Map It!

WORKBOOK

About Mind Mapping for Kids
Mind Mapping for Kids: How Elementary School Students Can Use Mind Maps to Improve Reading Comprehension and Critical Thinking is my latest book on learning with mind maps. MMFK helps elementary school students — even those in kindergarten — develop higher-level thinking and improve their reading comprehension using mind maps and the 8 reading comprehension strategies. Not only does it help them succeed in school but also in life — by teaching them the skills they’ll need to become lifelong learners. The book is presented in a kid-friendly format with mind maps and cartoons. I hope you’ll read it and use it with your kid.

About Map It! Workbook
“The principle goal of education is to create men who are capable of doing new things, not simply of repeating what other generations have done – men who are creative, inventive, and discoverers.” − Jean Piaget This workbook is a companion to Mind Mapping for Kids. MMFK was written for parents and teachers as a guide to helping kids think and learn while reading using mind maps. If that’s something you’d like your kids to be able to do, please read on. Be warned, however. Using the strategies laid out in MMFK requires you to commit to working with your kid on a level beyond passive reading. You’ll be mind mapping, practicing reading comprehension strategies, and actively working to change how your kids read. It’s demanding work but a worthwhile investment in the education and success of your kid. In the workbook, you’ll find 11 worksheets referenced in the book. Work together with your kids on questions and exercises to learn how to mind map and how to use the reading comprehension strategies while reading. If you like this workbook, please share it with anyone you think would benefit from it. Additional FREE resources and FREE downloads are available at www.mindmapsforkids.com.
Thank you for your interest and support! Please get in touch with me at profTK@conciselearning.com with any questions or comments.

#1

Mind Map of the Water Cycle
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Create a mind map of the water cycle.

INSTRUCTIONS

Using information below and any other information you have available, create a mind map of the water cycle. Water Cycle The water cycle (also known as the hydrologic cycle) is the never-ending circulation of water as it penetrates the three parts of the Earth system: the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (rivers, lakes, and oceans), and the lithosphere (land below the hydrosphere). The water cycle is driven by the sun (provides heat) and gravity (Earth pulls on the water). Water moves between these systems through four processes: evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and collection. Evaporation is when the sun heats up water in rivers, lakes, or the ocean and turns it into water vapor. Condensation is when water vapor in the air gets cold and changes back into liquid, forming clouds. Precipitation occurs when so much water has condensed that clouds can’t hold it anymore and water falls back to rivers, lakes, oceans, or land in the form of rain, hail, sleet, or snow. When water ends up on land, it soaks into the earth and becomes part of the groundwater that plants and animals use, or it may collect in the rivers, lakes, or oceans. This is called collection. And then the cycle starts all over again.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#2

Concept Map of the Water Cycle
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Create a concept map of the water cycle.

INSTRUCTIONS

Using information below and any other information you have available, create a concept map of the water cycle. Water Cycle The water cycle (also known as the hydrologic cycle) is the never-ending circulation of water as it penetrates the three parts of the Earth system: the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (rivers, lakes, and oceans), and the lithosphere (land below the hydrosphere). The water cycle is driven by the sun (provides heat) and gravity (Earth pulls on the water). Water moves between these systems through four processes: evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and collection. Evaporation is when the sun heats up water in rivers, lakes, or the ocean and turns it into water vapor. Condensation is when water vapor in the air gets cold and changes back into liquid, forming clouds. Precipitation occurs when so much water has condensed that clouds can’t hold it anymore and water falls back to rivers, lakes, oceans, or land in the form of rain, hail, sleet, or snow. When water ends up on land, it soaks into the earth and becomes part of the groundwater that plants and animals use, or it may collect in the rivers, lakes, or oceans. This is called collection. And then the cycle starts all over again.

Now it’s your turn to create a concept map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a concept map or create a concept map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#3

Question
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Question strategy: Ask key questions to understand what you’re reading.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Question strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#4

Summarize
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Summarize strategy: Identify key concepts and tell what's important.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Summarize strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#5

Knowledge
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Knowledge strategy: Use existing knowledge and previous experiences.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Knowledge strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#6

Connect
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Connect strategy: Connect what you know with what you're reading.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Connect strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#7

Visualize
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Visualize strategy: Picture what you're reading.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Visualize strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#8

Evaluate
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Evaluate strategy: Judge what you're reading.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Evaluate strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#9

Infer
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Infer strategy: Figure out meanings that are not obvious.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Infer strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#10

Synthesize
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use the Synthesize strategy: Put it all together to create new insight.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using the Synthesize strategy.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

#11

All Strategies Together
Name:
Great Job!

Date:

GOAL

Use all of the reading comprehension strategies together.

INSTRUCTIONS

After reading The Three Little Pigs story or one of the books listed at the end of this workbook, create a mind map of the book using all of the strategies.

Now it’s your turn to create a mind map. Use the blank space on the next page to draw a mind map or create a mind map electronically with a program of your choice. Happy mapping!

Reading to Understand: Children’s Books to Use with Comprehension Strategies
Compiled by Megan Schliesman Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC) School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison This bibliography was developed for the Wisconsin Educational Communications Board (ECB) for their Into the Book reading comprehension project. It maps selected children’s books to each of the eight comprehension strategies outlined in the project:
• • • • • • • •

Using prior knowledge Making connections Questioning Visualizing Inferring Summarizing Evaluating Synthesizing

A final category, “Using Strategies Together,” suggests longer or more complex texts that demand readers to integrate various comprehension strategies. The goal in creating this bibliography was to identify 12-15 titles for each strategy. But most books here will lend themselves to application across the strategies. The focus in choosing books was to find engaging titles that would meet a range of reading and listening abilities, and that would reflect the diversity of classrooms, communities and the world today. The book selections for every strategy include picture book stories and nonfiction for early elementary-age children. Some strategy sections also include poetry, wordless books, and/or chapter books. For more information about ECB’s Reading Comprehension Project, go to http://ecb.org/reading/

Using Prior Knowledge
Readers use what they already know (or think they know) before, during and after reading to clarify their understanding (or misunderstanding) of the text. Andrews-Goebel, Nancy. The Pot That Juan Built. Illustrated by David Diaz. Lee & Low, 2001. 32 pages Arnosky, Jim. All about Rattlesnakes. Scholastic, 1997. 28 pages Brenner, Barbara. Thinking about Ants. Illustrated by Carol Schwartz. Mondo, 1997. 32 pages Florian, Douglas. Bow Wow Meow Meow: It’s Rhyming Cats and Dogs. Harcourt, 2003. 48 pages Gibbons, Gail. My Soccer Book. HarperCollins, 2001. 32 pages (also available: My Baseball Book, My Basketball Book, My Football Book)

Reading to Understand, page 2 Hartman, Bob. The Wolf Who Cried Boy. Illustrated by Tim Raglin. Putnam, 2002. 32 pages Hausherr, Rosemary. What Instrument Is This? Scholastic, 1992. 38 pages Jenkins, Steve and Robin Page. What Do You Do with a Tail Like This? Houghton Mifflin, 2003. 32 pages Ross, Alice and Kent. The Copper Lady. Illustrated by Leslie Bowman. Carolrhoda, 1997. 56 pages Prelutsky, Jack, compiler. The Beauty of the Beast: Poems from the Animal Kingdom. Illustrated by Meilo So. Random House, 1997. 101 pages Trivizas, Eugene. The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig. Illustrated by Helen Oxenbury. Margaret K. McElderry, 1993. 32 pages Takabayashi, Mari. I Live in Tokyo. Houghton Mifflin, 2001. 32 pages Waldman, Neil. The Snowflake: A Water Cycle Story. Millbrook, 2003. 32 pages

Making Connections
Readers relate the text to personal experiences, to information from other texts, and to information about the world to enhance understanding of self, text and life. (Most of the books below naturally lend themselves to text-to-self connections. The books have been organized to suggest thematic text-to-text connections, although several lend themselves to use in multiple categories.) Theme: Family Ada, Alma Flor. I Love Saturdays y domingos. Illustrated by Elivia Savadier. Atheneum, 2002. 32 pages Hamanaka, Sheila. Grandparents Song. HarperCollins, 2003. 32 pages Jenkins, Emily. Five Creatures. Illustrated by Tomek Bogacki. Scholastic, 2001. 32 pages Kuklin, Susan. Families. Hyperion, 2005. 40 pages Little, Jean. Emma’s Yucky Brother. Illustrated by Jennifer Plecas. (An I Can Read Book ) HarperCollins, 2001. 64 pages Nye, Naomi. Sitti’s Secrets. Illustrated by Nancy Carpenter. Four Winds Press, 1994. 32 pages Theme: School Ajmera, Maya and John D. Ivanko. Back to School. Charlesbridge, 2001. 32 pages Creech, Sharon. A Fine, Fine School. Illustrated by Harry Bliss. HarperCollins, 2001. 32 pages

Reading to Understand, page 3 Choi, Yansook. The Name Jar. Alfred A. Knopf, 2001. 32 pages Edwards, Michelle. Pa Lia’s First Day. (A Jackson Friends Book) Harcourt, 1999. 50 pages Moss, Peggy. Say Something. Illustrated by Lea Lyon. Tilbury House, 2004. 32 pages Paterson, Katherine. Marvin One Too Many. Illustrated by Jane Clark Brown. (An I Can Read Book) HarperCollins, 2001. 48 pages Theme: Friendship Grimes, Nikki. Danitra Brown Leaves Town. Illustrated by Floyd Cooper. HarperCollins, 2002. 32 pages English, Karen. A Hot Day on Abbott Avenue. Illustrated by Javaka Steptoe. Clarion, 2004. 32 pages Kasza, Keiko. The Rat and the Tiger. Putnam, 1993. 32 pages Pinkney, Andrea Davis. Solo Girl. Illustrated by Nneka Bennett. Hyperion, 1997. 51 pages Rogers, Fred. Extraordinary Friends. Photographs by Jim Judkis. Putnam, 1999. 32 pages Zolotow, Charlotte. My Friend John. Illustrated by Amanda Harvey. Random House, 2000. 32 pages

Questioning
Readers ask questions about the text, and about the author and/or illustrator’s intentions, seeking information to clarify and extend their thinking before, during and after reading. Browne, Anthony. Into the Forest. Candlewick Press, 2004. 28 pages Davies, Nicola. Big Blue Whale. Illustrated by Nick Maland. Candlewick, 1997. 27 pages Erdrich, Louise. Grandmother’s Pigeon. Illustrated by Jim LaMarche. Hyperion, 1996. 32 pages Geisert, Arthur. River Town. Houghton Mifflin, 1999. 32 pages Gillette, J. Lynette. Dinosaur Ghosts: The Mystery of Coelophysis. Illustrated by Douglas Henderson. Dial, 1997. 32 pages Griffith, Helen V. Grandaddy and Janetta Together: The Three Stories in One Book. Illustrated by James Stevenson. Greenwillow Books / HarperCollins, 2002. 80 pages Hearne, Betsy. Who’s in the Hall? A Mystery in Four Chapters. Illustrated by Christy Hale. Greenwillow, 2000. 32 pages Lehman, Barbara. The Red Book. Houghton Mifflin, 2004. 32 pages

©2006 Educational Communications Board

http://reading.ecb.org

Reading to Understand, page 4 Macaulay, David. Shortcut. Houghton Mifflin, 1995. 32 pages Myers, Christopher. Wings. Scholastic Press, 2000. 40 pages Wiesner, David. The Three Pigs. Clarion, 2001. 40 pages Woodson, Jacqueline. The Other Side. Illustrated by E.B. Lewis. Putnam, 2001. 32 pages Reiser, Lynn. Two Mice in Three Fables. Greenwillow, 1995. 32 pages

Visualizing
Readers create images in their mind that reflect or represent the ideas in the text to enhance understanding. Alarcón, Franciso X. Iguanas in the Snow and Other Winter Poems / Iguanas en la nieve y otros poemas de invierno. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. Children’s Book Press, 2001. 32 pages Banks, Kate. And If the Moon Could Talk. Illustrated by Georg Hallensleban. Frances Foster Books / Farrar, Straus and Gioux, 1998. 40 pages Davies, Nicola. One Tiny Turtle. Illustrated by Jane Chapman. Candlewick Press, 2002. 32 pages Karas, G. Brian. Atlantic. Putnam, 2002. 32 pages Hopkins, Lee Bennett. Weather: Poems for All Seasons. Illustrated by Melanie Hall. (An I Can Read Book) HarperCollins, 1994. 64 pages Medearis, Angela Shelf. Our People. Illustrated by Michael Bryant. Atheneum, 1994. 32 pages Miller, Sara Swan. Three Stories You Can Read to Your Cat. Illustrated by True Kelley. Houghton Mifflin, 1997. 48 pages Perkins, Lynne Rae. Snow Music. Greenwillow, 2003. 36 pages Schaefer, Lola M. What’s Up? What’s Down? Illustrated by Barbara Bash. Greenwillow Books, 2002. 32 pages Schertle, Alice. Down the Road. Illustrated by E.B. Lewis. Browndeer Press, 1995. 40 pages Stock, Catherine. Gugu’s House. Clarion, 2001. 32 pages Updike, John. A Child’s Calendar. Illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman. Holiday House, 1999. 32 pages Wetterer, Margaret K. and Charles M. The Snow Walker. Illustrated by Mary O’Keefe Young. Carolrhoda, 1996. 56 pages

Reading to Understand, page 5

Inferring
Readers think about and search the text and art, and sometimes use personal knowledge, to construct meaning beyond what is literally stated. Baker, Jeanne. Window. Greenwillow, 1991. 32 pages Banks, Kate. Howie Bowles, Secret Agent. Illustrated by Isaac Millman. Frances Foster Books / Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999. 89 pages Esbensen, Barbara Juster. Swing around the Sun. Illustrated by Cheng-Khee Chee, Janice Lee Porter, Mary GrandPré, and Stephen Gammell. Carolrhoda, 2003. 48 pages Kasza, Keiko. My Lucky Day. Putnam, 2003. 32 pages McKissack, Patricia. Ma Dear’s Aprons. Illustrated by Floyd Cooper. Atheneum, 1997. 32 pages Minshull, Evelyn. Eaglet’s World. Illustrated by Andrea Gabriel. Albert A. Whitman, 2002. 32 pages Morales, Yumi. Just a Minute: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book. Chronicle, 2003, 28 pages Palotta, Jerry. The Skull Alphabet Book. Illustrated by Ralph Masiello. Charlesbridge, 2002. 32 pages Pattison, Darcy. The Journey of Oliver K. Woodman. Illustrated by Joe Cepeda. Harcourt, 2003. 32 pages Prelutsky, Jack. If Not for the Cat. Illustrated by Ted Rand. Greenwillow, 2004. 40 pages Simont, Marc. The Stray Dog. From a true story by Reiko Sassa. HarperCollins, 2001. 32 pages Scamell, Ragnhild. Buster’s Echo. Illustrated by Genevieve Webster. HarperCollins, 1993. 24 pages Young, Ed. Seven Blind Mice. Philomel, 1992. 40 pages Wiesner, David.Tuesday. Clarion, 1991. 32 pages

Summarizing
Readers identify key elements and condense important information into their own words during and after reading to solidify meaning. Bang, Molly. Common Ground: The Water, Earth and Air We Share. Blue Sky Press / Scholastic, 1997. 32 pages Blake, Robert J. Togo. Philomel, 2002. 40 pages Cooper, Elisha. Ice Cream. Greenwillow, 2002, 40 pages
©2006 Educational Communications Board http://reading.ecb.org

Reading to Understand, page 6 Fleming, Candace. Boxes for Katje. Illustrated by Stacey Dressen-McQueen. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2003. 36 pages Fleming, Denise. Buster. Henry Holt, 2003. 32 pages Goldin, Augusta. Ducks Don’t Get Wet. Illustrated by Helen K. Davie. (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science) HarperCollins, 1999. 32 pages Haas, Jessie. Runaway Radish. Illustrated by Margot Apple. Greenwillow, 2001. 56 pages Harjo, Joy. The Good Luck Cat. Harcourt, 2000. 32 pages Markle, Sandra. Creepy, Crawly Baby Bugs. Walker, 1996. 32 pages Muth, Jon J. The Three Questions. Scholastic Press, 2002. 32 pages Rylant, Cynthia. Mr. Putter and Tabby Stir the Soup. Illustrated by Arthur Howard. Harcourt, 2003. 48 pages Willey, Margaret. Clever Beatrice: An Upper Penninsula Conte. Illustrated by Heather Solomon. Atheneum, 2001. 32 pages Winter, Jeanette. My Name Is Georgia: A Portrait. Harcourt / Silver Whistle, 1998. 48 pages

Evaluating
Readers explain their responses to or understandings of a text based on stated criteria (e.g., Would you want a friend to read this? Why or why not?) Aliki. Ah, Music! HarperCollins, 2003. 32 pages Creech, Sharon. Love That Dog. HarperCollins, 2001. 84 pages DePaola, Tomie. 26 Fairmont Avenue. Putnam, 1999. 56 pages Foreman, Michael. Wonder Goal. Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2003. 32 pages Frame, Jeron Ashford. Yesterday I Had the Blues. Illustrated by R. Gregory Christie. Tricycle Press, 2003. 32 pages Herrera, Juan Felipe. Grandma and Me at the Flea / Los meros meros remateros. Children’s Book Press, 2002. 32 pages Hopkinson, Deborah. Fannie in the Kitchen. Illustrated by Nancy Carpenter. Athenuem, 2001. 32 pages Jones, Bill T. Dance. Photographs by Susan Kuklin. Hyperion, 1998. 32 pages Livingstone, Star. Harley. Illustrated by Molly Bang. SeaStar, 2001. 64 pages

Reading to Understand, page 7 Pringle, Laurence. Sharks: Strange and Wonderful. Illustrated by Meryl Henderson. Boyds Mills Press, 2001. 32 pages Sayre, April Pulley. Dig, Wait, Listen: A Desert Toad’s Tale. Illustrated by Barbara Bash. Greenwillow, 2001. 32 pages Stevenson, James. The Castaway. Greenwillow, 2002. 32 pages U’Ren, Andrea. Mary Smith. Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2003. 32 pages Weitzman, Jacqueline. You Can’t Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Musuem. Illustrated by Robin Glasser. Dial, 1998. 36 pages

Synthesizing
Readers create original insights, perspectives and understandings by reflecting on the text, and by merging elements from the text with their own way of understanding information and the world around them. Casanova, Mary. The Hunter: A Chinese Folktale. Illustrated by Ed Young. Atheneum, 2000. 32 pages Diakité Baba Wagué. The Magic Gourd. Scholastic Press, 2003. 32 pages Falwell, Cathryn. David’s Drawing. Lee & Low, 2001. 32 pages hooks, bell. skin again. Illustrated by Chris Raschka. Hyperion, 2004. 32 pages Jiménez, Francisco. La Mariposa. Illustrtated by Simón Silva. Houghton Mifflin, 1998. 40 pages McDonald, Megan. Judy Moody Saves the World. Illustrated by Peter Reynolds. Candlewick Press, 2002. 144 pages Martin, Jacqueline Briggs. The Water Gift and the Pig of the Pig. Illustrated by Linda Wingerter. Houghton Mifflin, 2003. 32 pages Muth, Jon J. Stone Soup. Scholastic Press, 2003. 32 pages Rumford, James. Calabash Cat and His Amazing Journey. Houghton Mifflin, 2003. 32 pages Ormerod, Jan. Who’s Whose? Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1998. 32 pages Paterson, Katherine. The Smallest Cow in the World. Illustrated by Jane Clark Brown. HarperCollins, 1991. 64 pages Raschka, Chris. John Coltrane’s Giant Steps. Atheneum, 2002. 32 pages Reiser, Lynn. The Surprise Family. Greenwillow, 1994. 32 pages
©2006 Educational Communications Board http://reading.ecb.org

Reading to Understand, page 8 Wong, Janet S. Apple Pie 4th of July. Illustrated by Margaret Chodos-Irvine. Harcourt, 2002. 32 pages

Using the Strategies Together
Readers combine the eight strategies as needed to come to a fuller understanding of the text. Ada, Alma Flor. My Name Is María Isabel. Illustrated by K. Dyble Thompson. Atheneum, 1998.

56 pages
Arnold, Caroline. Birds: Nature’s Magnificent Flying Machines. Illustrated by Patricia J. Wynne. Charlesbridge, 2003. 32 pages Ahlberg, Alan. The Cat Who Got Carried Away. Illustrated by Catherine McEwan. Candlewick, 2003. 79 pages Bechtold, Lisze. Buster, The Very Shy Dog. Houghton Mifflin, 1999. 48 pages Browne, Anthony. Voices in the Park. DK, 1998. 32 pages Cole, Joanna. The Magic School Bus Explores the Senses. Illustrated by Bruce Degen. Scholastic Press, 1999. 48 pages French, Vivian. T. Rex. Illustrated by Allison Bartlett. Candlewick, 2004. 32 pages Gerstein, Mordicai. What Charlie Heard. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2002, 32 pages Lester, Julius. John Henry. Illustrated by Jerry Pinkney. Dial, 1994. 40 pages Look, Lenore. Ruby Lu, Brave and True. Illustrated by Anne Wilsdorf. Atheneum, 2004. 105 pages Macaulay, David. Black and White. Houghton Mifflin, 1990. 32 pages Sís, Peter. The Three Golden Keys. Doubleday, 1994. 56 pages Sobol, Richard. Adelina’s Whales. Dutton, 2003. 32 pages Smith, Cynthia Leitich. Indian Shoes. Illustrated by Jim Madsen. HarperCollins, 2002. 66 pages Williams, Vera B. Scooter. Greenwillow, 1993. 147 pages

Reading to Understand, page 9 Megan Schliesman is a librarian at the Cooperative Children’s Book Center of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The CCBC is a noncirculating collection of children’s and young adult literature for adults. The library serves the UW-Madison campus, and librarians and teachers across Wisconsin. This bibliography was created in consultation with Marta Bechtol and Peggy Garties of the Wisconsin Educational Communications Board. Cooperative Children’s Book Center 600 N. Park Street, Room 4290 Madison, WI 53706 608-263-3720/608-262-4933 (fax) ccbcinfo@education.wisc.edu www.education.wisc.edu/ccbc/

©2006 Educational Communications Board

http://reading.ecb.org

THANK YOU!
Thank you for downloading and reading the Map It! Workbook. I hope you find it a helpful companion to the Mind Mapping for Kids book. If you have any comments or questions, you can reach me by e-mail, on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+, or via other social media channels listed at www.mindmapsforkids.com. If you haven’t yet, you can sign up for my insider’s list (http://eepurl.com/fpxrc) to get instant access to all of the mind maps in MMFK book and to keep up to date on what’s new in the mind mapping community. Also, if you'd like to learn more about using mind maps in high school and college, check out my other book, How to Study with Mind Maps. I hope you give mind mapping a try and personally discover why I’m so passionate about using mind maps for education. Thanks again for trusting me to help you with mind mapping.

All the best,

Toni www.mindmapsforkids.com www.conciselearning.com

To download another copy of the Map It! Workbook, go to http://www.mindmapsforkids.com/mindmappingforkidsbook.html.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful