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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

P

A Good Definition of “Unsustainable”: Beneficiaries Negotiating Benefits Without the Benefactors
is actually paid to each retiree. In today’s dollars, even 8 percent will not suffice, let alone current ROIs of 3 percent or lower. Consider this hypothetical example for illustration purposes: A 25-year-old starts working for the State of Illinois with an annual salary of $50,000. If this person works for 30 years and retires at age 55, having had a 1.5-percent COLA salary increase annually, a state and employee contribution of 8.2 percent of salary annually, and an investment income of 4 percent annually, she would have a pension nest egg of more than $597,000. And let’s say, hypothetically, that this person lives to be 86 years old, or has 31 years of retirement to enjoy. And, over those 31 years, the pension fund continues to return 4 percent annually. When she retired, her annual salary would have been $78,000 and, in this hypothetical case, the retirement benefit is 78 percent of salary when she retired – or just under $61,000 annually to start with. With a 1-percent COLA on the pension benefit annually, her second-year retirement benefit would then be just under $61,600. Even with the annual 4-percent investment return on the slowly diminishing retirement-fund balance, this person’s pension runs out of money at age 66 and is in the hole $45,000 at age 67. And by the time this person dies at age 86, her fund balance is in the hole to the taxpayers to the tune of more than $2.2 million. This is just for one single public-sector worker. Imagine what this figure looks like for some of the Illinois public employees who retire with even higher salaries, such as $200,000. (To do this math yourself, download the spreadsheet provided by the publisher’s father, Bill McGreevy, at RCReader.com/y/illinoispensions.) Naturally, public-sector employees’ unions are fighting to keep the defined-benefit plan. Who wouldn’t? The calculation for determining employees’ average annual income can include any overtime and the value of some perks (such as gas allowances) – all of which allow for accelerated incomes over the final four years. Obviously, this can dramatically increase the average income used for calculating retirement incomes, grossly inflating retirement benefits and adding to the funding dilemma facing states,

by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

ensions are among the most important investments American workers and employers make. We work for years so that when the time comes, we can retire with enough income to live comfortably, enjoy the much-deserved leisure time, and engage in activities of our own choosing. This week’s cover story examines Iowa’s and Illinois’ pensions, which, when coupled with health-care benefits, are in grave danger of insolvency, threatening to potentially bankrupt Illinois. This is due to the unsustainable “defined-benefit” pension plan that promises each employee a percentage of his or her annual income, regardless of the amount of contributions made by the employee, or on the employee’s behalf by the employer (the state’s taxpayers), over his/her years of service. The defined-benefit pension plan has built into its calculations an annual rate of return on investment (ROI) of roughly 8 percent. The investment is the aggregate contributions from both the state and its employees into the pension plan each year. The presumed 8-percent gain is supposed to cover the expansive gap that is created by the difference between what was contributed and what

especially Illinois. Conversely, most private-sector pension plans use some form of defined contribution, with the employee contributing a larger percentage into his/her account, and the employer contributing at some lower percentage. Some states impose a cap on the allowable contribution rate. Either way, the employee can choose the amount of risk he/ she is willing to accept for investing aggregate contributions during the years of service. Upon retirement, he/she is entitled to the total amount in the account at that time, regardless of whether the account gained or lost money. There is no guaranteed ROI. Defined-contribution plans provide for sustainable pensions, using reasonable expectations that can be met over time. Plus, these plans allow each employee to manage his/her particular appetite for investment risk. Defined-benefit plans carry no risk whatsoever to the employee, only to the taxpayer. It is an unreasonable burden due to the excessively large amount of risk, considering the model is tied to an annual ROI of 8 percent whether or not its achieved.

Continued On Page 12

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Rich Miller CapitolFax.com

ILLINOIS POLITICS

T

Feud Shows Madigan at His Ruthless Best

here’s nothing quite like the spectacle of Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan when he’s out to get somebody. Just ask state Representative Skip Saviano (R-Elmwood Park). The two men used to be allies, even friends. Saviano supported Madigan’s daughter when Lisa ran for state attorney general. But then Lisa turned against Saviano’s political mentor, the late Rosemont Mayor Don Stephens, blocking his dream of building a local casino because, she claimed, he was tied to the mob. Saviano vowed revenge. Even so, things eventually died down. Saviano kept the powerful committee chair given to him by Madigan – one of only two Republicans bestowed with that privilege in the Illinois House, the other being one of Skip’s best friends. But when Madigan cranked up his total war against then-Governor Rod Blagojevich, he eventually came to believe that Saviano, an old Blagojevich pal, had sided with the governor against him. That was the last straw. Before long, Saviano had lost his chairmanship. Then the Republican Saviano was given a new, solidly Democratic House district in the remap. And then Madigan moved Heaven and Earth to find an opponent for the locally popular Saviano, finally convincing an almost totally unknown local Republican to switch parties and challenge the incumbent. Madigan dumped hundreds of thousands of dollars into the campaign, forcing Saviano to work harder on his re-election than he ever has. Saviano is a clever tactician himself, however. When Madigan lieutenant state Senator Martin Sandoval (D-Chicago) crashed and disrupted a Latino candidates’ forum in Saviano’s district, Saviano finally got the Chicago media to pay some attention to his battle. Senator Sandoval stood on a chair and then sat on the floor, all the while shouting that Latinos should never vote Republican. Sandoval was eventually escorted out of the church building by local police and, instead of apologizing the next day, called Saviano a racist. The Chicago media generally disdains covering local state-legislative races, but that story was just too good to pass up. Saviano ginned up the attention further by claiming that Sandoval’s actions had prompted the state’s lone Latino congressman – Luis Gutierrez, a Democrat – to endorse the Republican Saviano. Never mind that Saviano had already ordered that the Gutierrezendorsement direct-mail pieces be printed

The wildest move came when a PAC with obvious ties to Michael Madigan blasted the Republican for being the speaker’s puppet.

before Sandoval crashed the forum. But, hey, it made for a good story. Not to be outdone, Madigan ordered up the printing of a flyer featuring photos of his candidate, Kathleen Willis, and Congressman Gutierrez. “Luis Gutierrez and Kathleen Willis, Fighting for our families and our concerns!” read the text underneath the photo. But the wildest move of the entire campaign came when a political action committee with obvious ties to Madigan popped up out of nowhere and sent direct-mailers to Republicans blasting Saviano for being Speaker Madigan’s puppet. “A vote for Skip Saviano is a vote for Mike Madigan!” blared one of the PAC’s mailers. The piece informed voters that Madigan had appointed Saviano to a committee chairmanship, claimed Saviano had contributed money to Madigan’s campaign committee, and “voted six times to make Madigan Speaker of the House!” “Democrat Speaker Mike Madigan calls the shots for Skip Saviano,” screamed the other mailer, which featured a photo of the two men with their arms around each other. The political action committee was formed October 15. Its treasurer appears to work at a law firm run by the Melrose Park Village attorney, who was once recommended for the Justice Village attorney position by none other than Speaker Madigan. One of the PAC’s top contributors gave $5,000 to the new group on October 19 – less than two weeks after the company contributed $10,000 to Madigan. Another company gave three contributions to Madigan’s committees totaling more than $6,000 just 10 days before it gave the new PAC $1,500. I’ve seen some crazy stuff in my day, but this one pretty much took the cake. Madigan’s people have insisted for years that Republican attempts to sully his name have not worked. But then they got behind what appeared to be a pro-Madigan group that attacked Madigan to help defeat a Republican state representative. To put it another way, the Democrats took the Republican Party’s ubiquitous “Fire Madigan” mantra and turned it against a Republican legislator. This was either a brilliant payback to the GOP or a foolish confirmation that Madigan’s name truly is toxic. Heck, it could turn out to be both. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

COVER STORY

A

riddle: What do you get if you add $209 billion to $54 billion to $15 billion? If you answered “a lot,” you’re correct and not particularly inclined toward math. If you answered $278 billion, you’re adept at arithmetic and correct, if literal-minded. If you answered the respective unfunded liabilities for Illinois’ state-run pension funds, its retiree health-care system, and its pension bonds, you’re correct and probably cheating. And if you answered “a time bomb,” you’re probably most correct. Because while the numbers are important, they’re constantly changing and open to interpretation, and the most important aspect of them is their magnitude. Whether it’s cast as an $83-billion pension problem or a $278-billion benefits issue, the sheer size of it shows that it can’t be solved with tinkering. “We’re getting close to the point where the choice is between making pension payments or paying for goods and services that we need today,” said Rae Ann McNeilly, director of outreach for Taxpayers United of America. “We are coming to the pinnacle of financial crisis where something has to be done.” Ted Dabrowski, vice president for policy for the Illinois Policy Institute, said retiree health care is another unfunded liability that will soon reach a critical juncture for Illinois government: “We’ve promised all these things, but we haven’t set aside any money. ... The only way to pay them is to take money from the current budget. And the way it’s growing, that means you’re going to take away from education, from health care, from public safety ... .” If that rhetoric sounds overheated, consider the 2010 paper “Are State Public Pensions Sustainable?” by Joshua D. Rauh of Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. He concluded that using the typical state asset-growth forecast of 8 percent a year, the money in the pension funds for “Illinois would run out in 2018, followed by Connecticut, New Jersey, and Indiana in 2019.” Only “five states never run out” in this scenario. Iowa would run out of pension-fund cash in 2035. A June analysis by the Pew Center on the States outlined a problem that has grown dramatically in the past decade: “Many experts say that a healthy pension system should be at least 80-percent funded. In 2000, more than half of the states were 100-percent funded, but by 2010 only Wisconsin was fully funded, and 34 were below the 80-percent threshold – up from 31 in 2009 and just 22 in 2008.” The funding ratio for the Iowa Public Employees’ Retirement System, for example, dropped from 97.2 percent in 2000 to 81.4 percent in 2010. Pew calculated that Illinois in 2010 had a $76-billion unfunded liability (out of a

The Pension Time Bomb
Why Public-Sector Retiree Benefits Need to Change, and the Barriers to Meaningful Reform

$138.8-billion total liability) in its pension funds, and a nearly $44-billion unfunded liability for retiree health care – meaning a total unfunded liability for retiree benefits of $120 billion. Iowa in 2010 had a $5-billion unfunded liability (out of a $27.1-billion total liability) in its pension funds, and a $538-million unfunded liability for retiree health care – for a total unfunded liability of close to $6 billion. Those are big numbers, but they don’t tell the whole story. The unfunded liabilities represent, at a given point in time, how much additional money the states would need now to pay for retiree benefits already earned. Add current assets to the unfunded liability and you get the total liability – the amount of money today that should through investment be adequate to fully fund retiree benefits. But that calculation is premised on a certain return on investment; if actual earnings are below expectations, the total and unfunded liabilities grow. Most states estimate their unfunded liabilities based on an anticipated asset-growth rate of roughly 8 percent a year – a historical number that many experts consider optimistic today, meaning that the actual retiree-benefit situation might be even more grim. Rauh’s paper figures that with 8-percent return, “states in aggregate will run out of funds in 2028.” However, “if average returns are only 6 percent, state funds in aggregate will run out in 2024.” The Illinois Policy Institute notes that Illinois’ five pension funds assume a rate of return of between 7 and 8.5 percent a year in

calculating unfunded liability. But their fiveyear average returns have ranged from 3.1 to 6.3 percent, and their 10-year average returns have been between 4.5 and 6.1 percent. The institute calculated that the state pension system’s unfunded liability is actually $209.0 billion under new, more-realistic reporting requirements by Moody’s – instead of the current official estimate of $82.9 billion. Pew said that one analysis of similar Governmental Accounting Standards Board reporting requirements and state and local pension systems found that “if the new rules had been in effect in 2010, those plans’ funding levels would have dropped from 77-percent funded to 53-percent.”

The first thing to understand about the pension crisis is that states nearly universally give their workers defined-benefit pensions. In these plans, workers are promised a certain retirement income based on their salary and years of service, regardless of how much they or their employers contribute to the system, and regardless of how much money those contributions generate through investment. Employer-provided defined-benefit plans in the United States originated, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, with the American Express Company in 1875 and spread to the railroad, banking, and publicutility sectors. As of March 2011, 84 percent

A $1.38-Trillion Bill for Taxpayers

of local- and state-government employees had access to a defined-benefit retirement plan, according to the Center for State & Local Government Excellence. Taxpayers of course foot the bill for the required employer contribution, but they also end up paying for an additional portion of pensions under a variety of scenarios: if the initial contributions aren’t adequate, if the investments don’t perform up to expectations, if people live longer, and/or if contributions aren’t adjusted to account for market shortfalls and increased life expectancy. Illinois has skipped or underfunded annual pension payments, but the current pension crisis across the country illustrates forcefully that the combination of employee and employer contributions and investment return is grossly inadequate to cover states’ pension obligations; simply put, what public-sector employees will draw from pension systems is far greater than the sum of contributions and earnings. As of Fiscal Year 2010, taxpayers nationwide are holding a $757-billion bill for anticipated shortfalls in state retirement systems, the Pew Analysis shows. That unfunded liability has spurred discussion of both a federal bailout of state pension systems and federal legislation to allow states to declare bankruptcy. The unfunded-liability problem extends to other retirement benefits, particularly health care: Inadequate money has been set aside to cover the costs of things promised to public-sector workers. The states’ estimated unfunded liability for retiree health care, according to Pew, was $627 billion in 2010. That $1.38-trillion total unfunded liability represented a 9-percent increase from Fiscal Year 2009, Pew said. (The figures from Pew represent state-run pension systems, and each state is different. For example, Illinois’ figures don’t include the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund. So Illinois’ unfunded liability does not include municipal employees, while Iowa’s does under the Iowa Public Employees’ Retirement System. Again, the specifics are less important than the magnitude and pervasiveness of the problem.) Two recessions in the U.S. economy since 2000 have certainly exacerbated the situation by bringing down returns on investments. They’ve also put budget pressure on state and local governments, and because pensions and other retirement benefits are long-term obligations, funding for them has suffered in favor of short-term priorities. Yet in a larger sense, pension underfunding over the past decade highlights the anachronism of defined-benefit publicsector pensions. The private sector has shifted to defined-contribution plans such

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com
as 410(k)s– in which retirement income is determined not by salary and tenure but purely by contributions plus investment return. Defined-contribution plans are attractive to employers and (with publicsector employees) taxpayers because there is, by nature, no unfunded liability. As Businessweek noted last year: “In 1985, a total of 89 of the Fortune 100 companies offered their new hires a traditional definedbenefit pension plan, and just 10 of them offered only a defined-contribution plan. Today, only 13 of the Fortune 100 companies offer a traditional defined-benefit plan, and 70 offer only a defined-contribution plan.” The public sector is now learning what the private sector learned over the past three decades: that defined-benefit programs are tremendously expensive in the long run if not properly funded up-front. And even when enough money is put in at the outset, uncertainty is built in. As McNeilly of Taxpayers United of America said: “They are mathematically impossible to sustain. The whole system is predicated on the future growth of the current asset investment. That’s an unknown, and we treat it as a known when we’re calculating the value of the asset.” A defined-benefit system “puts the taxpayers at risk of catastrophic unfunded liabilities.” Somebody will need to pay for those benefits, or the benefits will need to change, or both. As Pew summarized: “Though states have enough cash to cover retiree benefits in the short term, many of them – even with strong market returns – will not be able to keep up in the long term without some combination of higher contributions from taxpayers and employees, deep benefit cuts, and, in some cases, changes in how retirement plans are structured and benefits are distributed.” of the pension system altogether and into a defined-contribution plan.” She acknowledged, however, that pension reform has “become a left/right issue – another divisive issue.” There’s certainly some anti-union sentiment at work here. When asked why states haven’t shifted more quickly to definedcontribution plans for new employees, McNeilly answered: “Votes. The unions deliver a ton of votes to people who vote for the defined-benefit system. ... It’s a game; it’s a ploy.” She further argued that maintaining the current retirement system is the primary reason public-sector unions exist today: “Without the pension benefits, there really is no need for union leadership. That’s the biggest negotiating point – pensions. Health care, too; that’s a whole other unfunded liability.” She stressed that Taxpayers United does not intend to “blast rank-and-file [union] members. It’s to blast the [defined-benefit] system that’s sold to them as a good thing.” Nonetheless, efforts to reform state pension systems are often seen as de-facto attacks on union workers. Defined-benefit pensions and retiree health care were negotiated, and any changes that make those systems more sustainable will inevitably come at the expense of employees – through higher worker contributions, reduced benefits, or later retirement ages. So unions tend to fight structural reform efforts, and politicians allied with unions are hesitant to seriously consider them. In a June statement, a coalition of public-employee unions under the banner of We Are One Illinois bemoaned the Illinois Senate’s passage of legislation that would “shift the lion’s share of the burden for Illinois pension debt onto employees and retirees, who have faithfully contributed their share over their working lives.” The Illinois Policy Institute’s Dabrowski acknowledged that it’s difficult to bring unions on board, but he said it’s in their long-term interest: “Without those reforms, the pension system will go bankrupt anyway, so state workers will have to get behind some form of reform if they want to see their future benefits.” Yet even if unions decide that structural pension reform benefits their workers in the long run, the existing problem doesn’t go away. As Dabrowski said: “Most people will agree that benefits that are already earned and promised should not be diminished.” This is actually written into the Illinois Constitution’s pension clause, which states that “benefits ... shall not be diminished or impaired.”

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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McNeilly emphasized that the pension issue is “a matter of mathematics. The math doesn’t work. It’s pure arithmetic. So there’s no ideology here; the system doesn’t work and it’s been proven not to work.” She also said that beyond a core lack of sustainability, Illinois’ pension system is rife with abuse – double-dipping and “spiking” pensions through overtime and higher end-of-career salaries. She said that 6,700 current Illinois pensioners take home more than $100,000 annually, and her organization estimates that number could be 25,000 by 2020. Taxpayers United advocates shifting employees to a defined-contribution system. “Any reforms that we can make for current employees need to be made,” McNeilly said. “As far as new hires, they really need to be out

Simple Math or Union-Bashing?

Continued On Page 16

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Vol. 20 · No. 817

A Passage to India

MUSIC

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Nov. 8 - 20, 2012
River Cities’ Reader

H

Singer/Songwriter Kiran Ahluwalia, November 9 at St. Ambrose University
like ballads. They’re melancholic, they’re slower, they have lilting melodies and intricate rhythms. And so they’ve kind of always been paired well with Punjabi folk songs, which provide a nice, upbeat contrast to ghazals. Every time I went to a ghazal concert, I would also hear a couple of Punjabi folk songs, and the effect of that kind of concert stayed with me longer than any other kind of music.” At about age 10, says Ahluwalia, “we migrated to Canada, and then I continued my music classes part-time throughout high school and university.” But despite her strong affinity for singing and writing the music of her heritage – with Ahluwalia calling ghazals “the music that gave me the greatest comfort when I wanted to find solace” – she says she didn’t give much thought to a career as a professional musician. “I don’t think I dared to hope for that,” says Ahluwalia. “Because that would have been just too ludicrous an idea – to be in a predominantly English-speaking country and try to make a living singing in a foreign language. I couldn’t have even dreamt that.” Instead, Ahluwalia went on to receive a bachelor’s degree in international relations, followed by an MBA, and embarked on a career as a bond trader. Yet in between her pursuit of degrees and jobs, Ahluwalia says she also routinely spent months studying music in India. “And whenever I came back to Canada, I still didn’t feel like working,” she says with a laugh. “Not in a nine-to-five job anyway. I felt like working on my music.” Happily for Ahluwalia, though, “in the 1980s, very slowly, there started to be what were called ‘world music’ sections in CD stores. If you wanted to hear Korean singing, or Indian singing, you didn’t have

er first CD, Kashish – Attraction, earned her a Best Global Album nomination at the 2002 Juno Awards, the Canadian equivalent of the Grammys. Her second, 2003’s Beyond Boundaries, received the Juno for Best World Music Album of the Year. Her latest, 2011’s Aam Zameen – Common Ground, made her a two-time Juno winner in that category. Consequently, the estimable world musician and frequent touring artist Kiran Ahluwalia must be feeling relatively secure about career longevity, yes? “No,” says the Indo-Canadian singer/songwriter, with a laugh, during a recent phone interview. “Oh, God, no. “I mean,” she continues, “I released my fifth CD last year, and I’ve been doing this full-time for 12 years now, and I definitely feel like I have enough gigs lined up for the next two years. But there really isn’t any security in my portion of the industry. So you kind of have to have short-term plans – a year down the road, two years maximum. Because after that, who knows what’s going to happen?” Given the trophies, plaudits, and fans that Ahluwalia has amassed to date, “continued success” seems a pretty fair prediction. Appearing at St. Ambrose University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center on November 9, the New York-based musician will perform material from her awardwinning albums plus, as she says, “some new songs that are not recorded.” And in doing so, she’ll likely be introducing numerous Galvin guests to the Indianmusic stylings that Ahluwalia has been praised for, with the Washington Post describing her work as “austerely lovely,” and the UK’s The Observer calling the artist “a powerful woman who has a depth of character in her wonderfully pliable, expressive voice.” The possessor of a clear and confident soprano that fully captures the haunting,

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lyrical emotionalism of her songs – compositions that are performed entirely in the language of Punjabi – Ahluwalia was born in northern India, and credits her parents for a love for music “that started, basically, as soon as I came out of the womb. “Indian music was a very serious passion for both of them,” she says, “and I was definitely singing complete songs by the age of five. So they put me in Indian music classes, and took me to all sorts of concerts when I was young: Indian classical concerts, Indian pop, Indian folk.” Yet Ahluwalia says that her parents – and eventually Ahluwalia herself – were especially taken with the musical forms of ghazals (pronounced “guzzles”), which are Indian love poems set to music, and Punjabi folk songs. “That’s what they loved the most,” she says. “They would sing them all the time, and so that’s why I chose to sing them as well. “Ghazals,” she continues, “are kind of

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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D

The Actor’s Nightmare, at Scott Community College through November 10
uring Thursday’s presentation, actor James Thames seemed out of place in Scott Community College’s The Actor’s Nightmare, acting like he was acting, offering a limited range of emotions and inflections, and speaking with a note of desperation in his tone. However, his amateurish performance, whether by design or not, actually proved spot-on for this comedy in which a non-actor finds himself forced to perform roles in four plays with no prior rehearsals. In author Christopher Durang’s play, Thames portrays George Spelvin, an accountant trapped in a dream in which he’s thrust into the spotlight as Elyot in Noel Coward’s Private Lives, the Danish prince in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Willie (a Nagg surrogate) in Samuel Beckett’s Endgame, and Sir Thomas Moore in Robert Bolt’s A Man for All Seasons. George is routinely told that he’s about to go on stage in place of actor Edwin Booth (who has a broken leg), but is not told which role he’s playing, or when, and oftentimes depends on Sara Bolet’s Stage Manager – dressed as a maid to seem less intrusive when entering scenes – to feed him his lines. And all throughout the comedy, Thames seems believably lost and baffled by what’s going on around him, attempting to play along by adlibbing lines, or stringing together quotes he remembers from studying Shakespeare in school. Director Steve Flanigin takes a minimalist approach to the staging and blocking, which, as George’s nightmare progresses, allows for quicker and more fluid changes from play to play. Flanigin’s most creative effects lie in the lighting for the production, with its spotlight comically changing locations – frequently pointing to where George is supposed to be standing but isn’t – and the shadows cast across faces adding an eeriness to the Beckett sequence. Flanigin’s flair for comedy is also evident in the recorded sound effects used throughout the play, mostly composed of audience reactions such as applause or pitying “Aw-w-w”, that garnered some of the evening’s largest laughs from Thursday’s real audience. For her part, which doesn’t feature a lot of dialogue, I think Bolet’s Stage Manager could get anyone to agree to anything – including portraying the lead role in a play without rehearsals or even a peek at a script – by the sheer force of her charm, spunk, and refusal to take “no” for an answer. Bolet lit up the stage, and brought a smile to my face, every time she entered. The other actors, portraying actors here, show signs of true stage talent as they change roles in each subsequent play in George’s dream. Analisa Percuoco does a fantastic job of showing her growing frustration at George’s repeated delivery of the wrong lines in their Private Lives scene; Percuoco’s increasing impatience is evident in her smile, which gets more and more forced with every incorrect response to her grand line readings. While Isaac Scott speaks almost too quickly to be understood in his first scene, he more than makes up for it with his over-enunciated, comically loud performance as Hamlet’s Horatio, acting broadly while ignoring George’s flaky, confused portrayal of the titular character. And with her intriguing mix of daft, ethereal, and almost mad deliveries, Taylor Martin proves captivating in Durang’s Endgame scene. Aided by her over-teased hair and the fact that she’s sitting in a garbage can, Taylor speaks her written cues (“pause, pause, blink left eye, blink right eye ...”) while tossing her head back and forth, and looking like she’s a puppet instead of a person. At about 45 minutes in length, Scott Community College’s The Actor’s Nightmare moves along quickly enough, and has the added benefit of Durang’s script not lingering too long on its gags and humorously theatrical references. I also found that my enjoyment of this droll production was not negatively affected by my unfamiliarity with some of the plays included in its “nightmare,” though I think that anyone who is familiar with the four plays might find Flanigin’s production all the more amusing. The Actor’s Nightmare runs at Scott Community College’s Student Life Center (Room 2400 through Door 5, 500 Belmont Road, Davenport) November 8 through 10 at 7 p.m., and more information is available by e-mailing director Steve Flanigin at sflanigin@eicc.edu.

Performance Anxiety

THEATRE

By Thom White

Sara Bolet lit up the stage, and brought a smile to my face, every time she entered.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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Movie Reviews
Pilot Lit
FLIGHT
Within the first 15 minutes of director Robert Zemeckis’ Flight, you’ll witness what must rank as one of cinema’s most frightening, emotionally wrenching plane crashes. Yet in the end, and as harrowing as this passage is, I’m not sure that it’s actually more terrifying or heartbreaking than the scenes of Denzel Washington’s Whip Whitaker – the pilot whose heroic actions save 96 lives aboard that ill-fated flight – battling his urge to drink and, with only the mildest feelings of regret, losing that battle again and again and again. Though rare, movies about characters suffering from alcoholism generally follow the same template: a few early, unsettling highs for our protagonist followed by a rather disastrous low at around the mid-film mark, followed by numerous scenes of support and steady progress (interrupted by one more drunken setback) before the inevitably hopeful, if not exactly happy, conclusion. And Flight doesn’t fully diverge from this familiar blueprint. But it also feels unlike any film about alcohol addiction I’ve seen; buoyed by Washington’s rather extraordinary performance – one that, I think, is far finer than the two he previously won Oscars for – Zemeckis’ latest gets at the frightening, unpredictable threat behind alcoholism in ways that feel both freshly imagined and universally true. Coupled with the film’s tortured yet routinely unrepentant leading figure, its narrative – which finds Whitaker’s heavy

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

drinker and recovering addict frequent coke(beautifully head a subject played by Kelly of investigation Reilly, who’s after his plane’s like a beaten-up horrific free-fall Jessica Chastain – might make here) gingerly Flight sound like attempts to an unbearable comfort Whitaker experience. Denzel Washington in Flight while Zemeckis’ Blessedly, camera shrewdly though, Zemeckis is also a born entertainer delays our awareness of the beer bottle in (at least when not making boring, motionhis hand, and the dozen empties resting capture-animated features such as The behind him. Zemeckis keeps the aching Polar Express and Beowulf). With its script danger of alcohol addiction – for Whitaker, by John Gatins, the movie does feature a for his passengers, for those attempting to few ill-considered comic gambits, such help him – in constant view, and in doing as the decision to have John Goodman so, lends his addiction drama the electric play Whitaker’s drug-dealing enabler with charge of a first-rate thriller. such unwarranted cartoon relish; every Denzel Washington, meanwhile, lends once in a while, for too many minutes, it the power and force of a Shakespearean this tough-minded tale is infiltrated by tragedy, and his spectacularly textured awkward bursts of The Big Lebowski. turn, charming and pathetic and at all (I can’t think of too many instances in times wholly convincing, may stand as which a Big Lebowski infiltration would a new high-water mark in a career rife be considered a damaging thing, but this with them. There are sharp, formidable turns out to be one of them.) In general, portrayals courtesy of Don Cheadle, however, Gatins’ deft, engaging screenplay Bruce Greenwood, Melissa Leo, and many appears marvelously insightful about the others, but Washington, in Flight, gives endless cycle of rationalizations and lies an instant-classic performance – the type necessary for a closeted alcoholic to remain that makes you say “My God he’s good” closeted, and Zemeckis stages a series of some 30 years after our first hints about compositionally brilliant and enormously how good he actually was. The means by gripping scenes that demonstrate which Washington’s Whitaker lands his Whitaker’s plight in visual terms. The plane are described as miraculous. The long, haunting close-up of a miniature means by which Washington creates this bottle of vodka just out of the pilot’s reach fascinatingly complex, troubled character nearly throbs with tension, and during are awfully miraculous, too. one particularly painful encounter, a

WRECK-IT RALPH
As Wreck-It Ralph concerns an endearing video-game villain (sweetly voiced by John C. Reilly) who longs to escape the early-’80s arcade game he’s trapped in, director Rich Moore’s animated saga would seem custom-tailored to my generation of fortysomethings, and I’ll admit, at the film’s start, to giggling at the witty period references and appearances by the likes of Q-Bert and that blinking ghost that caused Pac-Man so much grief. Unfortunately, my initial, child-like enthusiasm wasn’t enough to offset my eventual disappointment with the film’s formulaic plotting and presentation; while stunning to look at, what starts as a clever spin on Woody Allen’s The Purple Rose of Cairo morphs into yet another animated outing that (like this spring’s The Lorax) slowly and inevitably morphs into a dully serviceable action comedy with “heart.” It’s still diverting and clever enough, I suppose, and kids should eat it up, but I was really hoping that WreckIt Ralph would emerge as a cinematic video-game worth playing for 90 minutes, when 15, it turns out, would’ve been more than enough. For reviews of The Man with the Iron Fists, Cloud Atlas, Chasing Mavericks, Silent Hill: Revelation, and other current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/ MikeSchulzNow.

Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren
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Sunday November 18 7pm
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What’s Happenin’ What’s Happenin’
Music
Wildlife

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Music

Rozz-Tox Tuesday, November 13, 8 p.m.

Pieta Brown & the Sawdust Collective
River Music Experience Wednesday, November 14, 8 p.m.

I

t’s November, it’s chilly, it’s time to trade the fall jacket in for the winter coat ... . Who’s up for seeing some wildlife? Better yet, who’s up for seeing some Wildlife from the comfort of a heated building while sipping a Vietnamese coffee? If your answer to that second question is “Me! Me! Me!”, then you won’t want to miss November 13’s concert at Rock Island’s RozzTox venue, featuring the up-and-coming Canadian powerhouses of Wildlife. Based in Toronto, the five-man ensemble – composed of lead vocalist Dean Povinsky, guitarists Derek Bosomworth and Graham Plant, keyboardist Tim Daugulis, and drummer Dwayne Christie – formed in 2005, and has subsequently become one of its country’s most acclaimed indie-rock outfits, with Lithium Magazine calling the quintet “a must-see-live act” boasting “genuinely great music with good vibes.” Listing Bruce Springsteen, David Bowie, and The Clash among their greatest influences, Wildlife’s band members followed their self-titled, 2008 debut EP with the 2010 release Strike Hard, Young Diamond. And according to music critics, “striking hard” is exactly what Wildfire did with this first full-length CD; Now Magazine raved about Wildlife’s “fast-strummed, passionately delivered indie rock,” while Exclaim Magazine described the album’s songs as “bold, full of angst, [and] filled with youthful exuberance and affirming righteousness.” The band’s online bio, meanwhile, provides a few other descriptions of its output, likening the band to “a loaded, five-man party sled,” and the group’s sound to “tobogganing down steep slippery slopes straight into the warm cave of your heart.” That Vietnamese coffee is sounding even more enticing now, isn’t it? Admission to Wildlife’s 8 p.m. concert is $8 at the door, and more information on the night is available by visiting (309)200-0978 or visiting RozzTox.com.

P

laying alongside her Sawdust Collective ensemble, the much-admired singer/ songwriter/instrumentalist (and Iowa City native) Pieta Brown will perform at Davenport’s River Music Experience on November 14. In our ongoing quest to make these What’s Happenin’ articles more helpful, we’ve attached a photo of Brown so that, when you hit the RME, you can more easily recognize her. Granted, you could also just aim your gaze at the stage and look for the lead singer, but we at the Reader pride ourselves on the personal touch! A tremendous talent whose 2007 CD Remember the Sun was cited by the Wall Street Journal as one of the year’s best, and whose 2010 One & All was described by AcousticMusic.com

as “cohesive and smooth and everything you want in an album,” Brown’s blend of altcountry, folk, blues, and indie rock has made her one of the Midwest’s most popular touring artists. She has shared stages with scores of gifted musicians, among them John Prine, Emmylou Harris, Ani DiFranco, Neko Case, Mark Knopfler, and Brandi Carlile. Her festival appearances have included sets at Bonnaroo, Mountain Jam, and the Edmonton Folk Music Festival. And with famed singer/songwriter Greg Brown as her dad, Pieta clearly has exceptional musical genetics to match her vocal, piano, and guitar skills. But if you want to read a really exceptional article on the musician, I’d recommend visiting

Pi with infor (563 org.

Dance
O

Pilobolus Dance Theatre

University of Iowa Tuesday, November 13, and Wednesday, November 14, 7:30 p.m.
n November 13 and 14, the University of Iowa’s Space/ Place Theatre will host 7:30 p.m. performances with the gifted and exceedingly limber members of Pilobolus Dance Theatre, the latest

guests in Hancher Auditorium’s Visiting Artists series. A contemporary-dance troupe formed in 1971, Pilobolus is famed for its inventive, witty, and athletic stage works, and has toured in 64 countries worldwide. A recent Pilobolus TV special was the recipient of an Emmy Award for “Outstanding Achievement in Cultural Programming,” and other prestigious honors for the company include the Berlin Critics’ Prize, the Brandeis Award, and the Samuel H.

Scripps American Dance Festiva Award for “Lifetime Achievemen Choreography.” The New York Times called the group “at once sensual and tough and “muscular, entertaining, and full of heat,” and Newsday magaz described Pilobolus as “a mindblowing troupe of wildly creative and physically daring dancers w leap, fly, intertwine, and break al rules.” And as I have a tendency to overwrite these things, let’s wrap

A Good Definition of “Unsustainable”: Beneficiaries Negotiating Benefits Without th
The rationale that defined-benefit plans should be maintained to remain competitive in attracting a qualified workforce is disingenuous. The public sector is the last employment arena remaining where excessive benefits are still provided. Add tenure and automatic increases in annual incomes to the mix, plus lower-than-average employee contributions to health-care premiums and costs, and higher-than-average wages compared to the same jobs in the private sector, and retention is hardly a problem. Consider that in Iowa, 90 percent of the state employees and retirees make no contributions to their health-care costs. Iowa is one of only six states that still pay 100 percent of employees’ health care. In Illinois, the state pays 5 percent of an employee’s premium for each year of service up to 100 percent after 20 years. Iowa’s recent Executive Order 78 asked state workers to voluntary pay 20 percent of premiums, with only one taker so far: Polk County employees are now contributing $15 to $25 toward their premiums. This lack of employee participation toward health-care costs is so far outof-whack with the private sector that it rises to absurdity. Most private-sector employees are paying as high as 50 percent of their premiums for healthinsurance coverage, including employers’ contributions, and as low as 18 percent. Iowa’s employers are mandated to pay a minimum of 50 percent of each employee’s premium if the company offers group health insurance. In Illinois, the privatesector employees pay on average 22 percent of their premiums. The national average premium for single coverage is $900 per month. There are also out-ofpocket expenses, deductibles, and other costs related to health care that are largely absorbed by the states on behalf of their employees, unlike the private sector, where employees absorb all those costs. Iowa and Illinois state employees are not to blame. The real problem lies in the process that provides such generous employment contracts that have no fiscal basis for financial sustainability – specifically, negotiations between union leadership and public-sector bureaucrats and politicians, none of whom actually pays the contracts. The absence of taxpayers, who ultimately do pay the contracts, from the table becomes a glaring one, especially with so many conflicts of interest among those who are at the table. Unlike public-sector unions, privatesector unions work efficiently and are of great benefit to both labor and management. Negotiations can be tough, but are mostly reasonable because both parties have high stakes in the game, and both benefit from a positive outcome. Management cannot succeed without labor, nor can labor thrive without management.

WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

Continued From Page 3

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

RCReader.com/y/pietabrown. In the interview, you’ll not only find Brown lauded for her “sharp, vivid lyrics” and the artist herself described as “clear-eyed about the world but uncynical,” but you’ll also be treated to some of the richest, most intelligent prose writing I’ve ever read – a glorious, musical waterfall of words that practically defies ... . Okay. Yeah. So the article was written by my boss, Jeff, and I’m angling for a raise these days. What does that have to do with anything? ieta Brown & the Sawdust Collective performs h an opening set by Sean Rowe, and more rmation and tickets are available by calling 3)326-1333 or visiting RiverMusicExperience.

Exhibit
T

Picturing Identity: The Allure of Portraiture

Figge Art Museum Saturday, November 17, through Sunday, February 17
he newest exhibition at Davenport’s Figge Art Museum is titled Picturing Identity: The Allure of Portraiture, and the Figge’s Web site mentions that one of the exhibit’s underlying purposes is to “remind us that we often remember people not as they were, but as they appeared to be through images.” That’s actually the same rationale I have for attaching that threeyear-old photo of myself above my movie reviews. Might as well make readers think, “Wow, he must have been young and thin once, huh?” Picturing Identity, which will be on display from November 17 through February 17, is a showcase of 34 works culled from the Figge’s collection, plus several pieces on loan from private collections and the University of Iowa Museum of Art. According to curator Rima Girnius, the exhibition has been designed to explore “how identity is perceived and constructed through images,” and “how representations of specific individuals provide some insight on contemporary values.” But it seems to me the exhibit will also offer museum visitors the chance to experience something truly rare: indoor star-gazing. Included in the exhibit are the visages of such historical figures as George

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this up and leave the final word to the members of Pilobolus Dance Theatre themselves:

e who ll the

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For tickets to one (or both) of Pilobolus Dance Theatre’s two University of Iowa performances, call (319)335-1160 or visit http:// www.Hancher.UIowa.edu.

Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King Jr., plus Gerhard Richter’s image of a grinning Queen Elizabeth – one of the past century’s most indelible examples of portraiture. But expanding on traditional notions of what portraiture can actually entail, Picturing Identity will also feature a number of artist Red Groom’s cartoon-like artworks, Al Hirschfield’s caricatures of such famed Hollywood actors as James Cagney, Shirley MacLaine, and Jack Lemmon, and – perhaps the most recognizable portrait of all – Andy Warhol’s legendary vision of Elizabeth Taylor (pictured). Oscar Wilde is quoted as saying, “Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter.” If that’s indeed the case ... man, was Andy lookin’ good! Among the special events being held in conjunction with Picturing Identity’s showing are November 15’s Veronica Smith lecture “Two Baroque Portraits: The 17th Century Woman” and November 29’s “The Good, the Bad, & the Mundane” presentation by Alycia Reed, and more information on the exhibition is available by calling (563)326-7804 or visiting FiggeArt.org.

Thursday, November 8 – The Klezmatics. The Grammy Award-winning klezmer ensemble in concert. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $30-32. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 9 – Kiran Ahluwalia. World-music concert with the Indo-Canadian, Juno Award-winning vocalist. St. Ambrose University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center (2101 Gaines Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $7-11. For tickets and information, call (563)333-6251 or visit SAU.edu/galvin. Friday, November 9 – An Evening with Savoy Brown. The British blues rockers in concert. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 8:30 p.m. $20. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Friday, November 9 – Manchester Orchestra. Folk, pop, and garage rock with the indie musicians. Iowa Memorial Union (125 North Madison Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $23-29.80. For tickets, call (800)7453000 or visit ScopeProductions.org. Saturday, November 10 – Tenth Avenue North. Contemporary Christian musicians in concert, with opening sets by Audrey Assad and Rend Collective Experiment. Adler Theatre (136 East Third

MUSIC

What Else Is Happenin’

Continued On Page 15 by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

he Benefactors
Therefore both sides at the table ultimately have the same goal: to make the company profitable so all can earn a better living. Public-sector union negotiations basically ignore one of the primary stakeholders – the taxpayers. The state bureaucrats and politicians are only concerned with their own stake in the contracts they negotiate, both financially and politically – as are union leaders. State bureaucrats, politicians, and union leaders’ retirement packages are reflective of the terms they negotiate among themselves. The problem is that none of these parties is negotiating with the proper skin in the game. In other words, they are not negotiating with their own money. Instead taxpayers are deliberately put at risk for what are fast becoming unaffordable benefits for state employees. The beneficiaries are negotiating their benefits without the participation of the benefactors. This process, too, is unsustainable Politicians not only participate in most negotiated benefits, but they simultaneously secure union membership votes, which go a long way in providing job security for both the politicians and the bureaucracy. Not to mention the enormous campaign contributions that flow from union coffers, thanks to membership dues. Union leaders also keep their jobs, and retain membership in return for securing generous benefits. This produces an abundance of political leverage. Thus, the circle is closed. But what of the taxpayers’ representation in such negotiations? They are saddled with far larger risk than reward, and the endless cycle gets more precarious and unmanageable with each year. It is an exponentially ballooning crisis that requires negotiators to come back to earth. There is no question that the pensions cannot continue as they are currently structured. The politicians and bureaucrats know it. The union leaders know it. The public-sector employees, whose pensions are on the line, know it. And the taxpayers know it. The ones who don’t know it – yet – are our children, who will end up with the bill for all of it regardless. Meanwhile, the public-sector employees

are understandably relying heavily on the legality of their contracts to be upheld and satisfied, rather than entertain reforms to the plans under which their contracts were generated. Most of us would not argue with the premise, just the wisdom. If the pension funds are not available, then what? The notion that taxpayers will have to pay more and more taxes to cover public-sector pensions is a slippery slope. Not only would likely tax increases not cover the widening gaps from ever-increasing pension-fund obligations, but taxpayers will only tolerate abusive taxation for so long before their votes will trump those of the union. And one thing is certain: Politicians will usually bow to the more formidable voting bloc.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com Article and Photos by Bruce Walters

ART

T

Art in Plain Sight: The Peaceful Warriors and No Future – No Past – No Me – No You

he Peaceful Warriors by Skip Willits and No Future – No Past – No Me – No You by Terry Rathje are located in an alley, not displayed prominently at a building’s entrance or in an open location as one might expect for such thoughtful and professionally produced artworks. Both artists, however, created their pieces knowing that they would be displayed alongside graffiti, dumpsters, and loading docks. Entering the alley between Second and Third avenues from 17th Street in the Rock Island District – near Theo’s Java Club – one is initially met by Willits’ three metal sculptures mounted high on a brick wall. The welded masks, made from hot rolled-metal sheets, are approximately five feet in height. In the daytime, they feel benign; their gaze is diffident. At night, they feel like armored sentries posted at an entry into darkness. This difference in mood reflects an interest that Willits has explored for years. As he told me: “I’m always interested in opposites and how they strangely seem to fit together for me. These words (‘Peaceful Warriors’) juxtaposed have opposite meaning to most. But this was my train of thought – warriors for peace. Or warriors struggling for peace.” In addition to working with contradictions of appearance and intent, Willits’ artwork references ritual African masks and other non-Western cultural styles. Seen in the context of an urban environment, the piece is a confluence of allusions and ideas. The artist didn’t realize that dumpsters would be parked directly beneath his work, but that’s fine with him. He said he’s surprised – and, I sense, a bit disappointed – that his work hasn’t been graffitied. About 50 yards farther into the alley is a series of four painted panels, No Future – No Past – No Me – No You. Rathje painted one of those phrases beneath a related image on each panel: “No Future” is symbolized by the wheel of fortune; “No Past” by a baby (a newborn has no past); “No You” by a portrait of someone other than the artist; and “No Me” by a painting of an x-ray. The images also have a personal meaning to the artist. For example, the newborn is Rathje’s grandson, and the x-ray is of the artist’s hand – an image of himself, but not his outer appearance. Inspired by Buddhist teachings, the series was meant as “a reminder to all of us that we should be conscious of the whole human race and not to think only about ourselves,” Rathje said. “Simultaneously we should not be too worried about the past or overly concerned about the future, because the past is already vanishing into the distance and the future is uncertain.” The intended message of Rathje’s work, like Willits’, is about inner peace. However, that meaning is somewhat undermined by beginning each phrase with “no”; painted in white on red, the words are like four consecutive stop signs. Perhaps this was his intent, as Rathje said he hoped his artwork would stop people in their tracks – compelling them to think about what the words and images meant. Instead, he said, the piece has been misinterpreted as nihilistic; the artist once received a letter from a woman offering to help paint over it. These and other artworks were created for an “alley gallery” as part of MidCoast Fine Arts’ partnering with the City of Rock Island in 2000. It was an innovative idea – breathing life into our relationship with art by putting it, provocatively, in an atypical urban setting. However, in a more conventional gallery context – where each artwork is seen in its own space and is often accompanied by an artist statement – the subtleties and purposeful contradictions of these works would be better understood. Bruce Walters is a professor of art at Western Illinois University. This is part of an occasional series on the history of public art in the Quad Cities. If there’s a piece of public art that you’d like to learn more about, e-mail the location and a brief description to BD-Walters@wiu.edu.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com Continued From Page 13

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What Else Is Happenin’
Street, Davenport). 7 p.m. $19-30. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com. Saturday, November 10 – A Helping Hand from the Heartland: Hurricane Disaster Relief Concert. Local musicians including Ellis Kell, Lewis Knudsen, and members of The Candymakers perform a fundraising concert, with all proceeds to benefit the American Red Cross’ efforts toward disaster relief on the East Coast. Davenport RiverCenter (136 East Third Street, Davenport). Noon–9 p.m. $8-5. For information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Saturday, November 10 – Flatfoot 56. Celtic punk musicians in concert, with an opening set by As We Were. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $22-25. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience. org. Saturday, November 10 – Pentatonix. Concert with the a cappella sensations and winners of the third season of TV’s The SingOff. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $35-55. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert. org. Sunday, November 11 – Michael Twitty. Tribute concert performed by Conrad Twitty’s son. Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf). 6 p.m. $10-15. For information, call (800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com. Monday, November 12 – The Be Good Tanyas. Country musicians Sam Parton, Frazey Ford, and Trish Klein in concert. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $25-27.50. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Tuesday, November 13 – Journey, Pat Benatar, and Loverboy. The chart-topping pop-rock musicians in concert. i wireless Center (1201 River Drive, Moline). 7 p.m. $39.50-75. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit iwirelessCenter.com. Friday, November 16 – Carrie Underwood. Grammy Award-winning country-music superstar in her Blown Away Tour, with an opening set by Hunter Hayes. i wireless Center (1201 River Drive, Moline). 7:30 p.m. $45-69.50. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit iwirelessCenter.com. Friday, November 16, through Sunday, November 18 – Amahl & the Night Visitors. One-act version of Gian Carlo Menotti’s opera, presented by Opera@Augustana. Augustana College’s Wallenberg Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $8-12. For tickets and information, call (309)794-7306 or visit http://www.Augustana.edu/tickets. Friday, November 16 – John Wubbenhorst and Samrat Kekkeri. Worldmusic recording artists perform in a Satva Center benefit event. Broadway Presbyterian Church (710 23rd Street, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $10-15. For information, call (309)793-7881 or visit SatvaCenter.com. Friday, November 16 – Sonny Landreth. Concert with the Louisiana-based slide guitarist and singer/songwriter. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $25. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 16 – St. Lawrence String Quartet. Chamber musicians perform in a Hancher Auditorium Visiting Artists presentation. Riverside Recital Hall (405 North Riverside Drive, Iowa City). 7:30 p.m. $10-37. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu. Saturday, November 17 – Holiday Pops. Annual event with the Quad City Symphony Orchestra, featuring performances by area choirs and Quad City Arts Visiting Artist Mark Wood, founding member of Trans-Siberian Orchestra. i wireless Center (1201 River Drive, Moline). 7:30 p.m. $13-47. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit QCSymphony.com. Saturday, November 17 – The Guess Who. Concert with the Canadian ensemble of “American Woman” fame. Riverside Casino Event Center (3184 Highway 22, Riverside). 9 p.m. $30-45. For tickets and information, call (877)677-3456 or visit RiversideCasinoAndResort.com. Sunday, November 18 – The Sax Offenders. Four-person saxophone ensemble performs and educates in Polyrhythms’ Third Sunday Jazz Workshop & Matinée Series. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 3 p.m. all-ages jazz workshop – $5/adults, children free; 6 p.m. concert – $10-15. For tickets and information, call (309)373-0790 or visit Polyrhythms.org or RiverMusicExperience. org. Thursday, November 8, through Sunday, December 30 – Miracle on 34th Street. Musical adaptation of the holiday-film musical, directed by Ann Nieman. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). Fridays, Saturdays, Wednesdays, and November 8 – 6 p.m. buffet, 7:45 p.m. show. Sundays – 4 p.m. buffet, 5:45 p.m. show. Wednesdays – 11:45 a.m. plated lunch, 1:30 p.m. show. $28.22-47.55. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Thursday, November 8, through Sunday, November 18 – A Nice Family Gathering. Playwright Phil Olson’s holiday comedy, directed by Jennifer Kingry. Richmond Hill Barn Theatre (600 Robinson Drive, Geneseo). Thursdays-Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. $8-10. For tickets and information, call (309)944-2244 or visit RHPlayers.com. Friday, November 9, through Sunday, November 18 – The Christmas Express. Holiday comedy by Pat Cook, directed by John Weigandt. Playcrafters Barn Theatre (4950 35th Avenue, Moline). Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. $10. For tickets and information, call (309)762-0330 or visit Playcrafters.com. Friday, November 9, through Saturday, November 17 – Spring Awakening. Tony Award-winning rock musical about tortured youth, directed by Nathan Halvorson. University of Iowa’s E.C. Mabie Theatre (200 North Riverside Drive, Iowa City). WednesdaySaturday 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $10-20. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://Theatre.UIowa.edu. Wednesday, November 14 – Away in the Basement: A Church Basement Ladies Christmas. Holiday-themed touring production and sequel to the musical comedy Church Basement Ladies. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 2 and 7 p.m. $25-30. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 16, and Saturday, November 17 – It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play. Director Lora Adams’ radioplay adaptation of the holiday-film classic, presented as a fundraiser for WQPT-TV. Augustana College’s Potter Theatre (3701 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). Friday 7:30 p.m., Saturday 2 and 7:30 p.m. $20. For tickets and information, call (309)794-7306 or visit http://www.Augustana.edu/tickets. Friday, November 16, through Sunday, November 18 – Willy Wonka: The Musical. Adaptation of Roald Dahl’s Charlie & the Chocolate Factory, presented by the Prairie Players Civic Theatre. Orpheum Theatre (57 South Kellogg Street, Galesburg). Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $10-17. For tickets and information, call (309)342-2299 or visit TheOrpheum.org. Sunday, November 18 – Fiddler on the Roof. The Tony Award-winning stage musical in a Broadway at the Adler presentation. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 7 p.m. $32-52. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com. Sunday, November 11 – Ralphie May. Stand-up comedian in his Too Big to Ignore Tour. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 7:30 p.m. $34.50. For information and tickets, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. November 11 – Discover the Dinosaurs. Hands-on exhibit featuring more than 40 animatronic and museum-quality dinosaur replicas. QCCA Expo Center (2621 Fourth Avenue, Rock Island). Fri. noon – 9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. $10-15. For information, call (309)788-5912 or visit QCCAExpoCenter.com. Thursday, November 8 – Food for Thought. Annual library fundraiser featuring gourmet food stations, wine and beer samples, music by Lee Blackmon and the Black Hawk College Jazz Combo, and more. Rock Island Public Library Main Branch (401 19th Street, Rock Island). 5 p.m. $30-35, $50/couple with RSVP. For tickets and information, call (309)732-7302 or visit RockIslandLibrary.org. Saturday, November 10 – Genesis Celebration of Life. Annual outdoor event featuring the lighting of the Remembrance Tree, holiday music, refreshments, and more. Bechtel Park (River Drive and Iowa Street, Davenport). 6 p.m. Donations encouraged; $10 donation for a Remembrance Tree light to honor the memory of loves ones. For information, call (563)421-6865 or visit GenesisHealth.com/tree. Saturday, November 10 – Oedipus & Tutankhamun: The Story of One Man’s Family. An “illustrated lecture” on the famed kings, presented by Genesius Guild founder Don Wooten and area artist Bill Hannan. Butterworth Center (1105 Eighth Street, Moline). 7:30 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)743-2700 or visit ButterworthCenter.com. Saturday, November 10 – Black Hawk College 5K Hustle. A cross-country run/ walk on the hills and trails of Black Hawk, with proceeds benefiting the BHC Physical Therapist Assistant Program. Black Hawk College (6600 34th Avenue, Moline). 8 a.m. $20-25 registration. For information, call (309)781-3198 or visit BHC.edu/event/hawk-hustle. Sunday, November 11 – Unity Fest International. Multicultural celebration featuring demonstrations, live music, ethnic dance, an international food court, children’s crafts, a wine tasting, a drumming workshop, and more. Putnam Museum (1717 West 12th Street, Davenport). Noon-5 p.m. Free with $5-7 museum admission. For information, call (563)326-1933 or visit Putnam.org. Friday, November 16, through Sunday, November 25 – Quad City Arts Festival of Trees. Annual holiday event featuring decorated trees, activities, visits from Santa, and more. Davenport RiverCenter (136 East Third Street, Davenport). $3-8/day. For information, call (309)793-1213 or visit QuadCityArts.com.

EVENTS

THEATRE

COMEDY

EXHIBIT

Friday, November 9, through Sunday,

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012 Continued From Page 7

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

COVER STORY

The Pension Time Bomb
The Pew Center on the States report noted that “between 2009 and 2011, 43 states enacted benefit cuts or increased employee contributions, or did both, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The trend continued in 2012: Alabama, Kansas, Louisiana, New York, Virginia, and Wyoming were among the states that adopted major reforms.” But it added that “the reforms that states have enacted in the last three years mostly affect future state workers, as it is legally difficult to reduce benefits for current employees and retirees.” At RealClearMarkets.com, Steven Malanga suggested that states cannot truly address pension debt without changing benefits for current employees. Despite retirement-benefit changes, he wrote, “pension debt keeps rising and annual payments to pension systems from government budgets are spiking in many places, in part because many of these socalled reforms are superficial in nature. ... The states left benefits untouched for the vast majority of their workforce. The savings make only a small dent in future costs.” workers will keep the retirement benefits they have earned already, but beginning July 1, 2012, they will earn new benefits at a lower rate. These workers will also get access to a newly created individual retirement account, which will add to their benefits based on the retirement contributions by both the worker and the state. The overall plan is called a hybrid because it combines features of the traditional defined-benefit and definedcontribution plans.” Still, even modest reforms can have some impact. McNeilly cited Iowa’s reforms as a good start. In 2010, the legislature enacted a handful of changes, according to the Center for State & Local Government Excellence: • “The vesting period for new employees will increase from four years to seven years. • “The reduction for early retirement will increase from 3 percent to 6 percent for each year before age 65. • “The number of years used to calculate highest average salary for benefits will increase from three years to five years. • “The amount that the combined employer and employee contribution rate can be raised or lowered annually will change from 0.5 percent to 1 percent. • “There was a one-time increase of 2 percentage points (11.45 to 13.45 percent) in the total employee and employer contribution rate effective July 1, 2011. Before a contribution increase of 0.5 percent in 2008, the legislature had not changed contribution rates since 1979.” Alex Brown, a research and policy analyst for that organization, wrote to Pensions & Investments that Iowa recognized the urgency of reform but also the need to be fair to employees: • “Employees were allowed to retire before reaching normal retirement age with the old reductions; the increased penalty for early retirement applies to those years worked after the reforms take effect. • “Employees are provided a ‘benefit snapshot’ when electing to retire. Employees will choose between the benefit calculated using the pre-reform salary calculation or the post-reform salary calculation, whichever yields the highest benefit. ... “Iowa has provided an example that can be followed to ensure employees are eased through what can be an anxious process.” In Illinois, Governor Pat Quinn earlier this year signed Senate Bill 1313, which will allow the Department of Central Management Services to determine what health-care premiums retirees will pay. (Roughly 90 percent of retirees in the state’s plan pay no premiums.) That could shave $30 billion off the state’s retireehealth-care liability, Dabrowski said. Other reform, however, has been elusive. Dabrowski said the state needs to move to defined-contribution benefits for all future work. Beyond that, he said, eliminating costof-living adjustments (COLAs) to pensions for a long period of time could eliminate $30 billion in unfunded liabilities from the official $83-billion estimate. “If you

That’s one reason that Rhode Island has been cited as a model for reform. The Pew report said: “In 2011, Rhode Island lawmakers approved an unprecedented overhaul of the state’s traditional definedbenefit-pension plan. If the legislation survives a likely legal challenge, it will cut benefits for current as well as future employees and trim the state’s unfunded liability by an estimated $3 billion. Current

Options for Reform

don’t ... reduce COLAs – if you don’t freeze them – then you can’t get out of the hole,” he said. Increasing retirement age to age 67 could save more than $10 billion, he noted. Furthermore, the state could cap pensions, and also change the number of years that go into the pension calculation. “All these reforms would chip away at the unfunded liability,” he said. “The state would be left with an unfunded liability, but one that would be much more manageable, that can be chipped away over time without destroying funding for kids’ classrooms, and health care, and other important needs.” Dabrowski said pension reform could be passed in January’s lame-duck legislative session, although he said he’s skeptical the changes will be meaningful: “We think it can be done. Of course, it takes a lot of political will and a lot of leadership, which we haven’t seen yet.” He added that two triggers could push the legislature to truly address the issue. “We’re going to see funding for education start to be cut. We’re going to see funding for ... a lot of core services the state needs to be cut,” he said. “At some point, people are going to get angry. ... We’re nearing that point over the next few years.” Alternatively, he said, the bond market could further downgrade Illinois’ rating, which “would send a signal.” The state isn’t at that point yet, he said, but “we’re doing all the wrong things to move us in that direction.”

MUSIC

Continued From Page 8

A Passage to India
to go to Korea-town or India-town to find CDs. You could actually go to your local record retail store and there would be a department for world music. And as this scene started to grow, I started to find friends and ways of performing my music from time to time, and realized I could have a career in it.” Her decision to gradually transition away from finance and toward a music career, says Ahluwalia, initially came with “a very deep feeling of failure. ‘Oh, I can’t make it in the real world.’ And I really had to tell myself over and over and over again that I wasn’t a failure – I was actually moving ahead.” For roughly “10 to 12 years,” says Ahluwalia, “I would go back and forth between India and Canada. I would do a year or a couple of years of music in India, and then come back to Canada for a while. I’d perform on weekends here and there, but it was mostly to make money and save, and then I’d go to India to do music again.” But at the end of the 1990s, she says, “I was working for a record label at a San Francisco office they decided to shut down. And when they shut down that office, I thought, ‘You know, before I look for another job or go to India for music, I’m going to do music here, now, in North America.’ And that’s when I recorded my first CD.” Together with musicians she collaborated with in Toronto and “a couple of Indian instrumentalists who I knew from the UK,” Ahluwalia recorded her debut collection of ghazals and Punjabi folk tunes, and the critical success of Kashish – Attraction led, she says, “to my getting a manager, and then an agent, and then – lo and behold – I started getting concert bookings.” She also started getting the aforementioned raves and awards, and currently spends some three months of the year touring while also composing new songs and occasionally performing with one of her husband Rez Abassi’s jazz ensembles in New York City. “I consider myself lucky,” says Ahluwalia.

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

“Very lucky. To be able to find a life that I could truly be able to live, instead of just going through the days. And that’s the way I’ve lived for the last 12 years. “Of course,” she adds with a laugh, “I still never really know that I’m not going back to finance.” Kiran Ahluwalia performs at St. Ambrose University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center (2101 Gaines Street, Davenport) at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 9. For tickets and information on the evening, call (563)3336251 or visit SAU.edu/galvin. For more information on Kiran Ahluwalia, visit KiranMusic.com.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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Featured Image from the Quad Cities Photography Club

PHOTOGRAPHY

D

(Editor’s note: The River Cities’ Reader each month will feature an image or images from the Quad Cities Photography Club.) ave Engler had one of the high scores in the nature category in the Quad Cities Photography Club competition for October with his pelican coming in for a landing. He had just gotten a new lens and decided that the pelicans at Lock & Dam 14 would be

a good subject on which to try it out. He headed out very early, before sun-up, and found dozens of pelicans hanging around the rollers of the dam looking for a meal. They weren’t concerned by his presence, as they are quite used to the fishermen. He sat on a flat rock near the river’s edge so he could be at the same level as the pelicans. They are constantly jockeying for the best fishing spots, and he was able to capture this one as it came in for a landing.

He used a Nikon D90 camera with a 300-millimeter f/2.8 lens, shooting at 1/2000 of a second at f/4.5 and ISO 500 with a -0.3 exposure compensation. The Quad Cities Photography Club welcomes visitors and new members. The club sponsors numerous activities encompassing many types and aspects of photography. It holds digital and print competitions most months. At its meetings, members discuss the images, help each

other to improve, and socialize. The club also holds special learning workshops and small groups that meet on specific photography topics, and occasionally offers interesting shooting opportunities. The club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the month September through June at the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth Street in Moline. For more information on the club, visit QCPhotoClub.com.

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Ask

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

the

Loved your response to the bored-outof-their-gourds parents of the one-year-old. I’m three months pregnant and a little worried in the wake of a recent dinner party. There were four sets of new parents there, and all the wives seemed to resent the hell out of their husbands. The husbands, predictably, seemed defensive and angry in response. My husband and I have a really great partnership, and I’d like to keep it that way. Are there things we can do to avoid the parental hate stage, or ... fret, fret ... is it an inevitability that comes with the stress of having a child? – Baby on Board Today’s marriage is reportedly a more equal partnership. For a lot of couples who become parents, here’s how that works: The woman blimps out for nine months, spends hours and hours in agony squeezing a huge thing out an extremely small opening, and then becomes a 24-hour milk dispenser and poo-slave for the better part of a year. The man holds her hand and says “You can do it, honey!” while she’s in labor, helps name the kid, and then, when friends come over to watch the World Series, picks it up and says, “Look what we made!” Trophy dads aside, if there’s one area of parenting that breeds eye-daggers of wifely resentment, it’s unequal sleeplessness. Yeah, I know, according to The Beatles, “love is all you need,” but they forgot the small print: This is only true of people who are not suffering from sleep deprivation, which, by the way, is not only a necessity for tending to one’s newborn but a form of torture banned by the Geneva Conventions. Sure, there are certain biological problems with sharing the nightly feeding duties. But just because the booby with the drinks in it is on only one of you doesn’t mean there can’t be catering. In other words, Daddy can bottle-feed if mommy breast pumps, and nothing’s stopping him from diaper-changing. What matters is that Mommy and Daddy are going halfsies on sleeplessness. As a happily married male friend with a new baby puts it, it’s essential to “scrupulously share” wake-up duty, or a wife who used to look lovingly at her sleeping spouse may begin calculating how much jail time she’d get for smothering him with a pillow. During daylight hours, a little time off for

The Call of Doodi

Advice Goddess

BY AMY ALKON

the stay-at-home mom, even for 20 minutes after Dad comes home, is a huge relief, as are play dates – one night a week for her to go out with friends and be a person instead of a big udder. Just a little alleviation goes a long way in showing that a husband doesn’t think women have babies and men have babies as props – to parade around Starbucks in a BabyBjorn, making all the hot girls coo, and then hand back to Mom until the kid’s old enough to be interesting: “Hey, little man, Daddy’s gotta read the newspaper and putter around the garage for six or seven years. Let’s talk when you’re big enough to throw a ball around.”

I’m thinking I should wait until after Christmas to break up with my girlfriend of two years. She is planning on accompanying me to my family’s for the holidays and otherwise has no place to go. (I’m picturing her home alone, maybe calling her stepbrother she talks to once a year.) – Not Jolly When your thought is “I think we should start seeing other people,” it isn’t supposed to mean making your girlfriend spend a week with your grandma and 62 of your closest relatives. Although you’re trying to be kind, delaying your breakup is the wrong thing to do. You break up with somebody as soon as you know, which means they can lick their wounds and get on to somebody who does want them that much sooner. (There are exceptions to the immediacy rule, like if it’s two days before your girlfriend has finals, or if somebody’s just died and she’s on her way to identify the body.) Just think how what you’re suggesting could play out. In the weeks before Christmas, she’ll likely sense that something’s not quite right. She’ll gnaw endlessly on this with her girlfriends, and they’ll come up with the perfect solution ... Santa lingerie! When you finally end it, she’ll likely drag out of you that you weren’t really feelin’ it – starting around Halloween. So, besides the painful emotions that accompany any breakup, you’ll be giving her the gift of humiliation as she replays the mental video of herself prancing around in a Santa hat and jingle-bell pasties ... on what turned out to be the biggest chopping day of the year.

Silent Knight

171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2012, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): The data that’s stored and disseminated on the Internet is unimaginably voluminous. And yet the 540 billion trillion electrons that carry all this information weigh about the same as a strawberry. I’d like to use this fun fact as a metaphor for the work you’re doing these days – and the play, too. Your output is prodigious. Your intensity is on the verge of becoming legendary. The potency of your efforts is likely to set in motion effects that will last for a long time. And yet, to the naked eye or casual observer, it all might look as simple and light as a strawberry. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What if you have a twin sister or brother that your mother gave up for adoption right after you were born and never told you about? Or what if you have a soul twin you’ve never met – a potential ally who understands life in much the same ways that you do? In either case, now is a time when the two of you might finally discover each other. At the very least, Taurus, I suspect you’ll be going deeper and deeper with a kindred spirit who will help you transform your stories about your origins and make you feel more at home on the planet. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I urged my readers to meditate on death not as the end of physical life, but as a metaphor for shedding what’s outworn. I then asked them to describe the best death they had ever experienced. I got a response that’s applicable to you right now. It’s from a reader named Judd: “My best death was getting chicken pox at age 13 while living in the Philippines. My mother banished me to the TV room. I was uncomfortable but hyperactive, lonely and driven to agony by the awful shows. But after six hours, something popped. My suffering turned inside out, and a miracle bloomed. I closed my eyes and my imagination opened up like a vortex. Images, ideas, places, dreams, people familiar and strange – all amazing, colorful, and vibrant – flowed through my head. I knew then and there that no material thing on this Earth could hook me up to the source of life like my own thoughts. I was free!” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Conservationists are surprised by what has been transpiring in and around Nepal’s Chitwan National Park. The tigers that live there have changed their schedule. Previously, they prowled around at all hours, day and night. But as more people have moved into the area, the creatures have increasingly become nocturnal. Researchers who have studied the situation believe the tigers are doing so to better coexist with humans. I suspect that a metaphorically similar development is possible for you, Cancerian. Meditate on how the wildest part of your life could adapt better to the most civilized part – and vice versa. (Read more: TinyURL.com/HumanTiger.) LEO (July 23-August 22): What is a dry waterfall? The term may refer to the location of an extinct waterfall where a river once fell over a cliff but has since stopped flowing. Döda Fallet in Sweden is such a place. “Dry waterfall” may also signify a waterfall that only exists for a while after a heavy rain and then disappears again. One example is on Brukkaros Mountain in Namibia. A third variant shows up in Cliffs Beyond Abiquiu, Dry Waterfall, a landscape painting by Georgia O’Keeffe. It’s a lush rendering of a stark landscape near the New Mexico town where O’Keeffe lived. Soon you will have your own metaphorical version of a dry waterfall, Leo. It’s ready for you if you’re ready for it. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): You are getting to where you need to be, but you’re still not there. You have a good share of the raw materials you will require to accomplish your goal, but as of yet you don’t have enough of the structure that will make everything work. The in-between state you’re inhabiting reminds me of a passage from the author Elias Canetti: “His head is made of stars, but not yet arranged into constellations.” Your next assignment, Virgo, is to see what you can do about coalescing a few constellations. LIBRA (September 23-October 22): Doctors used to believe that ulcers were caused by stress and spicy foods. But in the 1980s, two researchers named Barry Marshall and Robin Warren began to promote an alternative theory. They believed the culprit was H. pylori, a type of bacteria. To test their hypothesis, Marshall drank a Petri dish full of H. pylori. Within days he got gastric symptoms and underwent an endoscopy. The evidence proved that he and his partner were correct. They won a Nobel Prize for their work. (And Marshall recovered just fine.) I urge you to be inspired by their approach, Libra. Formulate experiments that allow you to make practical tests of your ideas, and consider using yourself as a guinea pig. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): This is not prime time for you to rake in rewards, collect hard-earned goodies, and celebrate successes you’ve been building towards for a long time. It’s fine if you end up doing those things, but I suspect that what you’re best suited for right now is getting things started. You’ll attract help from unexpected sources if you lay the groundwork for projects you want to work on throughout 2013. You’ll be in alignment with cosmic rhythms, too. Your motto comes from your fellow Scorpio, writer Robert Louis Stevenson: “Judge each day not by the harvest you reap but by the seeds you plant.” SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 21): On a beach, a man spied a pelican that was barely moving. Was it sick? He wanted to help. Drawing

by Rob Brezsny
close, he discovered that ants were crawling all over it. He brushed them off, then carried the bird to his car and drove it to a veterinarian. After a thorough examination, the doctor realized the pelican was suffering from a fungus that the ants had been eating away – and probably would have removed completely if the man hadn’t interfered. Moral of the story: Sometimes healing takes place in unexpected ways, and nature knows better than we do about how to make it happen. Keep that in mind during the coming weeks, Sagittarius. CAPRICORN (December 22-January 19): A farmer in Japan found a 56-leaf clover. Well, actually, he bred it in his garden at home. It took effort on his part. Presumably, it provided him with 14 times the luck of a mere four-leaf clover. I don’t think your good karma will be quite that extravagant in the coming week, Capricorn, but there’s a decent chance you’ll get into at least the 16-leaf realm. To raise your odds of approaching the 56-leaf level of favorable fortune, remember this: Luck tends to flow in the direction of those who work hard to prepare for it and earn it. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18): The largest bell in the world is located in Moscow, Russia. Called the Tsar Bell, it’s made of bronze, weighs 445,170 pounds, and is elaborately decorated with images of people, angels, and plants. It has never once been rung in its 275 years of existence. Is there anything comparable in your own life, Aquarius? Some huge presence that has never actually been used? The time is near when that stillness may finally come to an end. I suggest you decide how this will occur rather than allowing fate to choose for you. PISCES (February 19-March 20): Are you interested in experiencing a close brush with a holy anomaly or a rowdy blessing or a divine wild card? If not, that’s perfectly OK. Just say, “No, I’m not ready for a lyrical flurry of uncanny grace.” And the freaky splendor or convulsive beauty or mystical mutation will avoid making contact with you, no questions asked. But if you suspect you might enjoy communing with a subversive blast of illumination – if you think you could have fun coming to terms with a tricky epiphany that blows your mind – then go out under the night sky and whisper a message like this: “I’m ready for you, sweetness. Find me.” Homework: Name 10 items you would put in a time capsule to be dug up by your descendants in 500 years. Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

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BEST OF BREED · November 8, 2012

October 25 Answers: Right

October 25 Crossword Answers

ACROSS 1. Gender in gram. 5. Lawrence Peter “Yogi” _ 10. Spread 15. Hop kiln 19. Cupid, alternatively 20. Hypothetical elementary particle 21. _ cuisine 22. Vigor 23. Start of a quip by Sir Winston Churchill: 3 wds. 27. Kind of bond 28. Artistic creation 29. Shoes for running backs 30. Let it stand! 31. Sabot 33. Desktop items 35. Overran 38. Lend _ _ 39. Defensive covering 43. Phobia start 44. Doddering 45. Always, in a verse 46. Container 47. Part 2 of quip: 3 wds. 51. Word on a penny 52. Winnow 53. Last of a familiar series 54. Medieval king of France 55. Like 57. Lunar valley: Var. 58. Statute: Abbr. 59. Xena’s daughter 60. A knight of the Round Table 63. Facing 64. _ plaid 65. Growing outward 66. Teensy bit 67. Director’s cry 70. Sidereal 71. Old European coin 72. Bar mem. 75. Shade 76. Entry in old gazetteers 77. Astir anagram 79. Garland 80. Cafe au _ 81. Tax pro 82. Part 3 of quip: 2 wds.

86. Anoint 87. Bit of broth 88. Ohio or Mississippi, e.g. 89. Looped handle 90. Matman 93. Controls 94. Block out 96. Decree from a sultan 97. Chinese gelatin 98. Portico 99. Mythical Greek being 102. Mum 104. Juice bar order 108. End of the quip: 5 wds. 112. Choir member 113. Pin 114. Drink greedily 115. Leave unmentioned 116. Very bright 117. Corpulent 118. Do’s and _ 119. Cyrano’s hallmark DOWN 1. Word on a label 2. Part of OAS: Abbr. 3. “Brave New World” drug 4. Old weapon 5. Stinging 6. Praise 7. Paddy plant 8. Rob _ 9. Tropical bird 10. Influenced 11. Off limits: Var. 12. “From _ With Love” 13. WWII abbr. 14. Received with pleasure 15. Beseech 16. _ 51 17. Loose sediment 18. Some dogs and soldiers 24. Blanchett the actress 25. Oklahoman 26. Of a bone 31. Slothful 32. Gloriole 34. Mythical ruler of Thebes 35. Unleavened bread 36. Earthy color

37. Give rise to 38. _ meridiem 40. Of service 41. Kind of range 42. Knock’s answer 44. Popular ski resort 48. Spotted cat 49. Cousin to a jackdaw 50. Devilfish 51. Gerard or Hodges 52. _ qua non 56. Collapses: 2 wds. 57. Homecoming 61. Brief musical passage 62. Scull 63. A cleric 64. Essential part 66. Characteristic of verse 67. Lucent 68. Take charge of a meeting 69. Linen 70. _ _ rule 72. Coeur d’_ 73. Keyed up 74. Moon of Saturn 76. Set higher 78. Noted lithographer 81. Aka coriander 83. Sparing 84. _ monster 85. Fundraising event 87. Something for sharpening 91. San _, Calif. 92. Unseat 93. Having branches 94. Taborets 95. Aquatic bird 98. Food fish 99. University VIP 100. Wheelset part 101. Outside: Prefix 103. A son of Zeus 104. Climb 105. Relating to blood: Prefix 106. Rainbow goddess 107. Punta del _ 109. Untruth 110. Drug letters 111. Snake eyes

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

21

2012/11/08 (Thu)

THURSDAY

8

2012/11/09 (Fri)

ABC Karaoke -Frick’s Tap, 1402 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St. East Moline, IL Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Haley Bonar - Rachel Marie -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Live Lunch w/ Rose ‘n’ Thorns (noon) QC United Presents Raise the Roof Thursday (6pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

FRIDAY

9

2012/11/10 (Sat)

SATURDAY

10

Mighty Short Bus -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Rozz-Vox Open Mic Night w/ Donnie Bobb -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL
The Goddamn Gallows - Jake Orvis & the Broken Band -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA The Klezmatics -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Unnamed Acoustic -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

Aaron Kamm & the One-Drops -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Bryce Janey Group -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Buddy Olson -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Chuck Murphy -Davinci’s Cocktails & Dining, 116 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickor y Grove Rd. Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St. East Moline, IL Grand Larsony -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Jerr y Beauchamp Band -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kiran Ahluwalia -Galvin Fine Arts Center, 2101 Gaines St. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL

Harper @ The Muddy Waters – November 15
Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon) - Musical Happy Hour w/ Craig Heidgerken & the Mactet (4pm) - Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys Chastity Brown (7:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Manchester Orchestra -Iowa Memorial Union, 125 N. Madison St. Iowa City, IA Mer -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA North of 40 -Country Club Indian Hills, 600 S. Blair St. Morning Sun, IA Open Mic Coffeehouse -First Lutheran Church - Rock Island, 1600 20th St. Rock Island, IL Rob Dahms & Detroil Larry (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Robbie LeBlanc & the Real Live Show -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Russ Reyman Trio (5:30pm) - Fifth of Country (9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Savoy Brown -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Slip Silo - Electric Children -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Smooth Groove -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL Suns - Brontosaurus - Centaur Noir -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

1st Impression -Racer’s Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL A Helping Hand from the Heartland - Hurricane Disaster Relief Concert: The Winter Blues All-Stars (12:30pm) - Alan Sweet, Bret Dale, & Nick Vasquez (1:45pm) William Campbell (3pm) - Whoozdads? (4:15pm) - Ellis Kell Band & The Avey Brothers (6pm) - Lewis Knudsen (7:15pm) - The Westbrook Singers (8:15pm) -Davenport RiverCenter, 136 E. 3rd St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Barlowe & James (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Chance the Rapper - DJ 007 -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Cosmic -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st Ave Coal Valley, IL Crossroads -New Windsor Depot, 110 South 5th Ave. New Windsor, IL Curtis Hawkins Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St. East Moline, IL Flatfoot 56 - As You Were -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Grand Larsony -Bobbie’s Diner & Nightclub, 1213 10th Ave. W. Milan, IL Gray Wolf Band -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Hi-Fi -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Battery: Masters of Metallica -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

The Blushing Gun -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

The Hitman -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA The Lowdown -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA

Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Ken Paulsen Quartet -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Krotchripper - Sept of Memnon - Cranial Decay - Wax Moth -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Dave Smith (noon) Songwriters All-Original Open Mic (3pm) - Holy Ghost Tent Revival - Poets & Peasants (8:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mer -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Nitrix -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL North of 40 -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Patchy Fog -Davinci’s Cocktails & Dining, 116 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Pentatonix -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Signal Path -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Smooth Groove -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL

Continued On Page 22

22

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA 2012/11/12 (Mon)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 21

Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Tenth Avenue North - Audrey Assad Rend Collective Experiment -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

MONDAY

12

The Karry Outz -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

Tyvek - Wet Hair -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/11/11 (Sun)

ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Open Mic w/ J. Night -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA The Be Good Tanyas -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA 2012/11/13 (Tue)

SUNDAY

11

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Aseethe - Before the Eyewall -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Daniel Ellsworth & the Great Lakes Milk & Eggs -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Eddie Turner (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Five Bridges Jazz Band (10am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Lucy Kaplansky -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Michael Twitty (6pm) -Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA Open Mic w/ the J Spot -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME Cafe, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Journey - Pat Benatar - Loverboy -i wireless Center, 1201 River Dr Moline, IL Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL The Harris Collec tion Open Jam -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA

TUESDAY

13

Bebop Jazz Night -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL BHC Jazz Band Performance (6pm) -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Black Hawk College Jazz Band -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Duncan Sheik - Courrier -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St. East Moline, IL Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Harper -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA 2012/11/14 (Wed)

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -McClellan Stockade, 2124 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Burlington Street Bluegrass Band (7pm) - Joe Pug - Denison Witmer (10pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Jake Vevera -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

WEDNESDAY

Zoroaster @ RIBCO – November 16

14

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Musical Happy Hour w/ Bethann Gavin (4pm) - RME Open Mic & Jam (6:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Nitecrawlers (6pm) - Karaoke King (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Pieta Brown & the Sawdust Collective - Sean Rowe -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA 2012/11/15 (Thu)

Jason Carl Band -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Jazz Guitar Combo & Roberto Sion w/ U of I Jazz Professors (6pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Jef Spradley Band - Jim the Mule -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Other Lives - Indians (7:30pm) - Mixology (10pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Pert Near Sandstone - Jon Eric -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

Tuesday Night Dance Party -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Wildlife -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Lyle Beaver & Dave -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Men of Fortune - American Dust White Zephyr -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

THURSDAY

15

Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL 2012/11/16 (Fri)

FRIDAY

00 16

ABC Karaoke -Frick’s Tap, 1402 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

3rd Street Villians -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Bucktown Revue -Nighswander Theatre, 2822 Eastern Ave Davenport, IA Buddy Olson -Lancers Grille, 350 E. LeClaire Road Eldridge, IA Carrie Underwood - Hunter Hayes -i wireless Center, 1201 River Dr Moline, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickory Grove Rd. Davenport, IA Dick Prall - Stolen Silver -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Family Groove Company -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St. East Moline, IL Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL John Wubbenhorst and Samrat Kekkeri -Broadway Presbyterian Church, 710 23rd St. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Kris Delmhorst -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Mississippi Misfits -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Nervous Rex -Fargo Dance & Sports, 4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL Night Light -Davinci’s Cocktails & Dining, 116 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA North of 40 -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Juno What?! - Soap -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kings - My Pal Trigger - Snogulated Pig - The Easy Mark -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Liberty Leg - Brooks Strause & the Gory Details - Beat Strings -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Lynn Allen -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Nervous Rex -Fargo Dance & Sports, 4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL Night People -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA QC Rock Academy Concert (2pm) Musical Happy Hour featuring Nick Vasquez (4:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Scott Stowe, Tiler Mallonee, Kevin Powers, & Kyle Harris -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL 2012/11/19 (Mon)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

23

Old Man’s Curse -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Powell -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Prof - AWTHNTKTS -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Rob Dahms (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Sonny Landreth -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA The Old 57’s (5:30pm) - Cruisin’ (9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Zoroaster - Mondo Drag - Acoustic Guillotine -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL 2012/11/17 (Sat)

MONDAY

19
20

ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Open Mic w/ J. Night -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2012/11/20 (Tue)

TUESDAY

Holy Ghost Tent Revival @ RME Community Stage – Nov. 10
The Guess Who -Riverside Casino Event Center, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA The Karry Outz -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Three Years Hollow - Lifeline - The Wreckage - The Blushing Gun -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Tires -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Vodkaseven -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/11/18 (Sun) Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Minor Decline - The Fizzy Pops Brains! Brains! Brains! - Shotgun Gambling -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Open Mic w/ the J Spot -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Silly C & the Slack Man -The Lucky Frog Bar and Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Terry Hanson Ensemble (10am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Third Sunday Jazz Series featuring The Sax Offenders (6pm) -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

SATURDAY

17

3rd Street Villians -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Wooden Nickel Saloon, 2042 W 3rd St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Beaker Brothers - Louis Left -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Buckshot -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Cosmic -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Danika Holmes -Davinci’s Cocktails & Dining, 116 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Dave Chastain Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Dick Prall -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St. East Moline, IL Gratest Story Ever Told: Grateful Dead Tribute -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL The Fresh & the Onlys -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Harris Collec tion Open Jam -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA

SUNDAY

18

Tuesday Night Dance Party -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2012/11/21 (Wed)

Rude Punch -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Backroom, 411 2nd St. Matherville, IL Funkma$ter - Porch Builder -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Gray Wolf Band -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Keep Off the Grass -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st Ave Coal Valley, IL Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Le Roy - American Dust - Tambourine - Comfort -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Lynn Allen -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Night People (5:30pm) - North of 40 (9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA RME Open Mic & Jam (6:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

WEDNESDAY

21

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -McClellan Stockade, 2124 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Crossroads -Krusteez Pizza/Harry’s

Superfly Samauri -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Tronicity -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA

24

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 817 • November 8 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com