The emotional face     of Twitter

by Luke Grange and Celia Prosser 

 

 

The emotional  face of Twitter 
           

by Luke Grange and Celia Prosser 
   

 

                First published December 2009    © Knowledge Solutions 2009    All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or  by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without the prior  permission of the publishers, Knowledge Solutions. Requests and inquiries concerning  reproduction and rights should be addressed to Knowledge Solutions:  www.knowledge‐solutions.com.au  mailto:luke@knowledge‐solutions.com.au  |  mailto:celia@knowledge‐solutions.com.au  To purchase copies of this e‐book, please go to www.knowledge‐solutions.com.au    Disclaimer  This publication does not purport to be legal advice and is provided as a general guide only.  Some information may become superseded through changes to the law and as a result of  evolving technology and industry practices. Users should seek professional advice in relation to  their own online activities.    Edited by Jo Tayler www.jot.net.au  Typeset in 11/16pt Calibri by Jo Tayler www.jot.net.au  Cover image: © Photosani/Shutterstock 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Images: © Steve Brandon (Flickr) p. 27; Richard Audet (Flickr) p. 30;   Shutterstock pp. 10, 12, 17, 23, 33, 37, 46. 

 

 

 

 

Contents 
About the authors ........................................................................................................................ 6  0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 7  1 What is online social media? ......................................................................................................... 9  What is microblogging? .............................................................................................................. 10  The reach of online social media ................................................................................................ 12  What is Twitter? ......................................................................................................................... 11  The emotional face of Twitter .................................................................................................... 11  Microblogging as a ‘segway engine’ ........................................................................................... 11  The reach of social media ........................................................................................................... 10  2 An introduction to the terms and concepts of Twitter ............................................................... 13  Your profile ................................................................................................................................. 13  Following .................................................................................................................................... 14  Followers .................................................................................................................................... 14  Unfollow ..................................................................................................................................... 14  Both ............................................................................................................................................ 15  Blocking ...................................................................................................................................... 15  Retweeting ................................................................................................................................. 15  The live tweet stream ................................................................................................................. 16  Looking at an individual’s tweets ............................................................................................... 16  Searching on topics .................................................................................................................... 16  Hash tags .................................................................................................................................... 16  3 Managing your online communities ............................................................................................ 19  Collaborative business networks ................................................................................................ 19  CBN tips .................................................................................................................................. 19  Friendly social network .............................................................................................................. 20  FSN tips ................................................................................................................................... 21  Linking CBNs and FSNs  ............................................................................................................... 21  .
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

The reach of online social media ................................................................................................ 21  4 The place for online social media in business ............................................................................. 22  Is your business using online social media effectively? ............................................................. 23  Conference Twitter usage .......................................................................................................... 23     

 

  5 Emotional intelligence and online social media .......................................................................... 24  What is emotional intelligence? ................................................................................................. 24  Where did EI come from?  .......................................................................................................... 24  . Online social media as social science ......................................................................................... 25  Making sense of emotional intelligence  .................................................................................... 25  . 6 Personal filtering ......................................................................................................................... 27  Filtering and EI ............................................................................................................................ 28  Inattention blindness.................................................................................................................. 28  Same words, different meaning ................................................................................................. 29  7 Using emotional intelligence in online social media ................................................................... 30  It's a new school playground and it takes time to establish yourself. ................................... 30  Thin slicing .................................................................................................................................. 31  Building trust online to build rapport ......................................................................................... 31  Being clear .................................................................................................................................. 31  You’re selling emotion ................................................................................................................ 32  Is your social media communication style working? .................................................................. 32  Keeping your audience in mind .................................................................................................. 32  8 Learning emotional intelligence .................................................................................................. 34  Stages of learning ....................................................................................................................... 34  Feel the love ............................................................................................................................... 35  Emotions influence our performance ........................................................................................ 36  How can I improve the way I communicate through social media channels? ........................... 36  How’s your reputation? .............................................................................................................. 36  9 Emotional intelligence and online communities ......................................................................... 37  Belonging .................................................................................................................................... 37  What is a value? ......................................................................................................................... 38  10 Applying emotional intelligence to online social media  ........................................................... 39  . Reflection exercise for EI ............................................................................................................ 39  11 Twitter – it's all about connection ............................................................................................. 42 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Connecting people on Twitter .................................................................................................... 42  Rules for connecting ................................................................................................................... 43  The little fox ... ............................................................................................................................ 44     

 

 

12 Twitter your business ................................................................................................................ 45  How can Twittering earn my business money?  ......................................................................... 45  . Building customer loyalty ........................................................................................................... 45  Customers research differently these days ................................................................................ 45  Measuring growth ...................................................................................................................... 46  Customer relationship management.......................................................................................... 47  00 Conclusion ................................................................................................................................. 48   

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

About the authors 
Luke Grange  Luke is open minded, constantly revisiting communication concepts  to improve their timing, application and relevance. His three  passports are testament to an adventurous global career. Leading  Knowledge Solutions, together with the team, he helps clients take  part in new innovation and improving individual’s lives by  introducing online social media and open innovation. Client  engagement is the measure of online social media currency and Luke  has been developing and promoting online communities to help  companies develop their wealth of social media capital over the last  10 years. It’s his passion!  Celia Prosser  While working in the field of injury management in Australia and New  Zealand for ten years, Celia discovered that many of the injuries were  of a psychological nature, caused from interpersonal conflict or  bullying. Most of these injuries stemmed from a breakdown in  communication, poor leadership capabilities and lack of trust. So she  built on her existing skills in health science to include accreditation in  Emotional Intelligence and Workplace Coaching. Celia’s wide range of  skills and experience enable individuals and organizations to improve  their workplace culture to better achieve effective employee social  networking.   The Emotional Intelligence instrument Celia uses is the only  assessment supported by numerous peer reviewed research findings  and publications as well as tangible business case studies.    

 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHORS 

 

Introduction 
The concept of online social media isn’t really new. While it has only recently become part of  mainstream culture and the business world, people have been using digital media for  networking, socialising and information gathering for over 30 years. So whether you're a newbie  or have been using it for a while this e‐book is for you. It's is designed to give you practical  advice on how to use online social media and enhance improve and strengthen your experiences  of social media.   Online social media didn’t start with computers – it was born on 'line'... on the phone. However,  the invention of the telephone is not what we’re going to explore here. Let’s fast‐forward to  1997, to a social networking site by the name of Six Degrees. This innovative website sought to  bring people together online. But only three years later it closed down. The reasons for its  closure were mainly due to users feeling uncomfortable putting information online and  interacting with strangers – especially when the internet hadn’t caught on quite yet. Basically it  was too early for its time. At this point most people didn’t really ‘get it’ or understand what it  was for or how they could use it in the way we do today.  Despite the early demise of Six Degrees, this site helped establish the central characteristics of  online social media that would later be fine‐tuned and elaborated on.  The move to emerging web‐based technology allowed us to shrink the world – metaphorically  speaking, of course. It allowed us to have quick and easy conversations online. That's what the  world wide web is really all about ... conversation. Initially we thought of it as a big library. Then  we thought it would be a place to publish from. But it’s really always been about conversation  and will continue to be about conversation as we keep moving forward. The fact that it  connected people through email gave us a buzz back in the 90s, but that quickly wore off as our  inboxes overflowed. CCing and BCCing still meant we had to open and read all those emails (not  to mention spam). Basically the system connecting and allowing us to communicate called email  is no longer effective and efficient enough.  But we don't want to linger too much in the past so let's zoom forward to the current day, when  we have reached a tipping point for the technology of microblogging. In a 2009 report completed  by MarketingProfs Research Insights it was demonstrated that new media is on the rise.   With company websites and email marketing approaching saturation levels in terms of usage,  attention is now shifting to interactive online social media. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

Terminology 
You may see the terms ‘microblogging’ and  ‘twittering’ used interchangeably as you move  through this e‐book.   Twittering is microblogging. Microblogging is a  concept and Twitter is one of the technical tools  used to execute this concept.   (We would prefer to have called microblogging  'microsharing', which is a term we first heard  used by Laura Fitton @Pistachio – follow her,  she really really gets it.) 

Twitter has grown over a thousand per  cent in Australia since early 2009. Its  annual growth since last April exceeds  3200% (ReadWriteWeb).  With these staggering figures in mind,  let's look at how this is affecting our  relationships both on‐ and offline and  what this means for our ability to  communicate with each other.   Let's face it: Twitter is powerful! It’s  bringing more people together than  any other technology in the history of  communication.   Microblogging gives you 140  characters to get your message across.  If it is not communicated effectively  then your audience has no option but  to make erroneous assumptions about  the meaning of that tweet.  

This is why we feel it’s important to introduce Emotional Intelligence (EI) into the social media  arena. With microblogging there is even more scope for being misunderstood and more need for  people to think about how and what they say in each message. Because emotions affect the way  we think they ultimately affect the decisions we make.   Have you ever asked your boss for a pay rise when they were in a bad mood? Of course not!   So let me ask you this… how do you know they’re in a bad mood? Is it what they’re saying, or  how they’re saying it? Is it based on their body language and/or a combination of all of these  things?   Now imagine for a moment that you only communicate with your boss online ... How do you  think that would affect your messaging? (Or your ability to get a pay rise!)  It doesn’t matter if you’re on Facebook, Twitter, Yammer, YouTube or Flickr; your online  personality is not only part of your overall brand, it becomes an interactive experience for you,  personally, and, more specifically, the culture of your business.   We wrote this e‐book to help you navigate your way  around this new phenomenon and strengthen your  experience of online social media in a productive way.  We also align emotional intelligence and online social  media for the purpose of enhancing effective  communication through these channels – for your  business and in your personal life. 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Wherever you see underlined text  in this e‐book, it’s a live link.  Simply click on the link to open it  in your browser. 

 

WHAT IS ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA? 

 

What is online social media? 
Online social media is an umbrella term that defines the various activities that integrate  technology, social interaction and the construction of words, pictures, videos and audio online.  This interaction, and the manner in which information is presented, depends on the varied  perspectives and 'building' of shared meaning as people share their stories and understandings  (Wikipedia).  All online social media platforms share four main characteristics:  •  public or semi‐public profiles for users  •  members connect with one another because they have some sort of shared interest  •  members can view and connect with other individuals (friends or friends of friends)  •  online social media Services allow for user‐generated content.  Online social media is online content created by people using highly accessible and scalable  publishing technologies. At its most basic, online social media is a shift in how people discover,  read and share news, information and content. It's a fusion of sociology and technology,  transforming monologues (one‐to‐many) into dialogues (many‐to‐many) and it transforms  people from content readers into publishers.   Online social media has become extremely popular because it allows people to connect in the  online world and form relationships for personal, political and business reasons.   There are a number of technical tools that facilitate the connecting of individuals online (such as  Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, Twitter, Yammer, Flickr and the various blogging sites). Each one  of these tools can be used for the reasons stated above however some are better suited for  different purposes.   For example, LinkedIn is better for establishing business relationships while Facebook has  traditionally been better suited to personal relationships (though this is changing as the drive for  the software to be all things to all people creeps in and we see added complexity. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

What is microblogging? 
Microblogging is a form of online  social media that allows users to  send brief text updates of 140  characters in length, or micromedia,  such as photos or audio clips, and  publish them – either to be viewed  by anyone or just by a restricted  group chosen by the user. These  messages can be submitted via an  increasing number of platforms,  including SMS, smart phone or the  web.   I often hear people say 'I don’t even  blog why would I microblog?'   Well for a start, there is a vast difference between blogging and microblogging. Very simply put,  the content of a microblog differs from a traditional blog in that it is much smaller in length and  aggregate file size. A single microblog entry can consist of a single sentence or fragment, an  image or a brief video.   Users microblog about particular topics; these can range from what one is doing or thinking at a  given moment to the thematic (such as sports cars), to business topics (such as brand  awareness).   Microblogs provide short commentary on a person‐to‐person level, share news about a  company's products and services, provide logs of the events of one's life and more.  Microblogging gives us the ability to communicate easily to people all over the world in an  instant. We can share stories, events and messages easily and quickly. It allows us to collaborate  with people all over the globe. It allows for brainstorming, problem solving and coordination of  activities in a relative instant.  Microblogging fosters cohesiveness, connections, accountability, leadership and authenticity – if  used in the right way. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

The reach of social media 
Facebook accounted for 14.5% of all UK Internet page views during September 2009,  equivalent to 1 in every 7 (Hitwise).   Twitter is now the 26th ranked website visited by Australian Internet users (week  ending 5 September 2009) (Hitwise). 

10 

 

WHAT IS ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA? 

What is Twitter? 
The microblogging tool Twitter grew out of a brainstorming session at a podcasting company  called Odeo in 2006. The idea was for individuals to use an SMS service to communicate with a  small group. The first Twitter prototype was used among Odeo employees. It was launched  publicly in July 2006.   Twitter became its own company in April 2007. Twitter really took off at the 2007 South by  Southwest Festival in the USA, where usage increased by 300%.  

The emotional face of Twitter 
Every one of us on Twitter looks different even  though, in its simplicity, it only has four  fundamental facets:  •  following  •  being followed  •  people you follow who also   follow you (both)  •  blocking.  LUKE:  As I was growing up, my  mother often used to say 'It's amazing,  isn't it … we are brought into this  world with two eyes, a nose and a  mouth, yet we all look so different'.  

We all look different in Twitter based on the four facets in the face.   It's the combination of these four facets that determines your personal community surrounding  you in the twitterverse.  You can even go a step further and argue that we 'sense', 'listen' and   'communicate' through the face. Therefore understanding what you want your face to look like  on Twitter is essential.    

 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

11 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

Microblogging as a  ‘segway engine’ 
Storytelling is so important and the internet  is the perfect platform for us to shoot the  breeze. This breeze may be about rocket  science, some new biotech discovery or the  latest Hollywood blockbuster.   Your knowledge doesn't all reside in your  head. There is a knowledge support network  that is hard at work trying to pass  knowledge to us and from us to others. The  internet allows us to do all this while having  a conversation – which is the most natural  way to pass on what we have in our heads.   A link in a tweet takes you to many places.  One of these is your awareness of the  proximity or alignment you feel with those  you have chosen to follow. 

The reach of online social media 
•  By 2010 Gen Y will outnumber baby boomers. 96% of them will have joined an  online social network.  •  Online social media has overtaken porn as the number‐one activity on the  web.  •  Australians are now the third‐highest per‐capita group of Twitter users on the  planet.  •  It took radio 38 years to reach 58 million users. TV took 13 years. The internet  took four years. iPods took three years. Facebook added 100 million users in  less than nine months!  •  80% of Twitter users are on mobile devices. Imagine what that means for bad  customer service.  •  34% of bloggers post opinions about products and brands.  These statistics were featured in the YouTube video ‘Social Media Revolution' – it  gives incredible statistics on how online social media continues to grow and is worth  a watch.  
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

12 

 

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TERMS AND CONCEPTS OF TWITTER 

 

An introduction to the terms   and concepts of Twitter 
Your profile 
Help yourself and help others – start by making it easy  to see who you are. Set up your Twitter profile with a  photo and a bio. In your bio, you need to explain what  You cannot NOT   it is that you are all about. In Twitter you only have 160  have a persona online.  characters to do so, which is not a lot, so you really  have to think before you start to describe yourself. It's  a good idea to explain your reason for being part of  Twitter and also give a little insight into your personality. For example, start with something  about how you want to change the world and then say how much you like eating ice cream on a  sunny day.   It’s really important to set your profile up (with photo and bio) before you start to try and follow  others. If you follow someone without having these two things set up don’t expect them to  follow you; you will probably be blocked. The internet is now a two‐way conversation and we all  want to know a little bit about the other people out there before we get into deep discussion.  Everyone has a softer side – it's a great ice breaker just to show a little of this side of yourself in  your tweets and your bio.  Think of a suitable name to use in Twitter as  your username. This is really important as it  makes up part of your identity. If you have a  really unique first name – which most of us  don’t – you could use that. A combination of  your first and second names may be a good  one to use. Think about the context of your  Twitter account  

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

LUKE:  I often meet up with Twitter folk  offline as well as online. If your name is  Harry Collins, but you decide to call yourself  Spanner on Twitter, expect to be called  Spanner when you meet others in the street  who recognize your profile photo!  

 

13 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

Following 
In the microblogging world, just as in real life, we can choose who we want to associate with.  You can actively follow people – and we don't mean stalking them or following them home. You  simply decide that you would like to see their tweets in your 'following stream'. If they decide to  follow you back then they will see your tweets in their following stream.   And so communities get built and overlap and relationships form.  Each time you read a tweet from the people you are following you can unfollow the person with  one click if their tweets stop interesting you or their links are not relevant to you. 

Followers 
If you have a public profile, anyone can decide to follow you. If you have someone following you  then they will see your tweets in their following tweet stream.   There are tools to gather a lot of followers quickly, which are easy to sign up to online, but what  you quickly realize is that it's not the number of followers you have but the value of the  followers that is most important.   We each need to take time selecting who we want to follow and blocking those that it doesn't  make sense to have following you – those who most probably lack authenticity and would erode  the trust of others. It’s not a good idea to automatically follow anyone that follows you. 

Unfollow 
LUKE: People selling to me without 
having developed a working  relationship get the boot if they sell to  me in a 'buy this now' kind of way.   The community I have, the people  who I follow, would not sell to me in  this way.   They let me know what they like and  why they like it and if I want I can ask  them where they bought it and that's  it. It’s done in a conversation because  that is what the internet is becoming:  a conversation online.  When you hit ‘unfollow’ you won't see that  person again. So what drives us to do it? As it’s so  easy to ‘unfollow’ we thought we should provide  a run‐down on how to manage your community  in Twitter.   If we don't see sharing from someone we  unfollow them; that's life. We have to share the  ‘luv’ or else we will be unfollowed. Not everyone  has worked this out just yet so don't believe the  stats about how many people follow each other;   it will change. Things will begin to settle down   and we will begin to see people managing their  following and followers more effectively.  

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

14 

 

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TERMS AND CONCEPTS OF TWITTER 

Both 
In order to be able to send a direct  message (DM) to another Twitter  user you need to be following them  and they need to be following you.  A DM is really useful once you have  established a relationship with your  follower. It’s not something to be  overused, but it is a more secure  way to send contact details, such as  a phone number, to an individual  without having to broadcast  personal details to   the twitterverse.  

LUKE: The other thing I look out for from my 
followers is that they share.   I recently asked my wife what it is that keeps us  loving each other. She replied that we share stuff.  online social media is all about sharing – that's  what binds the communities online.   Currently the Twitter tools don’t make it easy to  get to grips with all our followers in one view.   But someone out there is no doubt developing an  application to do just that; by the time you read  this they have probably convinced you to use it.  Soon we will have the ability to fine tune our  community and tweak the untapped value   out there. 

Blocking 
There is a dark side to the tweetspace. Some people punt pornography through tweets. These  individuals will follow you on the offchance that you will click on a link they post, which will link  to a porn site. It’s a good idea to block these individuals as some of their links could lead you to  getting a virus online (or offline!)   When you send a tweet it will go into the main twitter stream for anyone to see. However,  though most Twitter users only look at the individuals they follow. With this in mind, it’s  probably a good idea to block those who you don’t feel need to see your tweets in their  following stream.  

Retweeting 
Retweeting (RT or Via) is a way to relay a tweet you found useful, funny or interesting to your  followers, thereby giving them value. By retweeting you also give the originator kudos for the  value you see in the message. In a retweet you can add a couple of words of your own to  embellish the argument of add your slant.   It’s polite to thank someone who RTs your messages in a short tweet or DM.  If those you follow tweet content (such as URLs), and they are in line with your objectives, they  would have read the content they are linking to. Each time they vet it on your behalf and you  begin to trust their judgment over time. If you retweet such tweets, it's important to double  check that the link is working and that the content that it takes you to is relevant to your  followers before you RT it out across the twitterverse. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

15 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

Similarly, your followers rely on you feeding them valuable content from those you follow and  they will reward you by handing out compliments and returning the favor with relevant valuable  links and RTs into their community. 

The live tweet stream  
The live tweet stream means that a person taking part in twitter can see tweets as tweeters  around the world are pressing the send button. This takes the shape of a stream of Tweets that  just keep coming as people converse with each other, allude to news reports or simply say what  they are thinking. 

Looking at an individual’s tweets 
If you want to see the list of tweets that one particular  person has sent over time you can click on their profile  and read their tweet stream. This enables you to see  who they have been making contact with and what  information they have been sharing with the  Twitterverse. It allows you to come to grips with what  interests them and what their passions are, how they  express sentiments and, ultimately, their emotions. 

You’re unique ... just   like everybody else! 

Searching on topics 
Another way to see a stream of useful information would be to search on a particular topic in  Twitter. If, for example, you are interested in rugby you could run a search for the word ‘rugby’.  All the most recent tweets with the word ‘rugby’ would be listed as a stream. Running searches  is a great way to find people in Twitter who may have similar interests; you might decide to  follow some of these people with similar interests.  

Hash tags 
Searching online brings us another dimension of the real‐time interaction that microblogging  brings us.   A hash tag is the hash (#) symbol followed by a term or topic that describes a common interest  and develops a following.   For example, there’s a rugby game underway and tweets are flying out about it. A hash tag could  be brought into play (excuse the pun) to create a stream about that particular game.   Let’s say you decide to tweet about a World Series rugby game between Australia and New  Zealand that is taking place and you want to have others reply to your thoughts. You could put 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

16 

 

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TERMS AND CONCEPTS OF TWITTER 

‘#OzNZrugby’ at the start of your tweet. If others want to join in they would also put the hash  tag ‘#OzNZrugby’ into their tweets and a common search tag develops momentum. You can then  click on the tag and be taken to a stream of all tweets people have posted about the topic. It’s  like watching the game with a group of friends; you get to share your thoughts and feelings and  see what others watching the game think of a try or tackle.  Quite a few reality TV programs have had hash tags assigned to them; viewers add their opinions  about who should be given the prize or who should win. Once again, it’s like having everyone  who’s interested in the  same program that  you are watching  taking part in one huge  conversation as the  event unfolds in real  time.  This can have some  interesting results and  raise issues for TV  programmers, as can  be seen in the story  about MasterChef  below. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

17 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

Mainstream media must come to terms  with realtime social media results 
Twitter became a space for the crazed support of the most popular reality  show in the history of Australian TV: MasterChef. (The same was also true  in many other countries.)   But something fundamental was uncovered: airing the same competitive  show across a country with different time zones doesn’t work.   The MasterChef final went to air on the east coast of Australia at 7.30pm.  Due to the two‐hour time zone difference, it was to be aired two hours later  on the west coast of Australia (when it would be 7.30pm there).   MasterChef, during the series, gained a massive following on Twitter. Do a  search for #masterchef in Twitter and see for yourself. For many who use  Twitter, the series was made that much more special when shared with  new and old friends alike online. The advertisement breaks for once  became useful as Tweets leapt between the lounge rooms of viewers. This  is entertainment and we will see this concept grow and grow.   Have you guessed the problem? All the viewers on the west coast who use  Twitter had to endure the final results, which had been guarded till the last  moment, without having seen the show yet. Big letdown to watch the  suspenseful last episode already knowing the result! This is reality TV … if  the results get out beforehand, the shows rating will go down and the  entertainment appeal will decrease. Twitter could spell doom for many  very clever shows, some of which will never get a chance to air as there  may be no point until TV companies work it out.   A possible solution would be to make the shows more localised and  actually incorporate online social media to boost the number of viewers. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

18 

 

MANAGING YOUR ONLINE COMMUNITIES 

 

Managing your online  communities 
Let’s say there are, for simplicity’s sake, two types of community networks out there. (The word  'social' does not always apply in the context of online social media.) There are the more formal  collaborative business network (CBN) forums and there are the friendly social networks (FSN).  They both have separate benefits and you should try to manage them as separately as you can.  Following are some rules of thumb that might help establish sanity in your online social world. 

Collaborative business networks 
The collaborative business network (CBN) is a network of professionals with whom you have  come in contact over your working life. As you change jobs over time you may lose touch with  these people (some of whom knew more about you and felt as close as family, given the amount  of time you spent or spend with them). Some of these people may be ex‐bosses who will give  you a reference, which you can place in your profile of this forum. CBNs relate to your  professional life.  But be careful, these networks can also work against you. If you invite everyone you have ever  received a business card from or simply people who you never met who worked for the same  companies you once worked for, you begin to dilute the value of your CBN. This is not a sensible  approach and you may lose credibility as a result.  CBN tips 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Here are some suggested rules to follow:  1  Don't dilute your network. Think before you invite or accept someone else’s invitation to  link with them.  2  Work it and it will work for you. (Invest the time.)  3  Maintain contact with the people on the network from time to time – even if it's just a  simple friendly hello. 

 

19 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

4  5 

Before posting any messages take a moment to reflect upon what emotional response you  are wanting to elicit from your audience.  You may disagree with this one (you’re welcome to do so!): keep your CBN and FSN  separate. Too many people allow far too many of their business contacts into their  Facebook network and live to regret it!  

Sites such as LinkedIn and Plaxo can be like a live CV or resume of all your career experience and  professional skills. Recruitment agents and companies are using these more and more to look for  new recruits and check up on job applicants.  

LUKE: Your Facebook profile photo is 
visible to the world so make sure you’re  wearing some clothes in it.   I know someone who wasn't and the  whole office took great delight in  emailing it around. 

These sites also allow fellow community  members to post references. This referencing  has lacked authenticity in the past, but is  starting to be considered bone fide as a critical  mass develops.   Your own credibility hangs in the balance if you  give a reference for someone and it ends up  being untrue or inaccurate. These forums, as a  result, begin to self‐police themselves. 

Friendly social network  
Your friendly social network (FSN) is a circle of people who you choose to share personal stuff  with.  This is more of a leisure activity and, depending on your personality, you may spend hours each  day or evening uploading stuff and checking what your friends have uploaded and written  recently.  

LUKE: I don't have the energy to break 
my Facebook site into multiple security  groups and compartmentalize my so­ called 'friends' into who can see what  videos or photos. I want to keep it as  simple as possible. 

This is an absolutely wonderful place to stay in  touch with people while you are travelling. It’s  also a great way to maintain contact with family  and close friends living in different states or  countries. It shouldn’t replace the phone. If used  in conjunction with other communication tools,  this type of communication enhances the bond  you can develop with others.  FSNs must be used with a level of maturity. Too  often we see a naïve approach to the FSN  concept. Think before inviting someone to be  your friend. Do you want to share everything  you are going to upload onto the site with  them? Once you have made someone 'a friend'  to later 'discard' or ‘block’ them could have  negative emotional consequences. 

CELIA: I have seen relationships break 
up as a result of Facebook passwords  being shared. On the flip side, I have  heard of long­lost friends getting in  touch and rekindling relationships ...  some even falling in love! 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

20 

 

MANAGING YOUR ONLINE COMMUNITIES 

FSN tips  Here are some suggested rules to follow:  1  Ask ‘do I really want them to see this stuff?’ before you invite or accept.  2  Consider the emotional consequences of a post or upload and, if in doubt, phone and  explain what you really mean.  3  It's a great way to share experience and have fun, but remember there is a serious side. 

Linking CBNs and FSNs  
FSNs and CBNs coming together is becoming more the norm. When you are explaining online  social media to someone, it’s far easier to separate them first and then explain that they often  do overlap. Facebook, for instance, has become a well‐recognized and effective business  platform.

The reach of online social media 
YouTube  445  million  users  •  #2 site in global minutes  •  over one billion video views each day  •  17 billion searches in August 09  •  20hrs+ videos uploaded every minute.   Facebook   390  million  users  •  #1 site in global minutes  •  over 6 billion minutes spent each day  •  over 2 billion pieces of content shared every week  •  over 2 billion photos  •  6 million Australian visitors in June 09  •   (the equivalent of the 4th‐largest ‘country’ on the  planet)  Twitter 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

55 million  users 

•  Real‐time micro broadcasting  •  5,000 messages/second sent  •  available via web and mobile  •  800,000 Australian visitors in June 09  

 

21 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

 

The place for online social   media in business 
Bringing online social networks into the mainstream and embracing them is a relatively new  concept for businesses. The MySpace and Facebook generation has grown up with them. As  these individuals take up management positions, online social networking is simply becoming a  part of the fabric of business – whether in a formal or informal way.   But even though younger generations live their lives  bathed in social media 24/7, this does not mean that  they immediately see the relevance of it in business.   The organizations that work out now how to integrate  online social media into their operations will be the  most successful.  This seems like a simple equation on the surface, but  in reality it's a complex task that needs to be  addressed by effective emotional intelligence skills at  each point along the communication journey by  everyone involved in the conversation. (This includes  those who only listen – don't forget them!)  Twitter is incredibly powerful. It’s bringing more  people together than any technology in the history of  communication. 

The benefits of using  online social media for  business are about return  on engagement: Connect  with people. Build  opportunities through  dialogue that would not  have otherwise occurred.  Then connect them with  your business. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

22 

 

THE PLACE OF ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA FOR BUSINESS 

Is your business using online social media  effectively?  
As you become more aware of how you communicate online you will engage more and more  effectively, which strengthens your ability to communicate over all social media channels –  including Twitter. It’s important to establish a common strategy for application in each of your  social media channels in order to remain effective online. You can repurpose content from  different channels, but it’s essential that you don’t simply repeat the message, but revise or edit  according to the environment and audience. 

Conference Twitter usage 
Twitter is really taking off at conference venues – this  brings a whole raft of value to the experience of the  event. As the speakers are describing ground‐breaking  findings or concepts, twitterers in the audience are  tweeting the essence of the information to their  followers.   This has an amazing effect in that it brings the outside  world into the room and followers start to build on the  ideas as they are being expressed, so aggregating  value.  Typically a common conference hash tag is used and  followers start to cluster around the threads of  information.  Some people following the information coming   out of a session will simply  take it all in while others will  start to participate and add  their own views and ideas.   We have often seen people  inside the auditorium think  that the tweets are coming  from within – not so. People  outside simply need to get  hold of the context and they  can build on the value being  given and propagate that to  the twitterverse for others  to contribute to. 

Imagine if you could  hook up with all the  people you would  consider just brilliant ...  We hope this section  generates some  conversations!   Let us know what you  think. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

23 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

 

Emotional intelligence and   online social media 
What is emotional intelligence? 
Emotional Intelligence (EI) can be defined as a set of skills that demonstrate how often we  perceive, understand, reason with and manage our own and others' feelings, emotions and  mood states. If that's too much of a mouthful, another definition is: an awareness of and ability  to manage emotions in a healthy and productive manner.   After all, emotions give us vital information and we need to learn to listen to that information. 

Where did EI come from? 
Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to perceive, control, and evaluate emotions.  Since 1990, Peter Salovey and John D Mayer have been the leading researchers on emotional  intelligence. They defined emotional intelligence as 'the subset of social intelligence that  involves the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate  among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions'.1  Salovey and Mayer proposed a model that identified four different factors of emotional  intelligence:   •  the perception of emotion  •  the ability to reason using emotions  •  the ability to understand emotion  •  the ability to manage emotions. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

                                                              P Salvoney & JD Mayer 1993, ‘The Intelligence of Emotional Intelligence’ in Intelligence,   17(4), pp. 433–42.   
1

24 

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA 

In 1995 the concept of emotional intelligence was  popularized after the publication of psychologist and  New York Times science writer Daniel Goleman’s  book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More  Than IQ. 

Online social media as  social science 
Realistically, online social media is about social science  and not technology. Social science can be defined as  the scientific study of human society and social  relationships. It can be argued that these days digital  communication channels:  •  can act as your receptionist or first point of  contact  •  are your spokesperson  •  are the main contact for your talkative customers. 

So do you place enough  emphasis on how  effectively you are  communicating online?   ... Seriously ... Do you?  We would love to have  loads of discussion on   this point so feel free to  build upon what we   have laid open. 

So it makes perfect sense that we should be working out how to use emotional intelligence to  make sure our online communications, especially those in online social media, have the best  chance of being clear and unambiguous, engaging and represent our business accurately. 

Making sense of emotional intelligence 
Below is a table showing the seven skills that define how effectively we perceive, understand,  reason with and manage our own and others’ feelings. We have simplified it so it is not too  overwhelming. We have done this because emotional intelligence is a new concept in the space  of social media. Whether you are new to Twitter or have been tweeting for ages we want to help  you enhance, improve and strengthen your experience of the tools.   Don’t get too hung up on each of the skills. The first step is awareness. There is a reflection  exercise at the end of this section to help with that.  Don’t over‐analyze yourself. Because we try to be aware of how often we demonstrate  emotionally intelligent behaviors, you may think you are low in certain skills. But, in fact, other  people may have a different view of you.  
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Or vice versa – you may believe you demonstrate  certain behaviors regularly, but other people may not  see it as being so.   It is by developing awareness that the gap can be  closed, creating an opportunity for growth and  learning.   

We admit it ... we also want  to open up some dialogue,  so have a read and let us  know what you think. 

 

25 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

SKILL OF EI 
Emotional self‐ awareness 

DEFINITION 

EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT  LEADERS USE THIS SKILL TO … 

The skill of perceiving  •  recognise how feelings are impacting  and understanding one’s  thoughts, decisions, behaviour and  own emotions  performance at work  The skill of expressing  one’s own emotions  effectively  •  generate trust and perceptions of  genuineness with others  •  inspire commitment from those they lead  when presenting the organisation’s vision  •  better understand others and how to  engage, respond, motivate and connect with  them  It is a fundamental element of interpersonal  success and quality of interpersonal  relationships 

Emotional expression 

Emotional awareness   of others 

The skill of perceiving  and understanding  others emotions 

Emotional reasoning 

The skill of utilising  •  influence marketing strategies (as they take  emotional information in  into account how customers may feel  decision‐making  towards a product or service).   (Low scores may indicate an individual has a  more fact‐based decision‐making style.) 

Emotional self‐ management 

The skill of effectively  managing one’s own  emotions 

•  improve their ability to cope with work  demands  •   practice effective self‐leadership   •   manage stress levels 

Emotional management  The skill of influencing  •  create positive work environments for those  of others  the moods and emotions  they lead  of others  •  generate greater productivity and  performance from others  Emotional self‐control  The skill of effectively  controlling strong  emotions experienced  •  improve their emotional wellbeing  •  think and lead others clearly in stressful  situations 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Source: adapted from Genos EI (Research partner, The Brain   Sciences Institute, Swinburne University).

26 

 

PERSONAL FILTERING 

 

Personal filtering 
According to psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, we gather information from the world.2 Out  of approximately two million bits of information surrounding us, we are only consciously aware  of around 134 bits per second (BPS). At every waking moment we are literally inundated at a  conscious and unconscious level with information.   Imagine going to the supermarket. You walk into the store and you are surrounded by external  stimuli (such as signs, color, noises and pricing) and your body responds. Perhaps your heart  beats a little bit faster, the sound of a crying child disturbs you, you feel warm or cool, you have  self‐talk reminding you to buy milk or you mentally add up the cost of your groceries as you push  your trolley around the aisles.   If we had to be consciously aware of everything we see, taste, touch, smell and feel and pay  attention to it we would be overwhelmed. So we  have a filter Csikszentmihalyi calls the ‘reticular  activating system’, which filters most of the  information for us. We are only aware of a small  piece of the actual reality occurring around us.  Some of us pay more attention to what we see,  some to what we hear. Some of us are more aware  of how things feel and some of us pay more  attention to data, facts and figures.  What that means is that none of us perceive  reality as it really is. We each only perceive a  different set of 134 bits of reality per second. We  all have a different perception of reality. This  explains why ten different witnesses at an accident  scene can have ten different experiences of what  occurred, based on what they have seen, heard,  felt and calculated.                                                              
2

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 Csikszentmihalyi, M 1990, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, Harper and Row, New York. 

 

27 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

Inattention blindness 
Daniel Simons (University of Illinois) and Christopher Chabris (Harvard University)  conducted a study to demonstrate how much we can actually delete information.  In their study subjects were asked to watch video footage of people throwing a  basketball back and forth. They were asked to focus and count how many times the  basketball was passed. In the middle of the video clip a person in a gorilla suit  passed through the middle of the game for nine seconds and then out of sight.   When asked, an average of 50 per cent of the subjects didn’t see the gorilla pass  through the game! Why? Some people were focusing so much on the counting and  data that they missed out on the visual detail of a gorilla in the middle of their view. 

As we gather information from the world the mind deletes, distorts and generalizes information  based on the beliefs we hold internally. If someone believes they are stupid, they may delete  from their experience any time they do something clever. Their mind will distort information, so  if someone says to them ‘You are so clever’ they may hear a sarcastic tone where there is none.  Their mind will generalize their experiences to support the belief they are stupid so they create  experiences, such as always failing exams, to support that theory.  Of course this is all unconscious. None of us would want to do this consciously. It’s human  nature to want to be happy and successful. Yet we have so much fear that we fabricate stories   to keep ourselves ‘safe’. Our unconscious minds then control and run programs automatically  for us – sometimes even programs that give us a result we don’t want, one that we struggle   to turn off.  The deletion of information also has an impact on how  we communicate online with other people. Whenever  we judge someone or have negative opinions about  someone or something, we tend to justify our own  reality and make that person wrong. We effectively  delete anything good about them from our reality.  Because of this, when we communicate through online  social media channels our minds will arrange  information in such a way that makes sense to us.  

Do we ever know with  100% certainty what is  going on in someone  else’s mind? ... Unlikely! 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Filtering and EI 
The existence of these filters and the need to become aware of our emotional intelligence is the  reason we wrote this e‐book. We want to get everyone thinking about what life is like in 

28 

 

PERSONAL FILTERING 

someone else’s shoes. Someone may put a  message online that you view as sarcastic or  arrogant – how do you respond to that?   Hopefully this e‐book helps you to view things a  bit differently, thus enhancing your experience  of Twitter and other social media channels and  helping you build a more robust community,  keeping constant awareness of others in your  mind’s eye. 

CELIA: Nothing has meaning but the 
meaning we give it  Have you ever come across a tweet or  blog post where the tweeter uses  language that’s so familiar to them, but  they don’t seem to realise that the same  language can have different meanings  to people in a different industries or  cultures? This can result in a barrier to  developing relationships online. So have  a look yourself. Notice how you  interpret different tweets and how they  make you feel – are you making  assumptions about the intended  meaning? 

We need to think about our language usage in  online social media and what happens when we  create a story about what someone else is  thinking. When we use tools such as Twitter we  should realize that our communities are a  collection of people with feelings, needs and  aspirations. We need to consider the makeup of  our audience. Ask yourself: have you taken the time to get to know your audience and are you  trying to build a relationship? Do you get to know them by dipping into the tweet stream each  day or every couple of days. 

We can never know for certain what is going on in someone else's mind. We can't possibly  because we don't know what experiences they've had, what values they hold or and what beliefs  they have that shape and influence the way they communicate.   If we simply keep this in mind it will help us communicate more effectively. 

Same words, different meaning 
This old example helps us understand how many meanings can be derived from the  same few words. Read aloud the following sentences, emphasizing the highlighted  word:  I never said I would do it.  I never said I would do it.  I never said I would do it. 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

I never said I would do it.  I never said I would do it.  I never said I would do it.  I never said I would do it. 

 

29 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

 

Using emotional intelligence in  online social media  
We must realize and remember that there is a person on the end of all communication streams  and therefore the ability to demonstrate a high level of emotional intelligence in such forums is  essential – not only for getting the desired outcome, but perhaps more importantly, for  nurturing ongoing internal and external relationships. We need to 'evolve' online. Just as it takes  time to evolve into the person we are truly meant to be, it also takes time to establish  relationships, communities and networks online.   It's a new school playground and it takes  time to establish yourself.   If you join in the game on day one and want  to play hopscotch when everyone else is  playing basketball you're not going to convert  the players to your way of thinking in an  instant. They may even throw you off the  court.   You may need to play a game or two of  basketball (who knows, as your  understanding of the game increases, along  with your skills, you may even get to like it)  before you introduce yourself as a team  player and then suggest a new game.   By this time you have the trust of the other  players and they are more willing to listen to  your ideas and have a go at something  different. The same is also true for online  social media.  

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

30 

 

USING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA 

Thin slicing 
Malcolm Gladwell introduced the concept of 'thin slicing' in his book Blink. He believes we are all  capable of judging and evaluating a person's authenticity and proximity to our values practically  in an instant. This is a process we have within us – to rely on a ‘gut’ feeling about people. If we  believe Gladwell, we simply need to go with our initial instinct in order to screen individuals  online who may or may not add value, as our instinct is practically always right.   On Twitter we are thin slicing individuals in 140 characters to determine whether they are worth  following or not –or whether we should block them altogether. This may sound callous at first,  but when the numbers of followers/following start to gather momentum you need to cope and  relying on your intuition is critical.  

Building trust online to build rapport 
A business that people don’t trust is not going to survive long. Trust is essential. Once eroded,  it’s hard to win back (even if a claim or rumor wasn’t even true in the first place).   To grow your online community you need people to feel they can trust you to live up to their  expectations. One of the things about building trust online is that it's not going to happen  overnight. But it will happen if done correctly.   Building trust is about building rapport. So how do we build rapport online?   When we talk about rapport we really want to look at becoming what can be called a  ‘charismatic communicator’. The word ‘communication’ comes from the Latin communicare  meaning ‘to share’. It’s about sharing information, give and take. Communication involves the  ability to be aware of other people and their needs. This awareness enables us to communicate  in a way that is uplifting, inclusive and generally favors others.  Rapport is not about trying to make people like you. (That’s called manipulation!) Creating  rapport is about having people feel they are like you in some way. This develops trust at a much  faster rate. Rapport is the ability to enter someone else’s world; to make them feel that you  understand them and that you have a common bond. The more you do this, the more flexible  you can be in situations and the greater your chances of obtaining relevant information to create  a win‐win situation. 

Being clear 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Nothing has meaning but the meaning we give it – so if we are not clear in our communication  then others will ‘hallucinate’ (make assumptions) about what they think we are thinking and  feeling. They will make their own judgment call and come up with an answer that makes sense  to them. The resulting response, however, may be inappropriate or inaccurate. 

 

31 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

You’re selling emotion 
The obvious, though overlooked, aspect of communication boils down to the fact that: you’re  selling emotion.  We are emotional creatures. Everything we do is for an emotional response. Think about it ...  when you go fast in your new red sports car or admire the results of your recent botox  treatment, what are you hoping to get out of it? Be honest now … you want to feel free,  powerful, alive, energized, whatever. The point is you want to feel something.  We feel first, then think later – this is our basic survival instinct. You don’t tend to analyze how  many claws the lion has; you feel fear and run like hell. (Penn)  We need to consider that how we communicate is going to have a huge impact on our ability to  form really valuable networks and productive relationships and maintain our reputation and  credibility in the marketplace. We create our own marketplace now by who we follow and who  we have following us. 

Keeping your audience in mind 
In order for us to make as much sense as possible to our audience we need to ask:  •  What do we want our audience to feel as a result of this tweet?  •  Could the message be construed as ambiguous, aggressive or damaging in  some way?  •  Is your messaging resulting in you being like what your audience expects you  to be like?  •  If not, how can you say it differently to be more yourself and authentic? 

Is your social media communication   style working?  
Are you attracting attention? (In the right way, of course.) Are you convincing your audience you  have something worthwhile to say? Are you converting leads to customers (having listened to  them and replied)?  This all starts with you having to decide what end emotion you want someone else to feel and  working your way back from there. This is easier said than done; it takes conscious effort.  Mark Twain once sent a letter to a colleague with a note attached: ‘Sorry about the long letter,   I didn’t have time to write a short one’.  
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

32 

 

USING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA 

This really applies to microblogging  as well. We might think writing a  message in 140 characters is  simple, but actually conveying  everything we want to say and get  the tone right in fewer words is not  that simple at all.   The constraints of 140 characters in  a Twitter post means we have to  put quite a bit of thought into it to  get it right. Don't forget that every  tweet conveys emotion and can be  misinterpreted! It is a skill that we  get better at with more experience  though.  Christopher S Penn, in ‘It’s how you make me feel that matters‘, explains that communication is  about selling emotion. He lists some examples of some of the well‐known folks in online social  media and asks:  Examine the feelings and notice what is going on for you:  How does Chris Brogan make you feel?  How does Gary Vaynerchuk make you feel?   How about Ann Handley, Pete Cashmore, Guy Kawasaki, Seth Godin, Perez Hilton or  Justine Ezarik?  The answer is never 'nothing'. They all create emotions in you that bring you closer to knowing  them and help build trust. Each of the above examples all elicit a certain emotional response  from the audience and this helps build trust.     

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

33 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

 

Learning emotional intelligence 
Online social media exposes us: We have long been segmenting our work life and private life and  the passion in both has been diluted as a result. Nothing is sacred on the internet and we are  exposed based on what we paste onto it, good or bad. Community shame is the law by which we  are judged. If we want to delve into the depths of the internet and drag up the dirt on someone  who has multiple identities it’s only a few clicks away. Don't feel you have to try hard to find out  more about someone’s identity. It's out there for you to find. And likewise for other people  learning stuff about you.   Hence we should practice constant awareness that what we are saying online could be forever.  Make sure that you don't do anything that could adversely affect your online community unless  you are prepared to have your name and all exposed. And in the blink of an eye you will be  unfollowed.   Microblogging has made it as simple as pie to never have anyone you don't want traipsing round  your backdoor. Microblogging lets you mould a true and authentic community, which will form  over time and provide value throughout your life.  We often hear people complain that it’s too  hard to learn how to mold their communication  so that it’s more effective and received well by  their communities. But it’s not impossible – we  can change and we can learn!  For example, it’s no secret that you can sweat  your way to more sculpted abs and a stronger  heart. But research has found that you can also  build a better brain.  
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Stages of learning 
Unconscious incompetence 

 
Conscious incompetence 

 
Conscious competence 

 
Unconscious competence 

Norman Doidge, author of The Brain that  Changes Itself, stated 'For about 400 years,  scientists viewed the brain as a complex  machine ... and that meant it couldn't grow   new parts.'  

34 

 

KNOWLEDGE EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE 

'But recent studies and imaging technology show that  it's more like a muscle – or a group of muscles working  together – that bulk up when exercised.' Much like a  football player who cross‐trains to improve his  performance (sprinting, weightlifting and stretching),  cross‐training your head with different tasks boosts  your mental fitness by increasing your brain's neural  connections, blood flow and even the weight of the  brain itself.’ 

They say you can't teach  an old dog new tricks ...   but you don’t have to be   an old dog to be stuck   in a rut! 

So even though people may have the misconception  that you can’t learn how to be more emotionally  attuned to both yourself and your audience it’s simply not true. Like learning any new skill, if you  practice, you move through the different stages of learning until the skill becomes part of who  we are – our neurology ‘learns’ a new behavior.   Take yourself back to when you learnt to drive a car. When you first got behind the wheel there  was so much to think about. You had to coordinate all the parts of steering, changing gear,  depressing the clutch and brakes. It all seemed so challenging back then, but now you probably  don’t give it a second thought. 

Feel the love 
Because emotions affect the way we think they ultimately affect the decisions we make. This is  where emotional intelligence comes in. Exercising emotional intelligence not only makes a huge  difference in the workplace and life in general. These skills are essential for building  relationships online. For example:  •  Effective leaders communicate how they feel to inspire and generate confidence from  others.  •  High‐performing sales teams think more about how their customers feel to strengthen  their selling relationships.  •  Teams that work more closely are more aware of how emotions help and hinder the  team’s performance, increasing job satisfaction and retention.  Ask yourself the following questions.  •  Have you ever been in a situation where you did not hire or accept someone because  something just didn’t feel right?  •  Have you missed out on a job promotion because of poor leadership or communication  skills?  •  Have you ever had any interpersonal conflict or been bullied?  •  Would you ask your boss for more resources or time off when you can see they are having  a bad day?  Emotions influence the behavior that we display to others. This gets reflected through our tone  of voice, our body language and our facial expressions. So how can this be transferred into  effective communication online? It’s the same principles as face‐to‐face interaction: listening,  sharing and remaining as transparent as possible. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

35 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

Emotions influence our performance  
How do you perform at work when you feel frustrated, bored, distracted, irritated or annoyed  about something or someone? Contrast this to how you perform when you are upbeat, positive,  satisfied and optimistic. Now think about your interaction online. Have you ever posted  something and then later regretted it? The  trouble is, now it’s up there for everyone to  see (or if you delete it, you’re probably too  late and lots of people have seen it). 

How’s your  reputation? 

A 2009 social networking study by  Deloitte LLP found that 74 per cent of  employed Americans believe it’s easy  to damage a brand’s reputation via  sites such as Facebook and Twitter.  Deloitte also reported that nearly  one‐third of those surveyed say they  never consider what management, co‐ workers or their clients would think  before posting material online. 

These days many organizations have online  social networks. Within these networks the  members demonstrate different levels of  emotional intelligence according to their  individual experiences and filters. In general,  businesses are not used to communicating  through multiple online channels. Because  online we don't have tonality and body  language to help us – especially over  modalities such as Twitter, where you only  have 140 characters to get your point across  – we begin to make judgments or  assumptions about another person’s  character. It’s only human. 

How can I improve the way I communicate  through social media channels? 
Great question! We're so glad you asked. You can start by trying to improve your own emotional  intelligence and apply it to our communication online. Read on!     

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

36 

 

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ONLINE COMMUNITIES 

 

Emotional intelligence and online  communities 
Belonging 
It would be nice if we could force our communities and networks to love us and stick around  forever. The truth is we can’t. They either exist or they don't. Members either swarm or they  leave. They are either interested and participative or they are NOT (and this includes lurkers who  simply listen).  So what is it that glues these communities together? It's a similar essence that makes a group of  colleagues go to the pub after work together. They have the opportunity to go straight home but  they don't. They feel they belong in this group (this network) and are better able to fend off any  attacking lions by being in a  group –it’s basic survival.  There is also a common  thread, which appears  through the language we  use. It is interesting to note  that words such as  authenticity, transparency,  honesty, trust, genuineness,  safety, respect, security,  integrity and congruency,  all seem to come up when  speaking about online social  media. These are values  that are important to many  people in our communities. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

37 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

What is a value? 
Very simply, if you place importance on something then you value it. Therefore values are  the way we judge good and bad, right and wrong, appropriateness and inappropriateness.  In our minds we unconsciously arrange our values in hierarchies. As we evaluate our  actions, the more important values are usually searched for first. After the more important  values are found and satisfied, then the next most important ones become important. We  can liken this to those Russian babushka dolls. All our values are a subset of our one big  value and the more layers you take off the values become more subtle and the dolls  become smaller.  If we feel that life is meaningless or pointless; if we  feel conflict over issues at work or home, in our  relationships with ourselves and with others, it is often  a result of conflicting values. Because values are  emotional states we want to experience on a daily  basis and they shape our decisions and what our lives  look like.  Therefore, ultimately, our values will dictate how we  communicate online.   

Values are the   unconscious rules   we live by. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

38 

 

APPLYING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TO ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA 

 

10

Applying emotional intelligence  to online social media 
Re‐read the emotional intelligence table on page 26.   Now let’s break down the skills listed to examine what they mean if applied directly to online  social media. See the table on behavioral indicators, EI skills and examples on the following two  pages.  Note that, as yet, there is no research available to show which of the skills is a direct predictor of  certain behaviors online.   We have a project underway to uncover this. The predicted outcome of this is to make it easier  to directly measure each skill and assess how it is affecting people’s ability to build effective  online relationships. 

Reflection exercise for EI 
Keep a diary for the next seven days. Take note of situations that occur online and how they  make you feel. How did you react or respond? Come back to some of the situations a day or two  later and note how you feel then.  At the end of the week, examine your diary. Reconsider each event and the emotions you felt,  the strength of the emotions and your reactions to them.  
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Consider whether your reactions were appropriate to the situation and how you expressed your  feelings online.   Recall your thoughts, your body language, facial expressions and whatever else is relevant for  you at that time. Did that affect how you responded online?   Rerun the situation through in your mind. Could you have done it differently with more  emotional awareness and expression? Would this have made a difference?   

 

39 

 

40 

BEHAVIOURAL INDICATORS 
Engages in creative ways of enhancing and  disseminating relevant information through online  social media.   Resolving group conflict with appropriate etiquette  (i.e. outside the view of non‐partial online parties).  Integrating various Online community members'  perspectives and feeding those out to the other  online groups of interest.   Is proactive in openly discussing difficult issues,  concerns and people problems in the appropriate  online social media channel of communication (e.g.  Facebook, Twitter, email, video conference call).   Can advocate an issue or cause that is often  sponsored by business. 

SKILLS OF EI 
Emotional awareness of others  Emotional management of others  Emotional expression  Emotional self‐control  Emotional self‐management 

EXAMPLE 
A great example of 'what not to do' is posted on Peter  Shankman’s blog, How an 'accomplished communicator'  communicates. The sender of an email publicly shared a  not‐so‐nice side of his personality in a very public setting,  which could potentially be disastrous for his career. Had he  been more aware of his emotions perhaps he would  probably have thought twice before posting the message. 

Emotional expression  Emotional self‐awareness  

Over $7,000 was raised in a short time through microfinance  for women in poverty. This mostly accomplished through  Twitter. Had the original message been incoherent, this may  not have been the outcome. This was a very effective segue  to a tweet‐up (face‐to‐face meeting) to further serve the  cause – all organised through Twitter, Facebook, a blog and  Flickr.   This is a great example of how communication can be  initiated online that also results in face‐to‐face interaction.  

 

 

  © KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009

APPLYING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TO ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA 

BEHAVIOURAL INDICATORS 

SKILLS OF EI 

EXAMPLE 
Twitter was used to broadcast updates regarding Australian  bushfires in the state of Victoria in early 2009.  

Encourages and supports team members in their  Emotional awareness of others  online social media activity to contribute actively and  fully to projects. This also acts as a decision support  Emotional management of others  system and crisis management. It also allows for  Emotional reasoning  assembly of relevant people at short notice.  Online social media allows for collaborative  brainstorming and contributes to project outcomes  regardless of where all contributing parties are  located.   Microblogging is often used as a tool to aggregate  relevant material and allow all parties to co‐create  valuable knowledge.   Emotional reasoning  Emotional management of others  

When looking for information on how competitors are  performing, a marketing group could create a hash tag in a  tweet to categorise a topic within their defined project  group. (For example, '#prodcomp'.)   Each time a marketing department member finds a related  article on the internet they can send out a tweet with this  tag. Then the person who is developing the competitor  analysis can search on this hash tag and extract all relevant  articles. That person can also check at any point to see how  many related articles have been found by the group doing  the research, give encouragement and motivate the group  members along the way. 

41 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

 

11

Twitter – it's all about connection 
Connecting people on Twitter 
The highest level of networking is not when you connect yourself with others, but when you  connect others with others who need each other. When this level of connectivity is attained the  degrees of separation becomes inextricable and the value gained is enormous. When these  individuals start to share information it is profound, but when this information is shared and  others who might have an ontological bind to it start to tap the source something amazing  happens. The strength of the multiplier effect experienced in knowledge sharing is something  we have never seen to such an extent before.   Microblogging is the platform that will drive this free flow of innovation and knowledge  aggregation. Twitter has already reached a tipping point in this regard and it is passing  knowledge at the speed of conversation.  Restrictions to knowledge sharing from the microblogging platform: Einstein took the concept of  time very seriously and for good reason. You just can’t change it. It’s set in our three‐ dimensional world. There is an amazing book called Einstein's Dreams in which the author  explores what the world would be like if we had a different perspective on time. For example  one chapter delves into how the lives of people living in a valley where time is faster the lower  down into the valley you live. You move slower as you walk up the hills surrounding the valley.   Microblogging can’t get away from the concept that it is best lived as it happens. Authenticity is  a result of us being in the moment. We can't delay a tweet until early morning and expect it to  have the same result. It's just not real!  There are a number of Twitter applications that will allow you to store up tweets and deliver  them in a staggered approach. This is a useful tool for some, though we feel the true value of  Twitter is to know that there is someone on the other side of the tweet who just pressed the  send key – someone’s stuck in a bus shelter has just tweeted that a car drove through a puddle  and sprayed water up onto them. This type of tweet is real time.   That's what a conversation is: real people, living right now, talking about it. 
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

42 

 

TWITTER – IT’S ALL ABOUT CONNECTION 

Rules for connecting 
OK we can't leave you hanging like that without some kind of solution, so here goes:  It’s going to take a combination of social media tools to successfully manage our network of  communities, but I guess you knew that already.   It’s going to take a combination of LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter (with a few others in the pot  to get the balance right).   It’s complex, time consuming, convoluted and ever‐changing, but massively rewarding if you  manage all your social media channels effectively and listen to the signals. These signals are  drawing on all the skills of emotional intelligence!   Repurpose your content to spread yourself effectively across these channels. Do so, however,  without repeating yourself word for word and remain authentic and real.

LUKE: Twittering in the time zones 
I have an extensive network in Europe and the USA. If I start to move my focus towards  Twitter and hypothetically start to ignore other social media channels as Twitter takes up  more and more of my social media time I'll start to ignore those who are not in a similar  time zone to me.   OMG we are getting back to how is really is in the real world and chatting to people who  are awake when we are ... how about that! Seems strange to even contemplate.   I have thought about this long and hard and unless I stay up very late or get up very early  there are followers and people I follow who I won't actually get to see in my tweet streams.  I will have to actually go and look at their tweet streams. I'm not tending to develop a  relationship with them as I don't see their tweets that often so I'm going to start to forget  about them over time and may even unfollow them (heaven forbid).  What's the point of following loads of people on the other side of the world who don't get  involved in the conversations that I am so passionate about?   It would seem that any time zone which is more than a few hours either side of me will  start to be forgotten in months to come. (I'm generalising here as there are a few  dedicated tweeters in the States and Europe who do some crazy hours and I’m not really  conscious of where they are and what time it is where they’re tweeting from, though they  are not the norm.) So for me Twitter is a latitudinal relationship builder – I'm starting to  adapt to this way of thinking.   Loads of you may think that I'm on another planet with this concept but in Twitter it's the  authenticity of the moment that gives me a thrill. Delaying tweets is a marketing game.  Keep it real people and it will work for you. I don’t feel the Luv unless I think there’s a  person behind the tweet. I’m not a ro(bot) so why should I reply to an automated tweet  sent by a bot? 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

43 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

It’s important to extract the essence of community for us to understand how to connect online.  The following anecdote highlights the importance of loose ties. 

The Little Prince 
… It was then that the fox appeared.  'Good morning' said the fox.  'Good morning' the little prince responded politely, although when he turned  around he saw nothing.  'I am right here,' the voice said, 'under the apple tree.'  'Who are you?' asked the little prince. He added, 'You are very pretty to look  at.'  'I am a fox,' the fox said.  'Come and play with me,' proposed the little prince, 'I am so unhappy.'  'I cannot play with you,' the fox said, 'I am not tamed.'  'Ah please excuse me,' said the little prince. But after some thought, he added:  'What does that mean: “tame”?'  'You do not live here,' said the fox, 'what is it you are looking for?'  'I am looking for men,' said the little prince. 'What does that mean: “tame”?'  'Men,' said the fox, 'they have guns, and they hunt. It is very disturbing. They  also raise chickens. These are their only interests. Are you looking for  chickens?'  'No,' said the little prince. 'I am looking for friends. What does that mean:  “tame”?'  'Oh, it is an act too often neglected,' said the fox. 'It means to establish ties.'  'To establish ties?'  'Just that,' said the fox. 'to me, you are still nothing more than a little boy who  is just like a hundred thousand other little boys. And I have no need of you.  And you, on your part, have no need of me. To you I am nothing more than a  fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me, then we shall  need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I shall be  unique in all the world ...' 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

44 

 

TWITTER YOUR BUSINESS 

 

12

Twitter your business 
How can Twittering earn my business money? 
This question gets raised all the time when we speak about using social media. People want to  know where the money or return on investment (ROI) is.   Social media is not a quick win – it takes time but you can see value building along the way.  What's the ROI of getting dressed in the morning? It allows you to go outside ... it's not about  instant gratification ... online social media is about building relationships.   Social media is not free – it takes people, it takes technology and it takes time. All of these things  are limited resources and they all have a specific cost, but they also yield a specific result. That  result is in the building of a worldwide community, which can reap rewards by developing new  marketplaces. Eventually it will result in a cost reduction in customer service, improved market  research and escalating business intelligence. And if you use online social media well to promote  your business, you will see ROI in the long run. 

Building customer loyalty 
Twittering helps build customer loyalty, it will get you more customers and it lets you identify  what your customer community perceives and determines your brand to be. Think about that  last point and repeat it out loud.   As long as you twitter with emotional intelligence, you will be able to strengthen your  relationships and make social media work for you. Your bought advertising spend will be partly  replaced by word of mouth or earned advertising (kudos), which is a lot more effective and less  expensive. 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

Customers research differently these days 
We listen to our community just like we did in the veggie market on the high street. Not a lot has  changed, except we spend more of our time and develop more of our communities online these 

 

45 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

days. Monitoring mentions of your business online is important. Measure the negatives and  manage them. Work on improving identified weaknesses or faults revealed by your customers in  the online community.  

Measuring growth 
If you want to think about dollars  you need to establish a baseline  to measure from: growth from  period to period, the before and  after statistics of how it's  generating you income.   You may want to keep an activity  timeline and then look at your  ROI (ROI = (gain from investment  – cost of investment) / cost of  investment). Measure the before  and after of:    •  •  •  sales revenue  transactions per month  net of new customers. 

Don't forget to include branding. Have a look at negative versus positive mentions over your  social media streams. Measure hits to your website and foot traffic through your business  outlets (if relevant). You will soon see that if used correctly and appropriately social media will  take your customer relationships and your business profile to new heights.   Olivier Blanchard’s slidedeck on return on investment has taught us a lot.   

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

46 

 

TWITTER YOUR BUSINESS 

Customer relationship management  
Have a look at: searchcrm.com (the self‐proclaimed ‘world’s best customer  relationship management resource’).   The trends are pointing towards the uptake in the relationship economy and the  future of the new web with its interactive technology.   •  At the Gartner Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Summit expert  Paul Greenberg stated that customer experience is now the key differentiator  in the business ecosystem. Web 2.0 technologies like blogs, wikis and social  networking sites are changing the way companies interact with their  customers and putting the customer experience centre stage. Gartner  recommends companies looking to improve the customer experience get  started with Web 2.0 as soon as possible.  •  Gartner's Scott Nelson feels the CRM market is changing as companies begin  to understand what it really means to be 'customer‐centered' and focus on  the customer experience. According to Nelson, Web 2.0 is taking a central  role in forward‐thinking organization’s customer strategies.  •  Frank Eliason, Comcast's director of digital care, has established a group  within Comcast to monitor blogs and social networks and respond to them.  While Eliason's division is providing customer service, it operates separately  from the company's customer service division. However, Gartner predicts  that by 2010 more than 50 per cent of companies that have established an  online community will fail to manage it as an agent of change.  •  Don't focus on CRM failure. A Gartner survey of CEOs found that building  closer relationships with customers will be the top strategy for growth  between 2007 and 2010. Nelson urged companies to investigate Web 2.0 and  social networking sites, which he believes will be one of the biggest areas  CRM h

  
© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

47 

THE EMOTIONAL FACE OF TWITTER 

 

00

Conclusion 
These days we have the ability to communicate easily to people all over the world in an instant.  We need to be conscious of creating our online social media personalities in the same way that  businesses consciously create their branding guidelines and key messaging guides.   Businesses need to be aware that their brands are now represented by individuals in the  organization and that a lack of emotional intelligence can result in potentially disastrous  consequences.   It is imperative that employees are equipped with the skills to communicate effectively online.  More importantly if employees are feeling dissatisfied, fed up, and undervalued offline, this will  have a ripple effect online. Therefore having an emotionally intelligent organization is good for  business.     

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

48 

 

CONCLUSION 

The emotional face  of Twitter 
by Luke Grange and Celia Prosser     

Let’s all embrace a new era of understanding!  Take a look around at the evolving social and business landscapes  in today’s world ... extremely rapid technology‐driven change is  creating unprecedented competitive pressures for survival.   But how does this affect our ability to get along? What are the  benefits of communicating in an emotionally intelligent way?  Where does the human factor fit into the ever increasing use of  online social media such as Twitter in our business and personal  lives? Luke and Celia decided to explore the concepts of  communicating effectively online – and the consequences of not  doing so!  Whether you’ve been using online social media since day one or are  fairly new to it, this e‐book should get you looking at things in a new  way, help you to be more aware of your online communications and  show you how to navigate your way around the online social media  spaces.  Online social media for business is about ‘return on engagement’.  Connect with people, build opportunities through dialogue that  would not have otherwise occurred, then connect them with your  business. It’s not irrelevant to you and can be very very powerful. 
www.knowledge‐solutions.com.au 

© KNOWLEDGE SOLUTIONS 2009 

 

49 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful