl or Steamer for the couscous Fork Grill Tongs Skewers

Presentation
Serve this on a colorful plate, preferably one with the types of designs seen in Moorish architecture, though that may be hard to come by. Make sure that the veggies grill long enough to acquire noticeable grill lines as those are part of the appeal of this dish.

Time Management
Plan ahead and allow the veggies to marinate in the refrigerator overnight. The longer they marinate, the more intense the flavors will be.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side salad of cooked eggplant with saffron and orange zest.

Where to Shop
I purchase my ras el hanout at World Market via their online store (www.worldmarket.com) or at their brick and mortar stores. It is also usually available in most Middle Eastern markets.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|110

How It Works
Olive oil, olives, apricots, and preserved lemons are integral to Moroccan cuisine. The different

veggies are used to create a variety of textures and flavor and are marinated in the spice mix, lemon juice, and oil so that they soften and absorb those flavors. The oil also keeps the veggies from sticking when they are grilled. Ras el hanout is a spice mix with a lot of coriander and cumin seed, giving the kebabs a deep, aromatic flavor.

Chef’s Notes
I very much enjoy the combination of the apricots, olives, and all the grilled veggies with the couscous. In fact, Moroccan cuisine is one of my favorites.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1804.5 (451.1) Fat 52.6g (13.2g) Calories from Fat 473.5 (118.4)

Total Carbohydrates 283.9g (71.0g) Dietary Fiber 29.9g (7.5g) Sugars 51.0g (12.7g) Protein 48.8g (12.2g) Salt 796mg (199mg) Vitamin A 433% (108.3%) Vitamin B6 78% (19.5%) Calcium 18% (4.5%) Iron 53% (13.3%) Thiamin 49% (12.3%) Riboflavin 29% (7.3%) Niacin 76% (19%) Folate 50% (12.5%) Phosphorous 85% (21.3%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|111

Vitamin C 621% (155.3%)

Potassium 97% (24.3%) Zinc 31% (7.8%) Magnesium 70% (17.5%) Copper 82% (20.5%)

Interesting Facts
Ras el hanout means “head of the shop.”

Moroccan cuisine is influenced by nearly every country in the Mediterranean and is known for its exquisite blend of spices, fruits, and olives.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|112

Panini with Roasted Tomatoes and Arugula
Type: Side Serves: 2 Time to Prepare: 30 minutes

1 panini, sliced in half 3 roma tomatoes ½ tsp. of olive oil 1 cup of loosely packed arugula 1 tbsp. of balsamic vinegar 1/8 tsp. of freshly ground pepper

Ingredients

Instructions

Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Slice the Panini in half, creating two flat pieces of bread. Toss the tomatoes in the olive oil. Wrap them in foil. Roast them on the grill for about 20 minutes, rotating them half-way through.

Option: Roast them in your oven on 400 degrees for 25 minutes.
Lightly toast the panini. Dress the panini with the arugula.

Flatten the roasted tomatoes and give them a few quick pulls to tear them. Top the arugula with the roasted tomatoes. Finish off the panini with a couple splashes of balsamic vinegar and a pinch of pepper.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|113

Low-fat Version
Do not rub the tomatoes in the olive oil, but fill the foil packet with about 1 tbsp. of water to keep the tomatoes moist.

Raw Version
Chop the tomatoes and marinade them in the vinegar. Use sprouted seed bread instead of the panini.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Foil Measuring Spoon Serrated Knife

Presentation
Serve this on a white plate and sprinkle a little extra pepper around the plate.

Time Management
If you want to save a lot of time, consider serving the tomatoes fresh and diced instead of roasted.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is perfect to go with a bowl of soup or a light spinach salad.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|114

Where to Shop
I usually get my panini at Trader Joe’s, though most bakeries should have them. I also get my arugula there. Average price per serving is about $1.00.

How It Works
This is a very simple way of presenting bread. The arugula is peppery and presents a good color contrast with the bread while the roasted tomatoes present yet another contrast and are soft, making an excellent topping for the bread. The balsamic vinegar adds one more color and its some extra flavor. breathy acidity enhances all of the other flavors. It is also partially absorbed by the bread, giving it

Chef’s Notes
This recipe is a simple, but elegant way to serve panini and reminds me of some of the recipes I’ve seen at bistros.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 317.3 (158.6) Calories from Fat 67.5 (33.7) Fat 7.5g (3.7g) Total Carbohydrates 52.9g (26.4g) Dietary Fiber 4.9g (2.4g) Sugars 6.8g (3.4g) Protein 10.0g (5.0g) Salt 354mg (177mg) Vitamin A 32% (16%) Vitamin B6 10% (5%) Vitamin C 64% (32%) Calcium 16% (8%) Iron 22% (11%) Thiamin 26% (13%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|115

Riboflavin 18% (9%) Niacin 23% (11.5%) Folate 32% (16%) Phosphorous 12% (6%) Potassium 17% (8.5%) Zinc 5% (2.5%) Magnesium 11% (5.5%) Copper 13% (6.5%)

Interesting Facts
The singular of panini is panino. Panini means “little bread.”

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|116

Smoked Mushroom and Black Bean Empanadas
Type: Appetizer Serves: 20 Time to Prepare: 1 hour 30 minutes

1 cup of warm water 1 tsp. of active dry yeast ½ tsp. of sugar ¼ tsp. of salt 3 tbsp. of olive oil 2 cups of cremini mushrooms ½ tsp. of olive oil or chili oil ¼ tsp. of salt ¾ cup of long grain rice ¼ tsp. of cumin ½ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper Zest of 4 limes ½ cup of rinsed black beans 1 tsp. of smoked paprika 2 ¼ cups of flour

Ingredients

Option: ¼ cup of sundried tomatoes Instructions

Making the dough… Mix the warm water, yeast, and sugar together, checking to see if the water becomes frothy (this means the yeast is active; if it does not become frothy within 10 minutes, discard the yeast and start again.) Combine the flour and salt together in a mixing bowl. Add the wet mix and oil to the flour and combine them thoroughly. Knead the dough until it is elastic. Separate the dough into two sections. Allow it to rise for one hour.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|117

Roll the dough into a ball, lightly oil it, and cover it.

Punch the dough down and roll the two parts into a ball. Press them into discs about ½” thick. Lightly flour your working surface. Cut out 3-4” discs of dough. Making the filling… Light the grill with mesquite wood and allow the flames to die down. Toss the whole cremini mushrooms in ½ tsp. of oil and ¼ tsp. of salt. Wrap the mushrooms in foil. Pierce the foil several times with a fork. Place the packet on a warm, but not hot section of the grill. Smoke the mushrooms for at least 30 minutes, rotating the foil packet every 15 minutes. Dice the smoked mushrooms. Soak the rice for 30 minutes. Once the rice is done soaking, drain away the water. Dress the rice with the smoked paprika, cumin, and pepper. Steam the rice for 20 minutes. Zest the limes. Add the diced mushrooms, lime zest, beans, and optional sundried tomatoes to the rice. Fluff the rice with a fork. Assembling the empanadas… Feel each dough disc with about 1 tbsp. of filling. Fold the discs in half. Crimp the edges together. Bake the empanadas on 350 degrees for 20 minutes or pan fry them over a medium heat until golden brown. Roll the dough out into 1/8” sheets.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|118

Low-fat Version
Cut the amount of olive oil in the dough down to 2 tsp. instead of 3 tbsp. and the amount of fat in the recipe will be cut to about one-quarter of what it is in the original recipe.

Kitchen Equipment
2 Mixing Bowls Measuring Cup Stirring Spoon Rolling Pin Grill Foil Tongs Fork Baking Sheet or Sauté Pan Steamer Crimper Measuring Spoon

Presentation
Lay these out on a platter propped against one another with a sauce in the middle and/or garnished with lime wedges. You can also give the empanadas a sprinkle of smoked paprika.

Time Management
The first part of this recipe you should do is to get the rice soaking. Next, make the dough and By this point, you should be ready to steam the rice. Once the rice is done steaming, the mushrooms should be ready to dice. Once those are done, the dough should be ready to work. If
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|119

get it to the point where it is rising. While it is rising, light your grill and get the mushrooms started.

you get the timing down this way, everything should come together about the same time. There are some tricks you can do to save a lot of time. First, instead of making your own dough, you can use ready-made pizza dough from Trader Joe’s and simply roll that out. You can also use potsticker discs instead of cutting out your own discs. They won’t be as light, but they are ready to use. Another trick you can do is to use smoked salt with the mushrooms and sauté them until they are soft. They won’t have quite the same flavor, but you can bypass the grill doing it this way.

Complementary Food and Drinks
To accent the empanadas, I serve them with a semi-sweet roasted tomatillo and cilantro sauce.

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients for this recipe should be readily available except for the smoked paprika. Smoked paprika, however, is becoming more common and while it should be available at your local spice store, you may even find it at your neighborhood market. Approximate price per serving is about $.40.

How It Works
This recipe has several important parts to it. The first part is the dough. Creating a yeast dough will lighten the empanadas as they rise just a bit while they bake. The next part is the fluffy rice. Soaking the rice significantly shortens the amount of time it needs to steam and steaming the rice helps keep the grains separated. This is also why the rice is fluffed with a fork and also why the beans are rinsed. If the beans are not thoroughly rinsed, the excess liquid will cause the grains to compress together. Note that it is particularly important to steam or at least boil the rice with the through the starchiness of both the rice and the dough. spices. Otherwise, the empanada tastes powdery. Finally, the filling is full of strong flavors to cut

Chef’s Notes
Empanadas are great to serve at a party. I particularly like these because the satiety of the black

beans the strength of the smoked flavors wins over vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike. I also like to make a large version of this empanada recipe and have it for lunch.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill

August 2009|120

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2059.3 (103.0) Fat 47.5g (2.4g) Total Carbohydrates 355.8g (17.8g) Dietary Fiber 19.2g (1.0g) Sugars 6.0g (0.3g) Protein 52.1g (2.6g) Salt 1184mg (59mg) Vitamin A 0% (0%) Vitamin B6 30% (1.5%) Vitamin C 7% (0.4%) Calcium 11% (0.6%) Iron 126% (6.3%) Thiamin 169% (8.5%) Riboflavin 116% (5.8%) Niacin 153% (7.7%) Folate 226% (11.3%) Phosphorous 78% (3.9%) Potassium 43% (2.2%) Zinc 38% (1.9%) Magnesium 44% (2.2%) Copper 91% (4.6%)

Calories from Fat 427.7 (21.4)

Interesting Facts
The word empanada is derived from empanar, which means to wrap in bread (em=in and pan=bread.) While empanadas may be baked or fried, the oldest versions of the recipe call for them to be baked.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|121

Smoked Black Bean Chili
Type: Main Dish, Chili Time to Prepare: 20 minutes Serves: 2

1 yellow onion, diced 3 cloves of garlic, minced ½ tsp. of olive oil 16 oz. of black beans with liquid 3 tbsp. of San Antonio chili powder (other chili powders can be used) 1 tbsp. of smoked paprika 1tsp. of cumin ½ tsp. of smoked salt (mesquite smoked salt works best) 2 tbsp. of chopped cilantro leaves

Ingredients

Instructions

Dice the onion and mince the garlic. Chop the cilantro leaves. Over a medium-high heat, sauté the onion in the olive oil until it browns. Reduce the heat to medium and add the garlic. Saute this for another 3 minutes. Add in the rest of the ingredients and stir (there should be at least ½ cup of bean liquid.) Allow this to simmer for at least 10 minutes.

Option: Smoked dried New Mexico chilies and grind those into a powder for the chili powder.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|122

Low-fat Version
Omit the olive oil and sauté the onion and garlic in a thin layer of water. Make sure to begin with a dry pan and the onion only and once the onion starts to brown, reduce the heat to medium-high and add in the water and garlic.

Raw Version
Soak an ancho chili pepper and three New Mexico chili peppers and then blend them with one cup of water, one clove of garlic, one-quarter of a yellow onion, and one tomato. Stir in the cumin, salt, cilantro, and sprouted black beans. Allow this to sit for at least two hours.

Kitchen Equipment
Medium-sized Pot Knife Cutting Board Stirring Spoon Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I serve this chili straight out of the pot without any fancy

presentation. If you want to go a bit farther than that, serve it in a bread bowl, garnish it with some freshly cut cilantro, and sprinkle the bread with chili powder.

Time Management
This chili cooks quickly, so make sure to get everything cut and measured before you start cooking. It will keep refrigerated for about five days.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|123

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of fresh corn tortillas and a dark beer.

Where to Shop
You may need to visit a spice store or a gourmet market for the San Antonio style chili powder and smoked salt. If you can’t find it, it’s ok to substitute other chili powders. Smoked paprika is starting to be available in many standard markets, but I generally get mine at Penzey’s (www.penzeys.com.) They ship, so you can order online. If you want to smoke your own paprika and salt, you can place them on your grill off to the side where it is cooler. Lay out a sheet of foil and curl up the sides. That will make a bed for your spices to rest while they smoke. Make sure to keep the grill closed! Approximate price per serving is $1.75.

How It Works
The onion is heavily browned to get the maximum sweetness out of it, which complements the chili powder. San Antonio style chili mixes tend to be dark with strong flavor and that style of chili mix goes well with black beans. The liquid is used instead of just water because it carries more flavor and makes a better gravy for the chili. Smoked paprika is used to impart smokiness and to balance out the heat of the chili powder. Smoked salt is used to add even more smoky flavor. This keeps you from having to smoke those ingredients on the grill.

Chef’s Notes
I love chili and happen to have a number of smoked salts and smoked paprika around. I wanted a smoky chili but didn’t want to fire up my grill, so that bit of laziness ended up being the inspiration for this recipe!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 817.2 (408.6) Fat 9.6g (4.8g) Calories from Fat 86.4 (43.2)

Total Carbohydrates 136.7g (68.3g)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|124

Dietary Fiber 51.0g (25.5g) Sugars 6.2g (3.1g) Protein 46.0g (23.0g) Salt 1402mg (701mg) Vitamin A 242% (121%) Vitamin B6 56% (28%) Calcium 23% (11.5%) Iron 82% (41%) Thiamin 65% (32.5%) Riboflavin 29% (14.5%) Niacin 27% (13.5%) Folate 183% (91.5%) Phosphorous 78% (39%) Potassium 69% (34.5%) Zinc 42% (21%) Magnesium 97% (48.5%) Copper 59% (29.5%) Vitamin C 49% (24.5%)

Interesting Facts
Beans have a higher percentage of protein by weight than meat.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|125

Mesquite Smoked Chayote with Chipotle Mango
Type: Appetizer, Low-fat Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 2

1 chayote squash, cut in half ½ tsp. of olive oil ¼ tsp. of salt 2 mangoes, peeled and diced 1/8 tsp. of chipotle powder

Ingredients

Instructions

Light your grill with mesquite wood and allow the wood to turn white. smoker box.

Option: If you are using a gas grill, soak mesquite chips for an hour and then put them in your grill’s

Cut the chayote squash in half along the length. Rub the chayote halves in the olive oil. Sprinkle them with salt. Place them on the grill and rotate them when they turn slightly black (about 8 minutes on a hot grill.) Grill the other side until it is slightly blackened. Remove the chayote from the grill. Peel the mangoes and remove the seeds. Dice the mangoes. Make a bed of mango for each serving and sprinkle the beds with a pinch each of chipotle powder. Lay the grilled chayote squash on the mango beds.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|126

Raw Version
Do not grill the chayote squash, but dice it instead. If you do not dice it, it will be too hard to handle on the dish. Instead of using chipotle powder, use a dash of New Mexico chili powder or minced red serrano pepper.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill

Tongs Knife Cutting Board Measuring Spoon

Presentation
Serve this on a small plate so the squash does not look overwhelmed. If you have any micro greens available, you can make a small bed of mango where the chayote seed is and stand some micro greens up with the mango bed.

Time Management
Make sure to light your grill before you start working on anything else. This will give the fire time to die down and get your grill to the proper temperature.

Complementary Food and Drinks
I love serving this with enchiladas.

Where to Shop
Chayote squash can be found at most Mexican markets and looks a bit like a wrinkled green pear.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|127

How It Works
The chayote is rubbed in oil to keep it moist on the grill. The salt is rubbed into it so the saltiness

infuses the chayote flesh as it cooks. This smoked chayote is offset with the cool, refreshing powder.

sweetness of the mango which in turn is balanced by the tiny amount of heat from the chipotle

Chef’s Notes
I created this recipe for a set of Southwestern recipes I did at the Scottsdale Culinary Institute for a guest instructorship.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 411.4 (205.7) Calories from Fat 35 (17.5) Fat 3.8g (1.9g) Total Carbohydrates 88.6g (44.3g) Dietary Fiber 14.4g (7.2g) Sugars 68.8g (34.4g) Protein 5.4g (2.7g) Salt 598mg (299mg) Vitamin A 326% (163%) Vitamin B6 44% (22%) Calcium 10% (5%) Iron 10% (5%) Thiamin 18% (9%) Niacin 22% (11%) Folate 108% (54%) Phosphorous 12% (6%) Riboflavin 18% (9%) Vitamin C 244% (122%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|128

Potassium 32% (16%) Zinc 22% (11%) Magnesium 22% (11%) Copper 46% (23%)

Interesting Facts
Chayote squash is also known as cho-cho, particularly in Cuba.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|129

Smoked Portabella Napoleon
Type: Main Dish Time to Prepare: 40 minutes Serves: 4

Layer 1

Ingredients
4 portabella mushrooms Olive oil for brushing

Layer 2 2 roasted red peppers Layer 3 1 Yukon gold potato, sliced thinly ½ tsp. of olive oil Layer 4 ½ cup of barley 1 cup of veggie broth 1 tsp. of thyme leaves Juice of ½ of a lemon The Sauce ¼ tsp. of freshly ground pepper ¼ of a yellow onion, chopped 3 Roma tomatoes, chopped 3 cloves of garlic, sliced 3 green onions, sliced ½ tsp. of olive oil ½ cup of water 1 tbsp. of capers 1/8 tsp. of salt 2 tbsp. of pine nuts for garnish 1/8 tsp. of crushed red pepper

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|130

Instructions

Begin by preparing the sauce.

Chop the onion and tomatoes and slice the garlic and green onions. In a small pot, sauté the onion and garlic on a medium heat until the onion is soft. Add the tomatoes and water to the pot. Simmer this until the tomatoes are soft. Puree the sauce. Return it to the pot over a medium-low heat. Add in the green onions, capers, crushed red pepper, and salt. Simmer this for at least 10 minutes. While the sauce is simmering, start the barley. Bring the veggie broth to a boil and add the barley, time, lemon juice, and pepper. Allow this to come back to a boil, cover the pot, and reduce the heat to low. This should take about 25 minutes to cook. When it is done, set it aside. Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Slice the potato thinly and toss it in the olive oil. Brush the portabellas with olive oil. Grill the potatoes until they are crisp. Grill the portabellas on both sides until they are soft, but not so soft that they completely collapse. Tear the roasted red peppers in half. With the cap sides up, lay a roasted red pepper half in each portabella. Add the potato slices next. Add a few tablespoons of barley to the top of this. Cup your hand and lightly press the barley down so it does not fall all over. Add a couple tablespoons of sauce on top of each portabella stack. Garnish with pine nuts. In order from bottom to top, you should have a portabella, roasted red pepper half, sliced grilled potatoes, barley, sauce, and then pine nuts.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|131

Low-fat Version
Instead of brushing the potatoes and mushrooms in oil, you can soak them in water for about ten minutes. This will help keep them from drying out on the grill. You should also wrap them in foil the oil. before they hit the grill. For the sauce, sauté the onion and garlic in a thin layer of water instead of

Raw Version
Marinate the portabellas in a light water and apple cider vinegar solution and rub them with Celtic sea salt once they are done marinating. You will need to marinate them for at least four hours. Instead of roasted red pepper, shred fresh red bell pepper and add those shreds as the next layer. Substitute thinly sliced zucchini medallions for the potatoes. Use soaked, sprouted barley all the ingredients together with six or so sundried tomatoes. dressed with lemon juice, thyme leaves, pepper, and salt. For the sauce, omit the onion and blend

Kitchen Equipment
Mixing Bowl Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon 2 Small Pots (one needs a lid) Stirring Spoon Cutting Board Knife Grill Tongs Brush

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|132

Presentation
If you have any left-over sauce, you can drizzle that around the lines or dots of the reduction across the plate.

plate. Alternatively, you can make a balsamic reduction and create

Time Management
If you can manage all of the aspects of this recipe at the same time, I suggest starting the barley first, then lighting your grill, and then getting the sauce to the point where the tomatoes are simmering while the flames die down. The potatoes and portabellas can be quickly prepped and put onto the grill at that point and while they are grilling, you can blend the sauce and set it back to simmering. The barley will almost be done at this point. If you are looking for simplicity instead, start the sauce and once the sauce is done, make the barley. Once that is done, do your grilling.

Complementary Food and Drinks
While you’ve got your grill going, you can make bruschetta, which makes a great complement to this dish.

Where to Shop
I get my roasted red peppers either at Trader Joe’s or Fresh & Easy. When shopping for the portabellas, the wider they are, the better as those will fit more ingredients. Approximate price per serving is $3.00.

How It Works
The layer of the stack (also called a Napoleon) is important. The roasted pepper is the first layer
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|133

added to the portabella so that the potatoes cover it. If the potatoes were on bottom, the barley would slide off of the roasted pepper. The barley is on top because it will absorb some of the citrus aspect, the barley and smoked potatoes and mushroom end up feeling too heavy. sauce. Lemon is added to the barley to brighten the flavors of the Napoleon. Without that light

Chef’s Notes
I have about ten different variations on the portabella Napoleon because grilled portabellas make

such a perfect base for a stack of ingredients.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 982.5 (245.6) Fat 29.5g (7.4g) Total Carbohydrates 152.1g (38.0g) Dietary Fiber 25.7g (6.4g) Sugars 19.9g (5.0g) Protein 27.2g (6.8g) Salt 1172mg (293mg) Vitamin A 216% (54%) Vitamin B6 85% (21.3%) Vitamin C 778% (194.5%) Calcium 11% (2.8%) Iron 48% (12%) Thiamin 47% (11.8%) Riboflavin 70% (17.5%) Niacin 91% (22.8%) Folate 38% (9.5%) Phosphorous 73% (18.3%) Potassium 91% (22.8%) Zinc 42% (10.5%) Magnesium 58% (14.5%) Copper 123% (30.8%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|134

Calories from Fat 265.2 (66.3)

Interesting Facts
A Napoleon is a fancy term for layers of ingredients stacked together.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|135

Type: Main Dish Time to Prepare: 60 minutes

Smoked Potato Korma
Serves: 4

The Veggies 3 Yukon gold potatoes ¼ tsp. of olive oil 2 carrots ½ cup of peas ¾ cup of chopped cauliflower 1 onion, diced 3 tbsp. of diced, roasted green chilies 1 tomato, diced 3 cloves of garlic, minced The Curry Mix 1 tsp. of poppy seeds 2 tsp. of cumin seed 2 tsp. of coriander seed 2 dried red chilies 1 tsp. of black peppercorns 1 tsp. of dried fennel seeds 4 cloves 2 star anise seeds 1 tsp. of cinnamon ½ tsp. of freshly ground cardamom 1 tsp. of turmeric The Sauce

Ingredients

Option: 2 tbsp. of yellow curry powder
2 cups of coconut milk 1 tsp. of grated ginger ½ tsp. of salt

Option: ¼ cup of plain soy yogurt

2 tbsp. of cilantro leaves 2 cups of cooked basmati rice
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|136

Instructions

Chop the potatoes (peeled potatoes are optional.) Toss them in the olive oil. Wrap them in foil. Pierce the foil all over with a fork.

Light the grill with hickory or apple wood and allow the flames to die down.

Place the potato and foil packet off center on the grill on one of the warm, but not hot parts. Allow the potatoes to sit on the grill until they become slightly soft, but not mushy, flipping the packet every 10 minutes. While the potatoes are smoking, begin working on the curry sauce. Toast the whole spices over a medium heat for 1 minute, stirring constantly (if they start to smoke, immediately remove the pan from the heat and get the spices into a small mixing bowl.) Remove the whole spices. Grind all of the spices together until you have a fine powder. Bring ½ cup of the coconut milk to a simmer. Stir in the curry mix. Add the rest of the coconut milk, the optional soy yogurt, and the diced tomato. Allow this to simmer for about 10 minutes. Stir in the cut veggies along with the chilies. Allow this to simmer until the veggies are soft (about 10 minutes). Remove from the heat. Garnish the korma with cilantro leaves. Serve over the rice. Add in the smoked potatoes and continue to simmer the korma for 5 more minutes. Add the powdered spices and toast those for about 30 seconds.

Dice the carrots, tomato, and onion, chop the cauliflower, and mince the garlic.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|137

Low-fat Version
You can use light coconut milk for a lower-fat version or use soy milk for the lowest-fat version.

Raw Version
For a raw korma, do not toast the spices and omit the potatoes, adding in extra cauliflower or squash instead. For the coconut milk, blend the flesh of a young coconut and the tomato until you have a creamy sauce. Instead of rice, serve the korma over shredded jicama.

Kitchen Equipment
Knife Cutting Board Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Pot or Wok Grill Foil Fork Tongs Stirring Spoon Mortar and Pestle or Other Spice Grinder

Presentation
Not only should you mix the cilantro leaves into the korma, but you should save some to sprinkle on top of the dish. If you don’t mind a little heat, you can also give the top of the dish a sprinkle of crushed red pepper.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|138

Time Management
Make sure to start the potatoes before working on anything else. They will take awhile to become adequately smoky and while they are doing that, you can make the curry powder, the rice, and the sauce. If you time it right, those will all be done about the time that the potatoes are finished. If you want to save a lot of time with this recipe, you can use a pre-made yellow curry powder and forgo smoking the potatoes. Simply add the potatoes in with the rest of the veggies.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of garlic naan and tamarind chutney.

Where to Shop
I usually get the veggies and spices at Sprouts as the spices can be purchased there in bulk, which will save you a lot of money. Approximate price per serving is about $2.50.

How It Works
Toasting the spices before grinding them activates the volatile oils in them, releasing a great deal

of flavor. It also makes them a touch easier to grind into a powder. The different veggies are used not only to give a complex flavor, but also to add a variety of color to the korma. The tomatoes are diced before being added to the sauce so that they dissolve more easily into the coconut milk, turning the sauce into a creamy tomato sauce.

Chef’s Notes
This is a recipe that looks complex, but once you get the spices ground, it’s actually fairly easy to put together.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1993.1 (498.3) Fat 102.0g (25.5g) Calories from Fat 918.1 (229.5)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|139

Total Carbohydrates 232.8g (58.2g) Dietary Fiber 25.3g (6.3g) Sugars 26.9g (6.7g) Protein 35.9g (9.0g) Salt 1461mg (365mg) Vitamin A 479% (119.8%) Vitamin B6 122% (30.5%) Vitamin C 248% (62%) Calcium 28% (7%) Iron 147% (36.8%) Thiamin 74% (18.5%) Riboflavin 21% (5.3%) Niacin 84% (21%) Folate 110% (27.5%) Phosphorous 99% (24.8%) Potassium 109% (27.3%) Zinc 47% (11.8%) Magnesium 108% (27%) Copper 125% (31.3%)

Interesting Facts
Although korma is an Indian/Pakistani dish, its silky texture shows a distinctly Persian influence. Korma is a form of curry and curry is an older English word for a stew.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|140

Smoked Shepherd’s Pie
Type: Main Dish Time to Prepare: 75 minutes Serves: 4

6 red potatoes, chopped 2 tsp. oil ¼ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper 1 onion, diced

Ingredients

Option: 2 tbsp. of vegan margarine
3 carrots, diced 3 cloves of garlic, minced 1 tsp. oil 2 tbsp. flour 2 cups peas 1/8 tsp. salt Paprika for garnish ¼ cup water

Instructions

Light the grill. Chop the potatoes. Toss them in oil and salt. Wrap them in foil and pierce the foil with a fork several times. Place the potatoes just off center on the grill and roast them on the grill for 30 to 45 minutes, until they are soft. Dice the onion and carrot. Mince the garlic. In a pot or wok, sauté the onion with the oil over a medium heat until the onion starts to brown. Add the carrot and continue to sauté this for another 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté this for another minute. Add the flour and stir, sautéing it for another minute. Slowly stir the water into the pot, creating a thick gravy.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|141

Remove this from the heat and immediately stir in the peas and salt. Once the potatoes are done, mash them with ¼ tsp. of pepper and any optional margarine. Separate the onion, carrot, and pea mix into a baking dish. Spread the mashed potatoes over the mix. Sprinkle paprika on top. Bake the shepherd’s pie on 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|142

Low-fat Version
Omit the oil when sautéing the onion, allowing the onion to brown in a dry pan. Once the onion has browned, add a thin layer of water and then the carrots and garlic.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Foil Fork Knife Cutting Board Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Pot or Wok Stirring Spoon Baking Dish Mixing Bowl Potato Masher

Presentation
I prefer using a glass baking dish so the entirety of the shepherd’s pie is visible. Once you are ready to serve it, garnish it with cayenne pepper or paprika.

Time Management
Make the onion, carrot, and pea filling while the potatoes are smoking on the grill. You can save time by not baking the pie. The top won’t be crispy, but that’s all you’ll be giving up.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|143

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of toasted sourdough bread rubbed with garlic.

Where to Shop
All the ingredients are readily available. Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.

How It Works
Browning the onion creates a strong base for the thick gravy which binds all the ingredients for the filling together. Carrot is used for color and sweetness and peas for texture. The foil is pierced to allow smoke to get into the foil packet containing the potatoes. The potatoes are tossed in oil so that they remain hydrated on the grill.

Chef’s Notes
You can use the first part of this recipe to make smoked mashed potatoes, which can be topped with crispy sage and smoked paprika.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2027.9 (507.0) Calories from Fat 139.1 (34.8) Fat 15.5g (3.9g) Total Carbohydrates 413.4g (103.4g) Dietary Fiber 64.2g (16.1g) Sugars 37.7g (9.4g) Protein 58.8g (14.7g) Salt 1088mg (272mg) Vitamin A 659% (164.8%) Vitamin B6 312% (78%) Calcium 41% (10.3%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|144

Vitamin C 723% (180.8%)

Iron 113% (28.3%) Thiamin 156% (39%) Riboflavin 69% (17.3%) Niacin 137% (34.3%) Folate 105% (26.3%) Phosphorous 152% (38%) Potassium 268% (67%) Zinc 66% (16.5%) Magnesium 142% (35.5%) Copper 114% (28.5%)

Interesting Facts
Early versions of shepherd’s pie lined the baking dish with mashed potatoes, not just the top of the pie.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|145

Smoked Tapenade
Type: Condiment Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 1

¼ cup of whole green pitted olives ¼ cup of whole oil cured black olives 1 clove of garlic 2 tbsp. of capers 3 fresh basil leaves Juice of 1 lemon 2 tbsp. of olive oil

Ingredients

Instructions

Light the grill using hickory wood as the fuel source and allow the wood to turn white at the edges. Blend together all of the ingredients until they are smooth. Wrap the mix in foil. Poke tiny holes in the foil with a fork. Place this on the edge of the grill rack and close the grill lid. Leave this on the grill for 20 minutes. Remove it from the grill, unwrap it, and it is ready to use.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|146

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Blender or Food Processor Measuring Cup Foil Measuring Spoon

Presentation
If you serve this on the side instead of mixed into a finished dish, place it in a very small dish with a serving spoon on the side. A little bit goes a very long way.

Time Management
If you don’t want to smoke the tapenade, you can use smoked salt in the recipe or make a spicy

version using chipotle powder, which is a smoked chili powder.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This goes great on flatbread, mixed with pasta, or as a garnish for a larger veggie like eggplant and many squashes. It’s also a nice topping for pizza!

Where to Shop
Although olives are fairly common, you’ll get a good selection at a market with an olive bar. The best olive bar I’ve seen is at Central Market, but you can also find a good one at Whole Foods. Trader Joe’s has a nice selection of jarred olives and Fresh and Easy has a good price on both green and oil cured black olives. Make sure to read the labels wherever you are as black olives are sometimes cured in lactic acid derived from milk.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|147

How It Works
Mixing the two types of olives creates a complex flavor enhanced by the fresh aroma of the basil

and brightened by the lemon juice. The garlic gives it bite while the olive oil smoothes everything. The capers add a super salty, briny taste. This is a recipe that should be used in small doses!

Chef’s Notes
I had my first tapenade at Olives in Las Vegas and the chef made sure to bring out a vegan version for me as traditional tapenades contain anchovies.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options, this has a lot of fat and salt, but is meant to be eaten in small doses)
Calories 514 Fat 42g Total Carbohydrates 30g Dietary Fiber 6g Sugars 1g Protein 4g Salt 5697mg Vitamin A 20% Vitamin B6 5% Vitamin C 50% Calcium 24% Iron 50% Thiamin 2% Riboflavin 16% Niacin 6% Folate 11% Phosphorous 2%
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|148

Calories from Fat 378

Potassium 4% Zinc 4% Magnesium 16% Copper 52%%

Interesting Facts
Tapenades were originally made solely from capers aged in olive oil.

The word tapenade is not derived from the olive, but from the Provencal word for caper, “tapeno.”

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|149

Smoked Cherry Tapenade
Type: Condiment Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: (makes 1 small dip/spread)

¾ cup of red cherries with pits Hickory chips ¼ tsp. salt 1½ tsp. chopped basil + a few leaves for presentation 1 tsp. white wine vinegar ½ tsp. freshly ground nutmeg ½ tsp. freshly grated ginger

Ingredients

Instructions

Soak some hickory chips.

Start a BBQ grill and add the hickory chips. Put the cherries on tinfoil (but don’t wrap them up) so they don’t fall through the grill. Smoke and roast them for 10 minutes. Let them cool down and remove the pits. Chop the basil. Pulse the cherries a few times until they break apart. Mix in the basil, salt, cherries, and white wine vinegar. Mix in the nutmeg and grated ginger.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|150

Kitchen Equipment
Smoker/Grill Tinfoil Blender Grater Measuring Spoon Small Mixing Bowl

Presentation

This looks nice in a white ramekin. Sprinkle some of the chopped basil on top for a nice color contrast.

Time Management
This is a fairly easy dish to make. While the cherries are smoking and cooling down, work on getting another appetizer ready. This can be made several hours ahead of time and refrigerated.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
A Riesling goes very nicely with this. It can be spread on small slices of toasted bread and goes well with light, toasted crackers. If this is part of an appetizer spread, serve it with other gourmet type foods so that it does not become the focus of attention.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|151

Where to Shop
Try an organic foods market or higher quality market for fresh basil, fresh nutmeg, and cherries.

Sometimes, smoking chips can only be found in “outdoors” stores, although many more gourmet stores are starting to carry them.

How It Works
The short roast helps develop the sugar in the cherries while not destroying the structure of the cherry. That leaves it intact enough that it will be chopped when they are pulsed instead of pureed. Smoking the cherries adds a heady, aromatic quality to the tapenade. The nutmeg adds a fresh aromatic quality and the ginger adds a lighter flavor to the dish.

Chef’s Notes
This is a fun dish to make. It’s a bit like a dessert and smoking cherries is not usually done, which makes it interesting as well as tasty.

Nutritional Facts (does not include the options)
Calories 64 Calories from Fat 0 Fat 0g Total Carbohydrates 15g Dietary Fiber 1g Sugars 12g Protein 1g Salt 492mg Vitamin A 1% Vitamin B6 1% Vitamin C 9% Calcium 1% Iron 1%
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|152

Thiamin 1% Riboflavin 1% Niacin n/a Folate n/a Phosphorous 1% Potassium 3% Zinc n/a Magnesium 2% Copper 2%

Interesting Facts
Tapenades are traditionally made with olives. The word tapenade is derived from the word for the caper plant, tapanei. The ancestor of the tapenade came from storing capers in olive oil, which would become mushy and form a paste. That’s why the dish is named after the caper plant and not the olive plant, even though olives account for more volume in the traditional dish than capers.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|153

Smoked Walnuts with Black Beans and Corn
Type: Side Dish Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 6

1 cup walnuts 2 ears corn 2 cups cooked black beans, rinsed 1/8 tsp. salt 2 tsp. coriander seeds 1 tsp. black peppercorns ½ tsp. cumin seeds

Ingredients

Instructions

Light the grill and allow the flames to die down.

Wrap the walnuts in foil and pierce the foil several times with a fork. Place the walnuts on the coolest part of the grill and close the grill, allowing the walnuts to smoke for about 20 minutes. Cut the corn kernels off of the cob. Combine the smoked walnuts, corn, and black beans. Grind the salt, coriander seeds, peppercorns, and cumin seeds until you have a coarse spice mix. Combine this into the walnut, corn, and bean mix.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|154

Low-fat Version
Reduce the amount of walnuts used to ¼ cup and use ¼ tsp. of smoked salt instead of the 1/8 tsp. of salt called for in the recipe.

Raw Version
Use sprouted beans instead of cooked black beans.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Foil Fork Measuring Cup Knife Mixing Bowl Colander Spice Grinder or Mortar and Pestle Stirring Spoon

Presentation

This is a very hearty salad, so if you serve it in individual portions, choose small bowls.

Time Management
You can cheat by using smoked salt instead of smoking the walnuts. If you do that, the recipe only
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|155

takes about 5 minutes to make.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this alongside a dish of stuffed roasted peppers.

Where to Shop
All the ingredients are common. Approximate cost per serving is $1.00.

How It Works
The walnuts should go on the coolest part of the grill so that they absorb the smoke with a minimum of cooking. If the grill is too hot, the walnuts will burn. The spices are freshly ground to add extra flavor and are only coarsely ground for a bit of texture.

Chef’s Notes
This makes a great side salad and can also be kept in the refrigerator overnight if it is marinated in an oil and vinegar solution.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1469.0 (244.8) Fat 81.8g (13.6g) Calories from Fat 736.2 (122.7)

Total Carbohydrates 130.2g (21.7g) Dietary Fiber 46.0g (7.7g) Sugars 9.1g (1.5g) Protein 53.0g (8.8g) Salt 324mg (54mg) Vitamin A 7% (1.2%)

Vitamin B6 50% (8.3%) Vitamin C 45% (7.5%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|156

Calcium 29% (4.8%) Iron 75% (12.5%) Thiamin 96% (16%) Riboflavin 51% (8.5%) Niacin 37% (6.2%) Folate 112% (18.7%) Phosphorous 110% (18.3%) Potassium 71% (11.8%) Zinc 47% (7.8%) Magnesium 106% (17.7%) Copper 146% (24.3%)

Interesting Facts
Walnut trees are highly toxic to other trees, which is how they protect their territory.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|157

Bruschetta Sandwich
Type: Sandwich Time to Prepare: 25 minutes Serves: 4

The Eggplant 1 eggplant, sliced into 4 slabs 3 cloves garlic, minced ½ tsp. salt The White Bean Spread ½ tsp. minced rosemary leaves ½ cup cooked white (cannellini) beans, rinsed 6 sundried tomatoes, rehydrated ¼ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. ground coriander ¼ tsp. black pepper The Bread and Lettuce 8 slices sourdough bread 4 slices of red leaf lettuce Water as needed 2 tsp. sesame oil 1 tsp. freshly grated ginger

Ingredients

Instructions

Cut off the stem end of the eggplant. Slice it along the length into four pieces ½” to ¾” thick. Mince the garlic. Grate the ginger. Combine the garlic, ginger, salt, and oil together. Rub this combo onto the eggplant slabs and set them aside. Light your grill. While the flames are dying down, make the white bean spread. Mince the rosemary leaves. Rinse the beans.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|158

Rehydrate the tomatoes, soaking them in water until they are pliable. blender to turn the ingredients into a smooth paste that will spread over your bread. Set the bean spread aside. Grill the eggplant until it is soft and slightly blackened on both sides. Toast the bread on the grill for about 15 to 30 seconds per side. Spread the bean spread on 4 of the slices of bread. minutes. Place a lettuce leaf and eggplant slice on the other slices of bread and allow them to sit for about 5 Puree the rosemary, beans, sundried tomatoes, salt, coriander, and any water you need to get your

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|159

Low-fat Version
Marinate the sliced eggplant in 3 parts water and 1 part red wine for about two hours. This will keep the eggplant hydrated on the grill.

Raw Version
Rub the ginger and garlic mix onto the sliced eggplant and place a weight over it, allowing it to sit for about 3 hours. Instead of using beans, use a like amount of soaked cashews. Use flax seed crackers instead of bread.

Kitchen Equipment
Large Knife

Cutting Board Small Mixing Bowl Grill Tongs Blender Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Spatula

Presentation
I generally serve this open-faced with an extra serving of the sundried tomato white bean spread on the side.

Time Management
If you have a large enough grill, you can do the eggplant and bread at the same time. Be careful
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|160

with the bread because it toasts very quickly.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of green olives mixed with crushed red pepper and minced rosemary.

Where to Shop
Fresh & Easy has vegan whole wheat sourdough bread. The other ingredients are fairly common.

Approximate cost per serving is $1.25.

How It Works
The oil in the garlic and ginger mix keeps the eggplant hydrated by trapping moisture in it while it grills. The ginger gives the sandwich a bite. The sundried tomatoes in the bean spread give it a nice color while adding a deep, sweet, tangy flavor that accentuates the flavor of the grilled eggplant. The bread is toasted so that it crisps, which facilitates it absorbing the flavors of the bean spread on one side and the grilled eggplant on the other.

Chef’s Notes
I made this sandwich as an excuse to use the sundried tomato white bean spread!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1042.3 (260.6) Calories from Fat 167.9 (42.0) Fat 18.7g (4.7g) Total Carbohydrates 183.6g (45.9g) Dietary Fiber 29.8g (7.5g) Sugars 17.1g (4.3g) Protein 35.0g (8.8g) Salt 3656mg (914mg)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|161

Vitamin A 106% (26.5%) Vitamin B6 39% (9.8%) Vitamin C 29% (7.3%) Calcium 53% (13.3%) Iron 89% (22.3%) Thiamin 100% (25%) Niacin 75% (18.8%) Folate 159% (39.8%) Phosphorous 53% (13.3%) Potassium 70% (17.5%) Zinc 30% (7.5%) Magnesium 55% (13.8%) Copper 74% (18.5%) Riboflavin 66% (16.5%)

Interesting Facts
Bruschetta should properly be grilled, not baked in an oven.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|162

Smoked Caponata Sandwich
Type: Sandwich Time to Prepare: 45 minutes Serves: 4

2 cups of diced eggplant 1 red pepper, diced 2 stalks of celery, diced 8 green olives, diced 1 clove of garlic, minced 1 tsp. of olive oil 1 tsp. of fresh thyme leaves 1 tbsp. of capers 4 sandwich rolls 1 package of Tofurky deli slices

Ingredients

Option: Vegenaise or extra olive oil Instructions

Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Mince the garlic. Toss the eggplant in the oil. Wrap it in foil. Pierce the foil with a fork.

Dice the eggplant, pepper, celery, and green olives.

Place the eggplant foil packet on the side of the grill where it tends to be cooler. Rotate the packet every ten minutes, leaving it on the grill for 20 minutes. Once it is soft, place the eggplant and any residual liquid in a mixing bowl. Split the Tofurky slices into four sets. Add the diced veggies, minced garlic, thyme, and capers to the bowl and toss them together. Place each set with an equal amount of caponata on the buns.

moisture.

Option: Spread a bit of Vegenaise on the bottom bun or lightly dip it in olive oil for extra

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|163

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Metal Spatula to lift and rotate the foil packet Knife Cutting Board Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon

Presentation
Serve this open-faced. The caponata is full of color and it would be a shame to hide it underneath a bun.

Time Management
You can save a few minutes by cutting the ingredients while the eggplant is smoking instead of before putting it on the grill.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Try this with a small salad dressed with peppered cashews and a light balsamic vinaigrette.

Where to Shop
Most of the ingredients should be readily available. However, you may want to go to a market with an olive bar for the green olives to get the best price on them. The Tofurky slices are available at Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, and some grocery markets with the best price being at Trader Joe’s. Approximate price per serving is $3.00.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|164

How It Works

The eggplant is wrapped in foil and dressed with a touch of oil to keep it moist and also to trap in the juices which are used to infuse the caponata with extra flavor. The foil is pierced to create holes through which the smoke can enter the foil packet and permeate the eggplant. The capers are added for a shot of salt, the green olives for a mild olive flavor, the celery for a deep flavor, and the red pepper for color and sweetness.

Chef’s Notes
I like to make a big batch of the caponata and then use it in various dishes throughout the week.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 662.0 (165.5) Fat 17.4g (4.4g) Calories from Fat 156.8 (39.2)

Total Carbohydrates 107.8g (26.9g) Dietary Fiber 13.0g (3.3g) Sugars 13.3g (3.3g) Protein 18.5g (4.6g) Salt 1948mg (487mg) Vitamin A 143% (35.8%) Vitamin B6 29% (7.3%) Vitamin C 392% (98%) Calcium 31% (7.8%) Iron 40% (10%) Thiamin 52% (13%) Riboflavin 35% (8.8%) Niacin 43% (10.8%) Folate 62% (15.5%) Phosphorous 23% (5.8%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|165

Potassium 30% (7.5%) Zinc 11% (2.8%) Magnesium 22% (5.5%) Copper 25% (6.3%)

Interesting Facts
Caponata is a Sicilian recipe which is heavily influenced by Middle Eastern cuisine. common.

There is no one traditional caponata, but all traditional ones have eggplant and peppers in

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|166

Grilled Summersquash Sandwich
Type: Sandwich Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 2

2 summersquash ½ tsp. of olive oil 1/8 tsp. of salt 2 sandwich buns (focaccia rolls and ciabatta rolls work well) ½ cup of sundried tomatoes 4 green olives 1 tbsp. of pine nuts 1/8 tsp. of freshly ground pepper 2 pieces of lettuce

Ingredients

Instructions

Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Slice the summersquash along the length into ½” slices. Lightly rub them in the oil and salt. takes 5-8 minutes.) Toast each sandwich bun on the grill (this takes 30 seconds to 2 minutes depending on how hot your grill is.) Blend the sundried tomatoes, olives, and pine nuts. Spread the sundried tomato mix on the buns. Place the grilled squash and lettuce in the buns. Grill them until they are soft and just a touch blackened, making sure to rotate them (each side

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|167

Low-fat Version
Omit the pine nuts from the recipe to create a low-fat version that is under 10% in fat.

Raw Version
Instead of rubbing the summersquash in the oil and then grilling it, allow it to marinate in fresh lemon juice. Use a light seed cracker for the bread or simply make a lettuce wrap out of it using butterleaf lettuce.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Knife Cutting Board Small Blender Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup

Presentation
Serve this on a white plate or a bed of lettuce.

Time Management
Make sure to light the coals before you start anything else so the flames have a chance to die down while you work on the other parts of the recipe. If you want to save a few extra minutes, you can find sundried tomato mixes available commercially. The best one I’ve had is Trader Joe’s bruschetta mix.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|168

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of watercress salad with shredded carrots and shallots.

Where to Shop
Look in the produce section of your local market for sundried tomatoes that are not packed in oil. Of course, if you want the richer taste of the extra fat, you can use oil-packed sundried tomatoes. You may also want to head to a market that has an olive bar so you don’t have to buy an entire jar Approximate price per serving is about $2.00. of olives just for this sandwich. Summersquash is also called yellow squash and crookneck squash.

How It Works
Grilling the squash not only softens it, but gives it a slightly smoky flavor which is complimented by the dark salty flavor of the sundried tomato and olive mix. The lettuce adds a crisp, cool contrast to the rest of the sandwich.

Chef’s Notes
I generally don’t want to start my wood fire grill just for one or two sandwiches, so I’ll throw on a bunch of other goodies I want to have grilled throughout the week and then store them in the refrigerator.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 474.3 (237.2) Fat 14.0g (7.0g) Calories from Fat 126.1 (63.1)

Total Carbohydrates 69.8g (34.9g) Dietary Fiber 11.3g (5.6g) Sugars 18.4g (9.2g) Protein 17.3g (8.6g)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|169

Salt 1110mg (555mg) Vitamin A 44% (22%) Vitamin B6 29% (14.5%) Vitamin C 154% (77%) Calcium 23% (11.5%) Iron 38% (19%) Thiamin 44% (22%) Riboflavin 31% (15.5%) Niacin 37% (18.5%) Folate 50% (25%) Phosphorous 33% (16.5%) Potassium 58% (29%) Zinc 13% (6.5%) Magnesium 43% (21.5%) Copper 34% (17%)

Interesting Facts
Sundried tomatoes were originally made in Tuscany by drying sliced tomatoes on tiled rooftops.

Yellow squashes are harvested early because as they mature, the rind becomes too hard to eat.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|170

Grilled Apple & Barley Salad
Type: Salad, Low-fat Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 30 minutes +1 hour to chill

2 cups of veggie stock 1 cup of barley 2 green apples, cored 2 tbsp. of chopped parsley leaves 2 green onions, sliced Juice of 1 lemon ¼ cup of dried cranberries 2 tbsp. of slivered almonds

Ingredients

Instructions

Light the grill and allow the flames to die down. Bring the veggie stock to a boil. Add the barley and stir it. Cover the pot and reduce it to low. Cook the barley for about 25 minutes. Core the apples and slice them in half. Grill each apple for about 2 minutes on each side, just enough time for them to acquire telltale grill lines and pick up a little smoky flavor without becoming too soft. Chop the parsley. Slice the green onions. Once the barley is done cooking, add all of the ingredients to the barley and mix them together. Chill the salad for 1 hour.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|171

Raw Version
Use sprouted and soaked barley and do not grill the apples.

Kitchen Equipment
Medium-sized Pot Stirring Spoon Grill Tongs Cutting Board Knife Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon

Presentation
This looks nice served on a plate of greens with shredded carrot or a spiral-cut beet.

Time Management
This keeps for a long time, so if you like this salad, make a big batch of it and store it in the refrigerator, covered.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a lemon chamomile tea. Because the salad is heavy from the barley, consider serving it alongside a light soup.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|172

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients for this salad should be readily available. Approximate price per serving is

$2.00.

How It Works
Grilling the apples for a brief time helps them retain some substance and allows them to have a

large presence in the salad. Green apples are used because of their tartness. The lemon juice and parsley are used to brighten the salad and the cranberries give a sweet-and-sour balance to the barley.

Chef’s Notes
The grilled apple and lemon combination can be used in a variety of dishes, including some soups.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1063.0 (265.8) Fat 11.6g (2.9g) Total Carbohydrates 213.5g (53.4g) Dietary Fiber 43.3g (10.8g) Sugars 53.6g (13.4g) Protein 26.3g (6.6g) Salt 1163mg (291mg) Vitamin A 44% (11%) Vitamin B6 39% (9.8%) Vitamin C 62% (15.5%) Calcium 11% (2.8%) Iron 44% (11%) Thiamin 63% (15.8%) Riboflavin 34% (8.5%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|173

Calories from Fat 104.0 (26)

Niacin 45% (11.3%) Folate 14% (3.5%) Phosphorous 57% (14.3%) Potassium 38% (9.5%) Zinc 38% (9.5%) Magnesium 74% (18.5%) Copper 61% (15.3%)

Interesting Facts
Apples are distantly related to roses. Apple wood is a popular smoking wood.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|174

Grilled Corn and Squash Salad
Type: Salad Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 30 minutes

2 ears of corn 4 zucchini or 3 Mexican gray squash 1 tsp. of olive oil 1/8 tsp. of salt ¼ tsp. of chili powder 1 head of red leaf lettuce, chopped 8 green olives, sliced 20 smoked almonds

Ingredients

salt, ¼ tsp. of freshly ground pepper, 1/8 tsp. of ground cumin

Optional Dressing: 1 roasted red pepper, 3 tbsp. of balsamic vinegar, 1 clove of garlic, 1/8 tsp. of Option: 1 avocado, sliced Instructions

Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Grill the corn and squash.

Rub the corn and squash lightly in the olive oil, salt, and chili powder. Rotate the corn when many of the grill side kernels turn a light brown color. Rotate the squash when the grill sides start to darken, but do not allow them to blacken. Remove them from the grill and set them aside. Chop the lettuce. Slice the olives. Slice the grilled squash. Cut the kernels off of the corn.

Option: Blend all of the ingredients for the dressing together and dress each salad with it. Option: Add ¼ of a sliced avocado to each salad.

Dress each salad with the corn, squash, olives, and almonds.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|175

Low-fat Version
Omit the almonds and replace them with chopped celery or baked croutons to get back the heavier texture lost with the almonds.

Raw Version
Don’t grill the corn or the squash, but still rub them with the oil, salt, and chili powder and allow them to sit for at least an hour to absorb the flavors of the rub. You will also want to use raw almonds.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Knife Cutting Board Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I usually try to put all of the ingredients on top of the lettuce unless I am serving a lot of people, in which case I will mix them into the lettuce.

Time Management
If you want to be able to walk away from the grill and work on something else, place the corn and squash off center of the grill in the cooler areas of it. It will take longer to cook the veggies, but that allows you time to do other tasks instead of monitoring the veggies.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|176

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is a great salad to serve alongside a stuffed pepper or even just a veggie burger.

Where to Shop
Smoked almonds are becoming more common, so you may be able to find them at your local market. I usually get them at Sprouts and I’ve seen them at Central Market, Whole Foods, and most serving is $1.50. gourmet markets. The other ingredients should be relatively easy to find. Approximate price per

How It Works
Grilling the corn caramelizes the sugar in it, giving the corn a dark, sweet taste. The squash will pick up a smoky flavor which is mimicked by the smoked almonds. Those almonds are used for croutons in the salad while the olives are there for a soft, salty taste.

Chef’s Notes
This is a salad I like to make when I have some other recipes I am making that require the grill.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 673.5 (168.4) Fat 29.1g (7.3g) Total Carbohydrates 69.2g (17.3g) Dietary Fiber 22.3g (5.5g) Sugars 26.8g (6.7g) Protein 33.7g (8.4g) Salt 1133mg (283mg) Vitamin A 106% (26.5%) Vitamin B6 60% (15%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|177

Calories from Fat 261.9 (65.5)

Vitamin C 391% (97.8%) Calcium 32% (8%) Iron 54% (13.5%) Thiamin 43% (10.8%) Riboflavin 35% (8.8%) Niacin 46% (11.5%) Folate 128% (32%) Phosphorous 95% (23.8%) Potassium 122% (30.5%) Zinc 52% (13%) Magnesium 98% (24.5%) Copper 59% (14.8%)

Interesting Facts
Corn was originally just the size of a thumb, but over the thousands of years of its cultivation, it was selected by farmers to have the larger ears.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|178

Frozen Lemon-Lime Mini Fruit Molds
Type: Dessert Serves: 6 mini-molds or 1 large mold that serves 6 Time to Prepare: 15 minutes plus 5 hours to chill

¼ cup cornstarch 2 cups vanilla soymilk 2/3 cup granulated sugar ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons lemon and/or lime juice 1 ½ tablespoons lemon and/or lime zest 1 ½ teaspoons lemon extract 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ¾ cup small or sliced berries

Ingredients

Instructions

Combine the cornstarch with 3 to 4 tablespoons of the soymilk in a medium saucepan and whisk until there are no lumps. Place on medium heat and whisk in the remainder of the soymilk and all of the sugar. Cook, whisking often, for about 7 minutes, or until the mixture thickens but does not boil. Whisk vigorously as it thickens so that the mixture is smooth. Remove from heat and pour into a medium bowl. Immediately whisk in the lemon juice, lemon peel, and extracts. Whisk rapidly until the mixture is smooth with no lumps. Pour into the mold(s). Place the berries into the mold, allowing some to submerge. Freeze for 5 hours to overnight. Allow to soften for a short while before serving. Keep frozen.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia, Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts
On The Grill August 2009|179

Kitchen Equipment
Medium, Heavy-bottom Saucepan Whisk Silicone Mini-molds or Larger Mold Pan

Presentation

Garnish these with fresh mint and berries, topping the molds with the berries if the berries are small and light.

Time Management
Pay close attention while you are making the sauce as the cornstarch will quickly stick and burn to your pan if you are not whisking the mixture.

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients are fairly common. You can find a nice selection of molds at most specialty kitchen stores.

Chef’s Notes
You’ll love the cooling refreshment that these super-tangy molds provide after a grilled meal!

Interesting Facts
Most vanilla extracts contain alcohol, though natural vanilla flavoring only contain vanilla bean.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia, Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts
On The Grill August 2009|180

Grilled Rum Peaches in Phyllo
Type: Dessert Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 40 minutes + 1 hour to soak the peaches

4 peaches, cut in half with stone removed 3 tbsp. of spiced rum 1 tbsp. of almond oil (olive oil can be substituted) 8 sheets of phyllo dough ¼ cup of slivered almonds

Ingredients

Instructions

Draw your knife into a peach until you hit the stone. Run your knife through the peach and around the stone to cut the peach in half. Remove the stone (freestone peaches work best for this.) Place the peach halves in a mixing bowl. Toss them in the rum. Allow them to rest for 15 minutes. While the peaches are resting in the oil and rum, light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Grill the peaches on both sides until they develop small browned parts (this takes about 3-5 minutes per side.) Lay 4 sets of phyllo dough out, each set 2 sheets thick. Lay 2 peach halves at one end of each phyllo set. Sprinkle slivered almonds over the peaches. Fold the phyllo over the peaches and then fold the sides over to create a phyllo pouch. Place these on a baking sheet with the folded edges down. Brush the top with the left over almond oil and rum mix. Bake these on 350 degrees for 20 minutes. Add the almond oil and toss the peaches again, allowing this to rest for 45 minutes.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|181

Low-fat Version
Omit the oil from the peaches and grill them that way. Instead of brushing the phyllo with the oil and rum mix, spritz it with water.

Raw Version
Omit the rum, but add 1/8 tsp. of cinnamon and cloves to the almond oil. Allow the peaches to soak in the almond oil for a couple hours. You will also want to slice the peaches into wedges instead of halves. Take a tart dish and press a thin date and almond crust into it. Add the peach wedges and then cover with one more date and almond crust. Date and almond crust can be made by mixing a cup of fine almond meal with four or five smashed dates and a pinch of salt.

Kitchen Equipment
Mixing Bowl Knife Cutting Board Grill Tongs Baking Sheet Brush Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I add a few sprinkles of slivered almonds and a touch of cinnamon to the plate for color, but like to leave this dessert mostly ungarnished so it can speak for itself.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|182

Time Management
This is something that should be served immediately. If you must prepare it ahead of time, plan on baking it again for about ten minutes to re-crisp the phyllo dough.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This dessert gets into the gourmet realm, so plan on serving it after a fancy, grilled dinner; perhaps a risotto with grilled oyster mushrooms and saffron or ravioli stuffed with smoked squash.

Where to Shop
I generally use Captain Morgan’s spiced rum in this recipe. All of the ingredients should be readily available except for the almond oil, which you may need to head to a gourmet store or Whole Foods to purchase. Approximate price per serving is $2.50.

How It Works
Fifteen minutes is about enough time to allow most of the rum to soak into the peaches while the rest of the time is used to infuse them with the flavor of the almond oil. There is another reason this amount of time is used. It allows some of the juice from the peaches to mix with the almond oil and rum that invariably collects at the bottom of the mixing bowl. This creates a fragrant oil which is used to brush the phyllo. Grilling the peaches softens them and also gives them a hint of smokiness, creating a subtle balance of flavors in this dessert.

Chef’s Notes
I still have some almond oil infused with the peach juice and rum left-over and ready to use for something else. The amount of flavor the oil acquired was an incredibly nice surprise.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 909.5 (227.4) Fat 35.8g (8.9g) Calories from Fat 322.0 (80.5)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|183

Total Carbohydrates 128.1g (32.0g) Dietary Fiber 13.5g (3.4g) Sugars 34.4g (8.6g) Protein 18.8g (4.7g) Salt 734mg (184mg) Vitamin A 42% (10.5%) Vitamin B6 7% (1.8%) Vitamin C 43% (10.8%) Calcium 9% (2.3%) Iron 33% (8.3%) Thiamin 45% (11.3%) Riboflavin 41% (10.3%) Niacin 53% (13.3%) Folate 32% (8%) Phosphorous 25% (6.3%) Potassium 29% (7.3%) Zinc 13% (3.3%) Magnesium 26% (6.5%) Copper 30% (7.5%)

Interesting Facts
Rum is part of a long line of sugarcane based alcoholic drinks that have been fermented for several thousand years.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|184

Gnocchi in a Fire Roasted Tomato Sauce
Type: Main Dish, Low-fat Time to Prepare: 45 minutes Serves: 2

4 Roma tomatoes ¼ of a yellow onion, chopped 2 cloves of garlic, sliced ½ tsp. of olive oil 1 cup of water 1/8 tsp. of cumin ¼ tsp. of salt ¼ tsp. of crushed red pepper 1 tsp. of fresh oregano leaves 4 cups of gnocchi (about 16 oz.) 8 green olives 1/8 tsp. of freshly ground black pepper

Ingredients

Instructions

Light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Wrap the tomatoes in foil and pierce the foil liberally. Place the tomatoes on the grill and close the lid to infuse the tomatoes with smoky flavor. Rotate the tomatoes every 10 minutes, leaving them on the grill until they are soft. While they are roasting on the grill, chop the onion and slice the garlic. browned. Add the garlic and sauté this for another minute, making sure to stir everything every few seconds. Add the water and stir. Add the roasted tomatoes, cumin, salt, crushed red pepper, and oregano. Allow this to simmer for 5-10 minutes. Blend the sauce together with a food processor or blender. Dump the gnocchi in a colander, but do not rinse it. Once the sauce is blended, plate up the gnocchi and pour the sauce over it.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|185

In a medium-sized pot, sauté the onion in the olive oil over a medium heat until the onion is slightly

While the sauce is simmering, boil the gnocchi until the gnocchi floats.

Slice the olives. Dress the gnocchi with the sliced olives and pepper.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|186

Low-fat Version (no oil added)
Saute the onion and garlic in a thin layer of water instead of in the oil, replenishing the water as it evaporates.

Raw Version
Omit the onion in the sauce and reduce the amount of garlic down to one clove. For the gnocchi, take two cups of almond flour, mix in fresh pepper and salt, and then moisten it until you have can set. almond dough. Form the dough into gnocchi sized balls and refrigerate them for an hour so they

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Foil Tongs Cutting Board Knife Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Medium-sized Pot Stirring Spoon Blender or Food Processor Pot to boil the gnocchi

Presentation
Serve this on a white plate. It makes a good backdrop for the red sauce and green olives and gives the finished dish an elegant look.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|187

Time Management
If you want to save a lot of time, you can use canned fire roasted tomatoes instead of fire roasting your own.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a small salad dressed with marinated sweet peppers and more green olives.

Where to Shop
If I don’t make my own gnocchi, I head to Trader Joe’s and purchase it there. It works in a pinch and is inexpensive. You can also purchase green olives there for a good price, though they should be available just about anywhere. Approximate price per serving is $1.50.

How It Works
Piercing the foil with holes allows the smoke to permeate the tomatoes as they roast over the fire. The foil is important because it traps the tomato juices. The onion is used to sweeten the sauce and is only chopped instead of cut finer because the sauce ends up being blended. The gnocchi is not rinsed because the hot starch of the gnocchi acts as a glue that traps the sauce onto it.

Chef’s Notes
Over the last year, gnocchi has become my favorite pasta and is one of the only pastas I eat now.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1247.2 (623.6) Fat 7.4g (3.7g) Calories from Fat 66.7 (33.4)

Total Carbohydrates 268.4g (134.2g) Dietary Fiber 11.3g (5.6g) Sugars 15.6g (7.8g) Protein 26.7g (13.4g)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|188

Salt 3948mg (1974mg) Vitamin A 84% (42%) Vitamin B6 27% (13.5%) Vitamin C 165% (82.5%) Calcium 6% (3%) Iron 36% (18%) Thiamin 16% (8%) Riboflavin 12% (6%) Niacin 15% (7.5)% Folate 19% (9.5%) Phosphorous 14% (7%) Potassium 33% (16.5%) Zinc 4% (2%) Magnesium 16% (8%) Copper 22% (11%)

Interesting Facts
Before the 1500s, Italian cuisine did not include any tomatoes (tomatoes are a New World ingredient). Gnocchi means “lumps.”

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|189

Fire Roasted Salsa
Type: Condiment Time to Prepare: 30 minutes Serves: 1

4 Roma tomatoes 1 Hatch chili 1 bulb of garlic 1 tsp. of olive oil 1 chipotle ½ of a red onion ½ tsp. of salt 1tsp. of ground cumin 3 tbsp. roughly chopped cilantro leaves

Ingredients

Instructions

Light the grill. Toss the tomatoes, Hatch chili, and garlic bulb in the oil. Wrap the garlic in foil and poke holes in the foil. placed just off center. When the tomatoes and chili start to blacken, rotate them until each side is slightly blackened (they will blacken at different times, so rotate them accordingly). When the garlic bulb feels soft, remove it from the grill. Remove the stem and outer blackened skin from the chili. Dice half the chili and two of the tomatoes, setting them aside. Puree the remaining part of the chili, the other two tomatoes, the garlic, chipotle, onion, cilantro, salt, and cumin. Stir in the diced chili and tomatoes and serve. Place the tomatoes and Hatch chili directly over the hottest part of the grill with the garlic bulb

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|190

Low-fat Version
Omit the oil from the recipe and roast all the veggies in a grill pan over your grill.

Raw Version
Blend all the ingredients together, replacing the bulb of garlic with 2 cloves of garlic and replacing the chipotle with an ancho pepper.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Blender or Food Processor Knife Cutting Board Measuring Spoon

Presentation
Not applicable.

Time Management
Make sure to start your grill before you start working with any of the ingredients so the flames have a chance to die down and the grill come to the proper heat level before you put the tomatoes, chili, and garlic on the rack.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|191

Complementary Food and Drinks
This goes great with guacamole mixed with seared poblano peppers and as a topping for a veggie burger.

Where to Shop
Whole chipotles can be found at most gourmet stores and most Mexican food stores. If you can’t find them, you can use a canned chipotle. Approximate cost per serving is $2.50.

How It Works
The key to this salsa is getting the blackened bits of the tomatoes into the end result and getting the roasted garlic flavor evenly disseminated throughout. Two of the tomatoes and part of the chili are diced instead of pureed simply to add a bit of texture to the salsa.

Chef’s Notes
Salsas are easy to make, not that expensive, and are fun to experiment with.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 141.1 Calories from Fat 47.4 Fat 5.3g Total Carbohydrates 19.6g Dietary Fiber 5.9g Sugars 11.3g Protein 3.9g Salt 1184mg Vitamin A 43% Vitamin B6 21% Calcium 7%
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|192

Vitamin C 125%

Iron 6% Thiamin 12% Niacin 11% Folate 13% Phosphorous 7% Potassium 22% Zinc 6% Magnesium 12% Copper 11% Riboflavin 6%

Interesting Facts
Salsa is the number one condiment in the U.S.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|193

Roasted Chili and Grilled Mango Chutney
Type: Condiment Serves: 1 Time to Prepare: 30 minutes

2 long green chiles (Hatch and Anaheim peppers work well) 1 mango ½ tsp. of black mustard seeds 1 tsp. of coriander seeds ½ tsp. of cumin seeds 1 sanaam pepper, crushed

Ingredients

Option: Substitute a dried chili Arbol for the sanaam
2 tbsp. of chopped cilantro Juice of 1 lime

Instructions

Light the grill. Slice the mango in half, avoiding the seed. Gently scoop out each half with a spoon, keeping the mango halves intact. Place the chiles on the hottest part of the grill, rotating them as their skins blacken. Place the mango on a part of the grill that has a lower heat, rotating it as it develops dark grill lines. Once the skins of the peppers have blackened, place them in a bowl and cover them for about 10 minutes. After that time, peel as much of the blackened skin off as possible, removing the stem as well. Chop the roasted peppers and mango. On a medium heat, toast the coriander seed, cumin seed, and crushed pepper for 30 seconds. Chop the cilantro and juice the lime. Combine all of the ingredients.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|194

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Saute Pan Cutting Board Knife Bowl and Towel to cover the peppers Spoon to scoop out the mango Wooden Spoon Mixing Bowl

Presentation
Make sure to save a few cuts of fresh cilantro to add to the center of the chutney. Also, the more decorative the bowl, the more festive this chutney will seem.

Time Management
Make sure to light the grill before you start anything else. If you’re good at managing time in the kitchen while your food is on the grill, you can save some time by toasting the spices while the chiles and mango slices are grilling.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This goes best with something crispy, whether that’s pappadam or corn chips.

Where to Shop
Hatch peppers should be one of the more commonly available peppers. However, if you can’t find them, see if you can get an Anaheim pepper. I picked up all of these ingredients at my local market.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|195

How It Works
Putting the peppers on the grill allows the open flame to quickly blacken the skin, separating it from

the soft pepper flesh. It also imparts a smoky flavor to them. Grilling the mango caramelizes the

sugars in the mango and, as with the peppers, imparts a smoky flavor. Toasting the spices brings their flavors to the fore. Cumin is added for depth while the black mustard seed gives an aromatic feel. Cilantro is added for a fresh, light herbal quality and lime juice is used to add moisture and for its acid to bring out the flavors of the mango and peppers.

Chef’s Notes
This is a nice variation on a traditional Indian chutney, grilling and smoking the peppers and mango

instead of adding them fresh.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 221.5 Fat 0.9g Total Carbohydrates 49.4g Dietary Fiber 6.0g Sugars 41.7g Protein 4.1g Salt 14.6mg Vitamin A 184% Vitamin B6 35% Vitamin C 702% Calcium 5% Iron 11% Thiamin 13% Riboflavin 13% Niacin 13%

Calories from Fat 7.7

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|196

Folate 16% Phosphorous 9% Potassium 24% Zinc 4% Magnesium 14% Copper 24%

Interesting Facts
Chutney is the British spelling of the word with chatni being a more proper transliteration of the Hindi. Many mango chatnis are made from unripe, green mangoes.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|197

Stuffed Red Peppers with Mexican Gray Squash
Type: Main Dish Time to Prepare: 40 minutes Serves: 4

2 red bell peppers 1 Mexican gray squash, sliced 1 tsp. of olive oil 1/8 tsp. of salt 2 cloves of garlic, minced 1 cup of rice Juice of 1 lime ¼ tsp. of coarsely ground black pepper 1 ear of corn 8 green olives, sliced 1 cup of cooked black beans, rinsed 2 tbsp. of chopped cilantro leaves

Ingredients

Option: 1 avocado, sliced Option: 1 chipotle in adobo sauce, diced Instructions

Light the grill and allow the flames to die down. Cut the peppers in half along the length. Slice the squash into ½-inch thick medallions. Toss the squash in 1 tsp. of olive oil and the salt. Grill the peppers and squash until they are slightly soft, but not mushy (the insides of the peppers do not get grilled). Mince the garlic. mixed into it. Dress the rice with the lime juice and black pepper. Slice the kernels off of the corn cob. Slice the olives. Mix the corn, olives, and beans into the rice.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|198

Cook the rice using your preferred method (boiling, steaming, or baking) with the minced garlic

Option: Add sliced avocado to each stuffed pepper. Option: Mix the diced chipotle into the rice.

Stuff each pepper with the rice, top it with a few medallions of squash, and garnish with cilantro.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|199

Raw Version
Use pulsed cauliflower for the rice. Keep the rest of the ingredients the same except for the beans, but do not grill anything. For the beans, use sprouted lentils, but only half the amount called for.

Kitchen Equipment
Knife

Cutting Board Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Grill Tongs

Presentation
I like serving this over a bed of fresh greens to give the plate some color. It serves as a simple presentation. If you want something fancier, serve this on a white plate. Make a roasted yellow tomato sauce and dab it around the plate. In the left over spaces, place dabs of cilantro tomatillo sauce. This is much harder to do, but your presentation will definitely impress.

Time Management
If you want to save a bit of time, start the coals going and then work on the rice. While the rice is cooking, slice the peppers and squash and then grill them. If you time it correctly, your squash and peppers will be done about the same time as your rice.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a salad featuring some fresh Southwestern veggies and some chopped hot peppers (serrano peppers are great for this if you like the heat.)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|200

Where to Shop
I generally get my Mexican gray squash at Sprouts, though it is also available at both gourmet stores and those that specialize in Mexican cuisine. It is sometimes called calabaza, which is really just Spanish for squash. The rest of the ingredients should be readily available. Approximate price per serving is $2.25.

How It Works
Grilling the peppers and squash to the point where they are just soft (if this were pasta, it would be called al dente) softens them enough so that they are easy to cut, but leaves their structure intact. The lime juice added to the rice keeps the dish from being too heavy. This is important because without the lime juice, the rice and beans would feel too thick for the dish. The corn is added for and protein. sweetness, color, and texture while the mix of beans and rice gives a nice balance of carbohydrates

Chef’s Notes
This dish was inspired by gallo pinto, Costa Rica’s national dish of black beans and rice.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 735.4 (183.9) Fat 11.6g (2.9g) Calories from Fat 104.7 (26.2)

Total Carbohydrates 130.1g (32.5g) Dietary Fiber 24.0g (6.0g) Sugars 15.8g (4.0g) Protein 27.6g (6.9g) Salt 972mg (243mg) Vitamin A 224% (56%)

Vitamin B6 57% (14.3%) Vitamin C 818% (204.5%) Calcium 14% (3.5%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|201

Iron 47% (11.8%) Thiamin 58% (14.5%) Riboflavin 16% (4%) Niacin 34% (8.5%) Folate 119% (29.8%) Phosphorous 49% (12.3%) Potassium 53% (13.3%) Zinc 26% (6.5%) Magnesium 62% (15.5%) Copper 43% (10.8%)

Interesting Facts
Squash, maize, and beans were typically planted together in North America. This combination, which is present in this recipe, was called “the Three Sisters.”

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|202

Red Peppers stuffed with Southwestern Rice
Type: Side Serves: 8 Time to Prepare: 30 minutes

1¾ cups water 1 cup short grain brown rice 1 tbsp. smoked paprika ½ tsp. salt 1 tsp. coriander seeds ½ tsp. freshly ground pepper ¼ cup raisins 3 tbsp. pepitas 4 large red bell peppers Cilantro for garnish 1 cup cooked black beans, rinsed

Ingredients

Instructions

Bring the water to a boil in a pot. Bring the water back to a boil. Cover the pot. Reduce the heat to low. Light the grill. Cook the rice for 20 minutes.

Add the rice, paprika, salt, coriander seeds, and pepper.

While the rice is cooking, slice the red bell peppers in half along the length (one side will have the stem). Remove as many seeds as possible. Grill the peppers on both the cut and open sides over the hottest part of the grill for 3-5 minutes per side, then set them aside. Stuff each pepper half with the rice. Garnish them with cilantro.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|203

Once the rice is done, add stir the raisins and pepitas into it.

Raw Version
Use coarsely ground cauliflower for the rice, mixing it with Hungarian sweet paprika, the raisins, pepitas, salt, pepper, and 1 tsp. of ground coriander seeds. Allow the mix to sit for about 20 minutes before stuffing the halved peppers.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill

Tongs Knife Cutting Board Pot with Lid Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Stirring Spoon

Presentation
Garnish the plate with extra pepitas and cilantro and, if you are feeling industrious, drizzle the plate with a golden raisin and yellow tomato reduction.

Time Management
Utilize the time while the rice cooks to grill the peppers and do some clean up. Alternatively, you can use that time to grill ingredients for other meals or accompanying dishes.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Follow this with a dessert of coffee flavored soy ice cream topped with toasted pepitas and a sprinkle of cayenne pepper.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|204

Where to Shop
Smoked paprika can be found jarred at most stores, but can be rather expensive. I generally buy

mine at a local spice store, where I pay about half the price as I do for the jarred paprika. Golden raisins and pepitas can be found in the bulk section at Sprouts, Whole Foods, and Central Market. Approximate cost per serving is $1.00.

How It Works
Rice greatly cuts the flavor of spices which is why so much is used in the recipe. This also allows the rice to be flavorful enough to compete with the grilled peppers. Raisins are used for sweetness and pepitas are used for color and texture. Both are added after the rice has cooked so they can maintain their original texture.

Chef’s Notes
This is a variation on a stuffed poblano that I did for a class several years ago and served as a

great introduction to vegan cuisine for the students.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1316 (165) Fat 19g (2.5g) Calories from Fat 172 (22)

Total Carbohydrates 247g (31g) Dietary Fiber 33g (4g) Sugars 20g (2.5g) Protein 41g (5g) Salt 998mg (125mg) Vitamin A 298% (37%) Vitamin B6 48% (6%) Calcium 12% (1.5%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|205

Vitamin C 1508% (188%)

Iron 75% (9%) Thiamin 100% (12.5%) Riboflavin 38% (5%) Niacin 68% (8.5%) Folate 97% (12%) Phosphorous 120% (15%) Potassium 107% (14%) Zinc 54% (7%) Magnesium 148% (19%) Copper 71% (9%)

Interesting Facts
Some raisins are treated with sulfur dioxide to alter their color.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|206

Summer Risotto with Grilled Lemons
Type: Main Dish Time to Prepare: 40 minutes Serves: 4

1 leek, sliced 2 cloves of garlic, minced 2 lemons, sliced 10-12 stalks of asparagus 1 tsp. of olive oil 1/8 tsp. of salt 1tsp. of olive oil 2 cups of Arborio rice ¼ cup of white wine 4-5 cups of veggie broth ½ tsp. of salt 2 tbsp. of slivered almonds

Ingredients

Instructions

Clean the leek thoroughly. Slice it into thin strips. Mince the garlic. Slice the lemons. Light the grill. Grill the asparagus until it is lightly browned and still just a bit crunchy. Grill the lemons until both sides are heavily browned and caramelized. Set them aside. Over a medium heat, sauté the leeks in 1 tsp. of olive oil until the leeks are soft. Add the rice and toast the rice for about 5 minutes. Warm the wine and veggie broth together while the rice is toasting. almost absorbed. Continue this until the rice is al dente, but not completely soft.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|207

Toss the lemons and asparagus in the 1 tsp. of oil and 1/8 tsp. of salt.

Ladle in the liquid 1 cup at a time, slowly and consistently stirring the rice until each cup of liquid is

Stir the salt and almonds into the risotto. Chop the asparagus. Stir the asparagus into the risotto. Top the risotto with the grilled lemons.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|208

Low-fat Version
Omit the oil from all parts of the recipe and marinate the asparagus in a light vinegar solution for about 4 hours prior to grilling to keep it hydrated and flavorful. Do not sauté the leeks before toasting the rice, but add them when you start adding the veggie broth so they simmer with the broth.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Pot (enameled works well) Pot for the stock Measuring Cup Stirring Spoon Knife Cutting Board Wide Mixing Bowl Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I like choosing colorful plates for this dish, ones that have light colors that mimic late Spring/early Summer colors.

Time Management
The timing can be tricky, so I suggest getting the asparagus and lemons grilled before working on person works the grill.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|209

the risotto. If you can pull a partner into the recipe, one person can work on the rice while the other

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a glass of the same white wine you used to cook the risotto.

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients are fairly common, though you will get the best price on Arborio rice at Sprouts and at Trader Joe’s. Approximate cost per serving is $2.00.

How It Works
Toasting the rice with a bit of oil slows down the absorption process, allowing the rice to become creamier since it has to cook longer. By not adding all of the stock at once, the rice can be stirred more forcefully, knocking starch from the rice into the liquid, which is what makes a risotto creamy. give the risotto a lighter feel. The grilled lemons are used mostly for presentation, though they are fun to eat in small doses and

Chef’s Notes
This recipe was an excuse to use more grilled asparagus, one of my favorite treats of the season!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1530 (382) Fat 10g (2.5g) Calories from Fat 90 (23)

Total Carbohydrates 333g (79g) Dietary Fiber 12g (3g) Sugars 3g (1g) Protein 27g (7g) Salt 1197mg (299mg) Vitamin A 49% (12%) Vitamin B6 12% (3%) Vitamin C 99% (25%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|210

Calcium 9% (2%) Iron 52% (13%) Thiamin 57% (14%) Riboflavin 21% (5%) Niacin 39% (10%) Folate 40% (10%) Phosphorous 29% (7%) Potassium 30% (7.5%) Zinc 28% (7%) Magnesium 26% (6.5%) Copper 45% (11%)

Interesting Facts
Asparagus was also known as sparrow grass, a corruption of the official term for it.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|211

Asian Fusion Bruschetta
Type: Appetizer Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 35 minutes

4 slices of 4” wide bread ½ of a Japanese eggplant 2 tsp. of sesame oil 1/8 tsp. of salt 8 cloves of roasted garlic ½ tsp. of fennel seeds 1 tsp. of sesame seeds

Ingredients

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Slice the eggplant. Mix that with the garlic cloves, salt, and fennel seeds. Toss all of that in 1 tsp. of sesame oil. Place this in a small baking pan and cover it with foil. Bake this for 25 minutes. Light the grill. Slice the bread. Brush the bread lightly with the remaining tsp. of sesame oil. When the coals are ready, grill the bread on both sides. Once the spread is done baking, load each slice of bruschetta with it.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|212

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Brush Knife Cutting Board Small Baking Dish Foil Oven Tongs

Presentation
If you want to make this look extra nice, add a sprinkle of sesame seeds to the finished bruschetta and lay a couple long cuts of green onion across the top.

Time Management
If you want to shave a bit of time off of the recipe, you can wrap the garlic, spices, and eggplant in foil and put it on the grill with the bruschetta. This has the added benefit of keeping your from becoming heated, as well!

Complementary Food and Drinks
Plum wine goes great with sesame and eggplant, so that is a natural complement for this bruschetta.

Where to Shop
Japanese eggplant is the long, thin bright purple eggplant that you see in many markets. If your

local market doesn’t carry it, a gourmet market should have it as well as any Asian market. All of the other ingredients should be easy to find.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|213

How It Works
The sesame oil adds depth to the garlic and eggplant and the fennel seeds bring out a nice, exotic

aromatic flavor. Baking these items softens them, caramelizing the natural sugars inside them and softens them so they can become a nice spread.

Chef’s Notes
I prefer toasted sesame oil with this recipe. Its incredible flavor really shines through on this one!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 337.5 (84.4) Fat 13.3g (3.3g) Total Carbohydrates 46.3g (11.6g) Dietary Fiber 4.8g (1.2g) Sugars 4.3g (1.1g) Protein 8.2g (2.1g) Salt 674mg (168.5mg) Vitamin A 2% (0.5%) Vitamin B6 15% (3.8%) Vitamin C 10% (2.5%) Calcium 12% (3%) Iron 16% (4%) Thiamin 22% (5.5%) Riboflavin 16% (4%) Niacin 19% (4.8%) Folate 22% (5.5%) Phosphorous 13% (3.3%) Potassium 10% (2.5%) Zinc 7% (1.8%) Magnesium 11% (2.8%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|214

Calories from Fat 119.3 (29.8)

Copper 11% (2.8%)

Interesting Facts
Another name for eggplant is brinjal. Eggplant is rich in both potassium and calcium.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|215

Orange Tapenade Bruschetta
Type: Appetizer Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 15 minutes

4 slices of 4” wide bread 1 tsp. of olive oil 20 green olives, pitted 10 black olives, pitted 2 tbsp. of capers 10 basil leaves 1 tbsp. of freshly squeezed orange juice 2 tsp. of olive oil 2 tsp. of orange zest

Ingredients

Instructions

Light the grill. In a food processor, combine the olives, capers, 2 tsp. of olive oil, and orange juice. Pulse this several times until you have a coarsely chopped tapenade. Slice the basil. Mix the sliced basil into the tapenade. Slice the bread. Set them on the grill and grill each side until it is toasted. These will grill quickly, so you will have to pay careful attention to them. When they are done, spread the tapenade on them. Zest the orange. Dress each bruschetta with orange zest. Brush each side lightly with olive oil.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|216

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Brush Measuring Spoon Food Processor Mixing Bowl Tongs

Presentation
Don’t cover the entire bruschetta. This allows the grill lines to show around the edges. Also, don’t mix the orange zest into the of the spread. tapenade as the brilliant orange contrasts well with the dark color

Time Management
Make sure to light the grill before starting on anything else. This will allow it to get rid of some of the heat, which keeps the bread from burning. If you want, you can make a big batch of tapenade ahead of time and then just pull small amounts from the refrigerator as you need it. Of course, it will get better as it sits.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This goes very nicely with a Chianti, blending a classy feel with the bold flavor of the bruschetta.

Where to Shop
You should be able to get all of these ingredients at a conventional market. However, you will probably pay quite a bit of money for the tapenade ingredients. For better flavor at a lower price, go somewhere that has an olive bar. They will often have capers there, too. The quality will be better, you can try different olives, and you can get the exact amount that you need.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|217

How It Works
Tapenades tend to be very intense. The orange juice in this recipe helps balance that. The zest

is there for color and also to give a burst of fresh aroma and lightness to the bruschetta. The grilled in the traditional manner in order to create a smoky, toasty flavor.

bruschetta is lightly brushed with olive oil to help guard against it drying out on the grill and it is

Chef’s Notes
This was so good, I had to make extra. Already a fan of both bruschetta and tapenades, the addition of the orange made this an instant favorite. Admittedly, I had a little help as both oranges and bruschetta are classic Tuscan ingredients.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 349.2 (87.3) Fat 17.0g (4.3g) Calories from Fat 153.3 (38.3)

Total Carbohydrates 41.1g (10.3g) Dietary Fiber 4.5g (1.1g) Sugars 6.3g (1.6g) Protein 7.9g (2.0g) Salt 3163mg (790.9mg) Vitamin A 14% (3.5%) Vitamin B6 2% (0.5%) Calcium 19% (4.8%) Iron 30% (7.5%) Thiamin 18% (4.5%) Riboflavin 13% (3.3%) Niacin 15% (3.8%) Folate 21% (5.3%) Phosphorous 8% (2%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|218

Vitamin C 17% (4.3%)

Potassium 4% (1%) Zinc 5% (1.3%) Magnesium 10% (2.5%) Copper 23% (5.8%)

Interesting Facts
Bruschetta is properly pronounced brew-skett-uh. Bruschetta is sometimes called fettunta.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|219

Fire Roasted Cauliflower with Roasted Garlic and Tomato Sauce

Type: Side Dish Time to Prepare: 40 minutes

Serves: 3

The Sauce 1 bulb garlic ½ tsp. olive oil 1 cup small yellow tomatoes ¼ tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. paprika The Cauliflower 1 head cauliflower 1 tsp. olive oil ¼ tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. black pepper

Ingredients

Instructions

Light the grill and allow the flames to die down. Drizzle olive oil over the bulb of garlic. Wrap it in foil. Rub the cauliflower in olive oil and salt. Place the garlic and cauliflower just off center of the grill. head as evenly as possible. Roast the garlic until it is soft. Separate the cauliflower into florets, chopping the larger ones into bite-size pieces. Squeeze the roasted garlic cloves out of the garlic paper. Drizzle the sauce over the cauliflower florets. Blend the roasted garlic cloves in a blender with the tomatoes, salt, paprika, and black pepper. Allow the cauliflower to roast on the grill until it starts to blacken, rotating it to cook the entire

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|220

Raw Version
Only use 2 cloves of garlic instead of a whole bulb.

Kitchen Equipment
Grill Tongs Foil Measuring Spoon Blender Knife Cutting Board

Presentation
Don’t douse the cauliflower in the sauce. This allows the nice roasted marks to show through on the cauliflower. You can load the sauce into a squeeze bottle for nice sauce lines.

Time Management
Because the temperature on a grill can vary greatly from one use to the next, stay around the grill and watch the cauliflower and garlic to make sure they don’t burn, checking them every couple of minutes and more frequently towards the end.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with lentils or rice.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|221

Where to Shop
You may need to purchase small yellow tomatoes at a gourmet store, though sometimes they are

available in large quantities at the warehouse style stores. Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.

How It Works
Roasting the garlic and cauliflower on the grill gives them both a subtle smoky flavor. Blending the

garlic with the tomatoes creates a creamy tomato sauce which sticks to the cauliflower. Yellow tomatoes are used for color.

Chef’s Notes
Don’t taste the sauce too much before serving it or else you may find yourself eating all the sauce before it even hits the cauliflower!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 327 (109) Fat 7g (2g) Total Carbohydrates 49g (16g) Dietary Fiber 15g (5g) Sugars 14g (5g) Protein 17g (6g) Salt 1157mg (386mg) Vitamin A 1% (n/a) Vitamin B6 88% (29%) Vitamin C 484% (161%) Calcium 13% (4%) Iron 17% (6%) Thiamin 29% (10%) Riboflavin 24% (8%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|222

Calories from Fat 63 (21)

Niacin 44% (15%) Folate 91% (30%) Phosphorous 35% (12%) Potassium 91% (30%) Zinc 12% (4%) Magnesium 25% (8%) Copper 21% (7%)

Interesting Facts
The white head of cauliflower is sometimes called the white curd.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick
On The Grill August 2009|223

Tasty Marinated Tofu Fingers with Spicy Peanut Sauce
Type: Snack /Main Time to Prepare: 55 min Serves: 10

Ingredients
Marinated Tofu 1/3 cup plus 1 tbsp. rice vinegar 1/3 cup light brown sugar 1/2 tsp. soy sauce 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 1 pound extra firm tofu cut into 10 thick fingers Spicy Peanut Sauce 1/3 cup organic unsalted crunchy peanut butter 3 tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3 tbsp. maple syrup 1 tbsp. water 1/4 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. hot sauce

Instructions
Making the Marinade Combine the vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, and crushed red pepper flakes in a 1-quart saucepan. Gently warm over medium heat until the sugar is dissolved. Pour into a shallow baking dish and add the tofu fingers. Marinate for 8 to 12 hours, turning several times. Insert the wooden skewers deeply into the tofu fingers, and grill the fingers on the barbecue for about 5 to 8 minutes, turning frequently to avoid burning. Making the Peanut Sauce
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr Flavor
On The Grill August 2009|224

Combine all the sauce ingredients in a bowl and stir with a wire whisk until smooth and creamy. Serve the tofu fingers with the sauce on the side. Making the Tofu Fingers Rub the tofu fingers in oil and lightly salt them. Pierce them through the length with the skewers. Grill them until they develop light grill lines on opposite sides. Option for Baking Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Do not use the skewers. Arrange the tofu fingers on a lightly oiled baking sheet and bake them for about 20 minutes.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr Flavor
On The Grill August 2009|225

Kitchen Equipment
1-quart saucepan Wire whisk Medium Bowl Knife and cutting board Measuring cups Measuring spoons Oven Tongs 10 Skewers

Complementary Food and Drinks
Vegan Beer or Wine Dr Flavor Super Island Chiller Nice bottle of Alkaline water

Where to Shop
All the ingredients can be found in your favorite natural or general grocery store.

Chef’s Notes
Marinated tofu and a vibrant peanut sauce were destined to meet as a great starter, perfect for any occasion. Prepare the sauce and marinate the tofu a day ahead so all that's needed is a quick sizzle on the barbecue or a brief warming in the oven. In addition to a dipping sauce, the spicy peanut sauce doubles as a tasty dressing for a salad or steamed vegetables. The sauce can be prepared up to three days in advance.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr Flavor
On The Grill August 2009|226

Interesting Facts
Tofu history in Western world - In 1603, the Spanish dictionary Vocabulario da Lingoa de Lapam was the first European document with reference to the word "tofu.” Domingo Fernandez
de Navarrete described in his book A Collection of Voyages and Travels how tofu was made. The first English reference to tofu was in 1704, when Navarrete's book was published in English.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Mayra a.k.a Dr Flavor
On The Grill August 2009|227

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful