The Weekender 11-07-2012 | Anheuser Busch Brands | Leisure

MODERN AMERICAN CUISINE

NATIONALLY
RECOGNIZED
EXECUTIVE CHEF
GUY CICCONE
NOWOPEN Open Tues-Sat at 4pm • Rt. 435, Blue Shutters Rd, Elmhurst • (570)842-9497 • www.theblueshutters.com
Follow Us On Facebook
MOTIONLESS IN
WHITE BACK IN
STROUDSBURG, P. 17
TWO FILMS
TACKLE
BULLYING, P. 26
VOL.19 ISSUE 52 NOVEMBER 7-13 2012 • THEWEEKENDER.COM
weekender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*
FROM NEPA TO PLAYBOY’S MISS NOVEMBER
NEXT DooR
PLAYMATE
THE
VOL.19 ISSUE 52 NOVEMBER 7-13 2012 • VOL.19 ISSUE 52 NOVEMBER 7-13 2012 • THEWEEKE K NDER.COM THEWEEKE K NDER.COM
S N S NEPA’S S NNNNNN AAAA PP EE NNNNNN PPAAA PA N ’S N NEPA’S Noo. 1 AAR ARTS TS TTS TS TSS TS TT && && TT NT NT NT NT NTTT RRRRTTTTA TA AA TA AAAA TA AAA TTAAA TA TAA NNNNNMMM NTTTTTT NT NT NTTTTTTTTTTT NTTTTTTT FF FFFFF FFFFFRR WWWWWWWWW KKLY LY LYY LY 1 AAARTSSS &&&& NN AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA NNNNNNNNNNNNMMMMMMMMMM NNNNNNNNNNN RRRR W KKLLY L SSSSSSSSSS TTA TA TTTA TA TA TA TA TA TTA TT SSSS && YYYYYY LLLLLL KKKKKKK EEEE EEEEEE WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW EEEEEEEEEE EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN EEEEEEEEEEEE MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT RRRRRRRRRRRR EEEEEEEEEEEEEEE TTTTTTTTTTTT NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN EEEEEE TTTTTTTT && TTT RRRR AAAAAAA 11 . 1 KKKKKK RRRRE RE RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR RRR RRRRRRRRR &&& WWWWWWWW SSS . 1 AAR ARRTS TS TS TS TS TS TS TSSSSSSSSS && && &&& EEEEE EEENT NT NTT NT NT NNT NT NT NT NT NT N ER ER ER ER ER ER ER ER ER ER ER ERRRRRRRRRRRRRTA TA TA TA TA TA TA TA TA TA TA TA TA TA TTA TA TA AA TA TA TA TA TAA TA A TA TA AA TAAAAAAAAAAIN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN INNN INN IN IN INNN IIIN IIIIIIN IIN IN IN IIINNN IN INN IN IIIINNNN INN IINNNME ME MME ME ME ME MMME MMME MMME MME MME ME ME ME MMME ME MMMMMMMEE MME MEE MMM NT NT NT NNNT NT NT NT NT NT NT NT NNNNNT NT NT NNT NT NNNNNNNT NT NT NNNNN FFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFRE RRE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE REE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RRRE RRRRRRE RRRRE RE RRRRRRRE RE RE REE REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE WE WWE WE WWE WEEEE WE W EK EK EK EKK E LY LY LY LY LYY LY
00000000000 SSSSS WWWWWW YYYYYYYYY 0 S MORE THAN 1772 THAN 1 ORE THAN WWWWW KKKKKKLY LY LY LY LLLY LLLY LY LY LY LY LY LY LLY LLY LLY LY LLLLL 0 A AAAA AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA M 00 WWW 00 000 MORE THAN 1 MORE THAN 17722, 2,,00 00 00 00 00 00 00 000000000000000000 RE RE RE RE RE REE RE RE RE RE REEAD AD AD AD AD AD AD AD AD AD AD AD AD A ER ER ER ERR ER ER ER EER ERRRSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS WE WE WE WWWE WE WE WE WE WE WWE WE WWEEK EK EK EK EK EK EKK EK EKK EKKKK EKLY LY LY LY LY LY LY YY LY LLLLY LYY LY LY LY LY LY LY LLLY LY LY LLY LY******
P
A
G
E
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
staff
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Marie Burrell, Kait Burrier, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Stephanie DeBalko,
Janelle Engle, Tim Hlivia, Michael Irwin, Amy Longsdorf, Matt Morgis, Kacy Muir, Ryan O’Malley, Jason Riedmiller, Lisa
Schaeffer, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Estella Sweet, Bill Thomas, Noelle Vetrosky
Interns
Megan Lange • Bill Rigotti • Tom Taraszewski • Jolisa Tokar
Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
Fax 570.831.7375
E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com
Online theweekender.com • myspace.com/weekender93 • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Twitter: @wkdr
Circulation
The Weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania.
For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7398 • To place a classified ad call 570.829.7130
Editorial policy
The Weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
The opinions of independent contributors of the weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff.
Rating system
WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable
* Scarborough Research
John Popko
General manager • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
“My mom would probably find it
funny. My dad, if he were alive,
not so much.”
Kieran Inglis
Account executive • 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
“I’d go under the name Mike
Honcho. They’d never know.”
Amanda Dittmar
Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401
adittmar@theweekender.com
“I think she would pull out a Bible
and attempt an exorcism.”
Mike Golubiewski
Production editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
“At this point, I don’t think they
would care. And, besides, if it
pays $$$, I’m in.”
Rich Howells
Editor • 570.829.7132
rhowells@theweekender.com
“That’s nice. Now don’t tell your
grandmother.”
Chris Hughes
Staff Writer • 570.831.7322
chughes@theweekender.com
“I. Have. No. Son!”
How would your parents react if you
posed for Playboy/Playgirl?
Tell @wkdr your
parents’ reaction
if you posed for
Playboy/Playgirl.
social
Hurricane Sandy @hurricannesandy
Online comment
of the week.
“IF UR HAVING WEATHER
PROBLEMS I FEEL BAD
FOR YOU SON I GOT
99MPH WINDS AND IMA
GIVE YOU SOME.”
The Weekender has 10,341
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
Letter from the editor
If I could go back in time and
tell 15-year-old me that I would
some day be casually chatting
with a Playboy Playmate on the
phone, I don’t know how I’d react
exactly, but I can tell you that it
would involve a lot of laughing
and a lot of questions about time
travel.
It’s funny where life can take
you, as our cover girl Britany
Nola can attest. A Hawley resi-
dent just three years ago, she’s
now on the centerfold of the big-
gest adult magazine of all time. I
wonder if 15-year-old Britany
would also be laughing in dis-
belief.
Whether you’re a model or a
writer or a band like Motionless
In White, also featured in this
issue as they head out on their
first headlining U.S. tour, it’s clear
that you can do anything you want
if you’re willing to put the time
and effort in. Some of it may be
chance, sure, but hard work gets
recognized eventually no matter
what profession you choose.
Whether it’s NEPA or LA, do
what you love and success will
find you. If your goal is to invent
time travel, please let me know
when that success comes. I’d like
to talk to a skinny little nerd who
could use such a message.
-Rich Howells, Weekender
Editor W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
P
A
G
E
4
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
7
4
7
4
8
2
WWW.BREWSBROTHERSBAR.COM
``W
1705 River St. 883-0444 1705 RRi SSSSSSt 8833 000444
PITTSTON
FRIDAY
SATURDAY • OPEN @ 3PM
SATURDAY NOV. 17TH
BREWS BROTHERS
Sports Bar & Grill
``W
75 Main St. 283-1300
LUZERNE
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
HARPO
OPEN @ NOON
COWBOYS VS EAGLES
OPEN @ NOON
TWO OF A KIND
ND VS BOSTON COLLEGE @8
SAT NOV. 24TH
FRIDAY
EVERY WEDNESDAY
OPEN MIC NIGHT W/ PAUL MARTIN
KARAOKE @ 9
FULL BANDS WELCOME, LAND A SHOW FOR YOUR BAND
EVERYTUESDAY
NFL
TICKET
COUNTRY NIGHT
GONE WILD
w/ DJ Crocket from Froggy 101
COORS PROMO 10-12
PENN ST VS NEBRASKA @ 3:30
ND VS BOSTON COLLEGE @ 8
DJ MIKE RILEY
ALT. ROCK BAND
‘LONDON FORCE’
HAPPY HOUR 5-7 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
2
8
6
3
0
0
P
A
G
E
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
38
REGAN SMASH
Comedy at
the Kirby
44
CHEST EXERCISES
CrossFitters raise
Barbells for Boobs
inside
Online
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
-
1
3
,
2
0
1
2
32
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
“Any Wednesday” full of
lies and laughs
only at www.theweekender.com
WATCH A TEASER FOR MOTIONLESS IN WHITE’S UPCOMING VIDEO FOR “DEVIL’S NIGHT”
COVER STORY
BRITANY NOLA … 36-37
LISTINGS
THIS JUST IN ... 7
SPEAK & SEE ... 13
CONCERTS ... 20-21
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ... 22
AGENDA ... 28, 34, 39, 48
THEATER ... 31
FITNESS … 42
MIND & BODY … 45
MUSIC
MOTIONLESS IN WHITE …17
BRUCE HORNSBY REVIEW…18
ALBUM REVIEWS ... 24
CHARTS ... 24
STAGE & SCREEN
‘BULLY’ AND ‘FAGBUG’ … 26
MOVIE REVIEW... 27
NOVEL APPROACH ... 31
RALPHIE REPORT ... 30
STARSTRUCK ... 30
ANY WEDNESDAY … 32
BRIAN REGAN … 38
WRITERS SHOWCASE … 40
MISC.
NEWS OF THE WEIRD ... 10
TECH TALK ... 16
PUZZLE ... 28
INFINITE IMPROBABILITY … 33
PET OF THE WEEK … 33
HAPPY HOUR … 40
JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT … 42
BARBELLS FOR BOOBS … 44
LIFE IS A DRAG … 47
SHOWUS SOME SKIN ... 50
WHO IS … 51
GET YOUR GAME ON … 52
SORRY MOM & DAD ... 54
MOTORHEAD ... 54
TELL US ... 55
SIGN LANGUAGE ... 57
WEEKENDER MAN ... 69
WEEKENDER MODEL ... 70
ON THE COVER
PHOTO COURTESY OF PLAYBOY
DESIGN BY AMANDA DITTMAR
VOLUME 19 • ISSUE 52
index
Nov. 7-13, 2012
TALKING DEAD
If you haven’t seen the latest
episode of AMC’s “The Walking
Dead,” then this is your spoiler
warning. Do not read further
unless you’ve seen the Nov. 4
episode “Killer Within.”
Still with us? Well, we were
heartbroken when Theodore
“T-Dog” Douglas, played by
IronE Singleton, bit the big one
(or, rather, was bitten himself) to
save his friend, Carol Peletier.
Just as his character started see-
ing some development this sea-
son, he was killed off before we
could learn more about him.
The Weekender interviewed
“The Blind Side” star in Septem-
ber before his appearance at the
Infect Scranton zombie conven-
tion, and while he couldn’t say
much about the popular show’s
third season, he did actually give
us a hint regarding his fate in the
interview:
“T-Dog’s a good guy. T-Dog
has experienced a lot of hard-
ship…comparing it to my life
story. T-Dog is one that is willing
to make the ultimate sacrifice if
it’s going to help someone else or
to better help humanity. He has a
great heart, and he’s all about
right over wrong, good over evil,”
Singleton said at the time.
During our coverage, he was
very gracious with his time and
was thrilled to meet local fans
throughout the weekend, even
getting a little muddy at the
Zombie Survivor Challenge
obstacle course in Taylor on
Sept. 22. We wish him the best of
luck in his future career.
ROCK OUT WITH
YOUR107 OUT
Following a successful show
with Sweatheart opening for The
Darkness on Oct. 20 at Terminal
5 in New York City, Scranton’s
own Brian Langan will be com-
ing home on Nov. 9 to play with
Kock 107 at The Bog (341
Adams Ave., Scranton) at 9 p.m.
Known for The Sw!ms and
Langor, Kock 107 is one of Lan-
gan’s many musical outlets,
though this band, which includes
several other local musician like
Pat Finnerty and Mike Quinn,
covers classic rock artists like
Aerosmith, Foreigner, and Thin
Lizzy.
“We’ve just seen 35 percent of
the world and now we’re coming
home for some Steamtown elec-
tric lovin’!” the band exclaimed
on Facebook. For more details,
visit facebook.com/
events/375400359208480.
SQUEAKY CLEAN
The Scranton Cultural Center
(420 N. Washington Ave., Scran-
ton) announced on Tuesday that
this month’s edition of Up &
Coming Comedy will be its first
ever clean show, featuring Fran-
kie Pace with John King on
Saturday, Nov. 10 at 8 p.m. with a
cocktail hour and music begin-
ning at 7 p.m. Tickets are $16.
Headliner Frankie Pace ap-
peared on “Saturday Night Live”
in his first national performance
and went on to appear on “Show
Offs” and “Rick Shaw’s Takeout
Theatre.” Pace has worked with
Robin Williams, Cheech and
Chong, Whoopi Goldberg, Gla-
dys Knight, and Penn and Teller
and is a regular at New York
City’s “The Comic Strip” and
“The Improvisation.”
Opener John King describes
himself as “an Army veteran,
actor, musician, substitute teach-
er, and bad credit risk,” according
to a press release, integrating
stand-up with songs and parodies
in his innovative comedic style.
W
“Walking Dead” actor IronE Singleton spent some time in Scranton in September for
the Infect Scranton zombie convention.
(Photo by Jason Riedmiller)
this just in
LATEST LOCAL NEWS
Weekender Staff | weekender@theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
8
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
9
$1.7 5 L IO N S HE AD & $2 M IL L E R HIGH L IF E
BO T T L E S . DAIL Y 8- 10PM .
M AGIC HAT BO T T L E S $2.50 DAIL Y
6 6 7 N . Riv e rS t., Plains • 822.29 9 2
riv e rstre e tjazzcafe .co m
K IT C HE N O PE N UN T IL 11P.M . E AC H DAY
HAV E Y O UR C HRIS T M AS PART Y AT T HE JAZ Z C AF E !
w w w .riv e rstre e tjazzcafe .co m
S AT URDAY S AT URDAY
FR IDAY FR IDAY
OP E N M IC
C O M E O UT & PE RF O RM !
$5.9 5 8 O Z . AN GUS BURGE R O R C HE E S E BURGE R W IT H F RIE S
TR IB U TE TO B OB TR IB U TE TO B OB
M A R L E Y & H IS M U SIC! M A R L E Y & H IS M U SIC!
G E OR G E W E SL E Y
G E OR G E W E SL E Y
A L L -STA R
A L L -STA R
B A N D
B A N D
M U SIC 10P M M U SIC 10P M
5-10 P M . F R E SH R OA STE D 5-10 P M . F R E SH R OA STE D
P R IM E R IB CU T 12 OZ. W ITH P R IM E R IB CU T 12 OZ. W ITH
P OTA TO & V E G E TA B L E $12.95 P OTA TO & V E G E TA B L E $12.95
W EDN ESDAY
W EDN ESDAY
THUR SDAY THUR SDAY
FLUX C A P A C IT O R
FLUX C A P A C IT O R
O N E O F T HE HO T T E S T N E W BAN DS T O HIT T HE S T AGE AT T HE JAZ Z
W W W .F L UX C APAC IT O RBAN D.C O M • L O W C O V E R/ F RE E W IT H C O L L E GE ID
$5.9 5 JAZ Z F AM O US BO N E L E S S W IN GS
FR IDAY
FR IDAY
GRE AT DO UBL E BIL L ! M US IC AT 10PM ! L O W C O V E R!
5- 10 PM : 14 O Z . L O BS T E R T AIL W IT H PO T AT O , S L AW & V E GE T ABL E $19 .9 9
T HE E N DS O F T HE E ART H m e e ts
O L ’ C ABBAGE
2
5
8
8
8
4
570 Union St., Luzerne • 570-283-9382 • Formerly Exit 6
inside the Luzerne shopping center - between Allstate and Big Lots
ONLY 1 MIN
OFF EXIT 6 OF CROSSVALLEY WITH PLENTY
OF PARKING
OPEN DAILY @ 4 P.M. AND NOON ON SUNDAY
FREE PIZZA ON US WHEN YOU RESERVE ONE OF OUR GINORMOUS TABLES (UP TO 20 PPL) FOR
YOUR BIRTHDAY/BACHELORETTE PARTY! CALL 570-283-9382 FOR INFO
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
MONDAY
SUNDAY
TUESDAY
$1.50 MILLER
LITE PINTS 9-11 P.M.
35¢ WINGS
$4.99 DOZ. CLAMS
$1 DOM DRAFTS • $1.50 IMPORT DRAFTS
$1.50 FLAVORED VODKA
$2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES
$2 CHERRY BOMBS/TIC TACS/
PINNACLE WHIPPED VODKA
HAPPY HOUR 9-11
$1.50 DOM. PINTS
$2 DOM. BTLS.
$2.50 CHERRY BOMBS
ANDTICTACS
$3 IMPORT BTLS.
WHAT’S GOIN ON DUO
EVERY THURSDAY 10-12
HAPPY HOUR 9-11 P.M.
$1.50 DOM. PINTS • $1.50 DOM. PINTS
$2 DOM. BTLS. • $2.50 CHERRY BOMBS AND
TICTACS • $3 IMPORT BTLS.
OPEN AT NOONWITH NFLTICKET
HAPPY HOUR 3-5,$1.50 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS ALL DAY
35¢ WINGS
$4.50 1/2 TRAY
$8 FULLTRAY PIZZA
$2 BOTTLES. 9-11PM
$2 MILLER LITE
BOTTLES
7
4
7
0
9
4
P
A
G
E
1
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
SENUNAS’
Bar &
Grill
133 N. Main St., W.-B. • (Right across from King’s College)
KITCHEN OPEN MON.-SAT. 11AM-2PM/5PM-11PM
HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS
$2.00
$2.00
$3.00
$2.00
$2.25
$1.00
BUD LIGHT, LAGER
MILLER LITE BOTTLES
CHERRY/GRAPE
TIC TAC BOMBS
JAGERBOMBS
MILLER, COORS LIGHT
BUD LIGHT OR LAGER
PINTS
AMSTEL LIGHT
BOTTLES, HEINEKEN
MILLER, COORS LIGHT
BUD LIGHT OR LAGER DRAFTS
EVERY THURS. 10-12
22 OZ. BUD LIGHT PLATINUMS
$3.25 ALL THE TIME
WED. NIGHT — BIG FREAKIN’ BEER
NIGHT. MILLER LITE/COORS LIGHT
40s — $5.00
HAPPY
HOUR
Mon., Tues. &
Wed. 9-11
Thurs., Fri. &
Sat. 10-12
FRIDAY
5-7 &
10-12 P.M.
FRIDAY
AUDIO
AFFAIR
Coors Light
16 oz. $2
SATURDAY
DJ KING B
Miller Lite
16 oz. $2
M—Miller Lite $2, 5-12
T—Bud Light, $2, 5-12
W—B.F.B. NIGHT
F—Coors Light $2, 5-12
S—Miller Lite, $2, 5-12
SUZE
THE NIGHT BEFORE
THANKSGIVING
THURSDAY NIGHT
WING NIGHT!
NFL TICKET
FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS!
OZ
WEDNESDAY
BEER PONG
AT 9:30
BEER &
DRINK SPECIALS
OSTRICH
HAT
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
MONDAY
$7 BUILD YOUR OWN BURGER!
$1.50 BUD LIGHTS
$2.50 PINNACLE MIXERS
FREE JUKEBOX
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
OPEN
MIC NIGHT
COME PLAY OUR WAY!
12 Market St., Nanticoke • 570-735-2023
OPEN 4 PM MON-WED, 11AM THURS.-SAT., 12 PM ON SUN
PARKING IN REAR — DO NOT PARK ACROSS STREET — THEY WILL TOW!
Happy Hour!
MON.-FRI. 9:30-11:30 • SAT. & SUN. 5-7
$3 DRINK OF THE DAY — EVERYDAY!
NEVER
A COVER!
HAPPY HOUR 5-7
with 1/2 PRICE APPS
and $4 BOMBS
1/2 PRICE APPS.
9:30-
1:30
FOOTBALL SUNDAY
NFL TICKET!
WATCH ALL THE GAMES ON OUR
12 TVs! $5 DOZ. WINGS &
$5 ROUND PIE (IHO)
T H E V ID E O G A M E ST O R E
BUY-S E L L -T RAD E
VIDEO GA M ES,
SYSTEM S & LP RECO RDS
PS1 & 2,XBox,N intendo,Sega,A tari,Coleco,Vectrex,
Gam eboy,Genesis,Etc.A lso Buying DVDs,VHS & CDs
M o n day - Satu rday
12 P M - 6 P M
28 S.M ain St.,W B • 822-9929
N ext to G allery o f So u n d
1150 S.M ain A v e.
Scran to n • 941-9908
news of the weird
STRANGE CRIME STORIES & MORE
Chuck Shepherd | Weekender Wire Services
DISGRACED, NOT
CONTRITE
Chutzpah! The former police
chief of Bell, Calif., Randy
Adams, had resigned in disgrace
after prosecutors charged eight
other city officials with looting
the municipal budget. Adams
had been recruited by the alleged
miscreants (at a sweetheart salary
twice what he made as police
chief of much larger Glendale),
and his resignation left him with
a generous state pension of
$240,000 a year. Rather than
quietly accept the payout, Adams
immediately appealed to a state
pension panel, claiming that his
one inexplicably rich year in Bell
had actually upped his pension to
$510,000 a year. In September,
with a straight face, Adams
pleaded his case to the panel, but
20 times during the questioning
invoked his right not to incrimi-
nate himself.
DOCS JUST WANT TO
HAVE FUN
A15-year-old Swedish student,
working at Malmo University
Hospital on a “practical work-
life” internship, was allowed by a
doctor to make part of the in-
cision for a cesarean section
childbirth and to examine the
patient vaginally. One alarmed
cesarean patient alerted news
media after reading about the
orientation program in May and
wondering if she had been a
“hands-on” patient.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN
IRS agents, investigating tax-
fraud suspect Rashia Wilson, 26,
turned up “thousands” of identi-
fication numbers in a September
home search in Tampa. Wilson
had already laid down a chal-
lenge in May, when she wrote on
Facebook: “I’m Rashia, the
queen of IRS tax fraud. (I’m) a
millionaire for the record. So if
you think that indicting me will
be easy, it won’t. I promise you. I
won’t do no time, dumb (exple-
tive unpublished).” The search
also turned up a handgun, and
since Wilson is a convicted felon
(with 40 arrests), she was jailed,
and denied bail in part because of
the Facebook post.
AN APP FOR EVERYTHING
“In development” now, accord-
ing to Harvard freshman Olenka
Polak, is a “Code Red” app that
creates an exchange network so
that women and girls who find
themselves unexpectedly spotting
can locate an emergency source
for a tampon or pad.
RELIGIOUS MESSAGES
The U.S. Supreme Court has
ruled that an insane person can-
not be executed, no matter how
heinous the crime, because he
cannot understand why he was
being killed. Notwithstanding
that, Florida Judge David Glant
has ordered John Ferguson, 64, to
death for a 1978 multiple-murder
conviction, despite evaluations
from 30 doctors that Ferguson is
an insane paranoid schizophren-
ic. (At press time, the U.S. Court
of Appeals is considering Fergu-
son’s lawyers’ last-second chal-
lenge.) Judge Glant acknowl-
edges that Ferguson is delusional,
but found that he nevertheless
understands why he is being
executed. Ferguson’s belief in a
Jesus-like resurrection upon
death, with a glorious afterlife, is
not, Glant said, “so significantly
different from beliefs (that) other
Christians may hold so as to
consider it a sign of insanity.”
REAP WHAT YOU SOW
A teenager, apparently fed up
with his parents’ commandeering
of their home’s basement for an
elaborate marijuana-growing
operation, turned the couple in in
August. The Doylestown Town-
ship, Pa., couple (a chiropractor
mom and software engineer dad)
had sophisticated hardware and
18 plants.
FIRST-WORLD PROBLEMS
America now has about 700
pet “aftercare” facilities, provid-
ing funeral services to the na-
tion’s companion animals, ac-
cording to a September NBC
News report. Oakey’s, in Roa-
noke, Va., performs 800 to 900
pet cremations annually and
provides about 20 customers a
year with pet caskets, part of the
estimated $53 billion America
spends on pets (higher than the
Gross National Products of more
than 100 countries). The basic
charge of Heartland Pet Crema-
tion of St Louis is $275 for a
private cremation, including a
“basic” urn and memorial video
slideshow. (For the more upscale,
other facilities offer deluxe urns,
taxidermy, freeze-drying pets and
creating a synthetic diamond out
of pet ashes.)
CRANK CALL
Gareth Lloyd, 49, admitted that
he is the one who made about
5,800 random phone calls (over a
90-day period -- averaging 64 a
day!) to people just to listen to
their reactions when he told them
that his penis was stuck in a
household object (usually jars or
a vacuum cleaner). A Flintshire,
Wales, court sentenced Lloyd
only to probation (with restric-
tions on telephone use).
W
REGRETFUL ROBBER
Two men robbing an Open Pantry store in Madison,
Wis., in October escaped, but with less money than
they came with. The lead thief grabbed a handful of
cash that the clerk had been counting when the
pair entered. The clerk pleaded, then sternly de-
manded that the man give back the money. The
thief thought for a moment, became remorseful,
threw all the money in his pocket to the floor, and
fled. The clerk told police that when she re-counted
the money, there was $1 more than in her original
count, meaning that the thief had accidentally
tossed in a dollar of his own. W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
1
7
5
2
2
4
4
DICKSON CITY
570-344-4744
WILKES-BARRE
570-235-1484
HAZLETON
570-861-8161
SCRANTON
570-342-0123
NEPATATTOO.COM
Specializing
in ALL styles
of Electric
Tattooing
and Body
Piercing
since 1993
7
8
2
0
0
9
Mon - Sat: 3:00 pm - 2:00 am • Sun: 12:00 pm - 2:00 am
Kitchen Hours: Tues - Sat 5:00pm - 12:00am • Sun 1:00pm-10:00pm
Mon - Sat: 3:00 pm - 2:00 am • Sun: 12:00 pm - 2:00 am
Kitchen Hours: Tues - Sat 5:00pm - 12:00am • Sun 1:00pm-10:00pm
M S 3 00 2 00 S 12 00 2 00
653 North Main Street • Plains, PA 18705
(570) 822-4443
COME FOR THE FOOD...
STAY FOR THE FUN!
$1.50 MUGS ALL DAY EVERY DAY.
Tuesday
ALL YOU CAN EAT WING NIGHT $8.95
$2 Lager Pints •$2 Btls of Twisted Tea,
Labatt Blue Lt Lime & Blue Moon
Thursday
B.I.D NIGHT
$3.50 Bombs • $3 Imports • $2 Domestics
MEXICAN FIESTA NIGHT
$2.50 Corona Bottles • $4 Margaritas• $2 Fresh Tacos hard
or soft • $7 Loaded nachos w/ slow roasted pulled pork or
homemade chili • $6.50 Chicken and cheese Quesidilla
Wednesday
40¢ea Fresh Rhode Island clams w/ crackers and butter
Sunday
NFL TICKET
$2 Bud Lt Pints All Day • $2.50 Bar Pie
Game Specials - .40¢ Wings • $12.50 1/2 Tray +
12 Wings w/ bc & celery • $7.50 Bar Pie + 6 wings
Saturday
DJ BONEZ JONES STARTING AT 9:00
$4 Jungle juice • $ 1.50 dom drafts & jollyrancher shots
7
8
8
1
9
9
P
A
G
E
1
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
NEW ITEMS ON THE HAPPY HOUR MENU
$3 BOMBS AND (2) $5.00 MARTINIS ALONG
WITH $2 DRAFTS, $2.50 MIXERS, $3 WINES
AND 1/2 PRICE APPETIZERS
Hours: Mon-Sat 4 pm-Close • Sunday Booking Private Parties or Special Events
http://bartandurby.com • www.carlsbeertours.com
119 S. MAIN, W.-B. 970-9570
THURSDAY
LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR 10-12
FRIDAY
HAPPY HOUR 5-7 & 9-11
HAPPY HOUR 5-7 & 9-11
FLUTTER
FLUTTER
SATURDAY
BUILD YOUR OWN MAC-N-CHEESE STARTING AT $4.95
BURGER
BURGER
NIGHT
NIGHT
TRIVIA
A
N
D
A
N
D
WEDNESDAY
MAC & CHEESE NIGHT
MAC & CHEESE NIGHT
9:30 START. 1ST ROUND WORTH MORE POINTS. MAGIC HAT #9$2.50 AND
MALIBU DRINKS $3 THE BEST TRIVIA IN THE VALLEY WITH DJ HOT VINCE
OPENING SET OF BOB WEIR BY GENE BURKE OPENING SET OF BOB WEIR BY GENE BURKE
10 PM PLAYING MUSIC
BY OLD CROW
MEDICINE SHOW
LONG STRANGE TRIP
LONG STRANGE TRIP
10 PM
AN EVENING
OF THE DEAD
BEERFEST BUS TRIP • SUN. NOV. 18
SPLITROCK CLASSIC BEERFEST. See carlsbeertours.com for reservations
November 10
th
& 11
th
Guns - Militaria - Ammo - Knives
CONTACT EAGLE ARMS PRODUCTIONS
PHONE 610-393-3047
www.eaglearms.com
100 Moseywood Rd., Lake Harmony PA 18624
7
7
0
4
6
1 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
3
speak and see
POETIC
Barnes & Noble Booksell-
ers (421 Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-
Barre, 570.829.4352)
❏ Book Signings:
• William Ecenbarger, author of
"Kids for Cash:" Nov. 7, 7 p.m.
Barnes & Noble Wilkes-
King’s Booksellers (7 S. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700)
❏ Events/Book Clubs:
• Open Mic Night: last Tues. of
every month, 6:30 p.m.
• Writer’s Workgroup: Wyoming
Valley Wordsmiths: first/third Tues.
monthly, 7 p.m.
❏ Children’s Events:
• Weekly Sat. morning story time,
11 a.m.-noon.
Converge Gallery (140 West
Fourth St., Williamsport,
570.447.5778, convergegallery.com)
Gallery hours: Wed.-Fri. 11 a.m.-7
p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
• Spoken Word: Nov. 9, 7-9 p.m.
Open mic limited to five minutes.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500)
• Writers Group: Thurs., 7-8:30
p.m. 18+. Celebrates all types of
writing styles, formats. Join anytime.
Free. Call to register.
Lizza Studios (900 Rutter
Ave., Suite 10, Forty Fort, 570.991.6611,
betsy@lizzastudios.com)
• On display: A private collection
of work by Czech artist Colini.
Nancy K. Holmes Library
(1032 Green Ridge St., Scranton,
570.207.0764)
• Book signing, "Green Ridge"
Arcadia Images of America series
with Margo L. Azzarelli: Nov. 19,
11:30-1:30 p.m. Info: 570.346.6179
The Osterhout Free Li-
brary (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, www.osterhout.info,
570.821.1959)
• Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed.,
5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m.
• Socrates Cafe Discussion Group:
Nov. 8, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
• Rebekah Armusik author dis-
cussion: Nov. 10, 1 p.m. Free.
• Franklin Street Sleuths mystery
book discussion: Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m.
Free.
• Poetry series: Third Thurs., Nov.
20, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
Pages & Places
• Cafe Programs every Thurs.
Happy hour 6 p.m., programs 7 p.m.
(Platform Lounge at Trax in Radisson
Lackawanna Station Hotel, 700
Lackawanna Ave., Scranton)
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565, pitmem-
lib@comcast.net)
• Craftastic Kids Craft Club: 3rd
Sat. every month, 10 a.m. Grades 2-5.
Call/email to register.
• Crochet Club: Tues., 10 a.m.,
Thurs., 6 p.m. New members wel-
come.
• Kids Science Club: First Sat.
every month, 10 a.m. Grades 2-5.
Call/email to register.
• Lego Club: Meets Mondays, 4
p.m. Wait list only, call.
• Page Turners Kids Book Club:
First Thurs. every month. Grades 3-5.
• Story Time: Toddlers Tues., 10
a.m. or Wed., 1:30 p.m.; Preschool
Tues., 1:30 p.m. or Wed., 10 a.m.
Plymouth Public Library
(107 W. Main St., Plymouth,
570.779.4775)
• Looking for volunteers: Call to
sign up.
• Adult computer lessons: Daily,
call to register.
• Story Time: Mon., 11 a.m. or Wed.,
10:30 a.m. Toddlers/preschool chil-
dren.
STACKS Writing Group
Every other Tues., 6 p.m., The Ban-
shee, (320 Penn Ave., Scranton). Info:
stackswritinggroup@gmail.com
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantons-
vintagetheater.com)
• Poetry open mic: Nov. 15.
• Scranton Story Slam III: Nov. 16.
West Pittston Library (200
Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
• Book Club: First Tues., 6:45 p.m.
Free. Informal discussion of member-
selected books.
• Weekly story time for children:
Fri., 1 p.m. Free.
VISUAL
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton: 570.969.1040 or
Artistsforart.org)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m.
• Life Drawing sessions: every
Tues., 7-9 p.m. Contact ted@ted-
michalowski.com for info.
• Drawing Socials: every Sun., 6-9
p.m. $5 GA, $2 student.
• “Out of the Dark,” series of self
portraits by Lori Ryan: Nov. 1-10.
Artspace Gallery (221 Center
St., Bloomsburg, 570.784.0737, art-
space-bloomsburg.com)
Gallery Hours: Thurs.-Sat., noon-8
p.m., Sun., noon-5 p.m., or by ap-
pointment.
• “Handiwork and Play:” through
Nov. 10, ceramics and paintings of
Deb and Dave Stabley.
Blue Heron Art Gallery (121
Main St., Wyalusing, 570.746.4922,
www.blueheronart.org)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4:30
p.m. Sat. by appt.
• “Seeking The Muse-A decade of
Art at the Blue Heron Gallery:”
through Jan. 24. 22 artists. Info:
wchamber@epix.net
The Butternut Gallery &
Second Story Books (204
Church St, Montrose, 570.278.4011,
butternutgallery.com). Gallery hours:
Wed.-Sat., 11a.m.-5 p.m., Sun., 12 p.m.-4
p.m.
• “Motion and Grace: Constanti-
nos Sfikas and Deb Youngling”:
through Nov. 18.
Camerawork Gallery (Down-
stairs in the Marquis Gallery, Laundry
Building, 515 Center St., Scranton,
570.510.5028. www.camerawork-
gallery.org, rross233@aol.com) Gal-
lery hours Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.;
Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “Up Close and Personal,” pho-
tographs of Laurinda Faye Rubin:
Nov. 2-Dec. 3.
• Accepting submissions for new
shows during 2012-2013. Photography
only; all photographic methods
considered. Check out submissions
procedure on website for details.
Converge Gallery (140 W.
Fourth St., Williamsport,
570.435.7080, convergegallery.com)
• Works of Matthew Rose: Nov.
2-30.
• “Saints and Sinners” feat. works
of 14 artists: Nov. 1-Dec. 22. Opening
reception, Nov. 1, 6-10 p.m.
Hazleton Art League (225 E.
Broad St., Hazleton, hazletonar-
tleague.org)
• Call to artists for Dec. 1-30
exhibit with opening reception on
Dec. 8. Artists must bring ready-to-
hang work no larger than 18"x24" to
Art League on Nov. 23-25 from 11
a.m.-6 p.m. Membership is $25 per
year. Info: 570.817.1075, krishna-
blue13@hotmail.com
The Linder Gallery at
Keystone College (570.945.8335,
keystone.edu/lindergallery)
• “Robert Stark: Inside the Stu-
dio:” through Nov. 30.
Misericordia University (301
Lake St., Dallas, 570.674.6286)
❏ Pauly Friedman Art Gallery,
Tues.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri., 10
a.m.-5p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 1-5 p.m.
• “Form and Process: Sculpture in
Stone, Bronze and Steel”: through
Dec. 9.
❏ MacDonald Gallery, Tues.-Thurs.,
1-5 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sun., 1-5
p.m.
“Elizabeth Fulton: Giclee Land-
scape Prints”: through Dec. 9.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine St., Scranton,
www.newvisionstudio.com,
570.878.3970)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-6
p.m. and by appointment.
• “SAME: An Artistic Exploration
of Humanity and Media,” exhibit by
Mary Chappell: Nov. 2-29.
Sordoni Art Gallery (150 S.
River St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.408.4325)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun.,
noon-4:30 p.m.
• "Advancing Tradition: Twenty
Years of Printmaking at Flatbed
Press:" Nov. 13-Dec. 16

Schulman Gallery (2nd floor
of LCCC Campus Center, 1333 S.
Prospect St., Nanticoke, www.lu-
zerne.edu/schulmangallery,
570.740.0727)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5
p.m.
• Old Masters: through Nov. 22
• Annual Faculty/Alumni Exhibit:
Nov. 30-Jan. 3
Something Special (23 W.
Walnut St., Kingston, 570.288.8386)
Open Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Sat., 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
• “Impressions of a Perfect Day”
exhibit: through Nov. 9.
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantons-
vintagetheater.com)
• “Rock, Paper, Scissor:” Nov.
2-29.
W
- compiled by Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
Speaking in turn
After relaunching its Spoken Word performances in October, the
Converge Gallery (140 West 4th St., Williamsport) has announced
another night of Spoken Word to be held Nov. 9 from 7-9 p.m.
The mic is open to anyone interested in reading poetry, prose, free
style verses, dramatic reading, jokes, and more for five minutes. Sign-
ups will occur at 6:30 p.m. and the event will start at 7 p.m.
P
A
G
E
1
4
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
7
8
8
2
2
9
LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
First Friday Scranton • 11.02.12.
Photos by Jason Riedmiller • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
5
o
HAPPY HOUR
$2.50 DOM BTLS, ALL
DRAFTS, MIXERS, SHOTS
EVERYDAY 8-10 PM
APPETIZER
HAPPY HOUR
$2 OFF ALL APPS
MON-FRI 4-6
570-235-1037 • 279 South River St, Plains 18705 (located across from bakery delite)
MON - FRI: 2P.M.-2 A.M. SAT & SUN: NOON - 2 A.M.
FRIDAY SATURDAY
SUNDAY
(
SPORTS BAR
MONDAY
$1.50
LAGER PINTS
35¢ WINGS
TUESDAY
$2 SAMADAMPINTS &
SEAFOOD NIGHT .40¢
CLAMS AND SHRIMP
OPEN MIC NIGHT
W/ CHRIS ZAWATSKY
FREE POOL
$1.50
MILLER LITE PINTS
$5.00 BURGERS
SUNDAY
$1.50
COORS LIGHT
PINTS
$5.00
CHEESESTEAKS
THURSDAY
$3.00
BOMBS
$2 OFF PIZZA
BREATHING EASY
ACOUSTIC
@10
HAPPY BDAY
MIKE, PAT, AND
CURT!!!
NFL GAMES
”BEST SEATS IN TOWN”
WEDNESDAY
7
8
8
2
3
2
LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Bruce Hornsby @ F.M. Kirby Center, 11.02.12.
Photos by Jason Riedmiller
For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
1
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
...and even some 80s
ALSO ON 730 AM
7
7
9
2
7
9
tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
In times of disaster or impend-
ing disaster, technology can be a
blessing. But its benefits can be
lost in the blink of an eye, or the
click of a breaker.
Sure, we have satellites, Dop-
pler radar, high-powered comput-
er modeling and networks of
weather sensors that allow us to
see trouble brewing days before
the first cloud appears in the sky.
We have numerous ways to
quickly spread information –
television, text messaging, e-
mail, Twitter and Facebook
among others. Being able to send
information from the field during
emergencies is also a huge aid to
disaster and recovery workers –
so it’s easy to see all of the ways
that technology can be helpful
during a crisis.
Unfortunately, it’s easy to
become over reliant on the con-
venience of having all of this
information at our fingertips.
The same infrastructure that
carries all of our beloved tweets,
e-mails, phone calls, TV pro-
grams and texts is highly vul-
nerable to things like wind and
water – which, if all the reports
are to be believed, we will be
receiving in large amounts as this
goes to print.
If you lose something as fun-
damental as electrical power,
you’re immediately deprived of a
large portion of that information
– your smartphone and laptop
might hold out for a while, but
will you still have an Internet
connection? And let’s say your
smartphone can get a signal –
how long will your battery last?
If you’re someone who’s highly
dependent on technology in your
day-to-day life (and you’re prob-
ably more dependant than you
realize) having a generator is
probably a good idea, but don’t
count on having continued In-
ternet access even if you manage
to have power.
Younger people, especially,
may find their only working
radio is in their vehicle and lack
a landline phone – which might
continue operating without elec-
tricity.
The bottom line when it comes
to emergency preparedness is:
Technology is nice, but basics are
better. You still need flashlights
and candles. You still need bat-
teries and a regular radio. In an
emergency, all of the modern
conveniences are just that – con-
veniences. Use them if you have
them, but be prepared to lose
them at a moment’s notice. An
iPad can’t keep you warm, and
your Droid is next to useless if
there’s no phone or Internet con-
nection.
W
- Nick DeLorenzo is director
of interactive and new media for
The Times Leader. E-mail him
atndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
Natural disasters show us tech's limits
Tunisia Wragg, left, a staff member with New York
Assemblyman Sheldon Silver, checks a cell phone at a
charging station that the assemblyman’s office brought
to Confucius Plaza in the Chinatown neighborhood of
New York, N.Y., Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in the wake of
Superstorm Sandy.
(AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
7
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
T
he last time Scranton
metalcore outfit
Motionless In
White played a show in their
hometown, the Vans Warped
Tour was hit by a lightning
storm. Frontman Chris
Motionless has been eager to
make-up the rained out set to
local fans since, and he’ll have
the opportunity to do so during
their first U.S. headlining tour,
which stops at the Sherman
Theater (524 Main St.,
Stroudsburg) on Nov. 10.
The Weekender caught up
with the energetic singer earlier
this week to talk about the
two-month tour and their new
album, “Infamous,” which hits
stores Nov. 13 and contains
a few surprises for longtime
followers.
The Weekender: What are
you looking forward to most
about this tour?
Chris Motionless: Pretty
much just going out there
and finally headlining. We’ve
been a support tour for the
past career of our band. We’ve
headlined some shows in some
small things, but never a full
U.S. tour. We’ve headlined
other countries before we’ve
headlined America. It’s a pretty
big build-up of just wanting to
go out there and get it done and
prove our worth.
W: How did you choose the
supporting bands on this tour?
CM: Chelsea Grin has been
friends with us for quite a while
and they’re doing really great,
so we wanted to bring them
out and get them involved.
And then another band that’s
on the tour, Stick to You Guns,
I’m a personal gigantic of, so
I pushed for them. I think that
they’re definitely going to help
bring a new dynamic to the tour
because their fans are a little bit
different than our fans. Most of
them actually hate us, so I think
it will be pretty hilarious. The
other bands were suggested by
our label and management.
W: When did you start
working on the new album?
CM: We started recording it
in January, and it kind of was
like an off and on process from
January until August, actually,
because we kept having a bunch
of tours booked in between
studio dates.
W: What inspired the songs
on this record?
CM: Just a lot of my thoughts
on life in general. When
anybody asks if there’s a theme
to it, it’s just easier to say life
in general because on the last
record that we did I did a lot
of songs that were based off of
movie characters in the literary
world and whatnot. This record
I wanted to do something a
little bit more real that people
could really connect to based on
the fact that it wasn’t coming
from some sort of character.
It was coming from an actual
person.
W: How has the band’s sound
progressed?
CM: It’s really, really
different. There’re definitely
a lot of the heavier aspects of
our bands that you’ll hear. It’s
got a lot of the same s--t that
you heard on “Creatures,” just
in a different way. And then
t d t th i l d
Motionless
embrace the infamy
there’re a couple songs that are
just altogether different that
are not in any way what people
are used to our band sounding
like, but at the same time, make
perfect sense if you think about
it. It’s just a step in a bigger,
better direction. My main goal
when I was writing the music
was I didn’t want to write the
same record again.
W: Why title it “Infamous”?
CM: Just looking at our
band and trying to find a word
that really defines what we are.
I feel like more people hate
us than like us. I don’t know
if that’s true, but it certainly
seems that way on the Internet,
that we’re a pretty hated band. I
guess you kind of have to be in
some sort of spotlight to have
that many people f--king hate
you and also have that many
people like you, so it’s just a
word that really struck me.
W: It seems like you guys
kind of revel in that infamy,
though.
CM: Yeah. I like to embrace
the negative things that come
my way. There’s a lot of s--t
that does bother me and does
p--s me off. It’s definitely a big
motivator, but I can get mad at
it or I can just laugh and move
on and just use it as some sort
of motivation or fuel, and that’s
what we do. W
Motionless in White with
Chelsea Grin, Stick To Your
Guns, Upon This Dawning,
and The Witch Was Right,
Nov. 10, 7 p.m., Sherman
Theater (524 Main St.,
Stroudsburg). $15 advance,
$18 day of show.
49 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top, PA
Ristorante
(570) 474-5464
Ri t t
LIVEONSTAGE
NFLTICKET
$2 Seasonal Drafts
on Sunday
Wednesday, November 21
st
TRAFIK JAM
9pm - 1am
Saturday, November 24
th
NORTH OF 40
9pm - 1am
www.theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
1
8
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
WEDNESDAY — KARAOKE
WEDNESDAY — KARAOKE
with DJ BOUNCE
with DJ BOUNCE
ACOUSTIC TUESDAY — AARON BRUCH • $2 IMPORTS
WEDNESDAY — $1 MILLER LITE DRAFTS, 10-12
THURSDAY — $1 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS, 10-12
DRINK SPECIALS —
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY
& THURSDAY
FULL MENU AVAILABLE
‘TIL 1 A.M.
760 N. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre • 822-2154
ANYTIME SPECIALS
$1.25 LIONSHEADS
$2.50 JUMBO 25 OZ. MUGS
OF MILLER HIGH LIFE
& BUD LIGHT
LIAMS IS AVAILABLE FOR BENEFITS & PRIVATE PARTIES
Dallas American Legion
730 Memorial Hwy.
Dallas • 675-6542
Hall Rentals Available (674-2407) • Welcoming New Members
STEALING NEIL
Friday, November 9th
9:30pm-1:30am
Sunday & Monday Football Drink Specials
CASTAWAY
Saturday, November 10th
9:30pm-1:30am
MR. ROGERS
Saturday, November 17th
9:30pm-1:30am
FLAXY MORGAN
THANKSGIVING EVE
Wednesday, Nov. 21st
Signing up is EASY
LOG ON TO
ENROLL TODAYAT
WWW.CHOICEONE.ORG
Go to the virtual branch
and click on the
Self Service Tab.
STATE OF THE ART
MOBILE BANKING IS HERE!
We Make it Easy to Manage Your Finances
Access to your accounts 24/7 anywhere,
using your mobile device.
Mobile Money lets you:
• Check your account balance
• Monitor account transactions
• Transfer funds between accounts
• Direct Deposit/Payroll Deduction
• Debit/ATM/Check Card
• Pay Bills
• E-Statements
Being someone who has played
with bands like the Range, the
Noisemakers, and the Grateful
Dead, Bruce Hornsby isn’t exactly
known for being a solo artist.
Sure, the tight musicianship of
everyone he’s involved with
makes for an excellent night out,
but outside of a band setting, there
is much more going on for Horn-
sby than people realize.
He’s a gifted classical, jazz and
rock pianist who is capable of
putting in mesmerizing solo per-
formances, like he did on Nov. 2
at the F.M. Kirby Center.
Beginning the night right
around 8 p.m. with something that
may be a bit obscure to his fans –
contemporary classical material –
Hornsby made brilliant runs
through pieces like “Concerto” by
Arnold Schoenberg and “Cate-
naires” by Elliot Carter.
With the show being simply
Hornsby and his Steinway and
Sons piano, it allowed the singer-
songwriter to branch out into
some of his favorite compositions
while still appeasing the crowd
with hits, like Don Henley’s “End
of the Innocence,” which Hornsby
co-wrote in 1989.
Showing his humorous side
(which was evident throughout his
banter with the audience), Horn-
sby delivered two cuts from his
2007 musical “SCKBSTD” in-
cluding a witty “Where’s the Bat,”
and a softer “Continents Drift,”
which led into a brief snippet of
“Tie A Yellow Ribbon.”
Hornsby paid tribute to the
influence the Grateful Dead gave
him by doing an almost jug band-
like performance of his early hit
“The Valley Road,” which Horn-
sby said was “the way the Dead
did it.” Another early favorite,
“The Show Goes On,” meshed
perfectly with “Hymn In C,” a cut
from the “Red Hook Summer”
soundtrack, which Hornsby
scored for famed director Spike
Lee.
The hits had a more prominent
presence in the second half of the
set list, starting with his Top Five
fan favorite, “Mandolin Rain.”
Hornsby did a fine job of rear-
ranging “Mandolin Rain” into a
moving, almost haunting show
highlight. He then changed over
to bluegrass piano for a pleasing
take on Jimmy Martin’s “20/20
Vision (and Walking Around
Blind),” before dipping back into
his own catalogue for a splendid
“A Night on the Town.”
Calling it his favorite artist
collaboration, Hornsby delivered
what many felt was the highpoint
of the show when he performed a
poignant version of the Bonnie
Raitt classic “I Can’t Make You
Love Me.”
After the Raitt chestnut, Horn-
sby spoke about the song he’s
most known for, but also playfully
pointed out how it has become a
“go-to” for hip-hop artists recent-
ly – “Tupac Shakur had a bigger
hit with it than I did!” – before
breaking into an intimate run
through “The Way It Is” complete
with a swift classical segue in the
middle.
Again paying homage to his
Dead days, Hornsby shared a
story of a group of Deadheads
telling him that his playing sound-
ed like a spider playing the piano
between “Scarlet Begonias” and
“Fire on the Mountain,” which he
found amusing enough to write
the song “Spider Fingers.” Joking-
ly referencing parts of George
Jones shows where Jones leaves
the stage to his band to play in-
strumental music, Hornsby
breezed through Jones’ “He Stop-
ped Loving Her Today,” “The
Grand Tour,” and a rousing “Just
One More.”
Wrapping at about 10:15 p.m.,
Hornsby gave one final nod to his
days with the Dead with a moving
take on the Robert Hunter/Jerry
Garcia gem “Standing on the
Moon,” which saw the song’s
ending coda meld flawlessly into
Hornsby’s often-overlooked cut
“Halcyon Days.”
For the roughly 900 people in
attendance, the song perfectly
capped off a night of story-telling,
jokes, and elegant music which
Hornsby delivered in the most
intimate of settings.
W
Bruce Hornsby performed alone with his piano at the F.M. Kirby Center in
Wilkes-Barre Saturday night.
(Photo by Jason Riedmiller)
Hornsby shares humor, talent
R E V I E W
By Ryan O’Malley
Weekender Correspondent W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
9 7
8
8
2
6
4
P
A
G
E
2
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
concerts
ALICE C. WILTSIE
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER
700 N. Wyoming St., Hazleton
570.861.0510
www.wiltsiecenter.org
- Bret Michaels: Nov. 17, $45-
$72
- An Evening with Michael
Feinstein, “A Gershwin Holi-
day”: Nov. 24, $37-$72
- Christmas with The Celts:
Dec. 1, $20-$36
- Classic Albums Live “Led
Zeppelin, Physical Graffiti”: Jan.
26
- Fiddler on the Roof: April 17
- The Hit Men: April 27
16TH ANNUAL BRIGGS
FARMBLUESFEST
88 Old Berwick Highway,
Nescopeck
570.379.3342, briggsfarm.com
- July 12-13. $28-$90. Dis-
counts available through Jan. 1.
COVE HAVEN
ENTERTAINMENT
RESORTS
1.877.800.5380
www.CPResorts.com
- Justin Willman: Nov. 18
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
71 Public Square, Wilkes-
Barre
Phone: 570.826.1100
- Brian Regan: Nov. 10, 8 p.m.,
$39.50
- Shaolin Warriors: Nov. 14,
7:30 p.m., $45.95-$56.70
- YOUniversal Suzuki Strings:
Nov. 17, 1:30 p.m., part of
Wilkes-Barre Christmas Parade
Day.
- NEPA Philharmonic presents
“A Night in Vienna”: Nov. 17, 8
p.m., $34-$65
- Shawn Klush / The Sweet
Inspirations: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.,
$35-$75
- Paul Anka: Dec. 7, 8 p.m.,
$49.55-$138.10
- “Let it Show” feat. Phillip
Phillips, Cody Simpson, Megan
& Liz, and Chris Wallace: Dec.
9, 4 p.m., $25-$35.
- Buddy Valastro’s “Home-
made for the Holidays:” Dec. 14,
8 p.m., $25-$45
- NEPA Philharmonic: Dec. 15,
7 p.m., $34-$65
- NEPA Philharmonic: Feb. 9,
8 p.m., $34-$65
- Buddy Guy and Jonny Lang:
Feb. 23, 8 p.m., $49-$99
- Irish Tenors: March 8, 8 p.m.,
$39.50-$59.50
- America’s Got Talent: March
16, 8 p.m., $49.50-$89.50
- Bill Cosby: April 5, 8 p.m.,
$37-$75
- NEPA Philharmonic: April
12, 8 p.m., $34-$65
- NEPA Philharmonic: April
26, 8 p.m., $34-$65
- Joan Rivers: April 27, 8 p.m.,
$39-$47
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA
HOUSE
14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe
570.325.0249
mauchchunkoperahouse.com
- Claire Lynch and the Front
Porch String Band: Nov. 9, 8:30
p.m., $20
- The “The Band” Band “Last
Waltz” Celebration: Nov. 10, 7
p.m., $8 p.m.
- Start Making Sense / The
Great White Caps: Nov. 17, 8:30
p.m., $20
- Free Range Folk: Nov. 21, 7
p.m., $10
- Eric Mintel Quartet: Nov. 23,
8:30 p.m., $15
- The Funk Ark: Nov. 24, 8:30
p.m., $20
- Twelve Twenty Four: Dec. 1,
7:30 p.m., $23
- Gandalf Murphy and the
Slambovian Circus: Dec. 7, 8:30
p.m., $26
- Peek-A-Boo Revue Holiday
Spectacular: Dec. 8, 8:30 p.m.,
$23.
- Season Celebration with
Cabinet and Mike MiZ Band:
Dec. 14, 8:30 p.m., $20
- Craig Thatcher and Friends
Rockin’ Christmas: Dec. 15, 8
p.m., $23
- The Tartan Terrors: Dec. 30,
8 p.m., $28.
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
255 Highland Park Blvd.,
Wilkes-Barre Twp.
- Trans-Siberian Orchestra:
Nov. 25, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.,
$38-$58
- Disney’s Phineas and Ferb:
The Best LIVE Tour Ever: Dec.
2, 2 p.m., 5 p.m. $26-$60
- WWE Supershow: Dec. 15,
7:30 p.m. $15-$95
- Disney On Ice: 100 Years of
Magic: Jan. 16-21, TIMES VAR-
Y, $25-$55
- “The Big One: Arenacross”:
Feb. 8-10, 7 p.m., $25
- Harlem Globetrotters: Feb.
24, 3 p.m., $29-$110
- Monster Jam: March 8-10,
TIMES VARY, $34.55-$50
- Sesame Street Live: Elmo’s
Super Heroes: March 15-17,
TIMES VARY, $20.60-$40.10
MOUNT AIRY CASINO
RESORT
44 Woodland Rd., Mount
Pocono
Phone: 877.682.4791
www.mountairycasino.com
- The Trammps: Nov. 24, 8
p.m., $20-$30
- Thunder From Down Under:
Dec. 7-8, 8 p.m., $20-$30
- Jackie ‘The Joke Man’ Mar-
tling: Dec. 28, 9 p.m., $15-$20
- Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorren-
tino: Dec. 29, 10 p.m., $20.
- Sugar Heat: Dec. 30, 8 p.m.,
$10
- White Hot Dance Party: Dec.
31, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., $40
NEWVISIONS STUDIO &
GALLERY
201 Vine St., Scranton
570.878.3970
- Petal / These Elk Forever /
Shorthand / 3 to Breathe: Nov. 9,
8 p.m. $7.
- Endless Mike and The Bea-
gle Club / Down to Six / The
Feral Children / Shop Local: Nov.
17, 8 p.m. $7.
PENN’S PEAK
325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe
866.605.7325 or visit penn-
speak.com.
- Ryan Pelton: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.,
$22-$37
- Lonestar: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.,
$49.25-$65.25
- Get the Led Out, Nov. 17, 8
p.m., $31-$41.75
- Dark Star Orchestra: Nov. 21,
8 p.m., $32
- Travis Tritt: Nov. 30, 8 p.m.,
$37-$52
- Blue Oyster Cult: Dec. 7, 8
p.m., $35.75
- The Lettermen: Dec. 8, 8
p.m., $27-$42
- Ernie Haase / Signature
Sound: Dec. 9, 7 p.m., $20-$35
- Rita Coolidge: Dec. 15, 8
p.m., $19-$34
- Hollywood Nights: Dec. 28,
8 p.m., $20
- Little River Band / Fran
Cosmo: Feb. 1, 8 p.m., $27-$42
- The Pink Floyd Experience,
Feb. 15, 8 p.m., $30-$45
- Bobby Vinton: March 23, 8
p.m., $35-$50
- Southside Johnny and the
Asbury Jukes: April 19, 8 p.m.,
$22
- Tanya Tucker: May 4, 8 p.m.,
$29-$44
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
667 N. River St., Plains
Phone: 570.822.2992
- Flux Capacitor: Nov. 8, 8
p.m., $5
- The Ends of the Earth / Ol’
Cabbage: Nov. 9, 8 p.m., $5
- George Wesley All-Star Band
(Bob Marley tribute): Nov. 10, 8
p.m., $5
- Ryan Montbleau Band: Nov.
15, 8 p.m., $12
- Kung Fu / Mystery Fire: Nov.
16, 8 p.m., $10
- Floodwood: Nov. 17, 8 p.m.,
$10
- Cabinet: Nov. 21, 9 p.m., $10
- Dopapod: Nov. 23, 8 p.m.,
$10
- MIZ / Nathyn Knott: Nov. 24,
8 p.m., $8
- Popa Chubby: Nov. 30, 8
p.m., $10
- The Ends of the Earth: Dec.
1, 8 p.m., $5
- Marco Benevento Trio: Dec.
7, 8 p.m., $12
- The Manhattan Project with
Jess Miller of Lotus: Dec. 8, 8
p.m., $5
- Kyle Morgan Band: Dec. 13,
8 p.m., $5
- Mother Nature’s Sons per-
forming The Beatles’ “Revolv-
er”: Dec. 14, 8 p.m., $5
- Mystery Fire: Dec. 20, 8
p.m., $5
- Start Making Sense: Dec. 27,
$10
- Indobox: Dec. 31, 8 p.m., $15
SCRANTON COMMUNITY
CONCERTS
Mellow Theater, 501 Vine St.
Scranton
Phone: 570.955.1455, lacka-
wanna.edu, etix.com
Prices vary, student and group
rates available
- The Virgin Consort: Dec. 6, 7
p.m., $20, $15 students
- Tim Warfield’s tribute to
Shirley Scott: March 22, 8 p.m.,
$25-$30, $15 students
- The Four Freshmen: April 20,
8 p.m., $25-$30, $15 students
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
420 N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton
Phone: 888.669.8966
- Michael Smerconish “Angry
is Over Tour”: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.,
$25.50
- Froggy 101’s Guitars and
Stars 5: Nov. 27, 7 p.m., $10-$35
- Appalachian Christmas with
NEPA Philharmonic: Dec. 14, 7
p.m., $34-$65
- The Midtown Men: Jan.
18-20, times vary, $37-$57
- ‘I’ll Take Romance’ with
NEPA Philharmonic: Feb. 8, 8
p.m., $34-$65
- “The Addams Family”: Feb.
15-17, TIMES VARY, $37-$57
- “Stomp”: March 5-6, 7:30
p.m., $27.50-$47.50
- Mendelssohn and Mozart
Festival with NEPA Philharmon-
ic: March 8, 8 p.m., $34-$65
- Celtic Woman: March 19,
7:30 p.m., $59
- Listen Local featuring Grip
of the Gods: April 5, $10
- “Peter Pan”: April 5-7,
TIMES VARY, $37-$57
- Streisand Songbook with
NEPA Philharmonic: April 13, 8
p.m., $34-$65
- “Peter and the Wolf ” Cre-
scendo family concert with NE-
PA Philharmonic: April 14, 2
p.m., $9
- “Hair”: April 15-16, 7:30
p.m., $32.50-$52.50
- Listen Local featuring A
Social State: May 3, 8 p.m., $10
- Maestro at the Movies with
NEPA Philharmonic: June 8, 8
p.m., $34-$65
SHERMAN THEATER
524 Main St., Stroudsburg
Phone: 570.420.2808,
www.shermantheater.com
- Too Much Cake Dance and
DJ Party: Nov. 9, 10 p.m., $10
- Motionless in White: Nov. 10,
7 p.m., $15-$18
- Falling In Reverse: Nov. 11,
$18-$20
- Lamb of God / In Flames /
Hatebreed / Sylosis: Nov. 14, 7
p.m., $35-$38
- The Loft: Nov. 16, 8 p.m., $8
- Megadeth: Nov. 19, 8 p.m.,
$35
- Railroad Earth: Nov. 23 and
24, 8 p.m., $30 single day or $50
for two-day pass
- Vienna Boys Choir: Nov. 29,
8 p.m., $25-$45.
- Never Shout Never: Nov. 30,
8 p.m., $20
- Change: A Christmas Spec-
tacular: Dec. 9, 4 p.m., $10-$15.
- Matisyahu “Festival of
Light”: Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m., $25-
$30
- Twelve-Twenty Four: Dec. 13,
8 p.m., $22
- Patent Pending: Dec. 21, 6
p.m., $10-$12
- Edelweiss: Jan. 12, 6 p.m., $8
VINTAGE THEATER W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
1
326 Spruce St., Scranton
info@scrantonsvintagetheater.com
- EWW Yaboo / Kid Icarus / Mock Sun:
Nov. 10
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
3421 Willow St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.LOVE.222
- Nas / Ms. Lauryn Hill: Nov. 7, 8:30
p.m.
- Cody Simpson: Nov. 8, 8:30 p.m.
- Falling In Reverse / Enter Shikari / I
See Stars / Letlive: Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m.
- Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experi-
ence: Nov. 10, 8:30 p.m.
- Taking Back Sunday / Bayside /
Transit: Nov. 13 and 14, 8 p.m.
- Grace Potter & the Nocturnals / The
Stepkids: Nov. 15, 8:30 p.m.
- Yellowcard / The Wonder Years / We
Are The In Crowd / Sandlot Heroes: Nov.
16, 8 p.m.
- Kreayshawn / Rye Rye / Honey
Cocaine / Chippy Nonstop: Nov. 17, 8:30
p.m.
- A$AP Rocky / A$AP Mob / Schoolboy
Q / Danny Brown: Nov. 18, 8 p.m.
- Pauly D: Nov. 21, 8 p.m.
- Tommy Conwell and the Young
Rumblers / Bricklin: Nov. 23, 8:30 p.m.
- Lamb of God / In Flames / Hellyeah /
Sylosis: Nov. 24, 7p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT THE
TLA
334 South St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.922.1011
- Dredg / Benjamin Henderson: Nov. 8,
7 p.m.
- Yelawolf / Rittz / Trouble Andrew /
Vajra: Nov. 9, 7 p.m.
- Gary Clark, Jr. / Kat Edmonson: Nov.
10, 7 p.m.
- The Tragically Hip: Nov. 13, 7 p.m.
- Macklemore / Ryan Lewis / Dee-1 /
Xperience: Nov. 14, 7 p.m.
- Sum 41 ‘Does This Look Infected’ 10
year anniversary: Nov. 15, 7 p.m.
- The Hush Sound: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
- All Time Low / The Summer Set / Hit
the Lights, more: Nov. 17, 6 p.m.
- Kill the Noise / Birdy Nam Nam: Nov.
18, 7 p.m.
- Trash Talk / Mellowhype: Nov. 19, 7
p.m.
- LIGHTS / Arkells: Nov. 20, 7 p.m.
- Dance Gavin Dance / A Lot Like Birds
/ I the Mighty, more: Nov. 21, 5 p.m.
- Delta Spirit / Jeff the Brotherhood /
FIDLAR: Nov. 23, 8 p.m.
- Conspirator / Eoto: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.
- Graham Parker & the Rumour: Nov.
30, 8 p.m.
KESWICK THEATER
Easton Road-Keswick Ave, Glenside,
Pa.
Phone: 215.572.7650
- Ben Gibbard: Nov. 7, 8 p.m.
- Robert Randolph & the Family Band:
Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
- David Bromberg: Nov. 10, 8 p.m.
- Ani DiFranco / Pearl and the Beard:
Nov. 11, 7:30 p.m.
- The Machine (Pink Floyd tribute):
Nov. 23, 8 p.m.
- Songs of The Band feat. Jimmy
Vivino and Garth Hudson: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.
- Scott Weiland: Nov. 25, 8 p.m.
- Tedeschi Trucks Band: Nov. 27-28,
7:30 p.m.
- The Monkees: Nov. 29, 8 p.m.
- Loretta Lynn: Nov. 30, 8 p.m.
- Shirley Alston Reeves /The Teenag-
ers /Eddie Holman /The Rip Chords: Dec.1,
8 p.m.
- Pink Martini: Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m.
- The Irish Tenors: Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m.
- Keith Sweat: Dec. 7, 8 p.m.
- Maxi Priest: Dec. 8, 8 p.m.
TOWER THEATER
69th and Ludlow Sts. Upper Darby
Phone: 610.352.2887
- Ray LaMontagne: Nov. 17, 8 p.m.
- Steel Panther: Nov. 23, 9 p.m.
- Of Monsters and Men / Soley / Elle
King: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.
- R.Kelly / Tamia: Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m.
TROCADERO
10th & Arch St, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.2000
- Deicide / Alustrium: Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m.
- The Wallflowers / My Jerusalem: Nov.
8, 8 p.m.
- Paul Banks / The Neighborhood: Nov.
10, 9 p.m.
- Joe Budden: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
- Travia / 13:1 / Reckless Behavior / Sick
Trust: Nov. 17, 6:30 p.m.
- Panzie / Clashing Plaid / Ammunition:
Nov. 23, 9 p.m.
- A John Waters Christmas: Nov. 29, 8
p.m.
- Nick Kroll: Dec. 1, 8 p.m.
- The Faint / TRUST: Dec. 6, 8 p.m.
- D.R.I. / Common Enemy: Dec. 7, 7:30
p.m.
- Aaron Lewis: Dec. 9, 8 p.m.
- Of Montreal: Dec. 13, 7:45 p.m.
- The Polyphonic Spree Holiday Show:
Dec. 12, 7 p.m.
- Monster Magnet: Dec. 16, 7:30 p.m.
SUSQUEHANNA BANK
CENTER
1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, NJ.
Phone: 609.365.1300
- The Script: Nov. 10, 8 p.m.
- The Killers: Dec. 13, 8 p.m.
WELLS FARGO CENTER
Broad St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.3600
- Bob Dylan and His Band: Nov. 19, 7:30
p.m.
- Neil Young / Crazy Horse / Patti
Smith / Everest: Nov. 29, 8 p.m.
- Justin Bieber / PSY / Cher Lloyd: Dec.
5, 6 p.m.
- Trans-Siberian Orchestra: Dec. 14, 4 /
8 p.m.
- Kevin Hart: Dec. 20, 7 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
BRYCE JORDAN CENTER
Penn State University, State College,
Pa.
Phone: 814.865.5555
- Carrie Underwood / Hunter Hayes:
Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.
- 3 Doors Down / Daughtry / P.O.D.:
Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m.
- The Temptations / The Four Tops:
Dec. 7, 7:30 p.m.
CROCODILE ROCK
520 Hamilton St, Allentown
Phone: 610.434.460
- State Radio: Nov. 7, 7 p.m.
- Late Nite Reading / Rocky Loves
Emily / Farewell My Love: Nov. 9, 5:30
p.m.
- Smile Empty Soul / Hurt / Givensix:
Nov. 9, 6 p.m.
- Alex Goot: Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m.
- Kung Fu Vampire / Mars / Liquid
Assassin: Nov. 11, 5:30 p.m.
- Anberlin: Nov. 11, 6 p.m.
- Straight Line Stitch: Nov. 15, 5:30 p.m.
- All Time Low / The Summer Set / The
Downtown Fiction / Hit The Lights: Nov.
16: 6 p.m.
- Endwell / My Bitter End: Nov. 17, 5:30
p.m.
- G. Love & Special Sauce / Giant
Panda Guerilla Dub Squad: Nov. 17, 8 p.m.
- Timeflies: Nov. 18, 7 p.m.
- Dio Disciples / Witchburn: Nov. 20, 7
p.m.
- Sum 41: Nov. 23, 7 p.m.
- Aaron Jennings: Nov. 24, 5:30 p.m.
- Sparks the Rescue / Handguns / The
Composure: Nov. 24, 5:30 p.m.
- Cannibal Corpse: Nov. 29, 7 p.m.
GIANT CENTER
950 Hersheypark Dr., Hershey
Phone: 717.534.3911
- Gaither Christmas Homecoming: Dec.
7, 7 p.m.
- tobyMac: Dec. 9, 7 p.m.
- Trans-Siberian Orchestra: Dec. 21, 4 /
8 p.m.
SANDS BETHLEHEM
77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem
- Cheap Trick: Nov. 24, 8 p.m.
- B.B. King: Nov. 27, 8 p.m.
- Rick Springfield: Dec. 1, 8 p.m.
- Mannheim Steamroller: Dec. 6, 7 p.m.
- Neil Sedaka: Dec. 8, 8 p.m.
- The Fab Four: Dec. 29, 8 p.m.
STABLER ARENA
Lehigh University, Bethlehem
Phone: 610.758.6611
- Harlem Globetrotters: Feb. 7, 7 p.m.
WHITAKER CENTER
222 Market St., Harrisburg
Phone: 717.214.ARTS
- The Machine: Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m.
- The Bacon Brothers: May 4, 8 p.m.
W
- compiled by Rich Howells,
Weekender Editor. Send your
listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
Take a trip back in time
Emerging from the outskirts of the Philadelphia area, Flux represents a ferocious new sound resonating
from ancient mysticism to futuristic visions obtained through lucid dreaming. Flux has gained an expand-
ing fan base by touring the East Coast and Midwest, headlining festivals and by hosting various parties
dubbed as “encounters” where you can find the band jamming and experimenting late into the night.
Highly influenced by the current psychedelic movement, the three brothers share a unique connection that
allows them to fuse groove intensity with ambient swirling effects and almost hypnotic singing.
The band will be playing at the River Street Jazz Café (667 North River St., Plains) on Thursday, Nov. 8 at
10 p.m. Doors open at 8 p.m. and tickets are $5.
P
A
G
E
2
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
Wednesday:
Arturo’s: Mark Maros
Bar on Oak: Line Dancing
Bart & Urbys:
Breakers, Mohegan Sun:
Brews Brothers Luzerne: Karaoke @9
Hops & Barley’s: Karaoke with DJ Bounce
Metro: Karaoke w/ Joe Miraglia
River Street Jazz Caféé: Open Mic
Rox 52: Kyle Baker
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Stan’s Caféé: Register to win WBS Penguins Tickets
Tommyboy’s: Beer Pong
Woodlands: Evolution: w/ DJ Mike The Godfather – EDM and Top 40
Club Music, Plus Media 5 Showcase 8:30-12
V-Spot: John Smith (from Underground Saints)
Thursday:
Arturo’s: Mark Maros
Bar on Oak: The Tones
Bart & Urby’s: Trivia Night
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Karaoke Contest
Carey’s Pub: Dance Music w/ Pat Hanlon & Eric Hoffman
Chacko’s: Kartune
Huns Caféé West: What’s Going On Duo
Metro: College Night w/ DJ entertainment & free pool
River Grille: Autism Coalition of Luzerne County Benefit w/ Non
Refundables 6-8 p.m.
River Street Jazz Caféé: Flux Capacitor
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Rox 52: Beer Pong
Tommyboys: NFL ticket
Woodlands: Club HD inside Evolution w/ DJ Data & Streamside-DJ Kev
hosted by 97BHT
V-Spot: Jackson Vee
Friday:
Arturo’s: Mark Maros
Bar on Oak: Chatter
Bart & Urby’s: Flutter
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: M80
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: London Force
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country Night w/ DJ Crocket
Chacko’s: Random Rock
Grotto, Harveys Lake: The Sperazzo Duo
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: Kira
Metro: Big Daddy Dex 6-9 on heated patio, Strawberry Jam 9-1 inside
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Headlock 3
rd
B-day Bash
OverPour: Breathing Easy Acoustic @10
River Grille: DJ Ooh Wee
River Street Jazz Caféé: The Ends of The Earth meet Ol’ Cabbage @10
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Robb Brown & Friends
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Senunas’: Audio Affair
Stan’s Caféé: 20 Lb. Head
Tommyboy’s Bar & Grill: Ostrich Hat
Woodlands: Evolution Neon Glow Party w/ Host 97BHT & Blush w/ DJ
Godfather during intermission in the Exec Lounge
V-Spot: On PA Live @ 4 & Mr. Echo
Saturday:
Arturo’s: High 5 Elvis Show
Bar on Oak: Indoor tailgate party w/ Iron Cowboy & Crazy Chris
Bart & Urby’s: Long Strange Trip w/ opening set of Bob Weir by Gene
Burke
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: UUU
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Two of a Kind
Brews Brothers, Pittston: DJ Mike Riley
Chacko’s: Stealing Neil
Charlie B’s: DJ Bonez @ 9
Gravity Inn: Mr. Echo
Metro: I Am Buffalo
River Grille: DJ Tonez
River Street Jazz Caféé: George Wesley All-Star Band Bob Marley
Tribute
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Free Jukebox
Rox 52: Free Juke Box
Senunas’: DJ King B
Stan’s Caféé: Stone Cats duo
Tommyboy’s: Ozz
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub - Resident DJ playing Top 40 & Club
Music w/ Host “Fishboy” of 98.5 KRZ & Big City w/ DJ Godfather
during intermission Streamside & Exec Lounge.
V-Spot: Haze
Sunday:
Banko’s: Mr. Echo 6-9
Brews Brothers Luzerne & Pittston: NFL Ticket
Carey’s Pub: NFL Ticket, Karaoke w/ DJ Santiago
Charlie B’s: NFL Ticket
King’s, Mountain Top: NFL Ticket
Metro: Big Daddy Dex 8-11
Over Pour: NFL Ticket
River Grille: NFL Ticket
Rob’s Pub: NFL Sunday Football
Rox 52: NFL Ticket
Stan’s Caféé: NFL Ticket
Tommyboy’s: NFL Ticket
Woodlands: Crescenzo’s NFL GameDay, 30 something again in
Evolution w/ DJ Godfather & 40 Something w/ DJ Godfather
Vesuvios: NFL Ticket
V-Spot: Gong Show Karaoke & NFL Ticket
Monday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne & Pittston: NFL Ticket
Charlie B’s: NFL Ticket
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Tommyboy’s: NFL Ticket
Woodlands: Crescenzo’s NFL Monday
Tuesday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic Night w/ Paul Martin
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Open Mic Night W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
3
PLAYING VINTAGE TUNES AT A BAR NEAR YOU!
ZEPPELIN • BEATLES • DOORS • STONES
AND MANY MORE
WWW.MRECHOBAND.COM
FACEBOOK.COM/MrEchoBand
MRECHOBAND@GMAIL.COM
Fri., 11/9
VSpot
Scranton • 9:30-1:30
Sat., 11/10
Gravity Inn
Waymart • 9:30-1:30
Sun., 11/11
Banko’s
West Nanticoke • 6-9
7
0
1
4
2
4
1/2 OFF HAPPYHOURNIGHTLY9-11
PLUS SECONDHHFRIDAYS 5-7
YOURWEEKENDBEGINS &ENDS AT THE METRO
DRAFTS, HOUSE WINES, WELL MIXERS
OPENTUESDAY- SATURDAY4 PM- 2AM
BAROPENS NOONSUNDAYS $2 MILLERLITES $3 NACHOS
TONIGHT
SATURDAY
THURSDAY
SUNDAY
SEEING DOUBLE
FRIDAY
themetrobarandgrill.com • find us on facebook.com/themetrobarandgrill
1174 Memorial Highway Dallas, PA 18612 (570) 675-3663
DOUBLE THE MUSIC,
DOUBLE THE HAPPYHOURS
KARAOKE
W/ JOE MIRAGLIA9-12
BIGDADDYDEX
6-9 ONTHE HEATEDPATIO
STRAWBERRY
JAM 9-1
TWOHAPPYHOURS
5-7 &9-11
SUNDAY SUNDAY
I AMBUFFALO9-1
1/2 OFF HAPPYHOUR9-11
$5 MARTINIS ALL DAY
SS
COLLEGE NIGHT
DJ, FREE POOL TABLE, $1
DRAFTS, 20%DISCOUNT W/ID
FOOTBALL SPECIALS
NOON-CLOSE
$2 MILLERLITE DRAFTS
$3 NACHOS
BIGDADDYDEX 8-11
1/2 OFF HAPPYHOUR9-11
YOURWEEKENDBEGINS &ENDS AT THE METRO OURWEEKENDBEGINS &ENDS AT THE METRO
LIVE MUSICALL WEEKEND
NEVERACOVERNOT EVER
H
Oak St. Pittston TWP.
654-1112
Wed.
LINE DANCE
BARB MONROE, INSTRUCTOR
DJ BIG JOHN, IRON COWBOY
Thurs.
THE TONES 8-11
Fri.
CHATTER 8:30-12:30
BUD LIGHT GIRLS W/PRIZES
$2 BUD LIGHT PINTS
Sat.
INDOORTAIL GATE PARTY with
IRON COWBOY
& CRAZY
CHRIS9-1
FREE SNACKS $1 HOT, $1
PIZZA. WEARYOUR FAVORITE
T-SHIRT OR HAT
7
6
0
4
7
5
FRIDAY
THURSDAY WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY SUNDAY
FRIDAY
STAN’S CAFE
570.829.9779
WE ARE A PROUD
STAR BAR OF THE
WILKES-BARRE
SCRANTON PENGUINS
STOP IN AND WIN
FREE TICKETS
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
20 LB. HEAD
9-1
HAPPY HOUR 8-10
HOUSE MIX DRINKS $2
HAPPY HOUR 8-10
NOW SERVING DR.
MCGILLICUDDY’S APPLE PIE
SPECIAL NFL MENU
(FULL MENU AVAILABLE)
$2 BUD LIGHT CANS ALL DAY
$1.75 MILLER HIGH LIFE
BOTTLES ALL DAY
NFL TICKET
YUENGS & WINGS
35¢ WINGS (IHO) 5-9
YUENGLING PINTS
$1.50 ALL DAY
STONE CATS DUO
9-1
NEVER A COVER
$1.75 COORS LIGHT BOTTLES ALL DAY EVERYDAY
AT THE CORNER OF E. NORTHAMPTON AND HILLSIDE ST. WILKES-BARRE
BAR HOURS 7AM-CLOSE • KITCHEN HOURS WED-SAT 5-9 SUN 1-8
CLAMS 15¢ EACH
IHO
7
6
2
7
5
0
THURS 9-11
9-11 $1.75 DOM
$2.75 IMPORT BTLS
FRI 6-8
1/2 PRICE EVERYTHING
10-12 • $2 BOMBS $3 MIXERS
SAT 10-12
$2 BOMBS & $3 PINNACLE
PINT MIXERS
SUN 8-10
1/2 PRICE EVERYTHING
MON & TUES 9-10
1/2 PRICE EVERYTHING
Vesuvio’s is now in Wilkes-Barre
Home of the cheese steak stuffed pizza
111 North Main St. Wilkes-Barre PA
570.824.8747
WEDNESDAY
COLLEGE NIGHT
WITH DJ MO
NO COVER • HAPPY HOUR 10-12
$2 BOMBS • $2 LI ICE TEAS
rtur s
140 MAIN ST. DUPONT
570.299.5296
THURSDAY
MARK MAROS 9:30-1:30
WING NIGHT! • 50¢ WINGS
$2 BUD LIGHT DRAFTS 8-10PM
WEDNESDAY
MARK MAROS
$2 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS
& $3 IMPORT BOTTLES 7-9PM
1/2 PRICE APPS. 7-9PM
FRIDAY
MARK MAROS
9-11PM
$2 COORS LIGHTS
SUNDAY
1/2 PRICE PIZZA IHO
DURING THE GAME
$2 DOMESTIC DRAFTS
4-9PM
TUESDAY
$3 PINNACLE VODKA MIXERS
18 FLAVORS!
SATURDAY
HIGH 5 ELVIS
SHOW
9:30-1:30
$2 WELL MIXERS 7-9PM
FINE ITALIAN DINING
AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE
NOW OFFERING PRIME RIB
EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY
TUES-SUN 4:30PM-10PM
NEVER A
COVER!
TUES-SUN
5PM-2AM
KITCHEN
OPEN LATE
NEPA BEST KEPT SECRET
FINE ITALIAN DINING
LARGEST VODKA SELECTION IN THE AREA
VOTED ONE OF THE NICEST RESTAURANTS • CIGAR LOUNGE • MARTINI BAR • BANQUET ROOM
www.theweekender.com www.theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
2
4
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
The members of ‘80s hard
rock powerhouse Dokken created
some great music together, even
if they weren’t all exactly getting
along. It’s no secret that bad
blood coursed between guitarist
George Lynch and vocalist Don
Dokken for years, and several
attempts at reuniting the classic
lineup proved futile since their
initial breakup in 1988. The
remaining members along with
Lynch, bassist Jeff Pilson and
drummer Mick Brown, continued
to play together in various in-
carnations while Pilson and
Brown continued to tread water
with revolving Dokken lineups.
Now, Lynch, Pilson, and
Brown, in what must seem like
the ultimate middle finger to old
Don, have come together under
the moniker T&N, recording
“Slave To The Empire” – an
album consisting of fresh takes
on old-school Dokken material
as well as some heavy new tracks
that pay homage to their melodic
rock past, laced with contempo-
rary nuts and bolts grooves and
progressive-edged marksman-
ship.
Pilson handles vocals on the
new songs, while guests like
King’s X frontman Doug Pinnick
puts his soulful grunt on Dokken
re-records like “Tooth and Nail.”
Other notable cameos, like Se-
bastian Bach’s viciously harmo-
nious spin on the 1984 hit “Along
Again,” might cause the listener
to decide these new gems could
be the definitive versions of each
song – they’re that good.
The new material gleams as
well. Tracks like “When Eagles
Die” feature Lynch’s finger-
twisting guitar leads over a del-
icate acoustic bed, while
“Rhythm of the Soul” throbs
with a wide-open groove and
Pilson’s quite capable vocals,
which resonate even more when
he harmonizes his leads. There
are obviously traces of Dokken
past, but the new output more
closely resembles each musi-
cian’s current projects, like
Lynch’s own Lynch Mob and the
Lynch/Pilson collaboration from
a few years ago called Wicked
Underground. Beyond compari-
sons, though, the new material is
Active Rock-ready, with enough
voltage to be “Breaking the
Chains” of Dokken past.
W
- Mark Uricheck,
Weekender Correspondent
ALBUM REVIEWS
Dokken still rockin'
T&N
‘Slave to the Empire’
RATING:
W W W W
charts
8. Ke$ha: ‘Die Young’
7. Justin Bieber/Big Sean: ‘As
Long As You Love Me’
6. Owl City/Carly Rae Jepsen:
‘Good Time’
5. Maroon 5: ‘One More Night’
4. Chris Brown: ‘Don’t Wake Me
Up’
3. Neon Trees: ‘Everybody Talks’
2. P!nk: ‘Blow Me (One Last
Kiss)’
1. fun.: ‘Some Nights’
Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa
1. Meek Mill: ’Dreams & Night-
mares’
2. Neil Young: ’Psychedelic Pill’
3. Taylor Swift: ’Red’
4. Black Country Communion:
’Afterglow’
5. Trans-Siberian Orchestra:
’Dreams Of Fireflies On A Christ-
mas Night’
6. Flyleaf: ’New Horizons’
7. Stone Sour: ’House Of Gold
& Bones Part 1’
8. Toby Keith: ’Hope On The
Rocks’
9. P!nk: ’Truth About Love’
10. Kendrick Lamar: ’Good Kid
M.A.D.D. City’
Top 10 Albums at Gallery of Sound
Perhaps one of the biggest challenges
young bands face is setting a tone without
rewriting the same song over and over
again. On the Fifty, which has just re-
leased its first EP titled “Fast Hands, Bad
Timing,” has managed to master that feat
with help from producer Anthony Raneri
of punk band Bayside.
On the Fifty – Tim Dolan (vocals/
guitar), Tom Dambro (guitar), John Kan-
tar (bass), and Anthony Imperato (drums)
– recorded the five tracks in New York
during the members’ winter break from
college last year.
As cliche as it sounds, “Fast Hands,
Bad Timing” starts off with a bang, a riff
that could easily be on a Rise Against,
Title Fight or even a Bayside record.
Dolan’s distinct voice sets the tone for
what’s to come on the five tracks and
hooks you to listen to all of them.
Songs “Things Get Wet in the Ocean”
and “D Song” seem to lean towards the
modern rock genre (think a hint of Shine-
down), which shows the diverse potential
in this young group. Meanwhile, “Blue
Roses” and “The Future” have lead guitar
riffs from Dambro that fit in with The
Ramones and Green Day.
“The Future” is a great album ender, as
it sums up just how you feel after listen-
ing to the record straight through. It al-
lows you to daydream about the past and
wonder about the future all at the same
time.
Overall, “Fast Hands, Bad Timing” is
one of the better EPs in the punk rock
genre this year, particularly for a new act
on the scene. W
-Matt Morgis,
Weekender Correspondent
On the Fifty
‘Fast Hands, Bad Timing’
On the Fifty
show good
timing
You remember Cody ChesnuTT:
He’s the guitar-slinging soul man who
came up with the killer riffage on
“The Seed,” the deathless track off his
2002 double-album debut “The Head-
phone Masterpiece” that appeared in
altered form on the Roots’ “Phrenol-
ogy” (and is still a centerpiece of the
band’s live show).
“Landing on a Hundred” is Ches-
nuTT’s f irst full-length album in a
decade, and like his debut, it’s a self-
released effort by the Atlanta native
that genre-blends R&B, soul, and
rock, f iltered through its auteur’s
gruff and sweet vocal maneuvers and
his idiosyncratic sensibility.
Ten years down the road on a Kick-
starter-funded effort that was cut at
the Memphis studios where Al Green
recorded his hits, ChesnuTT doesn’t
come off as forward-thinking as he
once did. But the musical questions
he asks on the smooth “What Kind of
Cool (Will We Think of Next)” and
“Where is All the Money Going?” are
timeless.
W
- Dan DeLuca,
Philadelphia Inquirer / MCT
ChesnuTT
returns after a
decade off
Cody Chesnutt
‘Landing on a Hundred’
Rating: W W W
Ten years down the road on a
Kickstarter-funded effort that
was cut at the Memphis stu-
dios where Al Green recorded
his hits, ChesnuTT doesn’t
come off as forward-thinking
as he once did.
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
5
1
5
1
7
4
0
7
3
1
7
7
4
Ono’s Bar & Grill
236 Zerby Ave.
Kingston, PA 283-2511
NOW OPEN
SUNDAY
AT NOON
NFL Sunday
Ticket
RICCI’S PIZZA &BEER
155 Park Avenue, W-B • 825-3652
View our menu at:
www.menusNEPA.com
R R
ATM M ACHINE NOW AVAILABLE
COORS LIGHT,M ILLER LITE & M GD 12 PK.BOTTLES $11.99
KEYSTONE LIGHT12 PK.BOTTLES $7.99
• 10 Cu tsOf Sicilian Pizza&
LargeRou nd 16” Pizza $18.49 + tax
Bu y13 Cu tsof Sicilian
Forth ePriceof 10!
Ba k e r’s D oz e n S p e c ia l
FRI, S AT, S UN
M O N D AY & W ED N ES D AY
• Bu y1 LargeRou nd,
Get2nd for$6.00
FOOTBALL SPECIAL
HAPPY HOUR TUES-THURSDAY, SAT. & SUN 9-11
FRIDAY 5-7 & 9-11
ROX 52
BAR & GRILLE
52 E. Main St., Plymouth • 779-7876
www.rox52.com • Find us on Facebook
KITCHEN
OPEN ‘TIL
MIDNIGHT
SMOKING
CABANA
WEDNESDAY
KYLE BAKER
LIVE ACOUSTIC • 10PM • NO COVER
THURSDAY
BEER PONG
$100 CASH PRIZE
SUNDAY NFL TICKET 35¢ WINGS
TRY OUR NEW MENU INCLUDING PHILLY STYLE
ROAST BEEF SANDWICH. SEE OUR NEW MENU ON
OUR WEBSITE AND FACEBOOK.
NEW ECONOMY BUSTER PRICING
$2 PINTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
$1.50 DURING HAPPY HOUR
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
FREE
JUKEBOX
Wednesday November 21
Third Annual - “Live at Downtown Arts”
47 N. Franklin Street • Wilkes-Barre PA
LIVE ALBUMRECORDING - solo acoustic with special guest Ryan Brown
(donation based benefit for
Hurricane Sandy)
all proceeds go to
American Red Cross
FREE & ALL AGES
doors at 6
showat 7pm
Saturday November 24
an evening with
5 piece MiZ
River Street Jazz Cafe
667 N. River Street
Plains PA
two sets
10pm
.....MiZ.....
Thanksgiving Week Celebration
more info at www.mikemizmusic.com
P
A
G
E
2
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
Bullying doesn’t disappear as
we all get older. There is a mis-
conception in the minds of some
that bullying is something only
children experience.
Erin Davies knows that isn’t
the case.
In 2007, Davies, then a Sage
College of Albany graduate
student, found her Volkswagen
Beetle vandalized. The word
“FAG” was spray-painted on her
driver-side window, while the
phrase “U R GAY” was scrawled
across the hood.
Naturally, Davies was upset
and planned to remove the graffi-
ti posthaste. Somewhere along
the line, though, plans changed.
“I spent a year driving the car
cross-country with the graffiti
still on it. The idea was to force a
conversation. That conversation
would start wherever the car was.
People would see the graffiti and
have really emotional reactions,”
Davies said. “By keeping the
graffiti on the car, it made people
feel the same discomfort I felt.”
During her road trip, Davies
interviewed the people she en-
countered, everyday people at gas
stations and hotels whose reac-
tions ranged from outrage and
disgust to sympathy and support.
The product of Davies’ experi-
ment? “Fagbug,” an 83-minute
documentary that will screen at
the club Twist in Wilkes-Barre
this Friday night, Nov. 9. A pre-
sentation of the NEPA Rainbow
Alliance’s SafeZone Youth Em-
powerment Program, Davies
herself will be present, along
with the now rainbow-colored
“Fagbug,” which she still drives,
to host the screening and take
part in a discussion.
“She’s taken the personal activ-
ist thing to a whole new level. It’s
a very visible, very candid con-
versation that she has with the
community that the community
can learn from,” John Dawe,
executive director of the NEPA
Rainbow Alliance, said.
Dawe is also manager of the
Anti-Bullying Coalition of Lu-
zerne County, a group which will
host its own film screening – in
this case, the Lee Hirsch-directed
documentary “Bully” – at the
F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-
Barre on Thursday, Nov. 8.
Though the screenings are not
formally connected, they are
linked nonetheless by a shared
theme. While “Fagbug” spot-
lights the issue of bullying
amongst a specific segment of
society, “Bully” tackles the
broader issue of bullying in gen-
eral.
“It pulls no punches,” Michael
Zimmerman said, stressing that
“Bully,” though rated PG-13,
deals with weighty subjects like
suicide and school violence in a
serious and unflinching manner.
“The film does a good job of
portraying the feelings of people
who are bullied and the reality of
what goes on with bullying in our
schools and our community at
large. It draws up a lot of strong
emotions.”
Zimmerman is executive direc-
tor of the Family Service Associ-
ation of Wyoming Valley, which,
like the NEPA Rainbow Alliance,
is a member of the Anti-Bullying
Coalition.
For the “Bully” screening,
which is also comprised of a
pre-film discussion and a post-
film forum, Zimmerman is coor-
dinating representatives from
Catholic Social Services, Com-
munity Counseling Services,
Northeast Counseling Services,
Children’s Service Center, and
the Family Service Association.
The representatives will be pre-
sent to provide information, take
part in the discussions, and offer
one-on-one counseling.
“Bullying happens all the time,
no matter what age, no matter
what demographic. However, it’s
kids that are most at risk,” Dawe
said. “Hopefully, when you’re out
of high school or college and in
the ‘real world,’ you’ve devel-
oped skills to cope with and
process bullying. The reason a lot
of anti-bullying efforts are fo-
cused on kids is because a 10-
year-old isn’t going to understand
what’s happening as well, or how
to deal with it.”
Davies shares Dawe’s empha-
sis.
“The reason I did ‘Fagbug’ is
for younger kids to see it and see
that they can turn these experi-
ences into something positive,”
she said.
“When these things happen, I
think most people feel shame. A
lot of kids are driven to suicide.
What I did is turn the tables on it.
I encourage people to document
when these things happen. If we
don’t, people think it never takes
place. How can we find a solu-
tion to a problem if we don’t
admit it really exists?”
W
Two films spark
bullying discussion
By Bill Thomas
Weekender Correspondent
“Bully” screening, Nov. 8,
doors at 6 p.m., film at 7 p.m.,
F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre.) $5. Info:
abcluzerne.org
“Fagbug” screening, Nov. 9, 8
p.m, Twist (1170 Route 315,
Plains Twp.) $5 for 21+, free
for under 21. Info: twistbarpa-
.com
Erin Davies turned the vandalism of her Volkswagen Beetle into a personal activism
effort that resulted in the ’Fagbug’ documentary.
Iowa resident Alex plays a central role in the documentary, ’Bully,’ which is being
shown at the F.M. Kirby Center on Nov. 8. W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
7
movie review
When Disney acquired Pix-
ar, their in-house feature ani-
mation division started to
resemble a contingency plan.
Films like “Meet the Rob-
insons” and “Chicken Little”
reflected this secondary,
plan-B status by being little
more than entertainment
placeholders – products of a
corporation that’s merely bid-
ing its time and dreading the
day when John Lasseter and
his Pixar crew refuse to pro-
duce “Cars 5” and successful-
ly navigate through the razor
wire maze that leads to the
exit of the Pixar Animation
Bunker.
However, things have
changed within the past cou-
ple of years. As Pixar’s output
slowly grows more cynically
calculated and commercial,
Disney is, once again, starting
to find its own voice. “Wreck-
It Ralph” marks the first time
in a long time that Disney’s
in-house staff hasn’t made the
kind of suitably entertaining
movie that parents reluctantly
show their children when they
can’t find their copy of “Find-
ing Nemo.”
After 30 years of playing
the “Donkey Kong”-ish villain
in a fictional video game
called “Fix-It Felix Jr.,”
Wreck-It Ralph (John C. Reil-
ly) wants to be seen as more
than just a monstrous hobo
who literally destroys every-
thing he touches. In order to
prove that he can be a hero,
Ralph leaves his video game
behind and covertly becomes
a part of a First Person Shoo-
ter that resembles a cross
between “Halo” and “Gears of
War.”
Even though he’s unaccus-
tomed to the fast pace and
non-stop violence of this new
video game world, Ralph still
manages to win himself a
medal (Well, “win” is kind of
a strong word. Steal is prob-
ably a bit more accurate).
Unfortunately, once he ac-
quires the medal, Ralph’s
oafishness causes him to
stumble into an escape pod
that takes him to the candy-
colored world of “Sugar
Rush.” While there, he en-
counters Vanellope Von
Schweetz (Sara Silverman), a
glitchy videogame character
who runs off with his medal
and uses it to enter herself
into a “Mario Kart”-style
race. But as Ralph attempts to
get his medal back, “Fix-It
Felix Jr.” is on the verge of
being unplugged, which
means that Ralph and the rest
of the “Fix-It Felix” gang
could soon be homeless.
“Wreck-It Ralph” could’ve
easily coasted on the goodwill
of people’s nostalgia and turn-
ed into something far more
smug and self-congratulatory.
There are plenty of jokey
cameos from such classic
video game characters as Q-
Bert, Dig-Dug, and that bear
from “Crystal Castles.” It
name checks obvious nerd-
pleasers like the Konami code
and there’s even a minor char-
acter that is clearly based on
Twin Galaxies founder Walter
Day. But thankfully, “Wreck-It
Ralph” realizes there’s more
to a movie than just the cheap
thrill of watching “Street
Fighter’s” Ken solemnly share
a drink with Ryu at the bar
from “Tapper.” Beneath the
in-jokes and references lurks
an engaging storyline with a
complicated protagonist who
is genuinely kindhearted but
also neurotic, insecure, and
somewhat bitter. The film’s
tone is frequently bittersweet,
especially whenever it reveals
just how awful it would be to
live in a video game. It’s re-
petitive, death lurks behind
every corner, and every mun-
dane chore is now a “mini-
game,” which sounds like it
could be fun until you realize
that you not only have to de-
tail your car with a gun that
shoots icing but you have to
do it within the 30-second
time limit.
Crafted by a veritable mur-
derers’ row of talent that in-
cludes former “Futurama”
director Rich Moore and ani-
mation great Jim Reardon
(whose short film “Bring Me
the Head of Charlie Brown”
deserves a wider audience),
“Wreck-It Ralph” is every-
thing an animated movie
should be: it’s smart, it’s fun,
and it cleverly subverts its
own product placement (two
characters nearly drown in
Nestle’s Quiksand). Parents,
take your children to see this
or they will hate you.
W
Wreck-It Ralph, left, voiced by John C. Reilly flips the expected formula of Disney
kids’ films with an engaging storyline and complex hero. (AP Photo/Disney)
By Mike Sullivan
Weekender Correspondent
'Ralph' wrecks
conventions
Rating: W W W W
reel attractions
After five movies, has Kristen Stewart
finally learned to emote?
The scariest thing Bond must face is Javier
Bardem’s haircut.
OPENING THIS WEEK:
‘Skyfall’
‘A Royal Affair’
‘The Comedy’
OPENING NEXT WEEK:
‘The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2’
‘Barrymore’
‘Anna Karenina
P
A
G
E
2
8
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
puzzles
ACROSS
1 Send forth
5 “- company, ...”
9 Scepter
12 Broad
13 Furnace output
14 - out a living
15 Find not guilty
17 Savings plan acronym
18 Person, place or thing
19 “Loves me (not)”
determinant
21 Had a home-cooked
meal
24 Old woman’s home?
25 Coffee vessels
26 Company agent
30 Money of Moldova
31 “The Age of Anxiety”
poet
32 Brewery product
33 Insisted on
35 List-ending abbr.
36 Historic times
37 Concerning
38 More angry
40 Macadamize
42 Lawyers’ org.
43 Work together
48 Obtain
49 Camel feature
50 Singer Campbell
51 Sailor’s assent
52 Puppies’ calls
53 Harvard rival
DOWN
1 Lamb’s mama
2 Blend
3 Altar affirmative
4 Serena’s game
5 From one end to t’other
6 Slowly withdraw (from)
7 Cereal tidbit
8 Sondheim or Colbert
9 Say again
10 Veggie in Creole
cooking
11 Transaction
16 Lo-o-ong time
20 Dawn goddess
21 “- Lang Syne”
22 Genealogy chart
23 Count
24 Coaster
26 Lather
27 Citric quaff
28 Verve
29 Hide
31 Lawlessness
34 Exist
35 Vim
37 Thoroughfare (Abbr.)
38 Long story
39 Do as you’re told
40 “- and Circumstance”
41 iPad downloads
44 French assent
45 Carte lead-in
46 Aviv preceder
47 Compass pt.
last week
agenda
BAZAARS/FESTIVALS
• Holiday Craft and Gift
Fair Nov. 9, 6-9 p.m., Irem Club-
house (64 Ridgway Dr., Dallas).
Vendors needed, $15 eash. In-
fo:570.675.1134 ext. 100.
Fine Arts and Crafts Fes-
tival Nov. 16, 5-8 p.m. and Nov.
17, 10-4 p.m., Triton Hall (Tioga St.,
Tunkhannock). $7.50 in advance,
$10 day of. Proceeds benefit Eat-
onville United Methodist Church.
Info: 570.836.2441.
BENEFITS/CHARITY
EVENTS
American Red Cross
• Seeking crafters for Annual
Holiday Craft Show (held Nov.
24-25, Kingston Armory). Proceeds
benefit programs/services of local
Red Cross. To be considered,
complete application by calling
570.823.7161, ext. 348. Items must
be at least 75 percent handmade;
no resale items. Rent booth for
$85 plus $30 event license fee.
booths, booths with electricity and
corner booths.
Chacko’s Family Bowling
Center (195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.BOWL,
www.chackosfamilybowlingcen-
ter.com)
• Strike Out SIDS in memory of
Luke Thomas: Nov. 10, 6-8 p.m.
$20; $10 children under 12; $80,
team of five. Event includes two
hours unlimited bowling, shoe
rental, pizza, soda, and prizes.
Proceeds benefit the CJ Founda-
tion. Register at 570.417.0826.
• Strike Out Epilepsy: Nov. 11, 3-5
p.m. $15. Includes two hours of
bowling, shoe rental, pizza, soda
and prizes. Proceeds benefit the
Epilepsy Foundation of Eastern
Pennsylvania. Register at
570.256.7823.
• Strike Out Heart Disease: Nov.
11, 6-8 p.m. $20 per person in
teams of five or six. Includes two
hours of bowling, shoe rental,
pizza, soda, t-shirt and basket
raffles. Proceeds benefit the
American Heart Association. Regis-
ter at 570.825.2717.
Relay for Life of Wyoming
Valley Kick-Off Breakfast
• Nov. 10, 9 a.m., Saxton Pavilion,
Kingston. Info: relayforlife.org/
pawyomingvalley.
River Grille (670 North River
St., Plains, 570.208.1282)
Happy Hour: Nov. 8, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
Twenty percent of sales to benefit
2013 Autism Coalition of Luzerne
County Walk when flyer is pre-
sented. Download flyer at aclc-
walk.com or facebook.com/aclcwalk.
Safe Haven Dog Rescue
(www.SafeHavenPa.org, Safe-
Haven@epix.net)
• Volunteer meeting: Nov. 20,
6:30 p.m., Cherry’s Restaurant (Rt.
209, Kresgeville).
• Pet pictures with Santa Claws:
Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Berger’s
Agway (Rt. 209, Brodheadsville).
$8.
Toys For Tots
• Drop off point conducted by
Sons of the American Legion
Mountain Post 781: Mountain Post
781 (Church Rd., Mountain Top);
Jannuzi’s Pizza (69 N. Mountain
Blvd., Mountain Top); The Good 2
Go (36 N. Mountain Blvd., Moun-
tain Top); Tony’s Pizza (26 S.
Main St., Mountain Top); and Wy-
chock’s (Rt. 309, Wilkes Barre).
New unwrapped toys can be
dropped off at the American
Legion Mon.-Fri., 1 p.m.-midnight,
Sat.-Sun., noon-midnight. Drop off
points open through Dec. 15. Info:
570.474.2161, alpost781.org.
CAR & BIKE EVENTS
Gunners PA Law Enforce-
ment MC (gunnerspa-
lemc@gmail.com, $20/rider, $10/
passenger unless noted otherwise)
• Phantom Rider Program: If
unable to make it to ride, donate
$10 passenger fee and new stuff-
ed animal, which will go to chil-
dren in need, any left end of
season go to Toys For Tots. Send
to Gunners 11 Hemlock Dr., Tunk-
hannock, PA 18657.
Hi Lites Motor Club (www.hi-
litesmotorclub.com, Jack
570.477.2477, John 574.7470).
Events feature door prizes, food,
music, 50/50 drawing, more. No
alcohol permitted.
Uncle Buck’s BBQ Pit Bike
Night Wed., 6-9 p.m., 361 W.
Main St., Plymouth. Food, drink
specials.
CHURCHES
Church of Christ Uniting
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 34 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
9 7
8
8
2
3
0
LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Electric City Tattoo Benefit for Joey Siconolfi • 11.04.12.
Photos by Jason Riedmiller • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
3
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your pictures for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when
and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail
high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18703.
starstruck
Norman McKenney, White Haven, with singer Brian
Fallon of The Gaslight Anthem on March 28, 2012 at
the Trocadero Theatre in Philadelphia.
ralphie report
the
ENTERTAINMENT REPORT
Ralphie Aversa | Special to the Weekender
He’s done TV, he’s done radio,
and heck, he’s certainly done the
Internet. But after finding his
single, “Gangnam Style,” stuck
at number two on the Billboard
Hot 100 for the past six weeks,
South Korean sensation Psy is
doing it all over again.
“How come they play Maroon
5 so much in United States?” the
K-Pop star jokingly asked in an
interview on “The Ralphie
Show,” slightly mispronouncing
“maroon” in the process. “One
More Night” has held on to the
top spot. “At some point I’m
thinking like, ‘Wow, how can I
stay that long at number two?
…Is this some kind of ‘Truman
Show’ or something like that?’”
You can’t blame the artist, born
Park Jae-Sang, for thinking that
TV cameras might be secretly
following him around. Prior to
“Gangnam Style,” the 34-year-
old topped the Korean charts
about a half-dozen times but
never came close to the success
he is currently having. As of
Tuesday, the video had over 650
million views and near five mil-
lion “likes.” This is unpreceden-
ted for anyone, let alone a rela-
tively unknown artist from a
country that has cultivated so
many “K-Pop” stars, with none
of them breaking in to the U.S.
What is even crazier is Amer-
icans have latched on to the song
simply for the video and dance,
along with the infectious beat.
Most of the lyrics are in Korean.
“If I perform this song in dif-
ferent countries, I feel happy and
sorry at the same time because
yunno (the audience) looks so
happy, so I’m happy with that,”
explained Psy. “They don’t have
any idea what I’m talking about,
right? What I thought was they
might have their own version of
lyrics when I’m singing this.”
U.S. fans of the song and video
have other questions as well: one
was floated my way on Facebook
about why Psy appears to be
screaming at one of his backup
dancer’s butts in the music video.
“The butt was so mad at me,”
he replied with clearly something
lost in translation. “They were
doing some erotic stuff and it
teased me, the butt teased me. So
I was like, ‘Hey, stop doing that!’
I yelled at the butt.”
So this is the stuff that 650
million view videos on YouTube
are made of.
W
- For more of Ralphie’s
interview with Psy, check out
the podcast at
97bht.com/ralphie. Listen to
“The Ralphie Radio Show”
weeknights from 7
p.m.-midnight on 97 BHT.
Psy’s ’Gangnam Style’ video sure has blown up.
‘They were doing some erotic stuff and it teased
me, the butt teased me. So I was like, ‘Hey, stop
doing that!’ I yelled at the butt.’
Psy
On the ‘Gangnam Style’ music video
3370 Scranton-Carbondale Highway
Exit 191A off I-81 • 570-489-7448
• Sexy Lingerie
• Fantasy Wear
• Thigh Highs • Stockings
• Packaged Lingerie
• Leather & Vinyl
• Romance Enhancement
Essentials
M
ira
g
e
L
in
g
e
rie
The Romance Store For Couples!
Gift Certificates Available
Mon & Tues Noon-6 PM •Wed-Thurs-Fri Noon-8 PM
Sat 10 AM - 8 PM
M & T N 6 PM W
20
%
W d 6 PM W
%
OFFFF
ENTIRE PURCHASE
(Excluding
Clearance) Clearance)
Expires 11-30-12
TT
MM
7
8
8
2
4
6
ALAN’S
20TH
ANNIVERSARY
SPECIAL
PART II
COVERING
MUSIC IN NEPA
NOV. 1992-
NOV. 2012
102.3-FM The Mountain
Every Sunday
from 8-9 p.m.
LI STEN
TOTHESE
ARTISTS
THIS WEEK
AND PLENTY
MORE
MUSIC
ON THE
MENU
LIVE
WITH ALAN K. STOUT
FACEBOOK.COM/
MUSICONTHEMENU
weekender
www.theweekender.com W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
1
novel approach
theater listings
John Banville, author and
winner of the Man Booker Prize,
presents readers with the final
installment of a trilogy, “Ancient
Light,” a novel about the power
of memory.
The novel highlights the life of
Alexander Cleave, a reputable
actor nearing retirement. He
begins to reflect on his life before
– memories of his first love to his
first loss.
In the present, Alexander is
compelled by the idea of finding
an old flame: “I should like to be
in love again. I should like to fall
in love again, just once more.”
This promptly takes readers to
Alexander’s past – the exact
moment he fell in love, to the
exact moment he lost it all.
While the plot itself is slow
moving, the change of time is
distinct. We move from present
day to the past when Alexander
is 15-years-old. Love, which has
no shortage of heartache, be-
comes even more unsettling
when Alexander finds himself
gravitating towards a woman
twice his age.
We find that the woman – Mrs.
Gray – is none other than his best
friend’s mother. Against the good
judgment of both parties, an
intimate relationship ensues.
Even though Banville evokes a
subtle humor throughout the
work, it becomes apparent from
the start that the relationship will
end tragically.
Unfortunately, Alexander’s
recollection of the relationship
proves futile. Readers realize that
his happy memories are more
illusion than truth. He fails to
illuminate the failures of his
relationship with Mrs. Gray,
leading to a recurrence of issues
with every relationship that fol-
lows.
There are numerous aspects of
the novel that are enthralling; of
particular note is Banville’s strik-
ing prose and character devel-
opment. But, with any well-
thought plot comes conflict.
While Alexander maintains his
longtime marriage to Lydia, their
relationship grows estranged
following the ill-fated death of
their daughter, Cass.
Arguably, the novel’s main
focus regards memory and how
those events form our identity. In
Alexander’s case, his memories
result in a revelation that unveils
the lies he has told himself since
the beginning that have thwarted
his emotional relationship with
others.
Throughout the novel, Banville
gradually weaves the plot, ulti-
mately unveiling the devastation
of one man against his memories.
The title of the novel becomes
appropriate in that readers, simi-
lar to Alexander’s stage audience,
see his brilliant performance
from the seats. Eventually, how-
ever, all walls come down and as
we read forward, we foresee the
train wreck looming ahead. We
watch Alexander’s life play out
behind the curtains – a place of
absolute vulnerability.
W
Lighting
the past
‘Ancient Light’
By John Banville
Rating: W W W
By Kacy Muir
Weekender Correspondent
Actors Circle at Providence
Playhouse (1256 Providence Rd,
Scranton, reservations: 570.342.9707,
actorscircle.org)
•“Any Wednesday”: Nov. 8-11, 16-18,
Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m. $12,
general; $10, senior citizens; $8 stu-
dents. Nov. 8 preview, $8 general and
senior citizens; $6, students.
Applause Theatre Co. (64
Church St., Pittston, applausetheatre-
.webs.com, 570.430.1149, applauseth-
eatre@gmail.com)
• “The Wizard of Oz:” Nov. 16-18, 23-25.
$15.
• Raymond the Amish Comic: Dec. 1, 8
p.m. $15.
• “Winter Wonderettes:” Dec. 14-16. $15.
F.M. KirbyCenter (71 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre, 570.826.1100)
• MoscowBallet’s Great Russian
“Nutcracker:” Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., $37.25-
$79.75
• “A Chorus Line:” Jan. 11, 8 p.m.,
$39.80-$71.55
• “Rock of Ages:” Feb. 15, 8 p.m.,
$44.95-$74.10
• “Pirates of Penzance:” March 22, 8
p.m., $38.80-$69
The Gaslight Theatre Com-
pany(570.824.8266 or visit gaslight-
theatre.org, gaslight-
theatre@gmail.com)
• “[Title of Show]:” Jan. 4-5, 7:30 p.m.,
Jan. 6, 2 p.m., MellowTheater (501 Vine
St. Scranton). Contains adult language/
situations. Not suited for children. $10.
JasonMiller Playwrights’
Project (570.344.3656, SubVerseA-
phrodesia.com, nepaplayw-
rights@live.com)
• “The Resurrection of Campbell
Colgate” by Sarah Regan: Nov. Multime-
dia staging of newplay in process.
The Keystone Players (Keys-
tone College, Brooks Theater, La Plume,
keystone.edu/keystoneplayers )
“The Curate Shakespeare As You
Like It:” Nov. 9-10, 7:30 p.m., Nov. 11, 2
p.m., Theatre in Brooks. $8, general; $4,
senior citizens and children12 and
under; $1, Keystone students and facul-
ty. Info: jane.honchell@keystone.edu.
LackawannaCollege (Mellow
Theater, 501 Vine St., Scranton)
• “The Marvelous Wonderettes:” Feb.
8, 8 p.m. $25-$30, $15 student.
MisericordiaUniversity
Players (Lemmond Theater at Walsh
Hall, 570.674.6400, misercordia.edu/
theartsandmore)
“A Murder is Announced”: Nov. 15-17,
8 p.m. $5, adults; $3, senior citizens and
students.
Music BoxPlayers (196 Hughes
St., Swoyersville: 570.283.2195 or
800.698.PLAY or musicbox.org)
•Auditions for ‘It’s a Wonderful Life:
The Musical,’ all roles open. Call
570.283.2195 for dates and times.
• “It’s a Wonderful Life” live radio
play: Nov. 24-Dec. 16, Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m.
curtain, Sun. 3 p.m. curtain.
PennsylvaniaTheatre of
PerformingArts (JJ Ferrara
Center, 212 W. Broad St., Hazleton,
570.454.5451, ptpashows.org)
• “Nuncrackers:” Begins Nov. 30.
The PhoenixPerforming
Arts Centre (409-411 Main St., Du-
ryea, 570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb-
.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com)
•“The Messenger”: A Jonah Produc-
tions presentation, Nov. 8-9-10 and16-17,
8 p.m., and Nov. 11 and18, 2 p.m., Phoenix
Performing Arts Centre (409 Main St.,
Duryea). $12. Info: 570.457.3589. View
trailers at youtube.com/jddem1 or on
their Facebook event page
ScrantonCultural Center
(420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton,
570.346.7369)
❏Broadway Scranton (broad-
wayscranton.com) presents:
• “The Midtown Men:” Jan. 18-20, Fri.,
8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “The Addams Family:” Feb. 15-17, Fri.,
8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “Stomp:” March 5-6, Fri., 8 p.m.,
Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• Cathy Rigby is “Peter Pan:” April
5-7, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 &
6 p.m.
• “Hair:” April 15-16, 7:30 p.m.
• “Dreamgirls:” May10-12, Fri., 8 p.m.,
Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
Shawnee Playhouse
(570.421.5093, theshawneeplay-
house.com)
•“Magic and Mystery” with Mark
Mysterrio: Nov. 2-17, Fri. and Sat., 10 a.m.
$10.
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantons-
vintagetheater.com)
• Staged reading of Ted LoRusso’s “A
Lie Is A Venial Sin:” Nov. 11
• Comedy Mini-Fest: Nov. 17-18, featur-
ing stand-up comics, sketch actors and
improv troupes fromScranton, Allen-
town, Philadelphia and NewYork.
W
- compiledby Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375.
Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m.
Expandedlistings at
theweekender.com.
For whom the bell tolls
“The Messenger” is a play set in real time chronicling the last hour of
a death row inmate. Theatergoers follow a death row inmate through
his final 60 minutes as a priest desperately tries to get the man’s final
confession.
After a preview Nov. 8, “The Messenger” will run Nov. 9, 10, 16, and
17 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 11 and 18 at 2 p.m. at the Phoenix Performing
Arts Centre (409 Main St., Duryea). Call 570.457.3589 for tickets.
P
A
G
E
3
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
stage
Greed, corruption, a scan-
dalous affair – all the mak-
ings of must-see, prime-time
drama, but you’ll have to
break away from your TV to
watch this one. The Actors
Circle at Providence Play-
house (1256 Providence Rd.,
Scranton) is presenting the
drama-driven “Any Wednes-
day” opening tomorrow night
and running though Nov. 18.
The story centers on John,
the president of a large cor-
poration who finds himself in
quite a delicate situation up-
on the discovery of his mis-
tress. “Any Wednesday” may
be set back in the 1960s, but
the themes are more than
relevant today, as so many in
power consistently lead dou-
ble lives.
“I think some of the
themes persist not only in the
political world, but in the
business world and any world
you choose to think about –
relationships, marriage, in-
fidelity – in how it’s handled
and what the end might be,”
noted director Cody Brooks.
“It’s certainly been highlight-
ed in the political world with
(former President Bill) Clin-
ton.”
Being described as a “farci-
cal comedy,” “Any Wednes-
day” surely isn’t just about
the drama. The tangled web
woven by John takes you into
a story full of irony and de-
ceit, which you can’t help but
laugh at.
“What happens is John has
a young girl as his mistress;
he has her living in what he
calls the ‘executive suite.’ A
new secretary at his company
mistakenly sends a younger
fellow (the co-owner of a
business that John has threat-
ened to close for tax purpos-
es) to the suite where he
comes upon the mistress,”
explained Brooks. “In turn,
that same day the secretary
sends John’s wife to the suite
and she concludes that the
mistress and young guy are
husband and wife. It goes
from there…figuring how to
keep the wife from finding
out about the situation.”
Brooks submitted the pro-
duction to the Actors Circle
for its 31st season after re-
membering how funny the
play was when he saw it on
Broadway in New York dur-
ing its original release in the
1960s.
“Me and my wife remem-
bered enjoying it, how come-
dic it was,” said Brooks. “It
has a cast of only four and it
did get a Tony Award.”
This is Brooks’ first time
working with the Actors Cir-
cle, although he has been
involved with theater before,
directing shows since high
school. And although there
are always bumps in the road
when perfecting an upcoming
performance, Brooks is excit-
ed for a live audience to see
it on opening night.
“Seeing the entire thing fall
into place is the reward, but
we won’t know until we have
a live audience as to whether
or not we truly have an en-
joyable comedy, but I think if
you were to just sit and read
it, you’d find it quite en-
joyable with some laughs.”
Brooks described a scene
in which the four characters
are playing a game after ar-
riving at the “executive suite”
which is “very entertaining
and also very insightful as to
what is really going on in
that setting of the suite,” but
you’ll have to check out the
show to find out what hap-
pens.
“I think it’s an entertaining
show, it’s one, if done effec-
tively, that’s very funny, en-
joyable, comedic…with a few
life lessons thrown in.”
W
“Any Wednesday,” Nov. 8, 9, 10,
16, 17, at 8 p.m.; Nov. 11 & 18 at
2 p.m.; Actors Circle at Provi-
dence Playhouse (1256 Provi-
dence Rd., Scranton). $12
general, $10 seniors, $8 stu-
dents. Reservations recom-
mended. Info: actorscircle.org.
Scandal, deceit,
and plenty of laughs
By Noelle Vetrosky
Weekender Correspondent
Cast members in ’Any Wednesday’ at Actors Circle
include, from left, John Jacobs, Ashley A. Michaels,
and John Arena.
2
9
2
7
9
5
WWW.GROTTOPIZZAPA.COM
FRI, NOVEMBER 9
SPERAZZO BAND
FRI, NOVEMBER 9
KIRA
GROTTO PIZZA IS YOUR FOOTBALL HEADQUARTERS.
$2 COORS LIGHT PINTS SATURDAYS
$2 MILLER LITE PINTS SUN & MON
GROTTO PIZZA AT
HARVEYS LAKE
THE GRAND SLAM SPORTS BAR
(639-3278)
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAYS
STARTING AT 9:30
GROTTO PIZZA AT
WYOMING VALLEY MALL
THE SKYBOX SPORTS BAR
(822-6600)
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
DURING HAPPY HOUR,
FRIDAYS 5-7
1-877-DR-BUCCI
www.BucciVision.com
Frank A. Bucci Jr., MD of Bucci Laser Vision in Wilkes-
Barre, PA is conducting a clinical research trial to study
an investigational treatment to stop or slow the
progression of keratoconus and corneal ectasia.
You may qualify to participate if you:
• are 12 years of age or older
• were diagnosed with keratoconus or were
diagnosed with corneal ectasia after you received
refractive surgery (e.g. LASIK, PRK)
• are able to come in for at least 8 office visits
over a 12 month period
Please call Bucci Laser Vision at 1-877-DR-BUCCI
(1-877-372-8224) and ask to speak with Ruth Evans for
more information and to schedule an appointment.
Do you suffer from
Keratoconus
or Corneal Ectasia?
Approved by Alpha IRB April 30, 2012
www.theweekender.com W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
3 7
8
8
2
1
4
v
Enter your pet for Weekender’s
PET OFTHEWEEK
by sending photo, pet’s name, breed
if applicable, owner’s name and
hometown to:
weekender@theweekender.com
subject line: Pet of the Week
Owner:
Eddie Powell
Exeter
Aussie Shepherd
CODY JARED
Infinite Improbability
GEEK CULTURE & MORE
Rich Howells | Weekender Staff Writer
As a very vocal hater of the
“Star Wars” prequels, many of
my friends expected me to abso-
lutely fly off the desert skiff like
an out-of-control bounty hunter
when Disney announced last
week that they had acquired
Lucasfilm for $4.05 billion and
are planning three new sequels in
the series, but seriously, I wish
them the best of luck.
This either means I’ve sudden-
ly become an optimist or I just
haven’t learned my lesson yet. I’ll
let you know which in 2015.
I still remember waiting out-
side the Viewmont Mall in 1999
with my father to purchase the
new “Star Wars Episode 1: The
Phantom Menace” toys at mid-
night from KB Toys. It was
weeks before the film’s theatrical
release, yet there I was ready to
drop all my hard-earned cash on
little plastic sculptures of charac-
ters I wasn’t even introduced to
yet – that’s how big a fan I was.
Then I saw the film on May
19, again at midnight. Having
seen the originals so many times
and surrounding myself with
every bit of merchandise I could
afford, it had honestly never
occurred to me that the movie
could be bad. Not as good, may-
be, but George Lucas could never
create a downright bad film. I
was even willing to see the mer-
its in “Howard the Duck.” How
could I possibly be let down?
Oh, but I was. It looked like
“Star Wars,” it sounded like “Star
Wars,” but it just didn’t feel like
“Star Wars.” This wasn’t the
droid I was looking for at all, and
no amount of Force suggestion
was going to distract me from the
wooden acting; clunky, unquo-
table dialog; yawn-inducing plot;
and dull, useless characters. Even
the special effects, which were
supposed to be so advanced, just
made everything seem even more
out-of-place as actors stood in
front of green screens and talked
to themselves. I left the theater
telling people it was “pretty
good,” but I knew I wouldn’t be
returning to KB for the second
line of toys.
I did return to the theater,
however, in 2002. And yet again
in 2005. My sad devotion to that
ancient religion only resulted in
continued disappointment as
Lucas choked the last remaining
hope for the series out of me. I
retreated back into the stories and
characters I loved as a child and
continued to watch Episodes IV,
V, and VI instead, at least until he
started messing with those too,
releasing special edition after
special edition of unnecessary
edits and additions.
Like many longtime fans, I felt
more betrayed than Obi-Wan
Kenobi. Why couldn’t the movies
be exactly as I remembered them,
as sci-fi masterpieces that were
both artistic and entertaining just
the way they were? Why couldn’t
I stop talking about how this new
trilogy had forever tainted my
beloved memories? Then I real-
ized one day that, quite simply, I
could.
For decades, authors have
written novels and comic books
full of new “Star Wars” adventur-
es. Video games utilized that
same universe, as did cartoons
and a certain holiday special that
no one wants to talk about. Be-
cause of its revolutionary mer-
chandising power, “Star Wars”
has always, by its very nature,
invited exploration and, there-
fore, exploitation. Did Hayden
Christensen make Darth Vader
silly and non-threatening or did
lamps, bobbleheads, and goofy
t-shirts do that first?
Between my VHS copies and
my DVDs with the theatrical
releases on the bonus discs, I can
see those old movies whenever I
want, so I’ve since learned to
agree to disagree with my old pal
George. Making crappy prequels
doesn’t erase the countless hours
of joy the originals brought me,
and how could anyone hate a guy
who plans to donate his $4 bil-
lion to children’s education? Not
only do I want to see what some
other writer and director does
with “Star Wars” next, I also
want to see those “personal
films” you keep talking about,
Mr. Lucas. After seeing “Red
Tails,” I still think you’ve got it in
you.
With rumors flying about
actors reprising their roles and
with possible plot points being
speculated, it’s an exciting time to
be a “Star Wars” fan again. I
truly want these new films to be
good, and considering Disney’s
history with Pixar and Marvel,
that seems like a very likely
possibility, but if they’re not,
they’re not. The series has sur-
vived worse and, obviously, so
has my fandom.
“Star Wars,” after all, has
always been more than a series of
films – it’s a cultural phenom-
enon, and no amount of Jar Jar
Binks is going to change that.
But please, Disney, no more
Jar Jar. The sound of a grown
Jedi crying is not a pretty one.
W
Disney brings new
hope to 'Star Wars'
"Star Wars" creator and filmmaker George Lucas meets
a group of "Star Wars"-inspired Disney characters in
2010 at Disney’s Hollywood Studios theme park in Lake
Buena Vista, Fla. (AP Photo/Disney, Todd Anderson)
P
A
G
E
3
4
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
(Market Street and Sprague Ave-
nue, Kingston, 570.288.8434)
• Veterans service: Nov. 11, 10
a.m.
Conyngham United Metho-
dist Church (411 Main Street,
Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conyng-
hamumc.com)
• Sisters: Tues., 10 a.m., began
Sept. 25. Andy Stanley six-week
study, “Twisting the Truth.” All
women welcome.
First Presbyterian Church
of Clarks Summit (300
School St., Clarks Summit,
570.586.6306, www.fpccs.org)
• Centennial Concert: Nov. 18, 4
p.m.
• Tim Coombs’ Interpretation of
Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol:” Nov.
30
Ss. Cyril and Methodius
Ukrainian Catholic Church
(135 River St., Olyphant)
• Third Annual Hometown Bake
Sale: Nov. 17, 5-7 p.m. and Nov. 18,
10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Info: 570.489.2271
St. Michael’s Ukrainian
Orthodox Church (540 N.
Main Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)
• Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11 a.m.-5
p.m.
St. Stephens Episcopal
Pro-Cathedral (35 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.346.4600)
• Food Pantry open Mon.-Fri.,
noon-4 p.m.
• Clothing Closet: free clothing
for men, women, children. Open
Tues., 4-6:30 p.m., Wed., noon-3:30
p.m.
St. Thomas More Society
(St. Clare Church, 2301 N. Washing-
ton Ave., Scranton, 570.343.0634,
stthomasmoresociety.org)
• Guardian of the Redeemer
Fellowship: First, third Mon. of
month for men interested in adult
discussion of Catholic faith.
• YOUCAT Teen Group welcomes
post-Confirmation youth from all
parishes for discussion of Theol-
ogy of the Body for Teens. Meets
first, third Thurs. of month, 5:30
p.m.
Trucksville United Metho-
dist Church (40 Knob Hill Rd.,
Trucksville, 570.696.3897, of-
fice@trucksvilleumc.com)
• All Gods Children special needs
program: every Sun. 9:45-10:45
a.m.
EVENTS
67th Annual Wyoming Val-
ley Veterans Day Parade,
Kingston Corners to Public Square,
Nov. 11, 2 p.m. Donations accepted
via SSgt. Christopher Keen at
570.288.6641.
Bartolai Winery (2377 State
Rt. 92 Highway, Coolidge Ave.,
Exeter Twp.)
• Rhythm & Wine: Nov. 16, 6:30-
9:30 p.m. Wine tasting, food, and
music to benefit Catholic Social
Services. Appetizers and desserts
by Dente Catering, music by Paul
Oschal. $50, call 570.822.7118 ex.
357 for tickets.
Browndale Fire Co. (Route
247, 620 Marion St., Browndale,
43fire.com)
• Homemade Pierogi For Sale:
donation $6/dozen. Potato and
cheese. To order, contact any
member, call 570.499.4908, e-mail
jdoyle@nep.net, go online.
Cameo House Bus Tours
(Anne Postupack, 570.655.3420,
anne.cameo@verizon.net, checks to
933 Wyoming Ave., W. Pittston, Pa.
18643)
• The Chocolate Show and 9/11
Memorial: Nov. 10
• Philadelphia — The Barnes and
Rodin Museums, Lunch at Union
League: Nov. 17
Celebrity Guest Bartending
Night benefiting Wyoming
Valley Childrens Associ-
ation: Nov. 28, 6-9 p.m., Luckys
Sporthouse (Schechter Dr., Wilkes-
Barre). $25 per stool, $50 per
table for two, $100 per table of
four, $200 per table of eight.
Info: 570.208.3267.
Conyngham United Metho-
dist Church (411 Main Street,
Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conyng-
hamumc.com)
• Sisters: Tues., 10 a.m., began
Sept. 25. Andy Stanley six-week
study, “Twisting the Truth.” All
women welcome.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500,
www.dietrichtheater.com)
• Airing of the Quilts: through
Nov. 15. Free.
• Golden Days of Radio Players:
Tues. through Dec. 4, 7-9 p.m.,
ages 18 and up. Free.
• Quilting for Everyone: “Carpen-
ter’s Wheel”: Wed. through Dec. 12,
6-7:30 p.m. $6 per class.
• Quilting for Kids - “Birds in
the Air”: Wed. through Dec. 12,
3:30-5 p.m. $6 per class.
• Decorative Painting: Wed.,
through Nov. 28, ages 16 and up.
$20 per class plus cost of paint-
ing surface.
• Yoga for You: Wed., through
Nov. 14 and Nov. 28, ages 16 and
up. $60 for six-class series or $15
per class.
• Kundalini Yoga: Sat., through
Nov. 17 and Dec. 1, 10-11:30 a.m.,
ages 16 and up. $60 for six class
series or $15 per class.
• Movement and Storytelling for
Preschoolers: Wed., through Nov.
14, Nov. 28, 10-10:45 a.m. Free.
• Painting From Life: Mon., Nov.
5-26, 7-8:30 p.m., ages 13 and up.
$60 for four-class series.
• Introduction to Sculpture: Tues.,
Nov. 6-27, 7-8:30 p.m. $60 for
four classes.
• Preschool Mask Making: Thurs.,
Nov. 8-15, Nov. 29-Dec. 6, 10-10:45
a.m. Free.
• Mask Making: Ages 5-8, Fri.,
Nov. 9-16, Nov. 30-Dec. 7, 4-5:30
p.m.; Ages 9-12, Thurs., Nov. 8-15,
Nov. 29-Dec. 6, 4-5:30 p.m. $40
for four classes.
• Holiday Candy Crafts: Nov. 10,
10-11:30 a.m. Free. For families with
kids ages 6-12.
• Northeastern Pennsylvania in
America History: Nov. 14, 7 p.m.
Free.
• Gingerbread House Workshop:
Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. For
ages 13 and up.
• Knit a Ruffled Scarf: Nov. 20,
7-9 p.m. $30, all materials provid-
ed. Ages 16 and up.
• Tips and Tricks for Making
Jewelry: Nov. 26, 6-9 p.m. $60, all
materials provided. Ages 16 and
up.
• Dietrich Radio Players Perform-
ance: Dec. 4, 7 p.m. Free.
• “Emmet Otter’s Jug-Band
Christmas”: Dec. 7-8, 5:30 and 7
p.m. Free.
• Holiday Workshop: Dec. 8, 11
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free.
• “It’s a Wonderful Life”: Dec. 18,
2, 7 and 8 p.m. Free.
• Holiday Camp: Dec. 27-28, 9:30-
11 a.m. $25. For ages 5-12.
• "Birds in the Air" quilting for
kids: Wed., through Dec. 12, 3:30-5
p.m. $6 per class.
• Holiday candy crafts: Nov. 10,
10-11:30 a.m. Free.
• "Carpenter’s Wheel" quilting for
everyone: Wed., through Dec. 12,
6-7:30 p.m. $6 per class.Doug
Smith Music (dougsmith-
bass@comcast.net, 570.343.7271)
• Dec. 1, 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.,
Santa Trail, train ride from Car-
bondale to Steamtown National
Historic Site. Info: 570.963.6730
Eastern Pocono Animal
Alliance Spay/Neuter Clinic
in need of volunteers, one day/
week to check in clients, more;
arrive by 8:15 a.m., commit to
every week. Positions to help w/
vaccination clinics, substitute desk
work. Stop in to office in back of
Rainbow Plaza, Route 209, Brod-
headsville, visitepaaonline.com, call
570.994.5846.
Eckley Miners’ Village (2
Eckley Main St., Weatherly,
570.636.2070, www.eckleyminers-
villagemuseum.com)
• Fall Foliage Photo Contest:
through Nov. 30. $5 registration
fee, submissions due to museum
Dec. 3.
Geisinger blood center
drive: Nov. 7 and Nov. 19, 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Geisinger-Community
Medical Center, Professional Build-
ing Auditorium (316 Colfax Ave.,
Scranton). Info: 1.866.996.5100,
geisingerbloodcenter.org.
Girls Night In Slumber
Party: Nov. 16, 6-11 p.m., The
Hilton Scranton and Conference
Center (100 Adams Ave., Scranton).
Presented by Mom Prom of NEPA.
Free when you book an overnight
stary at the Hilton for that eve-
ning. Info: 570.561.5714
Greater Scranton Chapter
of the Penn State Alumni
Association
Holiday Craft Fair: Nov. 10, 10
a.m.-3 p.m., West Side Career and
Technology Center (75 Evans St.,
Kingston). Proceeds aid community
projects and assist students in
their competitions. Info:
570.881.1882
Holiday Craft and Gift Fair:
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 39
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 28
Blood work
On Friday, Nov. 9, students of The Commonwealth Medical College will host a community blood
drive beginning at 11 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. at the Medical Sciences Building (525 Pine St., Scran-
ton). There is an emergency need for blood and platelet donors of all types throughout the area.
All blood donations made in the region stay in the region. The public is invited to participate.
For more information on donating blood, visit the Red Cross’s blood donation information online
at thecommonwealthmedical.com/blooddrive.
TCMC blood drive organizers are, from left: Sideris Facaros, MD1; Joleen DiMaggio, Representa-
tive I Donor Recruitment, American Red Cross; and Vincent Giannotti, MD1. W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
5
Mon - Thurs, & Sat 3-2 a.m., Fri & Sun noon - 2 a.m.
570-779-1800 • Corner of State and Nesbitt, Larksville
.30¢ wings all day/night
& $1 cans 9-11
$3 bombs & $2 shots of
Firewater or Black Haus
$3 well mixers & bombs $1 cans
9-11 p.m. • take it in the can?
.40 wings • $6 pizzas
$2 16 oz aluminum cans
t-shirt & gift certifcate giveaways
every quarter
MONDAY & THURSDAY
BEER PONG
$100 prize • $8 & $4 pitchers
$6 pizzas • $2 shots
Thurs: 20¢ clams
FRIDAY
ROBB BROWN
& FRIENDS
TUESDAY
BEER & WINGS
SATURDAY
FREE JUKEBOX
SUNDAY
NFL SUNDAY
FOOTBALL
779 1800 C f St t d N bitt L k i
Pub & Grub
YOU BELONG HERE!
shirt & g
e
b
Rob s
shirt & g
e
35 E. South St. • Wilkes-Barre
(570) 820-7172 • Open Mon.-Fri. 10 am - 6 pm
• Falafel • Kabob
• Gyros • Kibbi
• Tabouli • Baklava
$10ff
ß`$ߥl
1088$18l$ l81018l$ l81018l$ 10888888888888888888888888888888888888$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$11111111111111118l$
OPEN 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK!
355 S.Main St. Wilkes-Barre | (570) 371-3861
On the corner of Academy & South Main. Offer Exp.11/30/12.
S
P
OTS
S
PP
SS
OOOOOOOOOOO
PPPPPPPPPPP
T OO SSS TT
B
E
GO
N
E
S
S
BBBB
E
$100l81$I 60l 00f 800880l0 l80ß0f¶
88¶ l0f $â 8ß0 ¶0l 090f¶l0l߶ ¶00 08ß
8l0ll lß ll N88000 8 l0l000 l0f 0ßl¶ $1â
Nll0 00ll0¶0 l0.
8880088 888888880088
000000888888888888lllllllllffffffffffffffffff
0000000888888888llllllllfffffffff
ffffffffff000000000000000000088888888888888880
fffffffffff0000000000000088888888000000000000000000008888888888llllllllffffffffffffff
0000008888888888llllllllffffffff
00000000000
fffffffff000000000000000000008888888888888880
fffffffff0000000000008888888800000000000000000000000000000000000000888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff
000000000000000000008888888888888888888888888888llllllllllllllllllllllllllffffffffffffffffffffffffff
fffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888000000000000000000000000000
fffffffffffffffffffffffffffff000000000000000000000000000000088888888888888888888888888888800000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$#0l8 80 60ß0
l80ß0f0M8l

Check on it: www.theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
3
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
W
hen Britany
Nola’s
graduating
class at
Wallenpaupack Area High
School elected her “Most
Likely to Be Famous,” her
recent turn as Playboy’s
Playmate of the Month may
not be exactly what they had
in mind.
But then again, the beautiful
young blonde has always done
things her own way.
Born in Ontario, Canada,
her family moved to New York
before settling in Hawley,
where she spent her formative
years.
“I spent my middle school
and high school career in
Hawley, so I count it as
basically (my hometown),”
Nola explained during a phone
interview.
“I go there a lot. Because
I’m bi-coastal, I have a place
in (Los Angeles) and a place
in New York, but when I
don’t have anything to do,
they let me go home and I
spend a week or two weeks
there until whenever I have to
work again. I spend it with my
parents and my brother.”
With both her parents
working as therapists, child
psychology was her back-up
plan, but she truly wanted to
be an actress, even knowing
her chances were slim.
During her senior
year, she took classes at
the Fashion Institute of
Technology in New York,
where she would frequently
meet a friend who was
a model for lunch. She
MA
BRITANY
NOLA
BIRTH DATE:
APRIL 12, 1991
HEIGHT: 5’9”
WEIGHT: 125 LBS
MEASUREMENTS:
34B-26-36
BIRTHPLACE:
ONTARIO, CANADA
HOMETOWN: HAWLEY, PA
TURN-ONS: “A MAN
WITH PASSION AND
INTELLIGENCE.”
FAVORITE MOVIE:
“WINGS OF DESIRE”
FAVORITE SONG:
“WHERE IS MY MIND?”
BY THE PIXIES W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
7
ATURE CoNTENT
convinced her to try modeling
for herself, and before she
knew it, Nola’s new career
“happened really fast,” scoring
her first major job – a 16-page
fashion spread – at the age of
18.
“I dress very strange. Well,
not strange, but very, very
New York, so I have a hard
time in LAbecause I don’t
dress the way that everyone
else does in LA. I get a lot of
stares. When I go out to dinner
with girlfriends, they kind
of hate what I’m wearing all
the time,” she related with a
laugh.
“Ever since I was little,
everyone always called me
‘unique,’ but they always
said it in a very strange way,
like, ‘Britany, you’re very…
unique.’”
Her eccentricities, however,
may have helped her get
noticed.
“Alot of it is about
connections and about
networking and stuff. The
people I meet like me
because…I have a different
personality,” Nola noted. “I’m
very opinionated. I don’t back
down, not in a tough way, but
I’m not afraid of confrontation
or anything.”
She soon caught the eye
of photographer and director
Jonathan Leder, who thought
she resembled actress Mariel
Hemingway.
“I guess I became his muse,
which neither of us like to call
it that, but that’s the easiest
way to say what it was. He
shot me for like everything,”
including commercials for
Louis Vuitton and Adidas.
“I can attribute not being
shy about nudity to the films
that I’ve watched, but I think
I also attribute it to Jonathan
Leder because I was the shiest
person ever before I met him.”
He also helped her live
her childhood dream, giving
Nola her first starring role in
his film “American Ecstasy,”
a black-and-white art piece
described as “a lyrical
journey through the decadent
American landscape.”
“I spent like two years
of my life on the road with
him. We went to Florida to
shoot the film,” she recalled.
“Jonathan has pushed me to do
things in public or go talk to
people and ask them if we can
shoot there. He just pushed me
out of my shell these last two
years.”
SHEDDING
CLoTHES AND
INHIBITIoNS
N
ola first posed
nude for a German
magazine, wearing
a brunette wig “in the middle
of New Jersey.” Her Playboy
shoot at a home in LA,
featured this month in the
magazine’s centerfold, was a
decidedly different experience.
“It’s about you. It’s not a
fashion shoot. In the fashion
world, you’re a model
showing off and you’re doing
someone else’s concept,” she
pointed out.
“They had a very big
meeting in the beginning to
speak about your interests and
everything about you. They
want to find out everything
they can about you and then
try to portray it in the shoot.
That was cool because I felt
really confident…because it
was exactly what I wanted
and the clothing was what I
wanted. I was able to listen to
my own music, and everyone
was so kind.”
The retro furniture and
vintage record player in the
photos are evidence that she
feels “stuck in a different
decade,” citing Béatrice Dalle,
Brigitte Bardot, and Jane
Birkin as influences.
“You don’t feel weird seeing
them. You don’t feel strange
because they’re comfortable
and they aren’t ashamed of
their naked body. I think I’ve
drawn a lot of confidence from
seeing those women,” she
acknowledged.
“In other cultures, when
they do show the nude body,
they don’t necessarily over-
sexualize it, you know? I feel
like in America we get a little
nervous about doing it because
it’s such a taboo and because
people are weirded out by it.”
Not even her parents are
phased by her nude modeling,
but Nola guesses that this
may be due to their Canadian
origins.
“They raised me to be a
pretty well-rounded person,
and I think they really trust
me and they think that I know
what I’m doing. They think
that I can handle myself, and
they think it’s cool. They’re
amazing.”
MACHINE
MINDS
O
nce the 21-year-old
gets on the topic of
movies, her favorite
being Wim Wenders’ “Wings
of Desire,” it’s apparent that
she’s more than just a pretty
face.
The quote on top of her
Twitter page – “Machine
men, with machine minds and
machine hearts” – comes from
“The Great Dictator,” Charlie
Chaplin’s famous talking
picture.
“He was such an
inspirational person. I have
a really bad habit of calling
people machines. I think that
a lot of people need to open
their minds and open their
eyes and learn about our
world. …There’s just a lot of
hate in this world and a lot of
conformity,” Nola commented.
“I’m really trying to train
myself to live by my moral
standards, not society’s,
so every time that I do
something, I ask myself, ‘Am
I doing this because society
tells me I have to or I can’t,
or am I doing this because I
feel like it’s right or am I not
doing it because I feel like it’s
wrong?’”
Nola feels that “American
Ecstasy” may help expose this
deeper side of her personality
to future collaborators.
“I’m hoping that people who
see this film will realize that
this is where my interests lie,”
she continued. “I would love
to work with people who have
a bit of a different mindset,
people doing new things and
interesting things.”
Her Twitter account, which
she reluctantly started at the
request of her agent, has also
been a conversation starter in a
much different way.
“People write me all the
time and I always forget to
check my accounts and to
write back. …I go through
them all and reply and I guess
that’s the weirdest thing
– people on Twitter that I
went to high school with are
18 PLAYBOY
PLAYMATES, WHO
ARE FEATURED IN
THE MAGAZINE’S
CENTERFOLD,
WERE BORN IN
PENNSYLVANIA.
SCRANTON NATIVE
SARAH CLAYTON
HAS POSED AS A
PLAYBOY CYBER
GIRL ON PLAYBOY’S
WEBSITE, AND
EMMA MICHAUD,
“KIKI,” OF HARVEYS
LAKE HAS BEEN
FEATURED ON
PLAYBOY TV.
congratulating me and
asking me how I am,”
she said.
“I bought my place
in New York before I
graduated high school,
then I graduated high
school and I just got in
my car and I left that
day. I haven’t really been
back. I was back maybe a
month ago and I went to
my football game for the
first time. That was very
strange. I haven’t talked
to so many people since
I was in high school, so
that’s kind of cool to talk
to people through the
Internet and see what’s
new with them and how
their lives are turning
out.”
Few may have as
compelling a story in just
three short years. W
P
A
G
E
3
8
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
7
7
0
3
3
7
570-826-6931 or 570-970-9090
565 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702
• Serving Wilkes-Barre & Surrounding Areas
• Service To Area Airports •Fast, Dependable, Courteous Service
• Newer Model Taxi’s / Airconditioned / Safe & Reliable
• Open 24 hours a day
B
u
r
g
i
t

s
Cit
y
T
a
x
i
OPEN 365 DAYS
A YEAR
g
i
t
s
it
y
T
7
7
5
8
8
3
A MUST
570-602-4021
WWW.PRESTIGESSI.COM
49 SOUTH MAIN ST.SUITE 102
PITTSTON, PA 18640
7
8
8
2
2
1
Melissa

s Mind
I have reason to
believe the lady
from“Dance
Moms” is eating
the children.
Who can help
me prove this?
Lissa of KRZ has a lot on
her mind, and she needs
to speak it. Check out the
Weekender every week
to read her deep thoughts
and philosophical
approach to life.
For more of Melissa’s wisdom, follow her on Facebook and read her blog.
facebook.com/melissakrahnkerocks • 985krz.com/Lissa/11276840
Comedian Brian Regan last
performed in Wilkes-Barre in
2009, but that’s not why he re-
members the area.
While he grew up in Miami,
his father was a railroad worker
from Scranton and his mother
resided in Binghamton, N.Y.
“They went down to Miami,
Fla. for their honeymoon and
said, ‘Why would we go back up
to Scranton?’” Regan cracked in
a recent phone interview.
“We would go up there for
vacation. I used to joke with my
mom and dad, saying ‘We live in
Miami, Fla. and we’re going to
Scranton for our vacation?’ We
were relentless. We would go up
there to see our relatives and stuff
like that, so I spent a lot of time
in that area. It’s interesting to be
able to perform there.”
Returning to the northeast on
Nov. 10 for a show at the F.M.
Kirby Center (71 Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre), he now calls Las
Vegas, Nev. home, one that is
much less crowded than his
upbringing with seven brothers
and sisters.
“Oddly enough, of the eight
kids, there are four occupations –
there are two comedians, two
firefighters, two schoolteachers,
and two salesmen, so I tell peo-
ple we grew up on an ark. It’s
very weird,” he joked.
He credits them with shaping
his sense of humor, which may
have saved him from life as an
accountant.
“I was all geared up for one
exciting life of accounting and I
burned out on that after about
three weeks of accounting classes
(in college). I switched majors to
communication and theater arts.
One of my first classes in that
new major was a speech class
and I used to try to make my
speeches funny just so I wouldn’t
bore myself to tears. I remember
that feeling I got after I got the
class laughing, that feeling of
walking back to my dorm. I
remember saying to myself, ‘I
didn’t feel like this when I walk-
ed back from accounting class,’
so that’s what gave me the bug,”
Regan recalled.
The now 55-year-old has trust-
ed his gut ever since, formulating
material based on his everyday
life.
“I kind of tightrope between
real stuff and silly stuff. I like to
keep going back and forth with it
because I don’t want the audi-
ence to start figuring me out. I
like to do bits and I want the
audience to be saying to them-
selves, ‘Is this true? Or this just
like a true story that he’s telling
that’s funny, or is this going to
get a little quirky at the end?’” he
explained.
“Every once in a while, I throw
a curveball and have people go,
‘Well that’s clearly absurd. I
don’t believe that happened,’ and
then the next joke, they’re ex-
pecting absurdity and you give
them more reality. So it’s fun to
go back and forth.”
Not every incident is funny at
the time, however.
“I have a whole routine about
going to the emergency room,
which is a true story. Clearly I
wasn’t laughing like a maniac
while it was happening, but a
couple weeks later you look back
and go, ‘Hey, there was some
funny stuff there,’” he noted.
Featured in two Comedy Cen-
tral specials, Regan’s clean jokes
have helped him gain a nation-
wide audience, but it’s not some-
thing he consciously writes for a
specific crowd.
“I like just talking about every-
day things, and so my mind,
comedically, doesn’t really grav-
itate (towards profanity). Yeah,
there’s a nice by-product in the
fact that a lot of audiences also
like it, but I don’t put the cart
before the horse. To me, I just do
it because I like it, and if there
are people out there that also like
it, then great, I guess I get to
have a career out of it,” he said.
“The topics are purposely
bland. I like to try to pull comedy
out of everyday things. I talk
about food and I talk about going
to the doctor and I just talk about
things that everybody does on a
daily basis. If you just read the
topics, you might go, ‘Well this
seems a little milquetoasty, but
I’m trying to find peculiarity
within those.”
Over the years, he has made
friends with comics like Jerry
Seinfeld, but he has largely favor-
ed a career in stand-up over tele-
vision and movies, self-releasing
his latest special, “All By My-
self,” through his website, brian-
regan.com.
“If something came my way
that had to do with my comedy
and how I think as a comedian,
I’d be open to it, but I’ve been
resistant over the years to get
involved with somebody else’s
creative vision just for the sake
of becoming a sitcom star. That
doesn’t really interest me. I like
the comedy,” Regan insisted.
“If my comedy can be famous,
then I’ll be happy to go along for
the ride, but I don’t want to be-
come famous in lieu of my com-
edy. I don’t want to leave that
behind.”
W
Brian Regan returns
with relatable humor
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
Brian Regan, Nov. 10, doors at
7 p.m., show at 8 p.m., F.M.
Kirby Center (71 Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre). $39.50.
Brian Regan’s humor found in the otherwise mundane
has provided him with a widespread audience. He comes
to the F.M. Kirby Center to share more on Saturday. W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
9
Nov. 9, 6-9 p.m., Irem Clubhouse
(64 Ridgway Dr., Dallas). Info:
570.675.1134, ext. 100.
"In dulci jubilo: In Sweet
Rejoicing": Choral Arts of Lu-
zerne County, Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m.,
First Presbyterian Church (97 S.
Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre) and Dec.
9, 3 p.m., Christ Lutheran Church
(467 Main St., Conyngham). $15,
adults; $10, students and senior
citizens.
“Leadership on Tap,” Sus-
quehanna Brewing Co. (635 S.
Main St., Pittston), Nov. 9, 5-8
p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at door.
Proceeds benefit Leadership
Wilkes-Barre Scholarship and De-
velopment Fund. Info: 570.823.2101,
ext. 135.
The Mall at Steamtown
(300 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton,
570.343.3400)
• Live music and/or magic and
children’s entertainment: Every
Tues., Thurs., noon-2 p.m.; every
Sun. 12:30-2:30 p.m.
• Open Mic with Sarah Yzkanin
or Janice Gambo Chesna: Every
Wed., 6-8 p.m.
Monroe County Garden
Club
• Monthly meeting Nov. 8, 11:30
a.m. Hughes Public Library (1002
N. Ninth Street, Stroudsburg). $5.
Info: 570.420.0283.
Monroe County Unity Sem-
inar Nov. 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., East
Stroudsburg University Innovation
Center (314 Independence Road,
Route 447 and E. Brown St., East
Stroudsburg) Info: 570.445.4292.
National Adoption Month
event: Nov. 20, 6-8 p.m., Wyom-
ing Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre. Info:
families4kids.org.
Northern Tier Symphony
Orchestra (570.289.1090, north-
erntiersymphony@yahoo.com, north-
erntiersymphony.org)
• Concert: Nov. 17, 8 p.m., Tunk-
hannock Middle School. Advance:
$8/adult, $4/student. Door: $9/
adult, $5/student
The Osterhout Free Library
(71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
www.osterhout.info, 570.821.1959)
• Learn How to Knit of Crochet:
Nov. 7, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
• Socrates Cafe Discussion Group:
Nov. 8, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
• Apply to College seminar: Nov.
8, 6-7:30 p.m. Free.
• Knit and Crochet Group: Sat.,
Nov. 10 and 24, 10:30 a.m.-noon.
Free.
• Rebekah Armusik author dis-
cussion: Nov. 10, 1 p.m. Free.
• Franklin Street Sleuths mystery
book discussion: Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m.
Free.
• Poetry series: Third Thurs., Nov.
20, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565, pit-
memlib@comcast.net)
• Crochet club, Tues., 10 a.m.,
Thurs., 6 p.m.
• Kids’ craft club: Third Sat., Nov.
17, 10 a.m. For grades 2-5.
• Kids Science Club, first Sat. of
each month, open to students in
grades 2-5.
• ‘Page Turners’ kids’ book club,
first Thurs. of each month, 4 p.m.,
grades 3-5.
• Teen Advisory Group, Nov. 8, 6
p.m., open to middle and senior
high school students.
• Lego club, Nov. 11, 3:45 p.m.
• Christmas card collection for
troops: Cards due by Nov. 12, card
making party Nov. 12 at 6 p.m.
Submitted cards should not be
sealed or stamped.
• Holiday Gift Fair, Dec. 8, 10
a.m.-3 p.m. $10.00.
The Regal Room (216 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Olyphant, 570.489.1901)
• Deluxe Semi-private Christmas
Party: Dec. 8, 7 p.m.-midnight.
$35-52, due Nov. 30. Full course
dinner, open bar, music by Jeffrey
James Band, 21+.
“Tattoos For Life:” Nov. 10,
noon-8 p.m., Stormi Steel Tattoos
and Body Piercing (364 East St.,
Bloomsburg). Proceeds benefit
American Foundation for Suicide
Prevention. Tattoo designs themed
around “Love Life” available for
$20 per tattoo, 50 percent of
each tattoo benefits foundation.
Four artists available Nov. 10.
First-come, first-served; appoint-
ments scheduled if necessary.
Info: facebook.com/stormisteeltat-
toosforlife, 570.387.8085.
Trauma expo: Nov. 19, 9 a.m.-3
p.m., Geisinger-Community Medical
Center, Professional Building Audi-
torium (316 Colfax Ave., Scranton).
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Wa-
verly, waverlycomm.org)
• 29th annual Artisans’ Market-
place: Nov. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Nov.
18, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $6. Info: 570.586-
8191, ext. 5.
• Wreathmaking with Abby Peck:
Dec. 7, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $2. Info:
570.586.8191, ext. 5,
• Breakfast with Santa: Dec. 8,
10:30 a.m. $8. Info: 570.586.8191,
ext. 5
Wilkes-Barre City Events
• Farmers’ Market: Thurs.,
through Nov. 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Public Square. Thurs. Info: wilkes-
barre.pa.us/farmersm.php
Wyoming Farmers Market
(Butlers Park, corner of 8th and
Butler Streets)
• Every Saturday 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Fresh produce, crafts, and food
vendors. Vendor opportunities
available at 570.693.0291, option 1.
Your Dog’s Place, LLC
(570.729.8977, yourdogsplace@ya-
hoo.com)
• K9 Nose Work: Intro to Nose
Work, Sat., 11:30 a.m.; Wed., 10 a.m.
Intro to Odor, Mon., 8:15 p.m. Intro
to Vehicles and Exteriors, Mon., 7
p.m. Continuing Nose Work, Mon.,
5 p.m.
• Kinderpuppy: Wed., 6 p.m., Sat.,
10 a.m. Puppy parenting 101.
• Canine Life & Social Skills:
Thurs., 5:30, 6:30, 7:30 p.m.
• Reliable Recalls: Fri., 6-7:30 p.m.
LOCAL HISTORY
Eckley Miners’ Village (locat-
ed nine miles east of Hazleton,
just off Route 940; 570.636.2070;
www.eckleyminers.org)
Electric City Trolley Mu-
seum and Coal Mine Tour
(Cliff Street, Scranton
570.963.6590) Museum open 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Excursions: Wed.-Sun.
10:30 a.m., noon, 1:30 p.m., 3 p.m.
Rides: $10 adults, $9 seniors, $7.75
ages 3-12. Mine open daily 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Tours hourly, $8
adults, $7.50 seniors, $5.50 ages
3-12.
Everhart Museum (1901 Mul-
berry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
• European River Cruise: April
8-15, 2013. From $2,549/member,
double occupancy, plus air. Info:
570.504.7575, EverhartRiverCruise-
.com
The Houdini Museum (1433
N. Main Ave., Scranton)
Every weekend by reservation.
Open 1 p.m., closes 4 p.m. Also
available weekdays for school
groups, bus, hotel groups. $17.95/
adults, $14.95/11 and under.
• Ghost Tours: Scheduled daily, 7
p.m., reservations required. Secret
time/meeting place divulged upon
reservation, call 570.383.1821.$20/
adults, $15/11 and under. Rain or
shine, year-round. Daytime walks
also available on limited basis.
Private tours can be arranged for
groups. Info: scrantonghosttour-
s.com, magicus@comcast.net.
Lackawanna Historical So-
ciety (The Catlin House, 232
Monroe Avenue, Scranton,
570.344.3841)
❏ Downtown Walking Tours (free
and open to the public):
• Custom Tours: 7-8 blocks,
about 2 hours. Routes selected
based on interests of participants
Most days, noon-6 p.m. $5/person,
min. 4 people, max. 30. Call
955.0244.
• Step-on bus tours, Costume
Tours: Call for info.
Luzerne County Historical
Society (49 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.6244,
lchs@epix.net)
• Denison House Afternoons of
Colonial Hospitality: Dec. 8-9, 1-5
p.m., Nathan Denison House (35
Denison St., Kingston). $4, adults;
$2, children; free, under 5.
Pennsylvania’s Anthracite
Heritage Museum (McDade
Park, Scranton: 570.963.4804,
www.phmc.state.pa.ust) Open year
round, Mon.-Sat. from 9 a.m.-5
p.m. and Sun., noon-5 p.m.
Scranton Iron Furnaces (159
Cedar Ave., Scranton, www.anthra-
citemuseum.org)
For guided tours, call Anthracite
Heritage Museum at 570.963.4804
for schedule/fees.
St. Ann’s National Basilica
Shrine and Monastery
(Scranton: 570.347.5691) Group
tours available by appointment.
Open 9 a.m.-8 p.m. daily.
Steamtown National His-
toric Site (I-81 to Exit 53,
Scranton: 570.340.5200 or
888.693.9391, www.nps.gov/stea)
• Ongoing: Interpretive programs,
visitor center, theater, a history
museum. Open daily, 9-5 p.m. $7
adults, $6 senior citizens, $2
children ages 6-12.
• The “Scranton Limited” train
ride: Wed.-Sun. 30 minute rides
depart from Roundhouse boarding
area Wed., 10:30 & 11:30 a.m., 1:30
& 2:15 p.m. A historic steam loco-
motive operates Thurs.-Sun. 10:30
& 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 2:15 p.m. $3
per person, all ages 6+. Visit
www.nps.gov/stea for train sched-
ule or call 570.340.5200.
Tripp House (1011 N. Main Ave.,
Scranton: 570.961.3317). The oldest
structure in Lackawanna County.
Tours are conducted by appoint-
ment.
LEARNING
Art Classes at the Ge-
orgiana Cray Bart Studio
(123 Brader Dr., Wilkes-Barre,
570.947.8387, gcraybart@aol.com,
gcraybart-artworks.com)
❏ Painting, drawing, creative
arts/pencil, charcoal, oil, acrylic,
pastel, colored pencil, mixed
media:
• Adults (Ages 13+): Mon.-Tues.,
noon-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed., 6-9 p.m.
Student may choose length of
time from 1-3 hrs. for evening
class
• Children (Ages 8-12): Weekdays,
4:30-5:30 p.m.
ArtWorks Gallery & Studio
(503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
570.207.1815, artworksnepa.com):
• ‘Let’s Build a Snowman!”: Nov.
10, 1:30-3 p.m., for ages 7-12. $25,
all supplies included.
“Jewelry Making Goes Green -
Recycled Earrings Workshop”: Nov.
17, 12:30-2:30 p.m. $35, supplies
included.
Ballroom Dancing taught by
certified members of Dance Edu-
cators of America. Available for
private groups, clubs, organiza-
tions, senior centers, more. Call
570.785.9459.
Bridge. Beginning or Intermedi-
ate Lessons, playing time for
regular games and tournaments.
Jewish Community Center (River
Street, Wilkes-Barre). Call Rick
Evans at 570.824.4646 or Rev. Ken
McCrea at 570.823.5957.
Downtown Arts at Arts
YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787,
www.artsyouniverse.com)
• Kids Craft Hour with Liz Revit:
Sat., 10:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Make jew-
elry, paper mache, more. $15,
includes supplies. For info or to
register, call 817.0176.
Drawing and Painting Les-
sons: Realist painter teaches
techniques of old masters. Private
lessons Fri.-Sun. To schedule, call
570.820.0469, e-mail bekshev@ya-
hoo.com or visit www.artistvs.com.
Everhart Museum (1901 Mul-
berry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
• “Everybody’s Art” New Series
of Adult Art Classes: $25/workshop
members, $30 non-members. Pre-
registration required.
• Rosen Method easy movement
program, Thurs., 2-3 p.m., Folk art
gallery, $5/class, free to members.
Must pre-register.
• Early Explorers: Mon., 1-1:45 p.m.
Free, suitable for ages 3-5. Pre-
registration required, groups wel-
come. For info, to register, call or
e-mail education@everhart-mu-
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 48
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 34
P
A
G
E
4
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
A longtime audience member
will become one of the featured
readers at New Visions Studio
and Gallery’s (201 Vine St.,
Scranton) Writers Showcase this
week.
Barbara Taylor, a Scranton
resident and English teacher in
the Pocono Mountain School
District for the last 26 years, will
share pieces of her novel during
the event on Nov. 10 at 7 p.m.
Taylor will be joined by Scran-
ton resident and playwright Kait
Burrier; Misericordia University
instructor Erin Delaney; El-
izabethtown College writing
fellow Richard Fellinger; Yardley
resident and 2006 Bucks County
poet laureate Marie Kane; and
Vestal, N.Y. resident and English
teacher Grace Persico, according
to a release.
“I have been going to the read-
ings at New Visions since the
series started,” Taylor explained.
The event is one of several she
regularly attends that were started
by fellow Wilkes creative writing
alumni, including the “Prose in
Pubs” series founded by Amye
Archer.
Taylor said she’s excited to
share new pieces of her first
novel. “Providence Square” has
been in the works for two years,
she explained. It is set in Scran-
ton in the early 1900s “during the
time of Vaudeville, evangelism,
and coal mining.” It follows the
tale of a young girl blamed for
the tragic death of her sister and
is inspired in part by a true in-
cident, she said.
“My grandmother’s sister was
burned tragically on the Fourth
of July,” she explained. “No one
blamed the sister, but it’s a story
that always stuck with me. It was
actually the day of her baptism.
She survived for three days, and
she sang hymns. When she died,
people all over the city came to
see ‘the little girl who sang
hymns.’”
Mentor Kaylie Jones has
helped Taylor through the revi-
sion process a great deal. The
Wilkes University faculty mem-
ber is a novelist and screenwriter
in her own respect and the
daughter of James Jones, author
of “From Here to Eternity.”
The writing process often
brings surprises to the aspiring
novelist.
“I really enjoy finding out
what’s going to happen. I don’t
outline, so I’m not exactly sure
where the story is going. When I
go upstairs to sit down and write,
I’m finding out for the first time.
I let the characters tell the story,”
she said.
“I’m surprised by the stories
that come to me at the time I
need them, and characters come
out of nowhere. They pop up and
take it in a whole different direc-
tion.”
Taylor said she was drawn to
fiction after being introduced to
all of the creative writing genres,
adding, “The story (in ‘Providen-
ce Square’) was too big to tell in
any other way.”
“Novels are what I know and
what I read,” she said. “It was the
place where I felt most comfort-
able.”
Participating in readings like
the one set for Saturday changes
writing from a very solitary
practice to one that a community
can share. It’s also something she
does with her sophomore stu-
dents at Pocono Mountain.
“I love to read and write, and I
just try to bring that enthusiasm
into the classroom. When I get
the nerve up, I share my own
writing with the kids, and they
share with me. I try to build a
safe space to create that way,” she
said.
Taylor, who earned her mas-
ter’s degree in creative writing in
2008, is currently working with
an agent to pitch “Providence
Square” to publishers, and she
has started assembling the frame-
work for a second novel.
W
Novelist Taylor joins
New Visions series
By Christopher J. Hughes
Weekender Staff Writer
New Visions Writers Showcase
feat. Kait Burrier, Erin Dela-
ney, Richard Fellinger, Marie
Kane, Grace Persico, and Barb
Taylor: Nov. 10, 7 p.m., New
Visions Studio and Gallery (201
Vine St., Scranton). Free.
Aspiring novelist and Pocono Mountain School District
English teacher Barbara Taylor joins the New Visions
Writers Showcase after attending the Scranton event
for several months.
‘I really enjoy finding out what’s going to happen. I
don’t outline, so I’m not exactly sure where the sto-
ry is going. When I go upstairs to sit down and
write, I’m finding out for the first time. I let the
characters tell the story.’
Barbara Taylor
On developing the story behind ‘Providence Square’
Happy Hour
J&H Beer
1574 Highway 315, Plains, Pa 18702
Rich “How Did
I Get Here?”
“Strong opening,
nice finish.”
Johnny Beer
Drinker
“High ABV with a
clean, grape-like finish.”
Disaronno
Dittmar
“Good to the last
drop.”
Kieran Lite?
“Almost has a wine
taste.”
Sampling booze all over NEPA
The Weekender staff brings you our expert opinions (and by
expert we mean not at all) on alcoholic beverages from area
restaurants and bars every other week in the Weekender.
We know, our job is really, really hard.
WANT THE WEEKENDER
TO VISIT YOUR
ESTABLISHMENT
FOR A TASTE TEST?
E-mail the name of the business,
contact name, beverage you would
like sampled and phone number to:
weekender@theweekender.com,
subject line: Happy Hour
or call 570.831.7398
‘t Gaverhopke Singing Blond W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
1
LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Bill Clinton @ Scranton High School, 11.05.12.
Photos by Jason Riedmiller
For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Rudy Giuliani & Jon Voight in downtown
Scranton, 11.05.12. • Photos by Jason Riedmiller
For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
4
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
Fitness
I’m sure this scenario
sounds familiar...
You decided to get in
shape for that holiday party
- or beach vacation - or
wedding - or class reunion.
You joined a gym, told your
friends about your new plan,
toured the grocery store for
healthy items, and even
bought new workout gear to
get things rolling.
Week one you worked out
five days, week two, three
days, week three you were
down to one day because
your dog was sick. And
week four well, zero workout
days and zero motivation.
After one month of “solid
effort” you are back to
where you started; frustrated,
out of shape, feeling lazy
and having no desire to con-
quer that goal you set 30
days ago.
So what went wrong?
It’s difficult to say specifi-
cally what went wrong but I
can take a good guess. Peo-
ple tend to get all jazzed up
about something typically
surrounding an event. Some-
thing triggers that motivation
and more often than not this
new found motivation is
short lived.
While I think it’s extreme-
ly important to join that
gym, tour the isles of the
grocery store and even buy
new workout clothes, I don’t
feel that these things should
be done immediately. You
should first identify reasons
you attempted and possibly
failed in the past, and sec-
ond, realize and understand
what your true motives are.
You cannot fix something if
you aren’t sure where to
start. Many people skip
these initial steps and never
make it longer than one
month.
The holiday season is
quickly approaching. The
stores are stocking their
shelves with holiday mer-
chandise, commercials on
television have holiday un-
dertones and visions of coo-
kies, desserts, and high fat,
carb laden foods dance in
your head.
Don’t wait until January 1
to begin your journey – be
accountable for your actions
now. This holiday season
stand out from the crowd.
Don’t gain weight, lose it.
Then come New Year resolu-
tion time, instead of focus-
ing on the mundane, cliché
goals of losing weight, you
can focus on something
deeper such as the following
(as suggested by the Jew-
ishJournal.com):
• Re-evaluation your
friendships/relationships and
accept only what you de-
serve.
• Motivate yourself. Daily.
• Practice being a skeptic.
Not a cynic.
• Nurture your negative
feelings, then move on.
• Reach out to someone
who can use you as a role
model.
New resolutions will help
you re-energize yourself and
add an instant upgrade to
your life and help you create
a new, improved you. Don’t
wait...start your journey now.
For more information, I
can be reached at thli-
via@hotmail.com
W
- Tim Hlivia is the owner
of Leverage Fitness Studio
in Forty Fort.
Put fitness first
this holiday season
Don’t wait until January 1 to begin your journey – be
accountable for your actions now. This holiday sea-
son stand out from the crowd. Don’t gain weight,
lose it.
CLASSES
Academy of Northern Martial
Arts (79 N. Main St., Pittston) Tradition-
al Kung Fu & San Shou. For Health and
Defense. Adult & Children’s Classes,
Mon.-Thurs., Sat. First class free. Walk-ins
welcome, call 371.9919, 817.2161 for info.
Adult Kung Fu (Kung Fu & Tai Chi
Center, Wilkes-Barre: 570.829.2707)
Ongoing classes. Tues./Thurs., 6:30
p.m. Study of Chinese Martial Art open
hand, weapons sets. Mon., Wed., 6:30 p.m.
Covers Chinese style theories, concepts,
applications. “Sport” fighting concepts
explained, practiced.
Aikido of Scranton, Inc. (1627 N.
Main Ave., Scranton, 570.963.0500)
• Self-Defense Class taught by Aikido
Master Ven Sensei, every Mon. & Wed.,
7-9 p.m. $10.
• Traditional Weapons Class, Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. $10.
Back Mountain Martial Arts
Center & Mountaintop Karate
Center
For info, call either location, Back
Mountain (4 Carr Ave., 570.675.9535) or
Mountaintop (312 S. Mountain Blvd.,
466.6474): Visit Website at www.fu-
doshinkai1.com.
• Instruction in Traditional Karate,
Jujutsu, Sivananda Yoga (Back Mountain):
Tues., Wed., Thurs., 4:30-9 p.m., Sat., 8:30
a.m.-12 p.m. (Mountaintop Karate Center
Mon., Weds., Fri., 4:30-9 p.m.
• Instruction in Traditional Karate,
Jujutsu, Sivananda Yoga (Mountaintop):
Mon., Wed., Fri., 4:30-9 p.m.
Beauty Lies Within School of
Pole Dance (32 Forrest St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.793.5757, sl.beautylieswith-
in@gmail.com). Hours by appointment,
free sample appointment. Call or e-mail
for details.
Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152,
www.dancecontours.com)
• Adult classes: ballet, tap, lyrical,
CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.
• Children/teen classes: ballet, tap,
CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a form of
dance blending basic Jazz Technique
with styles of street dance, hip hop.
• Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.
• Adult ballet: Sat. morn.
Danko’s Core Wrestling
Strength Training Camp (Danko-
sAllAmericanFitness.com)
• Four sessions/week, features two
clinics, two core strength. 4 sessions/
week. Increase power, speed, agility.
Group discounts, coaches, teams, clubs,
free stuff. Visit website or call Larry
Danko at 570.825.5989 for info.
Downtown Arts at Arts YOU-
niverse (47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.970.2787, www.artsyouni-
verse.com)
• Traditional Egyptian Belly Dance:
Wed., beginners 6-7 p.m.; intermediate
7-8 p.m. intermediate. $10. Call 343.2033
for info.
• Tribal Fusion Dance: Thurs., begin-
ners 6-7 p.m.; intermediate 7-8 p.m. $10.
Call 836.7399 for info.
• Cabaret with Helena: Sat., 4:30 p.m.
Pre-registration required. Call 553.2117 for
info.
• African Dance: Wed. & Sun., 1 p.m.
Traditional African moves with jazz and
hip-hop. $10, registration required, call
212.9644 or visit hipbodysoul.com for
info.
Downtown Dojo Karate Acad-
emy (84 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.262.1778)
Offering classes in traditional karate,
weapons, self defense. Mon-Thurs.,
5:30-8:45 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon.
• Zumba Classes: Tues., Thurs., 7-8
p.m.; Sat., 12:30-1:30 p.m. $5/class. Call for
info.
Extreme M.M.A.(2424 Old Ber-
wick Rd., Bloomsburg. 570.854.2580)
• MMA Class: Mon., Wed., 6-7 p.m.
First visit free. Wrestling fundamentals,
basic Brazilian Ju-Jitsu No Gi. Call for
info.
• Boxing/Kickboxing Fitness Class:
Mon., Wed., 7-8 p.m. First visit free.
Non-combative class.
• Personal Training: Call 317.7250 for
info.
Fazio’s Hapkido Do Jang (61
Main St., Luzerne, 570.239.1191)
Accepting new students. Children (age
7-12) Mon./Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Teen/adult
Mon./Wed., 6:45-8:15 p.m.; Tues.-Thurs.,
6:30-8 p.m. Private lesson also available.
Learn Hapkido. Self defense applica-
tions. $50 monthly, no contract.
GregWorks Professional Fit-
ness Training (107 B Haines Court,
Blakely, 570.499.2349, gregsboot-
camp@hotmail.com, www.vipfitness-
camp.com)
• Beach Body Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri.,
6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m.
• Bridal Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8
p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m. Bridal party group
training, couples personal training
available.
• Fitness Bootcamp: 4-week sessions,
Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m.
• New Year’s Resolution Flab to Fab
Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m., Sat., 1
p.m. Guaranteed results.
• Private/Semi-Private sessions
available, e-mail for info.

Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Dragons’ Tale Karate: Mon., 5:30-7
p.m.; Wed., 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 5+.
• Tumbling: Fri., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages
5+. $30/month.
Kwonkodo Lessons – by reserva-
tion at The Hapkido Teakwondo Institute
(210 Division St., Kingston). $40/month.
Call 570.287.4290 for info.
Northeastern Ju-Jitsu (1047
Main St., Swoyersville, 570.714.3839,
nejujitsu.com)
Open 7 days/week, offers training in
Traditional Karate, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu,
boxing, Judo, Women’s self defense.
Group, private self defense classes
available by appointment.
Riot Hooping and Aerial
Dance (210 Division Street, King-
ston,www.riothooping.com, 912.656.4649).
Offering Aerial Silks Intro classes, Mon./
Tues., 7pm. Aerial Silks Beginner Series
(four classes), Mon./Tues., 8pm. Visit
riothooping.comfor info and registration.
Royce Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Net-
work, Scranton. Day, evening classes
for men, women, children. Ongoing
classes 6 days/week. Covers sport,
combat, self-defense aspects of Gracie
Jiu-Jitsu. For info visit gracie-nepa.com
or call 570.347.1107.
OUTSIDE
Hickory Run State Park (1137
Honey Hole Road, Drums, 570.403.2006)
Night Hike: Nov. 9, 6 p.m. Ages 8 and
up.
Geocaching 101: Nov. 12, 1 p.m. RSVP
required.
Guided hike: Nov. 15, 9 a.m.
Junior Bird Club Night Hike: Nov. 16, 6
p.m. Ages 9 and up. $5 fee for new
members. RSVP required.
Scavenger hunt: Nov. 18, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
W
- compiled by Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
just for the
health of it
By Tim Hlivia
Special to the Weekender W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
3
P
A
G
E
4
4
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
Workouts generally last up to
10 minutes, but there are some
who can “kill it in three min-
utes,” she added. Up to 20 bar-
bells will be set up at Keystone
CrossFit, depending on the num-
ber of required heats for regis-
tered participants.
But the event won’t just be
open to existing members.
“We plan to hold public prac-
tice workouts from now until the
event on Tuesday and Thursday
nights at 6:30 p.m. That will
allow completely new Cross-
Fitters to come in and learn how
to do the dumbbell version,” Mr.
Muenkel said.
Until then, donors are invited
to visit the Barbells for Boobs
page at keystonecrossfit.com to
offer their donations to the Dun-
more gym. Donations can be
made to the gym as a whole or to
individual members. Cash and
check donations will also be
accepted at Keystone CrossFit on
Nov. 17. 50/50 raffles and sales
of concessions will also aid Bar-
bells for Boobs.
About 30 area CrossFitters had
registered by Nov. 1, and $2,835
had been raised online by Nov. 2,
according to the Muenkels and
Keystone CrossFit’s fundraising
page at support.barbellsforboob-
s.org.
Aside from raising funds
through the unique fitness event,
the couple is happy to welcome
in CrossFitters from across
northeastern Pennsylvania.
“CrossFit is like a community,”
Mrs. Muenkel said. “In this area,
Since opening their CrossFit
gym in July 2010, Dickson City
residents Tim and Allison Muen-
kel have focused on ways to
educate and enrich the local
community participating in the
worldwide fitness movement.
Next week, the owners and
head coaches get their biggest
chance to date.
Keystone CrossFit (1000 Dun-
ham Dr., Dunmore) will host a
Barbells for Boobs event to bene-
fit Mammograms in Action on
Saturday, Nov. 17 from11 a.m. to
3 p.m.
“Barbells for Boobs is a non-
profit organization that’s 100
percent CrossFitters around the
country. It was started in Cali-
fornia by a group of CrossFitters,
and it kind of blew up into this
movement where CrossFit gyms
sign up to do the workout,” Mr.
Muenkel, 32, explained.
This month’s event in Dun-
more will put CrossFitters and
other athletes through the
“Amazing Grace” workout. Par-
ticipants will be challenged to lift
a barbell from the floor to their
shoulder and then to the overhead
position 30 times as quickly as
they can. Women will lift 95
pounds and men will lift 135
pounds, but the event will also
offer different tiers of the work-
out to fit all fitness levels, Mrs.
Muenkel, 29, said.
it’s kind of blown up in the past
two or three years. It’s catching
on, and this is just another event
that people want to participate in
to come together and meet other
athletes they don’t know,” she
said. “We’re happy to have it here
because we have the space. It’s
the largest CrossFit gym in our
area.”
“We thrive on the community
aspect of what CrossFit is and
being a part of something that’s
worldwide,” Mr. Muenkel said.
“One of the biggest things about
CrossFit is our fundraising
events.”
The Nov. 17 benefit will also
feature sports massages, food
from the Drinker Mobile food
truck, and music from Mike
Walton Productions.
Those interested in what Mr.
Muenkel called “the school to
achieve elite fitness” can also get
a glimpse of the basics of Cross-
Fit and see members in action.
W
Allison, left, and Tim Muenkel, head coaches and owners of Keystone CrossFit, will
host an event aiding Barbells for Boobs on Nov. 17. Donations are being accepted
through keystonecrossfit.com.
Keystone CrossFit
uniting athletes for cause
By Christopher J. Hughes
Weekender Staff Writer
Barbells for Boobs: Nov. 17, 11
a.m.-3 p.m., Keystone CrossFit
(1000 Dunham Dr., Dunmore,
left side of North American
Warhorse building). Event aids
Barbells for Boobs organiza-
tion, which provides funding to
Mammograms in Action. Do-
nate at https://support.bar-
bellsforboobs.org/group-fun-
draising/keystonecrossfit.
Info: keystonecrossfit.com,
570.909.8870.
Infinite
Improbability:
A column focusing on
geek culture, discussing,
analyzing, and debating
the impact of comics,
movies, music, and
anything that has a
dedicated following. W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
5
Mind and body
Arts YOUniverse (47 N. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.970.2787, www.artsyouni-
verse.com)
❏ Studio J, 2nd floor
• Meditation in tradition of
Gurdjieff, Ospensky: Sun., 12-1
p.m., $5
• Children’s Meditation: Thurs.,
6-7 p.m. Ages 9-14, $5
• Tarot Card Readings, by
appointment. $20 first half hour,
$10 additional half hours.
Awakenings Yoga
(570.472.3272)
• Private Yoga Instruction w/
certified senior Instructor of
Himalayan Institute. 24 years
experience. Learn secrets of
Himalayan Masters. Lessons
include asana, pranayama, med-
itation, relaxation, ayruveda,
holistic nutrition, tantra. $75/
session
Balance Ultimate Fitness
(Belladaro Prof Bldg,
570.862.2840)
• Early Morning Fitness Boot-
camp: Tues./Thurs., 6:30
a.m.-7:30 a.m., Sat, 9:30
a.m.-10:30 a.m., $15 or 12 classes
for $150.
Balance Yoga and Wellness
(900 Rutter Ave., 2nd floor, Forty
Fort 570.714.2777, balanceyogas-
tudio.net, balanceyogawell-
ness@gmail.com)
• Pole Fitness: Fri., 5:30 p.m.
(beginner); 7 p.m. (intermediate).
Sat., 1:30 p.m. (all levels); 3:15 p.m.
(advanced).
Bellas Yoga Studio (650 Bou-
levard Ave., Dickson City,
570.307.5000, www.bellasyoga-
.com, info@bellasyoga.com)
All workshops $15, pre-regis-
tration suggested.
• Sun. Class: 10-11:15 a.m. Fea-
tures Alternating Vinyasa style
yoga w/ yoga fusion.
Club Fit (1 West Broad St.,
Hazleton, 570.497.4700,
www.clubfithazleton.com)
• Boxing classes w/ Rich Pas-
torella (pastorella.net26.net).
Mon., 7-8 p.m. $40/month.
Hoop Fitness Classes (whirli-
gighoopers.com)
• Beginner/Intermediate:
Mon., 7:30 p.m., Harris Conserva-
tory (545 Charles St., Luzerne).
$5. Call 718.0673 to reserve.
• Beginner/Intermediate:
Thurs., 5:30 p.m., Studio 32 (32
Forrest St., Wilkes-Barre) $5.
Inner Harmony Wellness
Center (Mercy Hospital General
Services Bldg., 743 Jefferson
Ave., Scranton, 570.346.4621,
www.innerharmonywellness.com,
peteramato@aol.com)
• Meditation Technique Work-
shops: Wed., 6:30 p.m. $15/ses-
sion. Goal setting/stress reduc-
tion, more. Call for info/reserva-
tion.
Jeet Kune Do Fighting Con-
cepts Teaches theories of move-
ment in Martial Arts. $100/
month. Call instructor Mike Di-
Meglio for info, 570.371.8898.
JimThorpe Arts in Motion
(434 Center St., Jim Thorpe,
570.483.8640, jtartsinmo-
tion.com)
• Friday Night Drop-in Class
for Chair Yoga, Guided Med-
itation, Spirit Connections: $8/
class, $15/all three. Elemental
Alchemist AnneMarie Balog,
Level II Lakshmi Voelker Chair
Yoga instructor. Private/group
meditation sessions, reiki treat-
ments, classes, yoga, tarot read-
ings/parties, divination consulta-
tions. Contact 881.2399, shan-
tispirit23@live.com. Info: jtart-
sinmotion.com/Classes/
elementalalchemist
Kwon Kodo Lessons: Learn
self-defense system that com-
bines Korean Martial Arts such
as Hapkido, Taekwondo & Kuk
Sool. Lessons held at Hapkido
Taekwondo Institute (150 Welles
St., Forty Fort). $40/month. For
info, call 570.287.4290 or visit
htkdi.com.
Leverage Fitness Studio (900
Rutter Ave., Forty Fort,
570.338.2386, leveragetraining-
studio.com)
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 6 a.m.-9
p.m., Fri. 6 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 8
a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
• Fusion Flexibility: Sun. 9-10
a.m.
• Wake-Up Workout: Mon.,
Wed., Fri. 7-7:45 a.m.
• Executive Workout: Mon.,
Wed. 12:15-12:45 p.m.
• Sexy to the Core: Wed. 5:30
p.m.
• Primal Scream: Tues., Thurs.
7-8 p.m.
• Inferno: Sat. 10 a.m.
All classes free to members,
$10 non-members.
Meditation/Yoga classes at
Spectrum Health & Racquet Club
(151 Terrace Dr., Eynon). Med-
itation: Fri., 7-8 p.m. Yoga: Sat.,
9:45-10:45 a.m. $5 each class,
bring mat. Call 570.383.3223 for
info.
Melt Hot Yoga (#16 Gateway
Shopping Center, Edwardsville,
570.287.3400, melthotyogastu-
dio.com)
• Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m.
(90 minutes)
• Tues., Thurs., 4 p.m. (one
hour)
• Sat., Sun., 9 a.m., 3 p.m. (90
minutes)
New Visions Studio & Gallery
(201 Vine Street, Scranton,
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, newvisionsstu-
dio.com)
• Vinyasa Yoga Classes with
Sarah Yzkanin: Sundays, 2-3 p.m.
All levels welcome. $6. Call
570.575.8789 or e-mail dealerin-
wares@hotmail.com for info.
NutriFitness Boot Camp (311
Market St., Kingston,
570.288.2409)
• Free week of Boot Camp for
new members: Mon.-Fri., 8:30
a.m., 5:30 p.m.
• Wirred: Mon., Wed., 6:45
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. $5.
• Yoga: Thurs. 7 p.m. $10.
• Tang Soo Do Karate Classes:
Mon., Wed., 6:45 p.m.; Sat., 10
a.m. Call to register.
Odyssey Fitness (401 Coal St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.829.2661, odys-
seyfitnesscenter.com)
• Yoga Classes: Sun., 12:30
p.m.; Mon., 7:15 a.m.; Tues., 7 a.m.,
5 p.m.; Wed., 8 a.m., 6:30 p.m.;
Thurs., 6:30 p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m.
All levels welcome.
• ZumbAtomic: Lil Starz, ages
4-7: 5:30 p.m.; Big Starz, ages
8-12: 6:15 p.m.
Open Your Eyes To Dream
(143 W. Main St., Bloomsburg,
570.239.7520, www.oyetd.com)
❏ Open-Eyed Yoga. Call
394.2251 or go online for current
updates/cancellations. E-mail:
yoga@oyetd.com
• Beginner Vinyasa: Mon.,
5:30-6:30 p.m.
• Level II Vinyasa: Mon., 7-8:30
p.m.
• Mixed Level Vinyasa: Tues.,
9-10:30 a.m., Wed., 6:30-7:45 p.m.
Mats & props available. Stu-
dent/package discounts avail-
able. Bring friend to first class,
get two for price of one.
Prana Yoga Studio (960 Pres-
cott Ave., Dunmore, www.pra-
nayogadunmore.com) Classes
taught in vinyasa flow, geared for
all levels
• Mon.: Advanced, 6 p.m.; tai
chi with Blake Wheeler 7:30-8:45
p.m., Thurs., 8:45-10 p.m., $45/
month, on class/week, $65/
month, two classes/week. Con-
tact Blake at 434.989.1045 or
blakewhlr@yahoo.com for info.
• Tues.: Beginner, 10 a.m.;
Open Level, noon; Beg./Interme-
diate, 5:30 p.m.; Intermediate,
7:30 p.m.
• Wed.: Beginner, 5:30 p.m.;
Advanced 7:30 p.m.
• Thurs.: Open Level, 10 a.m.;
Beg./Intermediate, 5:30 p.m.;
Intermediate, 7:30 p.m.
• Fri.: Open Level, 10 a.m.;
Advanced, 6 p.m.
• Sat.: Beg./Intermediate, 10
a.m.; Intermediate, noon.
• Sun.: Intermediate, noon;
Candle-lit Open Level, 6 p.m.
• Sandstorm Fitness with
Rachel “Kali” Dare: Wed. 4-5 p.m.
Learn various techniques and
shed pounds. Call 570.677.7067
or email standuphungry@ya-
hoo.com for info.
Reiki Classes (570.387.6157,
reikictr@localnet.com) Sessions
with Sue Yarnes:
• Beginner to Advanced Reiki
at our locations or your home.
Hospital endorsed, training for
professional Usui Reiki teacher
certification available. Call or
e-mail for info.
The Self Discovery and Well-
ness Arts Center (200 Lake
Ave., Montrose, 570.278.9256 or
e-mail wellness@epix.net, well-
nessarts.com)
• Monthly World Peace Med-
itation and Reiki Circle: First
Tuesday of every month, 5-7 p.m.
$10.
Sandy Seyler Studio (House
of Nutrition, 2nd floor, 50 Main
St., Luzerne, 570.288.1785,
SandySeyler.com)
Sheri Pilates Studio (703
Market St., Kingston,
570.331.0531)
• Beginner mat class: Tues., 5
p.m. $50/10 classes.
• Equipment classes on re-
former and tower: $150/10 class-
es.
• Private training available on
reformer, cadillac, stability chair,
ladder barrel, cardiolates on
rebounder.
Call studio for additional mat
class/equipment class schedule,
all classes taught by certified
instructors.
Spine & SportCare (Old Forge,
570.451.1122)
• Pilates Mat Classes: Mon.
9:30 a.m.; Wed. noon; Thurs.
5:30 p.m.; Yoga Flow: Tues. 5:30
p.m. $10/class, $45/5 classes.
• Small Group Personal Train-
ing: Personalized program
changes w/ every session, similar
to P90X crossfit. All levels, call
for details.
Studio Brick (118 Walnut St.,
Danville, 570.275.3240)
• All Levels Yoga: Wed. (ongo-
ing), 10-11 a.m.
Symmetry Studio (206 N.
Main Avenue, 3rd Floor, Scranton,
570.290.7242, SymmetryStudio-
NEPA.com)
• Mon.: Gentle Yoga 5:30 p.m.;
Core Yoga 6:30 p.m.
• Tues.: Beginners Yoga 5 p.m.;
Yoga Strength and Flexibility 6
p.m.; Cardio Kickboxing 7:30 p.m.
• Wed.: Slow Flow 5:30 p.m.;
Core Yoga 6:30 p.m.
• Thurs.: All Levels Vinyasa
5:30 p.m.; Cardio Kickboxing 7:30
p.m.
• Fri.: Community Ballroom
(call for registration details)
• Sat.: Prenatal Yoga 9:30
a.m.; Essential Yoga All Levels 11
a.m.
• Sun.: Slow Flow11 a.m.
• Intermediate Jazz/Contem-
porary Technique Class: Mon.,
4:15-5:15 p.m. Ages 10-14. 10/class.
• Jazz/Contemporary Tech-
nique Class: Mon., 7:45-8:45 p.m.
Ages 15-adult. $10/class.
• Modern/Lyrical Technique
Class: Thurs., 7:45-8:45 p.m.
Ages 15-adult. $10/class.
• Cardio Kick and Interval
Training: Mon., 5:30 p.m., Tues., 4
p.m.
• Dancers Wanted: Female/
male dancers, ages 10-adult for
Symmetry Dance Company’s
Junior, Senior Companies. Call or
e-mail info@symmetrystudione-
pa.com. Info: symmetrystudione-
pa.com/dance-company
Tarot Card Readings Mon.,
noon-5 p.m., Duffy’s Coffee
House (312 S. State St., Clarks
Summit). Info: 570.575.8649
Tarot Readings every Sun., 11
a.m.-5:30 p.m., Shambala, Scran-
ton, located at Mall At Steam-
town, first floor outside Bonton.
Walk-ins welcome. Info: 570.575
W
P
A
G
E
4
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
M
O
S.
APR
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied *See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR
financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. See dealer for details. Sale ends
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
B1342 - - Auto., MyFord, Keyless Entry
w/Keypad, SYNC, Fog Lamps, Auto Headlamps
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
B1446 - - MyFord, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Auto.,
Convenience Group, Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm, SYNC, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Super Fuel Economy Pkg., 16” Steel Wheels, Rear Spoiler
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
B1254 - -Auto., MyFord, Keyless Entry
w/Keypad, SYNC, Fog Lamps, Auto. Headlamps
B1177, B1175, B1343, - - Auto.,
MyFord, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, SYNC, Convenience
Group, Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm, Sirius Satellite
Radio,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
B1594 - - Auto., MyFord, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
SYNC, Convenience Group, Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm,
Sirius Satellite Radio,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
B1486 - - 2.0L I4, Auto., MyFord, Keyless
Entry w/Keypad, SYNC, Convenience Group, Cruise
Control, Perimeter Alarm, Sirius Satellite Radio,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
B1392 - - Auto., MyFord, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
SYNC, Convenience Group, Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm,
Sirius Satellite Radio,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
B1604 - - Auto., MyFord, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
SYNC, Convenience Group, Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm, Sirius
Satellite Radio,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR
A4982 - -
Auto., Dual Climate Control,
Cruise Control, 16” Alloy Wheels
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SEL 4 DR
B1391 - - Titantium, Auto., Pwr. Leather Seats,
Rear Parking Sensors, Rain Sensitive Wipers, Sync, Sirius,
MyFord Touch, Push Button Start, Rear Spoiler, 17” Sport Alum.
Wheels,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS TITANTIUM
B1277 - - Auto., Convenience Group, Cruise
Control, Perimeter Alarm, MyFord, SYNC, Sirius Satellite, 16”
Alloy Wheels, Select Shift, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 5 DR
B1714 - - Auto., Convenience Group, Cruise Control,
Perimeter Alarm, MyFord, SYNC, Sirius Satellite, 16” Alloy Wheels,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 5 DR
B1088, B1360 - - Auto., Convenience Group,
Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm, Myford, SYNC, Sirius Satellite, 16”
Alloy Wheels, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 5 DR
B1361 - - Auto., MyFord,
16” Alloy Wheels, Select Shift, Keyless
Entry with Keypad,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 5 DR
B1695 - - Auto., MyFord, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
SYNC, Convenience Group, Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm, Sirius
Satellite Radio,
NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 5 DR W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
7
My weight is out of control! I
diet and diet and nothing
changes. I am so unhappy with
myself. It’s been years that this
has been going on. I’m not one
of those chicks who is 5’10”
and weighs 110 pounds and still
says she’s fat. Help me! I don’t
know what to do anymore.
-Fat in Forty Fort
Girrrl,
First of all chill. I know you
are hurting, but there is no reason
to panic. Nothing has been done
that cannot be undone and you
are not alone in your struggle.
God knows what percent of
America is overweight at this
point, and I guarantee none of us
are happy about it, myself in-
cluded. Keep in mind, I was
crowned Miss PA US at Large.
What we have all got to learn is
how to be happy with ourselves.
That is not to say that some of us
wouldn’t be happier with our-
selves if we were to shed a few
pounds.
So on that note, point number
one is that dieting does not work.
Yes, it’s a multi-billion dollar
industry, but don’t believe the
hype. The majority of the word
diet is DIE! What else must I say
for the love of Twinkies?
The real deal is lifestyle
change. I know it’s not as glam-
orous or as fast, but it lasts and it
doesn’t do horrible damage to
your poor little heart. There are a
million websites and books out
there with advice on what, when,
and how to eat. The key is to find
one that actually works for YOU.
Forget what’s trendy, forget what
your friends and family say. Find
what you think might work for
you and give it a try.
The other thing is to start
small. Make small changes and
stick to it. For example, decide to
switch to whole grains only. Do
this for at least six weeks before
you make any additional chang-
es. Research shows that it takes
at least six weeks for humans to
begin to accept a change as
something new in their life. An
excellent author on nutrition and
change is Dr. Andrew Weil. His
approach is very balanced.
Aside from looking at what
you are eating and beginning to
make changes, you will need
support. Rome wasn’t built in a
day and no one person built it
alone. Sometimes what we can’t
do alone we can do together. Find
a buddy with common goals that
you can talk to about your trials
and tribulations. Or, if you find
that you are eating for emotional
reasons, then begin the process of
exploring why you eat either in
counseling or with a book like
Geneen Roth’s “When Food Is
Love” or consider attending a
few meetings of Overeaters
Anonymous (you can look for
local meetings on the web).
Next, as King Julien says,
“You’ve got to move it, move it!”
No, you don’t need to join a gym
and sweat it out with all the
Brangelina wannabees. You don’t
need to buy a zillion dollars in
equipment or thigh-master your-
self to death with Guthy-Renker.
All you’ve got to do is MOVE.
Again, do what is easiest and
most interesting for you to start.
If that means walking, walk. If
that means dancing, dance. If that
means yoga, get twisted. Just
start to move. Start small and
build. If you move for fifteen
minutes a day for the first six
weeks, congratulations, it’s be-
come a habit. Now bump it up to
thirty minutes. True lifestyle
change takes time. We live in a
culture of quick fixes and easy
solutions. Reality doesn’t work
that way. Changing the shape of
your body will take time. Be
patient with yourself and it
WILL happen.
In the meantime, learn to love
yourself as you are. There is
nothing more attractive and there
is nothing that will make you
happier. By the way, I refuse to
call you “Fat in Forty Fort.” Re-
spect yourself. I do. Best of luck
in your journey, FABULOUS in
Forty-Fort – Just do you!
W
- Have a question?
Write Stella at
stella@theweekender.com. Find
more of Stella all week at Twist
Night Club or at facebook.com/
missestellasweet.
Dear Estella,
Stella suggests a lifestyle change if you’re truly
serious about losing weight, but more importantly, you
should be happy with yourself.
(Photo courtesy of The Stonewall Moose Lounge)
Life is a Drag
POSITIVE ADVICE IN A NEGATIVE WORLD
Estella Sweet | Weekender Correspondent
7
3
1
7
8
7
Get your head
inside the motor
Motorhead
To Enter email pictures to: weekender@theweekender.com
P
A
G
E
4
8
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
seum.org.
GreenBeing (334 Adams Ave.,
Scranton, info@shopgreenbe-
ing.com)
• Not Your Granny’s Sewing:
one-on-one lessons: $40/lesson,
$140/4 sessions, 2-3 hour sessions.
Tailored to individual needs.
Guitar & Bass Lessons
available from Fox Studios (11
Rhine Creek Rd., Drums) Mon.-
Thurs. 1-10 p.m. $16 per hour. All
ages, all styles of music, all lev-
els. Call 570.788.4797 for info.
Harris Conservatory for
the Arts (545 Charles St. Lu-
zerne, 570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Instrumental Music Instruction
• Private Ballroom Lessons
• Private Vocal Instruction: Tues.
evenings.
• Private Guitar Instruction: Clas-
sical, acoustic, electric for all
ages.
Healthcare provider CPR
class: Nov. 19, 6-10 p.m., Geis-
inger-Community Medical Center,
Professional Building Auditorium
(316 Colfax Ave., Scranton).
Healthcare provider renew-
al CPR class: Nov. 7 and 20,
6-9 p.m., Geisinger-Community
Medical Center, Professional Build-
ing Auditorium (316 Colfax Ave.,
Scranton).
Horse Back Riding Lessons
Elk Stables, Uniondale, by appoint-
ment only. All levels welcome. Call
570.575.8649 to schedule.
Math Tutoring and Coach-
ing Highly qualified and experi-
enced teacher. All levels tutoring,
coaching, homework help. Individu-
als/groups. Fun-filled Math Anxiety
Buster Workshops. Open all week.
Ongoing enrollment. Call
570.899.5576, e-mail sib-
ut4710@aol.com.
Moscow Clayworks (moscow-
clayworks.com)
• Focus on hand-building tech-
niques: Adults, Tues., 6-8 p.m.;
kids, Thurs., 6-8 p.m. $125/5 ses-
sions. Reservations required.
• Potters Wheel for Beginners:
Mon., Wed., 6-8 p.m. $125/5 ses-
sions. Reservations required.
NEPA Bonsai Society (Mid-
way Garden Center, 1865 Hwy. 315,
Pittston, 570.654.6194, www.mys-
pace.com/nepabonsai).
• Monthly meeting last Wed., 7
p.m. Features business sessions,
demonstrations/programs/work-
shops.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine Street, Scranton,
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, newvisionsstu-
dio.com)
• Kid’s Art Class: Ages 11-16, Sat.,
3-5 p.m.; Ages 5-10, Sun., 3-5 p.m.
$100 for four weeks or $30 per
class. All supplies included.
• Adult Acrylic Painting Class:
Mon., Nov. 5-26, 5-6:30 p.m. $100,
all supplies included.
Northeast Photography
Club (www.northeastphotography-
club.org) meets first Wed. of
month 7 p.m. in boardroom of
Prime Med (old Wes Freedman
Building) off Morgan Hwy. Variety
of topics, monthly contest, guest
speakers. Membership open.
Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb-
.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com)
• Ballet and jazz classes: Tues.,
5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages 10 and up.
$10, first class; $5, second class.
• Dimensions in Dance w/ Lee
LaChette: Jazz, tap, ballet for
adults & kids. $10/hour, $5/second
class. E-mail or call 991.1817.
• Tap classes: Tues., 6:30-7:30
p.m. Ages 10 and up. $10, first
class; $5, second class.
• Tap / jazz / ballet: Tues., 7:30-
8:30 p.m. $10, first class; $5, sec-
ond class.
• Vocal lessons w/ Joelle Col-
ombo Witner: Wed., Sun. E-mail or
call 991.1817.
• Vocal Coaching w/ Nicole Ras-
mus: $15/half hour
• Stage Combat Lessons w/ Paul
J. Gallo: 12 weeks, date/time TBA.
1.5 hours, prepare for intense
physical activity, dress appropri-
ately. $20/week or $200 up front.
Piano and Flute Lessons
(Anne, 570.881.2433)
• Private studio in Kingston,
enthusiastic approach, learn at
own pace and in natural learning
style. Professional teacher/perform-
er (Bachelors in Music Perform-
ance, SUNY Purchase Conservatory
of Music; Masters in Music Per-
formance, University of Texas at
Austin Butler School of Music).
Accepting new students of all
ages, time slots available early
mornings into evenings weekdays
for 30, 45, 60 minutes.
Pocono Arts Council (18 N.
Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
• Memoir writing: Fri., Nov. 2-23,
10 a.m.-noon. $72, member; $80,
non-member; $60, senior member;
$65, senior non-member.
• Beginner watercolor: Mon., Nov.
5-26, 6-8 p.m., $85, member; $95,
non-member; $65, senior member;
$70, senior non-member.
• Intermediate watercolor: Wed.,
Nov. 7-28, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $110,
member; $120, non-member; $90,
senior member; $95, senior non-
member.
• Drawing: Wed., Nov. 7-28, 6:30-
8:30 p.m., $72, member; $80,
non-member; $60, senior member;
$65, senior non-member.
• Creative writing, Christmas
letter workshop: Nov. 13, 6:30-9:30
p.m., $25, member; $35, non-
member; $15, senior member; $20,
senior non-member.
• Gift workshop, polymer jewelry
making: Nov. 27, 6:30-9:30 p.m.,
$25, member; $35, non-member;
$15, senior member; $20, senior
non-member.
Private Voice Lessons Mon.-
Thurs. by appointment. Learn
proper singing technique in down-
town Wilkes-Barre studio. Specializ-
ing in opera/classical/musical
theater. Hour, half-hour lessons.
Student discounts available. Please
call 824.5428 or visit www.katrina-
lykes.com for info.
Something Special: (23 West
Walnut Street Kingston,
570.540.6376, angiethear-
tist@aol.com, www.angelademu-
roart.com)
• MANGA Art Class: (Japanese
Cartooning) Wed., 4-5 p.m. Learn
the art of Japanese cartooning.
4-week session, supplies included:
$60 per child. Call or e-mail to
register.
Southside Senior Center
(425 Alder St., Scranton,
570.346.2487)
• Language Partnership English &
Spanish Classes: Fri., 10 a.m. Free,
open to all. For info, call
346.0759.
Volunteers needed for “Op-
eration Friendship”: Program
organized by Serving Seniors
(Scranton Life Building, 538 Spruce
St., Suite 408, Scranton). “Oper-
ation Friendship” works to bring
holiday cheer and greetings to
residents of nursing and assisted
living or personal care homes.
Individuals and groups needed to
write and send personalized
Christmas cards. Info: 570.344.3931.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)
• Ballroom Dancing Lessons: Wed.,
7:15 p.m., Comm auditorium. Basic
& advanced ballroom, swing. $15/
person. For info, call Vince Brust
at 489.3111.
Wyoming Valley Art
League
• Painting with Irina Krawitz:
$15/hour, $120/4-weeks. Call
570.793.3992 for info.
SOCIAL GROUPS
AA Intergroup NEPA If you
want to drink, that’s your busi-
ness. If you want to quit, we
have an answer. Info: aainter-
groupnepa.org, 570.654.0488
Alcohol Anonymous: Mon./Fri
7 p.m. (373 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre), Tue. 7 p.m. (25 Church St.,
Wilkes-Barre), Wed. 10:15 a.m. (301
Shoemaker St., Swoyersville), 7
p.m. (1000 E. Mountain Blvd.,
Wilkes-Barre), 8 p.m. (562 Wyoming
Ave., Kingston), Thurs. 10 a.m. (75
S. Prospect St., Nanticoke), 7:30
p.m. (301 Lake St., Dallas), Fri. 7:30
p.m. (Triangle 24 Hour Club, Dal-
las), Sat. 7:30 p.m. (1003 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort), Sun. 7 p.m. (128
W. Washington St., Nanticoke). Call
570.288.9892 for info.
Beehive Area Narcotics
Anonymous (Wilkes-Barre-
Kingston-Nanticoke-Mountaintop) 24
hour phone line: 570.654.7755 or
1.866.935.4762.
Better Breathers Club: Nov.
8, 6:30 p.m., continues second
Tuesday of every month, Geis-
inger-Community Medical Center,
Professional Building Auditorium
(316 Colfax Ave., Scranton). Info:
570.969.8986.
Building Industry Associ-
ation of NEPA (570.287.3331)
• Sponsorship: Become host of a
monthly General Membership Meet-
ing. Call or e-mail danielle@bi-
anepa.com for details.
• Accepting entries for Outdoor
Theme Project from builders, trade
schools, Vo-Techs, Job Corps. For
info, call 570.287.3331.
Candy’s Place (190 Welles
Street #120,Forty Fort,
570.714.8800)
• What You Need to Know About
Pancreatic Cancer: Nov. 12, 6-7
p.m., Candy’s Place (190 Welles St.,
Forty Fort). RSVP: 570.714.8800.
• Look Good Feel Better: Nov. 19,
5:30-7:30 p.m., Candy’s Place (190
Welles St., Forty Fort). RSVP: 1-
800-227-2345.
• Candy’s Place Holiday Gala:
Dec. 6, 6-9 p.m., The Woodlands
(Rt. 315, Plains). $30; free for
patients. RSVP: 570.714.8800.
Diabetes support group:
Nov. 9, 10 a.m., Geisinger-Communi-
ty Medical Center, Professional
Building Auditorium (316 Colfax
Ave., third floor, Scranton).Info:
570.969.7272.
Living with Grief: free six-
week bereavement support
group (2-3:30 p.m., 6-7:30 p.m.,
Spiritual Center, Geisinger Wyom-
ing Valley Medical Center, 1000 E.
Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre,
570.808.5539)
Nar-Anon Family Group
Meetings Sun. 7 p.m. Clear
Brook Bldg. (rear), Forty Fort;
Wed., 7 p.m. United Methodist
Church, Mountaintop. 570.288.9892.
Narcotic Anonymous Meet-
ings every Tues. at 7 p.m.,
downstairs in the Methodist Edu-
cation Building, located off Cour-
thouse Square, on the corner of
Marion and Warren Street in Tunk-
hannock. There are no fees or
dues. Newcomers always welcome.
Oakwood Terrace (400 Glea-
son Dr., Moosic, 570.451.3171 ext. 116
or 101)
• Support Group Meetings: third
Wed. of each month, 6:30 p.m.
Overeaters Anon. meetings
Mon., Tues., Thurs., 7 p.m.; Wed.,
7:30 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. No fee,
newcomers welcome. Call
570.829.1341 for details/meeting
locations of visit www.oa.org.
Pride of NEPA meetings the
second Tues. of each month. Visit
prideofnepa.org for details.
Suicide Bereavement Sup-
port Group First/Third Thurs.
every month, 7 p.m., at Catholic
Social Services (33 E. Northampton
St., Wilkes-Barre). Call 570.822.7118
ext. 307 for info.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Re-
solve Infertility Peer Sup-
port Group: Last Sun. of
month, 6:30-8 p.m., Kistler Learn-
ing Center at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley. Contact Jennifer for info,
610.393.8098.
Wyoming Valley Home
School Network A support
group for home school or cyber
school parents throughout NEPA
providing monthly meetings, field
trips, park days, more. Visit
wvhsnetwork.webs.com or contact
Julie Lemardy at jmlemar-
dy@gmail.com for info.
W
- compiled by Chris Hughes,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or
fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline
is Mondays at 2 p.m.
Expanded listings at
theweekender.com.
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 39 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
9 7
8
8
2
0
4
P
i
n
-
U
p
G
i
r
l
o
f
t
h
e
W
e
e
k
The apphire Salon
Specializing in Vintage,
Hollywood & Boudoir Style Photo Sessions
Call for more details and to schedule a private consultation @ 570-602-7700
Individual Pin-Up Packages
Include Hairstyle, Make-up application, Manicure, Props,
Costumes, Professional Coaching,
Jewelry & much more…
At The Sapphire, who you are makes you
beautiful not your body size. It’s time we
celebrate our bodies and curves. We work on a one-on-one
basis with each of our clients, to
ensure the utmost satisfaction, comfort and to find the most
flattering poses. Your privacy is always insured with
The Sapphire.
Book your Holiday Gift
for that Special Someone.
Packages include:
*12 Month Calendars
*Greeting Cards *Canvas Portrait
*Throw Blankets
*Mugs & Playing Cards
*Little Black Book of photos
Call for your private consultation
Sponsored by
P
A
G
E
5
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
show us some skin vote
Vote for your favorite tattoo at
weekender@theweekender.com
Please include “tattoo contest” and the number you are
voting for in the e-mail subject line.
Only one vote per e-mail address will be counted.
1
2
3 4 5
THE WINNER RECEIVES A $75 GIFT
CERTIFICATE TO MARC’S TATTOOING.
SPONSORED BY:
NEPATATTOO.COM
E-mail a photo of your tattoo (at least 200
dpi) with your full name, address and phone
number to weekender@theweekender.
com to enter our weekly contest. Each
month, Weekender readers vote for their
favorite, and the winner receives a $75 gift
certificate to Marc’s Tattooing. Must be
18 to participate.
Name:
Kyle Eugene Leslie
Town:
Dallas
HOWTO ENTER:
big red W...
weekender
LET THE SEARCH BEGIN.
CHECK OUT BIGREDW.COM
Find the (the one with the black outline), and win some s ag.
To enter e-mail a photo of the page with the red W on it along with your name, age,
hometown and phone number to weekender@theweekender.com W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
1
Who is...
Sean
Diggs,
Washington D.C.
How did you choose your
career? I wanted to spend more time
with my family and have my own
schedule.
The best part of my job is
helping people reach their goals and
create more champions and working with
all of the great guys and girls on the fight
teams.
What’s one thing people
should know about your place of
employment? It is non-intimidating.
We have something for the housewife to
the professional fighter.
Something most people don’t
know about me is … I am a
certified teacher with the Pennsylvania
Department of Education. I taught for six
years in the Pennsylvania school district
focusing on Special Education and
Alternative Education.
My hobbies are … reading,
researching history, watching boxing and
Muay Thai bouts, playing games and
collecting comics with my sons.
When I was little, I wanted to be a
scientist when I grew up.
Three interesting facts about
me: 1. I’ve trained guys and gals that
have won over 20 titles, one international
champ, and a two-time world champion.
2. I won a boxing title in 1996. 3. I
trained the only athlete in NEPAto
win Golden Gloves boxing titles and
an MMAtitle as an amateur. He was
undefeated as an amateur in boxing,
Muay Thai, kickboxing, and MMA.
My favorite place in NEPA is …
The gym...World Class Boxing.
Personal Trainer,
BoxingTrainer,
Professional Trainer
PHOTO BY: AMANDA DITTMAR
P
A
G
E
5
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
get your game on
VIDEO GAME REVIEWS
Robbie Vanderveken | Special to the Weekender
Over this console gener-
ation, there have been very
few games that captivated me
as much as the “Assassin’s
Creed” series has. That is why
I am so happy to play “Assas-
sin’s Creed 3” (360, PS3, PC
and Wii U).
The things I love about
“Assassin’s Creed” aside from
the great story is the huge
environments to explore, thou-
sands of hidden collectables
to find, brain-racking puzzles
to solve, and the fluid combat
and climbing. “Assassin’s
Creed 3” does not disappoint
and actually improves upon all
the well-established systems
that the series is known for.
The most enthralling thing
about “Assassin’s Creed” for
me is it has a story within the
story. The overall story of the
series is about a present-day
character named Desmond
Miles. In the first game, he
was kidnapped by a company
called “Abstergo Industries.”
Desmond was forced to use a
machine called “The Animus,”
which is a computer sim-
ulation that allows you to
relive the memories of your
ancestors using your DNA.
The reason they want Des-
mond to visit the past is to see
where his ancestor hid an
ancient artifact that they need
to take over the world.
Once in the past, a story
unravels about a war that has
been waging between the “As-
sassins” and the “Templars.”
One side wants people to have
free will and the other wants
to rule by controlling the peo-
ple. So far, the series has been
through the Crusades, Renais-
sance Italy, Constantinople,
and has concluded the story of
Altair and Ezio. The thing
that makes part three exciting
is that there is a new time
period to explore and the in-
troduction of a new main
character.
The setting of “Assassin’s
Creed 3” is the American
Revolution in the late 18th
century, and it introduces a
new protagonist named Con-
ner who is a Native American.
Players become an assassin in
the war for liberty against
tyranny and include the most
stylized and fluid combat
experiences in the franchise
so far. Conner’s story spans
many years of the Revolu-
tionary War, through some
vibrant cities, lush frontiers,
and on the battlefield where
George Washington’s Conti-
nental Army collide with the
British Army. Also, there is
an interesting story arc with
Desmond that is supposed to
run parallel with the events of
December 2012.
This game is just bursting at
the seams with things to do.
The new world is vast and
creates an amazing open-
world playground where you
can climb, explore, hunt, and
even sail a ship in epic naval
battles. Something this series
is good at is dropping you
right in the middle of histor-
ical events, so it is much as a
learning experience as it is
entertainment.
A technological achieve-
ment that is truly astounding
is the change in seasons and
weather from rain, snow, and
spring. This game is just
breathtaking. It really does a
lot to bring the world to life,
but because of the size of the
game, there are sometimes
some graphical hiccups and
lulls in the story but that
hardly takes away from the
experience.
The basic game mechanics
have been drastically im-
proved; the climbing and
fighting are nearly perfect. No
longer will you randomly
jump off things or confuse
what you can climb on. Fight-
ing is where they have made
the most improvements. It is
simplified but actually allows
for more options such as
throwing and disarming with
ease. It really makes you feel
like a badass when you take
out a dozen guys with just a
couple of button presses.
There are a few new mul-
tiplayer modes that were fun,
such as wolf pack, where you
and some friends can hunt
targets as a team, but I had
the most fun with the older
Assassinate Mode, which
provides a more compelling
multiplayer experience than
your average shooting game.
Overall, this game is amaz-
ing. It tells a great story, it is
a marvel of technology when
it comes to graphics and the
game world, the combat is a
blast, and you can learn some-
thing about history. This game
is a must play for people who
like the series, but it can also
be a good jumping on point
for someone who just wants to
play a good game. If the May-
ans’ prediction is correct and
the world is ending soon, this
should be the last game you
play. It’s that good.
W
- Robbie Vanderveken is the
digital operations specialist
at The Times Leader. E-mail
him at rvanderveken
@timesleader.com
` Creed' is a revolution
“Assassin’s Creed 3” is the most rich and interesting
game in the series so far.
ONLY ONE LOCAL
ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
PUBLICATION INTERVIEWED
GET YOUR
WEEKENDER
EVERY WEDNESDAY.
Theweekender.com
“NIGHT OF
THE LIVING
DEAD”
ACTRESS JUDITH O’DEA
BEFORE SHE CAME TO NEPA.
PHOTO BY JASON RIEDMILLER W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
3
P
A
G
E
5
4
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
sorry mom&dad
A 20-SOMETHING’S WILD ADVENTURES
Justin Brown | Weekender Correspondent
motorhead
RIDE OF THE WEEK
Michael Golubiewski | Special to the Weekender
To submit your vehicle,
email: mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
2006
CHEVROLET
CORVETTE PAXTON
Owner:
Tim Barto
Kingston
“This has been my never-ending
project since I purchased it new in
2006,” Barto said. “It’s supercharged
with alcohol injection, putting down 735
horsepower to the wheels. I did all the
work except exhaust installation. The
DynoTuning was done by East Coast
Supercharging, and I’ve had the car in
many local shows.” W
Everybody has a dream. The
girl who gives you your coffee
every morning. The guy who
does your dry cleaning. The son
of a b---h who cuts you off on the
highway. Even you. What’s your
dream?
According to my high school
yearbook, mine is to “have my
own TV show.”
“I’d rather be on my deathbed
and say, ‘At least I tried,’ than
ask, ‘What if...?” I told myself.
Eight years later, the closest
I’ve come to making my dream
come true is running around in
glittery gold spandex on 10 epi-
sodes of a Japanese game show.
At least that was the case.
“I need a pitch meeting!” I told
myself. “Even if I never get a
show on TV, I want to be able to
say I had a pitch meeting and
tried.”
Recently, one of the most
innovative production companies
in reality television agreed to
meet with me to discuss the
possibility of spinning my co-
lumn into a reality show.
“Picture it! ‘Sex & The City’
meets ‘Boy Meets World,’” I
expressed in my first Hollywood
meeting. “Each episode would
feature me narrating my column
while sharing the adventures of
me and my friends as I return to
school.”
I could see I had their full
attention as I shared past experi-
ences of buying a Chihuahua
when I was drunk in a trailer
park and craving Taco Bell,
awarding Michael Lohan an
orange juice-stained Father of the
Year Award, calling 911 after
catching my roommate having
sex on my air mattress, and hav-
ing to move back with my par-
ents after losing financial aid.
“There needs to be a reality
show that focuses on the heart of
today’s generation,” I insisted. “A
show that features real people
who aren’t where they thought
they would be, or are on that
journey of figuring out where
they belong. No show out there
balances the struggles our gener-
ation faces with the fun we have
along the way of figuring every-
thing out.”
“I love it!” they said. “I love
the title. I love you. This is the
most creative pitch we’ve prob-
ably ever seen.”
Maybe in a year from now
“Sorry, Mom & Dad” will be the
reality show that defines a gener-
ation. Or maybe I’ll be the assist-
ant manager at Pizza Hut. Who
knows?
What I do know is that I
chased my dream. So what are
you waiting for? Follow your
dream, or you’ll find yourself
working for someone who did.
W
- Tell Justin what your dream
is on Twitter
@sorrymomanddad or
Facebook.com/
sorrymomanddad
You can’t say he didn’t try. Justin recently met with a
Hollywood production agency with his dream of a
reality show.
Think big W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
5
tell us...
How would your parents
react if you posed for
Playboy/Playgirl?
Anthony
Lommardo
22, Pocono Summit
“They’re all about making
money so they’d most likely
be pretty supportive.”
Peyton
Walker
18, Mechanicsburg
“They just wouldn’t
talk to me.”
Liz
Donovan
18, Marlton, NJ
“They’d disown
me.”
Chris
Wilson
22, Dallas
“They’d probably
be pissed.”
Joseph
Gay
22, Pocono Summit
“My dad would disown
me and my mom would
freak out.”
Sara
Bruno
20, Edison, NJ
“I would get
smacked.”
by Tom Taraszewski & Megan Lange, Weekender Interns
The
holidays
are
coming...
Get the
gift that
keeps on
giving
Contact us today
to advertise:
JohnPopko: 831-7349
KieranInglis: 831-7321
P
A
G
E
5
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
7
8
8
2
0
9 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
7
sign language
SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)
A lot of people I know are using No-
vember as a chance to lose weight, save
money, write a novel, or otherwise cross
off something that’s been on their To-do
list for a while. A week in, it’s not too late
to follow their example. In fact, if I were
you, I’d take advantage of this window
between now and the December holidays
to accomplish something you’ve been
wanting to do for this entire past year, but
haven’t had a chance to make happen.
Wouldn’t that, after all, be the best Christ-
mas/Hanukah/etc. gift you could give
yourself?
SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)
Take it out; blow off the years of accu-
mulated mental dust that have collected on
it. What is it? I can barely remember—I
think it’s that neglected goal you set for
yourself ages ago. It was important to you
then, and it’ll be important to you again
now that you remember what it was; may-
be even more important than anything else
you have on your plate at the moment.
Why dredge it out of your cerebral attic?
Because, finally, doors have opened that
will let you move miles closer to it. Yes,
that’s right, you’re at last able to take some
steps—long, loping strides, actually—
towards it. The only thing that might dis-
concert you: they’re not necessarily the
steps you originally intended—they’re
better.
CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)
I don’t know about you, but the lesson
I’m working on comprehending this week
is the one where I remember to actually
think before I speak. Like you, I’m a big
fan of spontaneity, but it works best when
I’m in a clear-headed, happy place, not
when I’m down in the trenches working
on my shit. You’ve admirably spent the
past week thigh-deep in mental sludge,
digging through your mental blocks and
rooting out your most unhealthy patterns.
When I’m in that state, I don’t necessarily
respond to external stimuli in as enlight-
ened a way as I might like. Might you be
the same? To avoid being irrevocably
branded asshole, I’m inclined to take a
moment before I open my mouth. This
week, follow my example.
AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)
It may not be a perfect day, but the sun
is shining gloriously. Your friends adore
you, your love life is looking up, and, well,
you just feel good. This is like the scene in
the movie where everything’s going great,
where the director shows you how won-
derful life was before all the crazy shit
goes down. Except you’re not in a movie.
That’s the good news. Although the love-
liness can’t last forever, obviously, it’s not
about to come crashing down on you
tomorrow. Squash your anxieties, please.
You’ve got a clear stretch ahead. Relax
and enjoy the sweetness.
PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)
Scruff is in. 9 out of 10 guys within my
range of vision have gone days without the
blade. It’s a very Piscean fashion state-
ment, to let your stubble grow, to walk
around sporting a fabulous bed-head, or
go bra-less. That’s right, your casual this-
is-me-take-it-or-leave-it-ness spreads as
easily as cream cheese. It extends beyond
mere laziness—with you, at least. While
you’re leading the hyper-casual fashion
trend, maybe you could start a minor atti-
tude revolution while you’re at it, and
encourage people to accept themselves as
thoroughly as you do. Show them how
feeling okay about extra pounds, new
wrinkles, or slightly obnoxious quirks is
much, much more attractive than trying to
hide them.
ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)
Love often requires sacrifice, compro-
mise. It’s not unheard of for your lover to
ask you to give up something altogether.
For someone as freedom-hungry as you,
these demands are frequently deal break-
ers, especially because they most usually
from a completely irrational, hyper-emo-
tional realm you’re not that familiar with.
This week, you may discover emotional
roadblocks on every route you’d normally
choose to travel, but don’t panic. Although
you may have to delay your arrival at the
destination you picked, you don’t have to
cancel your plans to get there. These barri-
cades are temporary, just a checkpoint to
ensure (for everyone’s safety) that your car
is bomb-free and its passengers are prop-
erly belted in.
TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)
Everyone hates grunt work. Who wants
to spend half the day scrubbing mildew
from between tiles with an old toothbrush,
or redoing someone else’s botched job?
No one, but some signs are better at put-
ting up with it than others. Let’s face it:
this isn’t one of your strengths. However,
every once in a while you’ve still got to
buckle down and clean out the fridge or
steam-clean the carpets. This week, the
misery won’t be as profound as usual,
should you decide to cross a few tedious
tasks from your list. Get them out of the
way while you can bear it. The sense of
relief when they’re finished will eclipse
the foul memory of actually doing them
soon enough.
GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)
Your inner eye is bloodshot and blurry.
Although you’ve been lauded for your
astoundingly clear and far-sighted internal
vision in the past, you haven’t been im-
pressing people with your feeble feats of
imagination lately. Luckily, this week’s
astrological events are the Visine you need
to clear up that stoner redness and get your
inspiration synced with reality again.
Don’t let the past month’s despicable let-
downs and setbacks keep you down. As of
this week you can (and should) trust your
gut, your intuition, and your oracular
enthusiasm again.
CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)
You have an intoxicating effect on peo-
ple. You’ve heard this before, but the
phenomenon has usually been confined to
selected locales, like the bedroom, or
during your delectable home-cooked din-
ners. This week, however, your delicious
influence may be more universal and
pronounced. Don’t be surprised if people
around you become suddenly prone to
throwing their arms around your neck and
slurring candor in your direction, or toast-
ing you with moony affection. They can’t
help themselves. Just take their (compli-
mentary) smashed conduct with a grain of
salt, and be generous with the aspirin and
TLC the next day.
LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)
The shackles cut into your wrists, the
mildew reeks, and the rats keep nibbling
your toes. Much as I love Scorpios, their
birthday season is a rough time for the
Leo tribe. Having the sun (your ruler) in
that cool, dark, watery sign—which is
about as different from your exuberant,
sunny optimism as it’s possible to get—
made the past few weeks feel a little like
being chained in a dungeon. Swallow your
gruel and make it through this last stretch,
though; pretty soon your buddy Sagittarius
will rule the world, let you out of the pit,
and all will be well again.
VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
Just because you can do the work of 2-3
people doesn’t mean you get paid, recog-
nized, or rewarded accordingly. Wouldn’t
it be great if your efficiency meant you
could pull in two paychecks every week?
Unfortunately, most businesses don’t run
that way, and you almost get punished for
your effectiveness by simply getting more
responsibility and hardly any more pay. It
might be true that the only way you could
get paid what you actually deserve is to
work for someone who notices, and
cares—you. Have you ever thought of
being your own boss? This is a good time
to check in again and see if that might
actually be a possibility. If it is, seize it.
LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)
Oh, Pollyanna. Your rosy outlook of the
near future flies in the face of all odds,
public opinion, and educated forecasts.
But why fight it? If you have reason to
hope that the next few weeks will be more
wonderful than chocolate, more power to
you. Be a shining example of how in-
tention shapes reality. You know what
happens to cynical naysayers? Shit hap-
pens. It just ends up justifying and rein-
forcing their cynicism. Unfortunately, shit
happens to idealistic optimists, too. But if
you retain that ability to concentrate on the
silver lining of any sinister thunderheads
that come your way, you’re a lot less likely
to go down with the next flush.
W
- To contact Caeriel, send mail to
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS
Morgan Spurlock
Nov. 7, 1970
Tara Reid
Nov. 8, 1975
LOU FERRIGNO
(pictured)
Nov. 9, 1951
Tracy Morgan
Nov. 10, 1968
Leonardo DiCaprio
Nov. 11, 1974
Anne Hathaway
Nov. 12, 1982
Jimmy Kimmel
Nov. 13, 1967
P
A
G
E
5
8
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@theweekender.com
theweekender.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
FA LL FE STIVA L O F SA VINGS!!!
W E SE RVICE A LL
M A KE S A ND M O DE LS!
W INTE RIZE Y O UR VE H ICLE NO W !
E XPE RT SE RVICE
FO R O VE R 65 Y E A RS
$AVE $AVE $AVE
TAKE $10.00 OFF YOUR
M E CH ANICAL RE PAIRS
OF $100.00 OR M ORE
W ITH TH IS COUPON
O NE CO UPO N PE R RE PA IR O RDE R,
CA NNO T BE CO M BINE D W ITH O TH E R
CO UPO N O FFE RS,NO CA SH VA LUE
E XPIRE S 12-31-2012
BRAKE SE RVICE
$AVE 10% OFF
W ITH COUPON
-INCLUDE S NE W SE M IM E TA LLIC PA DS
O N FRO NT O R RE A R
-INCLUDE S INSPE CTIO N O F CA LIPE RS,
M A STE R CY LINDE R A ND LINE S
O NE CO UPO N PE R RE PA IR O RDE R,
CA NNO T BE CO M BINE D W ITH O TH E R
CO UPO N O FFE RS,NO CA SH VA LUE
E XPIRE S 12-31-2012
TIRE S! TIRE S!
TIRE S
GRE A T PRICE S
A NY SIZE
RE GULA R O R SNO W S
FRE E COL L ISION
RE PAIR E STIM ATE S
570-825-4581
1280 SANS SOUCIPKW Y
H ANOVE R TW P,PA 18706
H OURS
M ON-FRI8AM -5PM
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
110 Lost
LOST. Fiberglass
Boat, tan, missing
from West Side Lot
at Mountain Lake,
“Lili”. REWARD.
570-654-0929 or
570-814-9419
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION
Your baby will have
a lifetime of love,
support, encour-
agement, happi-
ness and security
with a devoted
mom, dad, and
extended family.
Happily married and
financial secure
couple with strong
education values
would be lucky to
adopt your baby.
Expenses paid.
1-888-368-8909 or
AileenAndKevin2
adopt.com
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570)
342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
150 Special Notices
LOOKING FOR
WADE GRIFFITH, JR.
and Helen Griffith to
probate their father’s
will. Children must
sign their consent
for their father’s
wishes in our state.
Please contact Kim
Patton krpatton48@
hotmail.com
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
350 Elderly Care
IN HOME CARE
Reliable, Pleasant,
Experienced
Woman seeks posi-
tion as companion.
Appts, errands, etc.
570-823-8636.
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ’95
F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
NOW
$4,295
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK ‘05
CENTURY
Silver, 83K, 4 new
tires. Warranty.
$6,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CHEVY ‘04
MONTE CARLO SS
Extra Sharp.
Warranty. $6,495
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘03 IMPALA
Auto, V6. Very
Clean Car!
$3,495.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
TOYOTA `03
HIGHLANDER
White.
Original Owner.
Garage kept.
Excellent condition.
$9,750. Neg.
570-677-3892
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘02 FOCUS
WAGON
4 cylinder, auto.
Highway miles.
Like New!!!!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HONDA ‘08
CIVIC LX
22k.Burgundy.
Warranty.
$12,495
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
9
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
CIACAR
USA
Quality
Service
for 20 Years
Hablamos
Espanol
The Best Choice
for the Best
Price
5703431140
CALL
TODAY
1301 CEDAR AVE • SCRANTON, PA 18505
Diagnostics
Oil Changes
Brakes
Suspension
Electrical
State Inspection
Emissions
Safety Checks
LARGE SELECTION OF 4 CYLINDER GAS SAVERS
Honda • Hyundai • Nissan • Kia • Toyota
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
JOB F JOB FAI R AI R
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10TH, 9am till 1pm
Seasonal Call Center
Customer Service Representatives
Full Time - AM & PM shifts available for 5 weeks.
(11/26/2012 - 12/28/2012)
These positions are responsible for the efficient handling of
customer inquiries via phone and/or mail. Ensure all inquiries
are worked and resolved in accordance with company policies
and procedures. Flexibility required for weekends and holidays
We offer generous merchandise discounts at Lord & Taylor.
We guarantee an interview upon completion of an
application or apply online at
www.lordandtaylor.com/careers
Lord & Taylor Service Center
250 Highland Park Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Lord & Taylor is an equal opportunity employer.
THEOS METRO
Now Hiring for experienced
Kitchen Help
Servers, Hostess,
Daytime Bartenders,
and Waitstaff.
Apply in person
596 Mercer Ave.
Kingston, PA
570-283-2050
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA ‘10
ACCORD LX
22k. Silver. 22k.
Factory Warranty.
Like New $15,800
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MERCURY ‘03
SABLE
Leather, Sunroof,
One Owner.
Like New
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
96 Ford Taurus,
30 V6, 4 door,
power window &
door locks, A/C
$1,800
79 Chevy Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
90 GMC Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
96 Buick Skylark
Auto, 4 door, 81K
$2,300
00 Chevy S10
Blazer. 4 door.
4wd. Red.
$2,500
96 Pontiac Grand
Prix. White, Air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good.
106K.
$2,995
02 Ford Windstar
44K, auto, 6
cylinder, air, all
power options,
runs good.
$4,600
95 Buick Park Ave
54k. $3,995
03 Ford Windstar
LX, 6 cylinder,
A/C, 94K, all
power options,
$4,300
94Cadillac Fleet-
wood Limo, ex -
cellent condition,
40K $6,000
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $10,000
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $11,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$47,000
Junk
Cars,
Used Cars
& Trucks
wanted.
Cash paid.
574 -1275
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$1,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
439 Motorcycles
BRAND NEW
‘12 SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA ‘08 STAR
RAIDER RAVEN EDITION
Mint condition.
Very low miles.
Asking $7400.
Call for details.
570-472-2327
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘03
SILVERADO 4X4
REG CAB
AUTO, V8. LOOKS
& RUNS GREAT
$6995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘04
COLORADO SPORT
5 speed, 2WD,
Like New, 1 Owner
Truck $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘05
SILVERADO
4x4, 6 cylinder,
auto. One Owner,
highway miles.
Super Buy!!!
$4,995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE ‘03 CARAVAN
Auto, V6. Nice
clean car!!!
$4495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE ‘04
DURANGO SLT
4X4, 3rd row
seat, leather,
sunroof. 1 Owner!
Like New!!!
$5,995
Call For details!
570-696-4377
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘02
EXPLORER XLT 4X4
3rd row seat.
VERY NICE SUV!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘03
EXPLORER XLT
4X4, leather,
sunroof, like new!
$5,495
570-696-4377
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘03 F150 XL
4x4, 6 cyl., auto, 1
owner, great work
truck $4495.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HONDA ‘09
CRV EX
Grey, AWD, 20k
miles. Moon roof.
Factory Warranty
$18,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNLL NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
P
A
G
E
6
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP ‘04 GRAND
Cherokee Laredo
Columbia Edition.
Silver. 94k. Moon-
roof. 4.0L 6 cyl.
new tires. Warranty.
$9,400.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP ‘02 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4X4. One Owner.
Sharp Clean
Suv!!!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LEXUS ‘05
RX 300
AWD. 102k miles.
Navigation. Heated
seats. Like New.
Warranty. $14,200
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
SATURN ‘04 VUE
Front wheel drive,
4 cyl, 5 speed,
sunroof, clean,
clean SUV! $4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
472 Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
ESTIMATOR/
PROJECT MANAGER
Leading Mechanical
Contractor seeking
experienced, self
starter for an Esti-
mator/Project Man-
ager position. Com-
prehensive benefits
package. E.O.E.
Send resumes and
salary requirements
in confidence to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 4205
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
DIET COUNSELOR/
TELEMARKETER
Leading Weight
Loss Company look-
ing for a DIET COUN-
SELOR/TELEMARKETER.
Responsible for
customer service
and marketing in the
Wilkes-Barre Area.
Candidate must be
health orientated
and professional.
Part-time morning,
evening and some
Saturday hours.
Hourly rate plus
incentives.
Call Karen at
570-822-4500 or
leave message.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
FORKLIFT MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc.,
located in Pittston,
PA, is the exclusive
dealership for
Crown and TCM
forklifts for NEPA.
We are seeking a
full time forklift
mechanic to trou-
bleshoot, repair and
diagnose Crown
and other makes of
lift trucks. Good
written and verbal
communication
skills, as well as
customer care skills
are necessary. A
valid driver’s license
and the ability to
safely operate lift
trucks are required.
Previous forklift
mechanical experi-
ence or technical
school graduate will
be considered. We
offer an excellent
wage and benefits
package, as well as
401K Retirement
Savings Plan, paid
holidays, paid vaca-
tion and much
more.
Apply by e-mail
mike.phelan@action
liftinc.com or call
570-655-2100 x115.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS:
Home Nightly
Hazleton,
PA Dedicated Run.
New Higher Pay!
CDL-A, 1 year Expe-
rience. Required.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
548 Medical/Health
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Full time in busy
Wilkes-Barre office.
Experience pre-
ferred in all aspects
of general dentistry.
Xray certified. Good
benefits package
available. Send
resumes to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 4210
15 N. Main Street.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
R.N.
Openings all shifts.
C.N.A.
7am-11am, 5pm-
8pm, 3pm-11pm, &
11pm-7am shifts
available
245 Old Lake Road
Dallas, PA 18612
570-639-1885
E.O.E.
548 Medical/Health
KEYSTONE HUMAN
SERVICES is seeking
caring
COMMUNITY SUPPORT
ASSOCIATES
to provide support
to individuals with
intellectual disabili-
ties.
Keystone offers an
excellent benefits
package for full and
part time employ-
ees.
Various shifts are
available: Awake
Overnight, After-
noon, Evening and
paid sleep shifts.
Starting rate $9.50
per hour.
Please visit our
website to learn
more and apply
online: Job Requisi-
tion#1718
www.keystone
employment.com
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
MEDICAL SECRETARY
A FULL TIME POSITION
FOR A MEDICAL SECRE-
TARY IS AVAILABLE AT
VALLEY PEDIATRICS.
PLEASE GO TO THE WEB
SITE AT RHCNEPA.COM
FOR SALARY, JOB
DESCRIPTION AND
BENEFIT INFORMATION.
OFFICE NURSE
Busy medical prac-
tice seeking part
time Office Nurse.
Send resumes to:
The Times Leader
Box 4170
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
551 Other
WEEKENDS
ARE MORE
FUN!
Share
your good times
with children.
FCCY is looking
for weekend and
full time foster
parents. Call
1-800-747-3807
EOE.
551 Other
Local Lumber
Yard Seeking:
Y Yard Man ard Man
Deliveries, loading
and unloading
trucks. Full or part
time.
Secretary/Data Secretary/Data
Entry Entry
Knowledge in
Excel a must. Part
time.
Send resume to
Times Leader
Box 4215
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES
Telemarketing or
sales experience
preferred in selling
technical products.
Calling current
clients, cold calling
and account man-
agement. Benefits
package, salary +
commission. Send
resume to:
gdtitan@hotmail.com
570-753-1027
569 Security/
Protective Services
SECURITY OFFICER
Save-A-Lot
is looking for
a Part Time,
Security Officer
to work second
shift. Applicant
must be 18 years
old and have a
minimum of 2
years experi-
ence. Back-
ground Check
Required. Apply
at 400 South
Main Street,
Wilkes Barre
572 Training/
Instruction
DISLOCATED
WORKERS!
LAID OFF?
NEED A SKILL?
EARLY
RETIREMENT?
Consider Career
Retraining In
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVING
November
Classes
Liverpool, NY
1-800-243-9300
WWW.NTTS.EDU
Consumer
Information:
http://ntts.edu/
Programs/
Disclosures
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO
COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned
about your
future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts
available
NOW
throughout
Luzerne &
Lackawanna,
Counties
We guarantee
$5,000. to
$200,000
in annual billing.
Investment
Required
We’re ready –
Are you?
contact JAN-
PRO for more
info and about
VetConnection
(Discount for
Vets)
5 7 0 - 8 2 4 - 5 7 7 4
Jan-Pro.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
UTICA OIL
FIRED PACKAGED
CIRCULATING HOT
WATER BOILER
140,000 btu, bc3T,
excellent condition,
tankless hot water
coil. $1950/OBO.
570-735-7736
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
DEN
FURNITURE
Wood/cloth. Reg-
ular size sofa,
chair and
ottoman. Coffee
table, 2 end
tables. Excellent
condition. $325
for all.
570-675-5046
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
MATTRESS/box
spring. A brand new
p-top queen. Still in
bags! Must sell!
$150. 280-9628
MOVING SALE
Furniture and Misc
items for sale. 80 x
36 sofa sleeper
(new). 96 x 43
sofa with matching
ottoman. 60x32
setee. Maple sofa
table, chrome/
glass end table
and coffee table.
1960 retro free
standing bar and
stools. Glassware,
pots/pans and
much more.
Call 570 472 3152
754 Machinery &
Equipment
AC Generator
120/240 VAC-
25A/12.5A. Like
New cond. 3000W
rated/3750W
Surge. Less than
12 Hr total time in
actual use.
Model: WEN Power
Pro Model 3500
gas-fueled (no
fuel-gas mixing),
recoil (pull-cord)
start, approx 95
Lb.Price: $250.00
Phone: (570) 693-
3882
SNOW
BLOWER.
Craftsman. 12
HP, 32” dual
stage. Electric
start. Track
Drive. $525.
570-675-5046
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
756 Medical
Equipment
A PAIR OF
STAIR LIFTS
1 for 7 steps, 1 for
5 steps, any offer
considered. Avail-
able separate or
together. Brand
new. 675-5071
SCOOTER/
POWER CHAIR
Golden Compass
Heavy duty, used
in house only,
excellent
condition $1,500.
702-292-5595 or
570-752-5353
758 Miscellaneous
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
6
1
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
566 Sales/Business
Development
551 Other
566 Sales/Business
Development
551 Other
566 Sales/Business
Development
551 Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
$900.00
Routes Currently Available:
Wyoming - Potential Proft - $800
W. 8th St. • Ensign St. • Hill Top Dr. • Holden St.
Butler St. • W. Brady St. • Shoemaker Ave.
177 Daily Papers • 187 Sunday Papers
89 Sunday Dispatch
Pittston - Potential Proft - $380
Center St. • Searle St. • Lambert St. • Washington Terr.
101 Daily Papers • 101 Sunday Papers
Plymouth - Potential Proft - $920
Cole St. • Flat St. • W. Main St. • North St.
Davenport St. • Lee St. • Orchard St.
166 Daily Papers • 221 Sunday Papers
Duryea - Potential Proft - $560
Adams St. • Blueberry Hill Development
Columbia St. • Foote Ave. • Wright St. • Green St.
151 Daily Papers • 150 Sunday Papers
Bear Creek - Lafin - Miners Mills - Potential Proft - $690
Scott St. • E. Main St. • 2nd Street • Jumper Rd.
Wildflower Dr. • Pocono Trailer Ct. • Baltimore Dr.
144 Daily Papers • 160 Sunday Papers
SALES REPS:
$700-$1,200 weekly
We offer motivated individuals an opportunity to earn
the type of income they deserve and set their own
work calendar. Instead of cutting back, we encourage
our winning team to work as much as they want and
earn more money while enjoying a change of scenery
each week working a variety of prescheduled in-store
promotions and special events.
We offer:
• Consistent Full-Time Income
• Advancement Opportunities
• Unlimited Income Potential
Qualifcations:
• Strong communication skills & work ethic.
• Driver’s license & insured vehicle required.
• Weekend Availability
CALL NOW: (888) 502-5521
RMS Promotions, Inc.
Apply Online: www.rmspromos.com/jobs
We currently offer this employment opportunity:
A regional multimedia company headquartered in Wilkes-Barre, we provide
news, information and entertainment across multiple media platforms. Our
fagship publication, The Times Leader, and several weekly and specialized
publications serve the readers and advertisers of northeastern Pennsylvania
well. We provide commercial and other services in the region and surrounding
states.
Building on our solid print foundation, we offer various multimedia products:
website development; social media marketing; search engine optimization and
marketing; QR code marketing and tracking; and many other services.
Day & night shifts positions available in our Packaging Department. Experience is
preferred, but we will train the right candidate. This position reports directly to the
Packaging Supervisor.
Duties include, but are not limited to:
• Opening of insert skids
• Feeding of circulars into assigned hoppers
• Stackdown of ROP
• Clean up of Packaging Department at the end of assigned shift
Employees must be able to work fexible hours, be able to lift at least 25 lbs., and have
reliable transportation. Pre-employment drug screening and background check required.
Inserter/Packager - Part Time
Please send cover letter, resume and salary history to:
758 Miscellaneous
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
POMERANIAN
AKC, 8 weeks, 2
females, black. 2
males, black &
sable. Shots &
wormed. Vet
checked. Home
Raised. Champion
blood line. $500
(limited papers) to
$600 (full papers)
Each.
570-864-2643
815 Dogs
AUSTRALIAN
SHEPHERD
PUPPIES
Beautiful, eight
weeks old,
dewormed and
ready to go now.
Asking $300.
Call
570-925-2951
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
modern country
kitchen with Corian
counters, family
room with fireplace,
wet bar and walkout
to patio, multi-level
decks. All appli-
ances included.
$217,000.
570-675-0446
evenings.
Find a
newcar
online
at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LE EE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
Find your next
vehicle online.
timesleaderautos.com
P
A
G
E
6
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
522 Education/
Training
522 Education/
Training
522 Education/
Training
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
ADMISSIONS COUNSELOR
The Admissions Counselor will speak to prospective
Penn Foster students via telephone, at all times endeavoring
to serve the best interests of the prospective students by
learning their goals, identifying an educational programthat
will help them achieve those goals, and motivating them to
begin their program using exceptional, enthusiastic
service that consistently exceeds the prospective
students’ expectations, as well as a hospitality-based sales
methodology to encourage enrollment.
Our Core Values:
1. Be a Student Achievement Champion
2. Provide Service Infused with Understanding,
Respect, and Empathy
3. Be Responsible and Act with Integrity
4. Collaborate to Create Better Outcomes
5. Surprise and Delight
6. Take Care of the Earth and Give Back to
the Community in which we Live and Work
Benefits and requirements include:
• Earning potential $30,000 plus
• Day One Benefits
• Paid Vacation and Holidays
• High School Diploma or equivalent required
• Afternoon and evening shifts Monday-Friday
with alternating weekend availability required
Interested applicants should visit our Career Center at:
www.PennFosterInc.com
Just click on Job Opportunities to submit your application.
925 Oak Street – Dept. TMST, Scranton, PA 18515
EOE/AA M/F/D/V
HDI Metals
Cash Paid for Gold Silver Jewelry Coins
any type or condition
We will beat any competitors advertised
price by up to 20% Guaranteed
Licensed & Insured
(11AM - 6PM | M-Sat)
Confidential & Secure
570-735-1487
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-899-8877
570-654-1490
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom
home in mint metic-
ulous condition, with
2 full baths, and a 2
car garage, hard-
wood floors, tile
floors, exterior com-
posite wood deck,
fully finished lower
level family room,
large closets, up-
graded kitchen with
stainless steel appli-
ances, granite
countertops, gas
heat, excellent
neighborhood.
$174,900
Bob Stackhouse
654-1490
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3 sea-
son porch. Profes-
sionally landscaped
yard. 1 car garage,
storage shed, new
appliances, ceiling
fans. Close to
LCCC. $153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
35 STARK ST
Completely
Remodeled 3 bed-
room. Home in a
great neighbor-
hood. Includes
refinished hard-
wood and new tile
floors, new bath-
room and kitchen
with stainless steel
appliances and
granite counter-
tops. Gas heat, nice
yard and porches.
$74,900
Call (570)654-1490
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
PLAINS TWP.
4000 sf. Large
corner lot, great for
storage, reduced
$49,000.
570-722-2939
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY
1991 Schult Mobile
in Ashley Park. 2
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Corner lot. Needs
minor repairs
$12,000. 829-1293
938 Apartments/
Furnished
HANOVER TWP.
Carey Ave. Bridge
FULLY FURNISHED
NEW LOFT APARTMENT
with one bedroom,
Includes all utilities.
stove, laundry,
fridge, micro, dish-
washer, disposal,
WIFI, cable, A/C,
granite, plasma TV,
hardwood, lovely
modern furniture,
large closets, pri-
vate entrance with
deck. Share pool &
grill Pictures on
request. MUST SEE!
4 miles to 81. Non
smoking unit. Pet
considered. $725/
month. Additional
charge for each
additional person.
570-332-8026
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
1 bedroom,
All Utilities Included.
$535/month. No
pets, Section 8 OK
Call 570-817-3332
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DUPONT
Large modern 2
bedroom half dou-
ble with interior attic
and basement
access, includes
refrigerator, stove,
washer dryer
hookup, new carpet
and freshly painted,
great neighborhood,
plenty of parking,
heat included. $675.
No pets. 479-6722
FORTY
FORT
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
1-2 1-2
BEDROOMS BEDROOMS
RENOV RENOVA ATED TED
America
Realty Rentals
RENOVATED 1-2
BEDROOMS TO
PERFECTION.
1 BEDROOM
STARTS AT $500
+ UTILITIES.
2 BEDROOMS
$750. & UP
PLUS UTILITIES.
All new maple
kitchens,
appliances,
some carports,
fireplaces,
porches, etc.
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION
REQUIRED, NO
PETS/NO
SMOKING/
2 YEAR SAME
RENT.
MANAGED.
570-288-1422
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
1 bedroom, private
rear entrance, off
street parking,
appliances, gas,
water, hot water
and sewer included
pets considered
$425 per/ month + 1
month security. Call
1-570-606-7884
after 9am before
9pm & call 1-570-
256-7837 before
9am and after 9pm
HANOVER TWP.
1 bedroom, first
floor, stove & fridge
included. Small pets
allowed. Washer &
dryer included.
Ample secure park-
ing. $425 + utilities.
Call Natalie
(570) 357-1138
Land for sale?
Place an ad
and SELL
570-829-7130
HUDSON
Newly renovated
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. Living & din-
ing rooms, wall-
to-wall, washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking,
walk up attic, no
pets. $600/month,
+ utilities, security
& references
570-430-1200
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references.
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
KINGSTON
1st floor, newly
remodeled 1 bed-
room, central heat
and air, off-street
parking, wall to wall
carpeting, washer/
dryer hook-up, No
pets. $450.
Call 570-288-9507
KINGSTON
2 bedroom, water
included.
$580/month.
NO PETS
Section 8 OK
Call 570-817-3332
LUZERNE
276 Bennett St.
2nd floor, large,
2 bedroom, large
living room, den,
dining room, tiled
bath, kitchen with
stove and refrig-
erator, washer
and dryer hook
up, mini blinds and
ceiling fans, off
street parking.
Water and sewer
included. $650
plus utilities and
security, no pets
or smoking. Ref-
erences. Call
570-288-7309
Leave Message
MINERS MILLS
2 Story, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 bath,
washer/dryer
hookup, 3 season
room, carport.
$650 + utilities.
570-881-7372
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
1 bedroom first floor
apartment. Gas
heat and hot water.
Range and refriger-
ator
included. Garage
parking. Laundry
room on premises.
$475 per month +
utilities. Water,
garbage, state and
sewer included. No
dogs. References
and security. Call
570-696-3596
PITTSTON
1 Bedroom Apt. 1st
Floor. Deck, Yard,
Renovated, Off St.
Parking, Large
rooms, Private. A
Must see. Please
call for details. No
Pets. $500/MO.
610-574-9142
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
1234 S. Prospect
Street
1st floor, 1 bedroom,
completely remod-
eled. Wall to wall
carpet, eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances and bonus
washer. Front
porch, sewer and
garbage included.
Tenant pays water,
and electric/heat.
No pets
$425 plus security.
570-814 -1356
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PITTSTON
152 Elizabeth Street
Spacious 1 bedroom
apartment with
ample closet space.
Off street parking.
All utilities and appli-
ances included. No
pets. $695 + lease &
security. Call
570-510-7325
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apart-
ment. W/W & hard-
wood floors. Wash-
er/Dryer hook-up.
Some off street
parking. No Pets.
$500/per month +
utilities.
570-417-2063
PITTSTON
4 room apt. 2nd
floor, stove &
refrigerator, off
street parking.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Non smokers & no
pets. $550/month.
570-655-2567
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
2nd floor, large and
modern. 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
computer room,
laundry room with
washer & dryer. Full
bath, kitchen with
stove, fridge and
dish washer. Fresh
paint and carpet.
Water and trash
incl. No smokers,
no pets. $550/mo
plus security.
570-881-9789 after
6PM
PITTSTON
Remodeled single
home. 3 bedrooms.
Gas heat. No Pets.
$695/month & 1st
month, & security
deposit. Credit
Check Required.
570-479-0302
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON/JENKINS
TOWNSHIP
3 1/2 bedrooms,
2 full baths, large
living room, dining
room, kitchen,
stove, washer/dryer
hookup. Off street
parking. Spacious
with heat and
water included.
$875/mo., security,
credit check &
references.
AVAILABLE NOW!
917-753-8192
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified! W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
6
3
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON-
HUGHESTOWN
Large modern 1
bedroom apart-
ment, includes
refrigerator, stove,
washer dryer hook-
up, new carpet and
freshly painted,
great neighborhood,
off street parking,
gas heat and hot
water. $495. No
pets 479-6722.
PLAINS
2 bedroom first
floor, off street
parking, washing
machine, stove,
refrigerator, dish-
washer, dryer
hookup all included.
No pets. $640/
month + utilities +
security deposit.
570-851-0852
PLAINS
Available Nov. 1st
First Floor. 3 room
apartment. CLEAN
AND QUIET.
$550/month
includes heat,
water & sewers.
Definitely no smok-
ing and no pets. Off
street parking. First
months rent, first
months security.
Credit and back-
ground check done.
570-899-6710 or
570-820-3906
PLYMOUTH
2 bedroom apart-
ment. Heat, water,
stove & fridge
included. Near
bus stop.
$600/month
No pets. Credit
and background
check, security &
references
required. Call
(570) 592-2902
SCRANTON
Green Ridge Area
2nd floor, 3 bed-
room, living room
kitchen, bath &
laundry. New car-
pet, fresh paint. No
pets. Modern, nice,
clean. $600,
includes sewer.
No pets.
570-344-3608 or
973-541-0686
SCRANTON/
SOUTH
Two, 2 bedroom
apartments, private,
all redone, fully car-
peted. Nice land-
lord. 600 Block
South Scranton.
Non-smokers.
$660 each. Pay
heat & separate
electric only. No
washer/dryer.
Call Nina
570-575-6280
WEST WYOMING
Eighth Street
Beautiful 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, all
appliances incl.
washer & dryer &
air conditioning.
Non smoker, secu-
rity and references,
off street parking,
no pets. $630 plus
utilities. 954-2972
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
108 Grove Street
2nd and 3rd floors,
3 bedroom, 1 bath
half-duplex, new
flooring and kitchen
cabinets, fridge,
stove, dishwasher,
private entrance,
nice deck, small
yard. Easy on-
street parking. Sec-
tion 8 welcome
$595/ month + utili-
ties. Pets OK with
additional rent.
570-798-7051
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
Victorian 2 bed-
room in Historic
downtown. All appli-
ances + washer/
dryer, off-street
parking, no pets.
$800/month + utili-
ties, security & 1st
month. 5 minutes
from Rt. 309 & I-81.
(570)239-4067
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
947 Garages
ASHLEY
2,100 sq. ft. Building
Suitable for Storage
Close to 1-81.
$330/month.
570-592-3575
FORTY FORT
11’, 6” by 23’
Cinder block
walls, interior
walls are steel
studs with sheet
rock. Concrete
floor, steel over
head door with
locks, over head
lighting. $110 a
month. 1 year
lease + security.
570-655-0530
950 Half Doubles
EXETER
132 VALLEY STREET
Modern 3 bedroom
corner lot ½ double
with yard and
storage. New tile/
hardwood flooring.
Washer/Dryer,
Stove, Refrigerator,
and garbage includ-
ed. $650/ month.
plus electric and
gas. No smoking.
No pets. Security
required. 570-954-
1746 or 570-417-
2775. Available
November 1.
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
Charming, spacious
6 room, 2 bedroom
duplex, includes 2nd
& 3rd floor. Ample
closets. Washer
/dryer hook-up.
$575/ month + utili-
ties, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PITTSTON
109 Lagrange St.
3 bedroom 1 bath.
New wood floors,
porches, big kitchen
with dishwasher, full
attic, basement, lots
of space! New gas
furnace and new
windows small yard.
Easy on - street
parking. Section 8
welcome. $625/per
month, plus utilities.
Pets okay with addi-
tional rent.
570-798-7051
PLAINS
Spacious 3
bedroom, 1 bath
with Victorian
charm with hard-
wood floors, neutral
decor, stained glass
window, large
kitchen. Washer
/dryer hook-up,
off-street parking.
$700 month +
utilities, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLYMOUTH
House for Rent.
$750 + utilities.
Water, sewer & all
appliances includ-
ed. Fenced back
yard. One month
security up front, no
partial payment.
Section 8 OK.
Call Steve at
570-592-5764
PLYMOUTH
Large 1/2 double, off
street parking &
yard. 2 bedrooms, 1
1/2 baths, $650 +
security. Utilities by
tenant. Section 8
Ok. Call
570-690-6289
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, small yard,
front porch, off
street parking.
$615/month
security required.
Tenant pays
all utilities.
570-357-0712
950 Half Doubles
TRUCKSVILLE
3 bedrooms,
refrigerator &
stove, washer/
dryer hookup, laun-
dry room, off-street
parking. $700/
month + electric,
gas & hot water,
1 month security,
references &
background check.
570-592-2902
953Houses for Rent
CLARKS SUMMIT
4 bedrooms,
2 baths, all appli-
ances, washer/
dryer hookup, no
pets. $1,800/month
+ utilities & security.
Month to month
lease.
(610)256-5352
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
brick Ranch house
with attached 2 car
garage. Full base-
ment. $1,300 per
month. Security &
references.
570-690-2570
DURYEA
Spacious 1 bed-
room renovated
house. 1 1/2
baths, partially
furnished, open
dining & TV rooms
with cozy wooden
gas fireplace.
New refrigerator,
freezer, dishwash-
er, mounted
micro-wave &
new oak cabinets.
Brand new gas
furnace/water
heater. New
apartment sized
washer/dryer on
1st floor. Brand
new draperies,
blinds & carpet-
ing. Detached
garage with drive-
way. Front &
back yards in
tranquil neighbor-
hood. No smok-
ing. $750 + utili-
ties & security.
570-762-8265
EXETER
Beautiful magnifi-
cent Cape Cod style
home. 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, finished
lower level, 2 car
garage with a rear
deck area. Master
bedroom and bath
on first floor, new
carpets, recently
painted, hardwood
& tile floors, granite
counters & stainless
steel appliances in
kitchen. Gas heat.
$1500 per/ month.
570-479-6722
HARVEYS LAKE
Lehman Outlet Rd
3 bedrooms, full
bath, full basement,
very large yard.
$800 month + $800
security. Tenant
pays utilities. Avail-
able December 1st.
Pets considered.
570-357-5289
PARSONS
114 Govier St.
2 1/2 bedrooms, 1
bath. $650. No
pets. 570-825-0908
953Houses for Rent
KINGSTON HOUSE
Great location &
neighborhood. 3
bedrooms 1.5 bath,
dishwasher &
garbage disposal.
2 car garage. No
pets. $1000. per
month plus utilities
& 1 month security.
call 574-7904
leave message.
Available Dec. 1st.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LAKE SILKWORTH
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
single home. Lake
view with lake and
dock rights. Hard-
wood and tile
floors. $725/mo
plus utilities, securi-
ty, and 1 year lease.
Lake Lehman
School District. No
Pets or smoking.
Call 570-696-3289
PLAINS
Modern 6 rooms,
laundry, base-
ment, gas
heat/water, fenced
yard $700/per
month, plus utili-
ties and security,
no pets
570-472-3837
WILKES-BARRE
Safe
Neighborhood
2 bedroom, $550
Plus all utilities,
security & back-
ground check.
No pets.
570-766-1881
WYOMING
Cozy little yellow
house. Nice carpet,
freshly painted, 1
bedroom, living &
dining rooms,
kitchen with stove
& refrigerator.
Washer in base-
ment, private park-
ing. Security & ref-
erences. $485/mo.
NO PETS.
772-465-9592,
570-693-3963,
570-709-9206
959 Mobile Homes
MIDDLEBURG RD.
Crestwood
School District
2 bedroom. Country
setting, on side of
mountain. 1 car
garage, paved
driveway. Porch.
Situated on 3/4
acre lot. 15 minutes
from Crestwood
Industrial Park also
close to Lehigh
river, ski resorts &
all major highways.
Includes refrigera-
tor, stove, washer,
sewer & water. All
other utilities by
tenant. Oil heat.
$450 month +
security. Call
(570) 474-0388
or 570-417-8751
959 Mobile Homes
WEST WYOMING
Modular Home, nice
neighborhood,
2 bedroom, new
wall-to-wall carpet-
ing, all appliances,
freshly painted, sun
porch, shed, securi-
ty lighting, sewage,
fully maintained
lawn, off-street
parking. 475/month
+ utilities. Refer-
ences, security, No
pets.No Smoking.
570-693-2355 or
570-650-8120.
AVAILABLE NOW!
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HILTON HEAD
Island Marriott’s
newest ocean front
resort. 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, accommo-
dates 12. December
23-30, 2012. Call
570-299-5189 or
570-262-3443
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1024 Building &
Remodeling
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
SNOW
PLOWING
RESIDENTIAL/
COMMERCIAL
SIDEWALKS
Insured & Bonded
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
1132 Handyman
Services
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J & F
CONSTRUCTION
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LEE LE LLEEEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
P
A
G
E
6
4
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
$900.00
Routes Currently Available:
Wyoming - Potential Proft - $800
W. 8th St. • Ensign St. • Hill Top Dr. • Holden St.
Butler St. • W. Brady St. • Shoemaker Ave.
177 Daily Papers • 187 Sunday Papers
89 Sunday Dispatch
Pittston - Potential Proft - $380
Center St. • Searle St. • Lambert St. • Washington Terr.
101 Daily Papers • 101 Sunday Papers
Plymouth - Potential Proft - $920
Cole St. • Flat St. • W. Main St. • North St.
Davenport St. • Lee St. • Orchard St.
166 Daily Papers • 221 Sunday Papers
Duryea - Potential Proft - $560
Adams St. • Blueberry Hill Development
Columbia St. • Foote Ave. • Wright St. • Green St.
151 Daily Papers • 150 Sunday Papers
Bear Creek - Lafin - Miners Mills - Potential Proft - $690
Scott St. • E. Main St. • 2nd Street • Jumper Rd.
Wildflower Dr. • Pocono Trailer Ct. • Baltimore Dr.
144 Daily Papers • 160 Sunday Papers W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
6
5
242 N. M em orial H wy., Sh avertown,PA
675-1245
H E AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
$10 O F F
AN Y S E RV IC E
W IT H C O UPO N
E x pire s 11- 14- 12
As usual, w e acce ptco m pe tito rs
m o ne y o ff co upo ns
2
0
6
5
3
9
SENSATIO NS
New A m ericanStaff
A cceptingallm ajor credit cards
5 70 -779 -4 5 5 5
14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
SUND AY NOW OP E N
12 -8 P M
INTR OD UCING
SUM M E R & STAR
D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H OUR $40
M OND AY 4-8P M
2 0 M INS. F OR $30
TH UR S. 2 -6 P M
2 F OR 1
F R ID AY
1/2 OF F AL L SE SSIONS
SUN. 12 -6 P M
2 0 M INS. F OR $30
2
9
3
7
3
8
7
3
1
7
8
8
ULTIMA II
1-866-858-4611
570-970-3971
CALL TO HEAR
OUR DAILY
SPECIALS!
NOW HIRING
PART TIME & FULL TIME
IMMEDIATE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
7
3
1
7
8
8
7
4
9
8
8
5
539 R e a r Scott Str e e t, W ilk e s-B a r r e
570.82 9.3914 • H our s: 10 a m – 1 a m • Op e n 7 D a ys A W e e k
Or ie n ta l Sta ff
M a ssa g e
B od y Sh a m p oo
Ta n n in g
Sa un a
539 SPA
South Rt. 309 • Hazleton
(entrance in
back, 2nd
floor)
FREE
PARKING PARKING
570-861-9027
Spa 21
7
7
2
5
3
9
Magical Asian
Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
9:30 A.M.-12:30 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
7
7
2
5
4
1
19 Asian
Spa
Open 7 Days 10am-11:30pm
FEATURING BODY AND
FOOT MASSAGES
$10 OFF HOUR
SESSIONS
570-337-3966
Unit 19A Gateway Shopping
Center, Edwardsville
7
8
4
7
8
6
7
8
4
8
0
8
Secret Moments Massage
SENSUAL MASSAGE
PRIVATE BY APPOINTMENT
DAILY 10AM-10PM
81N EXIT 182 / 81S EXIT 191B
SCRANTON 570-702-2241
S w e d is h & R e la xa tion M a s s a ge
750 Ju m p e r R oa d , W ilk e s - B a rre
M in u te s from
the M ohe ga n S u n Ca s in o
$10 off 60 m in . m a s s a ge
H EAVEN LY TOU CH
M AS S AGE
Tra c to rTra ilerPa rk ingAva ila b le
Sho w erAva ila b le
8 29- 30 10
Im m e d ia te H irin g
N ew Cu s to m ers Only
T.S. BUNNY
Brazilian & Blk beauty
FUN! FUN! FUN!
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Call 24 hours
(267) 516-3265
NEPA
NEPA
Playmates
Playmates
In call/out call In call/out call
Flat Rates Flat Rates
nepa.escortsite.com nepa.escortsite.com
570-266-9183
570-266-9183
Discrete, Independent, Mature,
Attractive. 36D, 110 lbs.
Small waist, Blonde Escort-
Dancer-Lingerie Model
570-299-0064
The Aroma A Spa
405 N. River Street • Wilkes-Barre
ORIENTAL SHIATSU
BODY MASSAGE
570-991-8566
10 AM
to 10 PM
DAILY
B E A U T IF U L Y O U N G
A S IA N G IR L S
Profes s iona l
M a s s a ge
Open 7 days
9:30 am -11 pm
Fash ion M all
Rt. 6
7
5
7
9
7
8
570-341-5852
NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-11 NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-11
12-6 pm Sunday 12-6 pm Sunday
Aura
Aura
Massage
Massage
460 S. Empire St. 460 S. Empire St.
Wilkes-Barre •970.4700 Wilkes-Barre •970.4700
HALF HOUR HALF HOUR
$20 $20
HOUR HOUR
$40 $40
With Coupon With Coupon
Bella Diamond
Escorts
(570) 793-5767
Open 24/7
In Call/Out
Call
Flat Rates
Now Hiring
Elegant Escort
Escort - Massage -
Domination - Fetish -
Fantasy
24 hours a day • in call/out call
570-829-1406
570-497-3628
M&R Agency
Rt. 11, West Nanticoke
735-4150
$20 OFF
ANY SESSION, ANY DAY,
ANY TIME W/AD
EXPIRES 11-21-12 • NOWHIRING, INCENTIVES OFFERED
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Brand New
T.S. MEGAN
MORRECOX
1 week only mall area
(305) 791-4961
CALL 831.7349
TO ADVERTISE IN
THE WEEKENDER.
P
A
G
E
6
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
SALES REPS:
$700-$1,200 weekly
We offer motivated individuals an opportunity to earn
the type of income they deserve and set their own
work calendar. Instead of cutting back, we encourage
our winning team to work as much as they want and
earn more money while enjoying a change of scenery
each week working a variety of prescheduled in-store
promotions and special events.
We offer:
• Consistent Full-Time Income
• Advancement Opportunities
• Unlimited Income Potential
Qualifcations:
• Strong communication skills & work ethic.
• Driver’s license & insured vehicle required.
• Weekend Availability
CALL NOW: (888) 502-5521
RMS Promotions, Inc.
Apply Online: www.rmspromos.com/jobs W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
6
7
7
3
6
9
8
7
SUBMIT TWO
RECENT PHOTOS TO
MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM
INCLUDE YOUR AGE, FULL
NAME, HOMETOWN AND PHONE
NUMBER. (MUST BE 18+)
THINK
YOU’RE
ATTRACTIVE?
ASPIRING
TO BE A
MODEL?
2012 MODEL OF THE YEAR
DOMINIQUE KOZUCH
P
A
G
E
6
8
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2 W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
6
9 7
8
8
1
9
4
weekender
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
DANNY LALLI
AGE: 23
HOMETOWN: JESSUP
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
CONCERTS
MY BEST CONCERT WAS …
PARKWAY DRIVE…I CRIED A LITTLE….TRUE STORY.
FOR MORE
PHOTOS OF
DANNY, VISIT
THEWEEKENDER.COM.
PHOTOS BY
AMANDA
DITTMAR
W
A
N
T
T
O
B
E
F
E
A
T
U
R
E
D
?
S
E
N
D
T
W
O
R
E
C
E
N
T
P
H
O
T
O
S
,
Y
O
U
R
F
U
L
L
N
A
M
E
,
H
O
M
E
T
O
W
N
,
A
G
E
,
&
P
H
O
N
E
N
U
M
B
E
R
T
O
M
O
D
E
L
@
T
H
E
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
.
C
O
M
.
P
A
G
E
7
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
7
8
8
1
8
8
BRANDI BURKE
AGE: 20
HOMETOWN: JENKINS
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
MODEL OF THE WEEK
WHAT’S SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE DON’T KNOWABOUT
YOU? I NEVER WENT TO A COLLEGE PARTY OR A CONCERT.
FOR MORE
PHOTOS OF
BRANDI, VISIT
THEWEEKENDER.COM.
PHOTOS BY
AMANDA
DITTMAR
HAIR AND
MAKEUP
PROVIDED
BY SAPPHIRE
SALON AND
DAY SPA
WARDROBE
PROVIDED
BY BRATTY
NATTY’S
BOUTIQUE
W
A
N
T
T
O
B
E
F
E
A
T
U
R
E
D
?
S
E
N
D
T
W
O
R
E
C
E
N
T
P
H
O
T
O
S
,
Y
O
U
R
F
U
L
L
N
A
M
E
,
H
O
M
E
T
O
W
N
,
A
G
E
,
&
P
H
O
N
E
N
U
M
B
E
R
T
O
M
O
D
E
L
@
T
H
E
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
.
C
O
M
.
weekender
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
7
1
P
A
G
E
7
2
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
7
,
2
0
1
2
7
5
3
8
7
9
L.T. VERRASTRO, INC. * IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR * 1-800-341-1200
·..·.. .· ·.. !¯'· .·.· ..·
´., ¯.. ..,. . ... .,.
.· . ·· .· .,. .
.·. . , ... · .... ,
. ,...· , ··.. ... · .·
. .. .· . ,· , .·.·.·.
LACKAWANNA
A CLAUSE INC ............................ CARBONDALE
MANCUSO BEER BARON ............................ CARBONDALE
ABBEY BEVERAGE ............................ DICKSON CITY
GREEN STREET BEVERAGE ................................ DUNMORE
BEER CITY U.S.A........................... S WASHINGTON AVE
BEST BEVERAGE COMPANY............................. KEYSER AVE
BIRNEY BEVERAGE .................................... MOOSIC
BORO BEVERAGE ................................. MOSCOW
A CLAUSE INC ........................................ CARBONDALE
BREWERS OUTLET ................................ DUNMORE
CROWN BEVERAGE ........................ CLARKS SUMMIT
CLARKS SUMMIT BEVERAGE........................ CLARKS SUMMIT
FLANNERY BEER DISTRIBUTORS .................... MOOSIC ST
HARRINGTON’S DISTRIBUTING ...................... MINOOKA
JOE’S BEERMAN ............................................ PECKVILLE
NORTH POCONO BEVERAGE .................... BILL’S PLAZA
OK BEERMAN LLC ................................. KEYSER & OAK ST
OLYPHANT BOTTLING COMPANY ................... OLYPHANT
PIONEER DISTRIBUTING ......................... GREENRIDGE ST
TAYLOR BEVERAGE ............................................ TAYLOR
PAUPACK AREA
HAMLIN DISTRIBUTORS ........................................ HAMLIN
BIG LAKE BEVERAGE ........................................... TAFTON
PAUPACK AREA
NEWFOUNDLAND BEVERAGE ............... NEWFOUNDLAND
SHOOKYS DISTRIBUTING ............................... HAWLEY
LUZERNE
B & S DISTRIBUTOR ...................................... MOCONAQUA
BEER SUPER ............................................ WILKES-BARRE
BONANZA BEVERAGE ............................... SHAVERTOWN
J & M UNION BEVERAGE ...................................... LUZERNE
KERN BROS. INC ................................................ DALLAS
CITY BEVERAGE LLC ................................... WILKES-BARRE
DUNDEE BEVERAGE ......................... SAN SOUCI HIGHWAY
LAKEWAY BEVERAGE .......................................... DALLAS
MAIN BEVERAGE ......................................... LARKSVILLE
MIDWAY BEVERAGE ....................................... WYOMING
MOUNTAIN BEVERAGE ........................................ PLAINS
PIKE’S CREEK BEVERAGE ................................ PIKE’S CREEK
NANTICOKE BEER DISTRIBUTOR ..................... NANTICOKE
PLAZA BEVERAGE .......................................... PITTSTON
QUALITY BEVERAGE OF NEPA ................................. LAFLIN
SHICKSHINNY JOE’S INC. ......................... SHICKSHINNY
THRIFTY BEVERAGE ........................ SAN SOUCI PARKWAY
WYCHOCK’S BY-PASS BEVERAGES ............. WILKES-BARRE
WYCHOCKS MOUNTAIN TOP BEVERAGE .... MOUNTAINTOP
WYOMING VALLEY BEVERAGE .............................. EXETER
WYOMING VALLEY BEVERAGE ..................... EDWARDSVILLE
POCONO AREA
BELTZVILLE BEVERAGE .................................... LEHIGHTON
DUNBAR BOTTLING ....................................... LEHIGHTON
MOUNT POCONO BEVERAGE .................. MOUNT POCONO
WEST END DISTRIBUTORS, INC. .......................... GILBERT
CLASSIC BEVERAGE .............................. NESQUEHONING
SMITHFIELD BEVERAGE ....................... EAST STROUDSBURG
HIGHLAND BEVERAGE .................................. JIM THORPE
EAGLE VALLEY BEVERAGE ........................ E. STROUDSBURG
PIKE COUNTY BEVERAGE ...................... DINGMANS FERRY
HAZLETON AREA
BUTLER VALLEY BEVERAGE,INC. .............................. DRUMS
JO JO’S BEVERAGE STORE ................. HAZLE TOWNSHIP
PARTY BEVERAGE ......................................CONYNGHAM
QUALITY BEVERAGE ....................................... HAZELTON
T VERRASTRO ................................................. HAZLETON
TUNKHANNOCK/MONTROSE AREA
B & R DISTRIBUTING ................................ TUNKHANNOCK
DRINKER CREEK BEVERAGE .................. SUSQUEHANNA
LAKE WINOLA BEVERAGE .......................... LAKE WINOLA
SUSQUEHANNA BEVERAGE ........................... GREAT BEND
MONTROSE BEVERAGE ................................. MONTROSE
CLIFFORD BEVERAGE CO ................................. CLIFFORD
PLAZA BEVERAGE .................................. TUNKHANNOCK
WYOMING COUNTY BEVERAGE ................. TUNKHANNOCK

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful