Your Quick & Dirty Guide to  Understanding and Deploying OSSIM 

By Houcem Hachicha

Hands­On OSSIM 2.3

Disclaimer
All the information in this report is not necessarily correct.

License
Not for commercial use.

Abstract
This work deals with OSSIM Security Information Management system (version 2.3 as of this writing). The report gives a detailed description of OSSIM's core components: sensor, server, database and framework. Installation process, advanced configuration, and server administration, are all covered. Details about integration of third party devices, including development of custom plugins for unsupported ones, are explained in this writing. Correlation techniques and CALM Risk assessment algorithm are described. OSSEC, OCS Inventory, Nagios, and other open source software are dealt with in their integration within OSSIM. Keywords: SIM, OSSIM, risk, correlation, sensor, server, CALM, OSSEC, open source.

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Outline
1. Security Information Management systems.....................................................................................3 2. OSSIM: the Open Source SIM.........................................................................................................4 2.1. General description...................................................................................................................4 2.2. OSSIM's architecture................................................................................................................4 2.2.1. OSSIM sensor...................................................................................................................5 2.2.2. OSSIM server....................................................................................................................6 2.2.3. OSSIM database................................................................................................................7 2.2.4. OSSIM framework............................................................................................................7 3. Installing OSSIM..............................................................................................................................8 3.1. Downloading the .iso image.....................................................................................................8 3.2. Selecting the profile..................................................................................................................9 3.3. Configuring the network.........................................................................................................10 3.4. Setting up the partition table...................................................................................................10 3.5. Installing the base system.......................................................................................................10 3.6. Activating plugins...................................................................................................................11 3.7. Installation settings modification ...........................................................................................12 3.8. Updating the system ...............................................................................................................13 3.9. Accessing the web UI.............................................................................................................13 4. Assets and network discovery........................................................................................................15 5. Data collection ...............................................................................................................................17 5.1. Cisco PIX and Cisco FWSM..................................................................................................17 5.2. Linux server and Apache .......................................................................................................17 5.3. Windows host .........................................................................................................................18 5.4. OCS inventory........................................................................................................................18 6. Risk and correlation setup..............................................................................................................21 6.1. Risk configuration ..................................................................................................................21 6.2. Aggregated Risk and CALM algorithm..................................................................................21 6.3. Correlation directives..............................................................................................................23 7. OSSIM tuning ................................................................................................................................26 7.1. Least privilege account creation ............................................................................................26 7.2. Extending partitions................................................................................................................26 7.3. Filtering noise.........................................................................................................................27 7.4. Tuning panels .........................................................................................................................29 8. Conclusion......................................................................................................................................30

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1. Security Information Management systems
Infrastructure of information technology companies is getting more and more complicated. Security devices are heterogeneous, ranging from firewalls and IDSs, to AntiViruses and Spam filters. Yet, they all have something in common: they store data on the so called “logs”. A log is a record of events that happens to a particular software. Thus, logs contain all the data a security manager needs. However, logs are too long to be analyzed. Indeed, a study conducted by Gartner, the IT research and advisory firm headquartered in Stamford USA, showed that out of 700 European IT managers questioned, 45% receive over 4,000 security log line every second from their IT systems. Furthermore, according to the same source, one in ten IT departments spends more than three days a week analyzing security log data. A Security Information Management system (SIM), is a tool that fills in that gap by collecting eventlogs into a central repository for trend analysis. Indeed, it: • • • • • • centralizes log information; correlates logs to establish cause-effect relationship between events; aggregates security events to a manageable list; prevents possible damage/flaws on the company’s resources; generates a security dashboard for management, assuring compliance with security policies (internal or external); etc.

Hence, deploying a SIM in a company's infrastructure is extremely beneficial.

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2. OSSIM: the Open Source SIM
Various SIM products exist on the market. Perhaps the most famous closed-source SIM is ArcSight, as it is said to be the leader of the market. An open source popular solution exists: OSSIM.

2.1. General description
OSSIM is a fully featured SIM solution that offers all the necessary functionality, ranging from the detection at low-level to high-level reporting. Founded in 2003 by AlienVault, OSSIM is at the time of this writing the de-facto standard in Open Source Security Information Management. Indeed, AlienVault claims to have an installed user base exceeding 10,000 units, which accounts for half of the installed SIM market. Based on GNU/Linux Debian, kernel 2.6, OSSIM takes advantage of the wealth of free software “gems”, by integrating a handy suite of security open source tools, among which: • • • • • • OSSEC Host Intrusion Detection System; OpenVAS Vulnerability Assessment Scanner; OCS Inventory; Nagios Availability Monitor; Nmap Port Scanner; etc.

Note that OSSIM and all of these tools are licensed under the strict GPL license. As a vulnerability scanner, earlier versions of OSSIM included Nessus. However, when Tenable company brought Nessus and changed its license to a proprietary one, OSSIM developers integrated OpenVAS, which is a GPL-licensed fork of Nessus. Apart from the advantages of a SIM systems in general, OSSIM has several benefits over proprietary products: • • • • • free: no license fees to afford, just implementation costs; has a strong community support, professional support can be brought later on; runs perfectly on common hardware, no fancy servers needed; has an open architecture; integrates powerful open source software.

2.2. OSSIM's architecture
The first thing one must do in order to deploy OSSIM (or any SIM) in its infrastructure, is to decide which architecture to opt for. OSSIM's architecture is based on four main components: • • OSSIM sensor: it collects and normalizes the events generated by the different security equipment. One can deploy as many sensors as needed; OSSIM server: it receives events from sensors, and does Risk Assessment and Correlation tasks; 4 / 30

• •

OSSIM database: it is a MySQL database that stores events, configurations, and useful information. OSSIM framework: it is the PHP/Python code that “serves” the information to the web front-end.

The choice of a convenient architecture depends mainly on the number of machines one will allocate to OSSIM. For instance, the recommended architecture using a three machines is the following:

OSSIM simple architecture using three machines
In this particular architecture, the management server will play the role of OSSIM framework and OSSIM server. OSSIM server and OSSIM database are deployed on separate machines. This is the recommended architecture because usually OSSIM sensor and database require more hardware resources than other OSSIM components. Let us discover more details about OSSIM by following an example of an event generated by a security equipment that goes through the sensor, server, database, framework, to end in the web front-end.

2.2.1. OSSIM sensor
If we suppose that we have a Stonegate Firewall we want to monitor using OSSIM, in this case, we have to set up that Firewall to send its logs to OSSIM sensor. A relevant method to do so is using syslog,   which  is  the  standard  protocol  for   forwarding   log   messages.   Hence, we have Stonegate firewall sending its logs to the sensor via syslog. OSSIM sensor is configured (by default) to receive logs from external devices. Indeed, it has rsyslogd service enabled out of the box. Typically, the received logs will get stored in the /var/log/syslog file. A sample Stonegate log line from that file would be:

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Jul 14 16:25:43 "2010-07-14 16:25:41","5928048","x.x.27.253", "Protocol Agent","Notification",,,"x.x.27.3","x.x.186.59","HTTP","TCP","1326","80",,,,,,"407109632",,"HT TP",,,,,,,,,,,,,"FR_Hammemlif node 1", ,,,"2010-07-14 16:25:42" ,"Firewall","HTTP_URLLogged",,,"5365022921374463088",,,,

OSSIM sensor parses incoming events using different plugins. One can choose which plugins to activate in the installation process. Activating Stonegate Firewall plugin will result in OSSIM sensor looking for Stonegate related events in /var/log/syslog. Each plugin has a set of python regular expressions (regexes) that will be matched against log lines in /var/log/syslog. Once the regex matches the log line, useful data will be extracted, like source IP address, destination IP address, source port, destination port, event signature, etc. Out of the previous log line, Stonegate plugin will extract the following information: • • • • • • • • date: Jul 14 16:25:41; source IP address: x.x.27.3; destination IP address: x.x.186.59; source Port: 1326; destination Port: 80; protocol: TCP; event signature: Protocol Agent; etc.

This process is called “normalization”. Normalized data, along with the brute log line are then sent to OSSIM server.

2.2.2. OSSIM server
Based on the normalized event, the server will perform risk assessment and correlation tasks. Risk assessment depends on three variables: • • • asset value; event's Priority; event's Reliability.

Assets are key for SIM systems. An asset is an equipment that one wants to secure. Hosts, firewalls, IDSs, servers, etc, are all assets. For each asset one defines in OSSIM, an asset-value between 0 and 5 that has to be specified. This value measures the asset's importance. Priority and reliability are both values relative to each event, they range from 0 to 10. Priority measures the relative importance of the event as an attack, while reliability measures the probability of the event itself being real. For instance, IDSs are known for generating many false positives. 6 / 30

Those need to have a weak reliability value. Each of those three variables will be combined in one called Risk. Risk = (Asset * Priority * Reliability) / 25 Therefore, OSSIM server will calculate the risk value for each event. Once that value bypasses 1, the server will generate an alarm to notify the security manager. To illustrate, let us suppose that x.x.27.3 is an asset of ours with a value of 5. Knowing that “Protocol Agent” event has a reliability of 2, and a priority of 5, the risk calculated for source IP is: Risk=(5*5*2)/25=2. An alarm will automatically be generated. However, x.x.186.59 is not one of our assets. It gets the default asset value, which is 2. The risk for destination IP will be: Risk=(2*5*2)/25<1. Beside risk assessment, the server handles event correlation tasks. Correlation is perhaps the most interesting feature in SIM systems. As I mentioned earlier, an IDS can be really noisy, generating lots of false positives. However, if one combines its IDS output with its Firewall logs, relevant results are generated, and this is what correlation is all about: combining outputs of different equipment. OSSIM server performs three different correlation types: logical correlation, cross-correlation and inventory correlation. In a nutshell, logical correlation is when the server looks for a predefined sequence of events (called correlation directive) that generically describes an attack scenario. Cross correlation is comparing the attack signatures with the actual vulnerabilities of the assets (detected previously by the vulnerability assessment scanner). OSSIM in its current version (2.3) cross correlates Snort IDS with OpenVAS vulnerability scanner. Finally, inventory correlation is when the server checks whether the attack signature targets the version and type of system one has or not. For instance, an IDS will produce the same alarm for a malicious packet targeted for a Windows host as a Unix host, even though the Unix host may not be vulnerable. Inventory correlation allows to evade such false positives. Again, in OSSIM, this type of correlation is between Snort events and OCS inventoried assets. Correlation results in new events that OSSIM sensor will calculate their risk and, again, if their risk value bypasses 1, an alarm is generated.

2.2.3. OSSIM database
Once the risk is calculated and the event is correlated, OSSIM server will finally write all of the events and useful data to the MySQL database.

2.2.4. OSSIM framework
The security manager can monitor OSSIM from a nice polished web interface. Using his favorite web browser, a http://OSSIM_Framework_IP/ossim in the URL should point him to the administration panel, where he can find the dashboards, all the details about the different events, configuration options, etc... The framework contains all the PHP/Python code that will serve the web browser with information. 7 / 30

3. Installing OSSIM
As explained previously, SIM systems are supposed to harvest and process data from various security equipment in real time, that is why they usually require powerful servers to run on. The central processing unit I installed OSSIM on was pretty common hardware, with a 3Ghz Intel microprocessor, 1Gb of RAM, which I extended to 4Gb later on, and a common Ethernet card. Yet, I practically did not encounter any performance-related issues with OSSIM. In fact, running #tload and #free commands on the machine showed reasonable stats about memory and processor consumption. This can by explained by two reasons: • Event filtering I did not forward all of the logs. In fact I tuned syslog options of the different equipment to monitor so that only relevant log data would be forwarded. • Linux architecture SIM systems are usually proprietary software, and as such, they are built on top of proprietary Operating Systems. However, OSSIM is an open source software, thus, it can be based on Linux, which is the case. Linux is well known for its high performance and processing capabilities. In fact, unlike some other UNIX and Windows Operating Systems, Linux runs perfectly on very old hardware, and can handle process-consuming jobs with limited resources.

3.1. Downloading the .iso image
Firstly, I downloaded the latest OSSIM release available from AlienVault's official website. After verifying the integrity of the image using md5 algorithm, I burned the image into a DVD. Meanwhile, I modified the BIOS configuration of the future OSSIM box so that it can boot from a DVD. Now that everything is set to begin the installation process, I inserted the DVD and started the machine. OSSIM had a fully featured graphical installer.

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OSSIM graphical installer
I had to choose between a standard installation, and a custom one. Of course, I opted for a customized installation.

3.2. Selecting the profile
After setting the language, country, and keyboard layout, OSSIM installer prompted me with the following profile choice screen:

Profile selection
I had to choose which profile to install. With only one machine, I had no choice but an all-in-one installation.

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3.3. Configuring the network
Time to configure the network details. To do so, I had to provide an IP address for OSSIM, the netmask, domain name, name servers, and finally a hostname for OSSIM, which I set to OSSIM.

Network configuration
From now on I will be referring to “OSSIM all-in-one server” by OSSIM.

3.4. Setting up the partition table
Once the network is configured, I needed to set up the partition table. I opted for an LVM customized partition table. A standard partition table would have installed all the system in ext3 file-system under “/” partition. But I wanted flexible control of the different repertories' sizes, namely /var, /tmp, /usr, and /home; and that is why I opted for LVM. So, here is a screen-shot of the final partition table I created:

Partition table final setup

3.5. Installing the base system
Next, I specified the network interfaces to monitor, as well as their IP addresses with CDR format. This is useful for those who want to analyze a redirected network traffic using Snort, Arpwatch, PADs, and a handset of various open source security tools incorporated within OSSIM. I finally specified the root password of OSSIM. And the installation took place.

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Base system installation

3.6. Activating plugins
Once the base system is installed, I had to choose the detectors plugins I wanted to activate. Those are the plugins that OSSIM will use to parse the logs it receives. So, I activated the plugins related to equipment that were supported out of the box by OSSIM. Other equipment can be integrated later on by developping custom plugins (not that hard).

Plugin selection
Finally, the server was running, and I had a fully functional shell to play with.

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OSSIM's command line shell

3.7. Installation settings modification 
All the previous configuration can be easily edited using the #ossim-setup and #ossim-reconfig commands.

#ossim­setup command output
#ossim-reconfig command will write changes on some OSSIM key configuration files, like /etc/ossim/ossim.conf. However, once someone does custom modifications on configuration files, for example to integrate unsupported equipment, he should never use #ossim-reconfig, because this particular command will write back the configuration files, erasing customized data. Alternatively, one should restart adequate services manually. 12 / 30

3.8. Updating the system 
The first thing I wanted to do on OSSIM is to update it with new packages and releases. OSSIM is based on Debian, so I had to run #apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade && apt-get upgrade.

3.9. Accessing the web UI
From now on, I needed no more direct access to the central unit. I used SSH to access OSSIM remotely from my desktop machine, and a web browser to browse the web User Interface. In fact, a http://IP_adress_of_OSSIM/ossim URL would prompt the following authentication screen:

Web UI login page
admin/admin user-password pair grants authentication to the web administration front-end. The administrator's password can of course be edited lately from the web interface.

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Main Dashboards

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4. Assets and network discovery
In a typical SIM system implementation, the first thing to do is to define assets. In OSSIM, when defining assets, one have to specify the asset-value variable. Asset-value is an integer between 0 and 5, which measures the importance of the asset itself. The most critical asset gets a value of 5.

Network assets list
After defining the different networks, as assets, along with their values, it was time to scan them for alive hosts. OSSIM had the top port scanner incorporated in it: Nmap. So, I launched ping scans against networks from the web frontend.

Host asset discovery through Nmap
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Once a scan finishes, it saves a list of discovered hosts, along with useful information, like  host­names, open ports, etc. This information will be helpful later on for asset reports.

Host assets snapshot

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5. Data collection 
5.1. Cisco PIX and Cisco FWSM
The first equipment I integrated in OSSIM where two Cisco firewalls, namely, Cisco-PIX and Cisco-FWSM. Both of them had the same logging format, and therefore their logs can be processed using the same OSSIM plugin. I activated cisco-pix detector plugin during the installation. So all we had to do is to get the firewalls to send their logs to OSSIM via syslog. OSSIM runned on top of a 2.6 Linux kernel. As such, it is supposed to save syslog received data to /var/log/syslog. Indeed, running #tail -f /var/log/syslog against OSSIM showed that it is receiving logs from both firewalls. In the web UI, under (Analysis > SIEM), Cisco related events started to pour in. OSSIM was processing the logs, identifying events, and normalizing them as can be seen in the screen-shot below.

5.2. Linux server and Apache 
To monitor the RedHat box using OSSEC, I had two choices: • • forward the logs via syslog to OSSIM; OSSIM can handle those directly using Apache and Linux plugins; install an OSSEC agent on the RedHat box, that will parse the relevant data and communicate it to OSSIM.

OSSIM relies on OSSEC for remote data collection. OSSEC is an independent open source project. It is a Host Intrusion Detection System that is capable of collecting and processing logs from various equipment, including Linux, Windows, HP-UX and IBM AIX systems, Cisco firewalls, Apache etc. OSSEC has a server client architecture and is perfectly integrated in OSSIM. I decided to opt for the second option. I preferred adding another service (ossec-agent service) on the RedHat server, rather than modifying configuration files to forward logs via syslog. And OSSIM already had plenty of syslog data forwarded to OSSIM. OSSEC has an agent server classic architecture. The server is already configured on OSSIM, so we only needed to install the agent on the Linux Box. Behind the scenes, that agent will send data to OSSEC server through UDP 1514. Consequently, OSSEC server will generate logs that OSSEC plugin will parse. Note that OSSEC's agent communicates with its server using a symmetric encryption key (Blowfish algorithm). The agent can be downloaded from the web UI (Tools > Downloads).

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OSSIM's available downloads
Beside importing the communication key from OSSEC server to the agent, installation is straightforward. I checked in the SIEM section of the web UI that OSSIM was collecting events from the Linux server along with Apache.

5.3. Windows host 
OSSIM can harvest data from Windows hosts (and servers) through several different agents, namely: Snare, Osiris, and OSSEC. I tested all the three, and decided to deploy OSSEC. Snare and Osiris are great software, but all they do is log collection. However, OSSEC is more than just a log collection tool. It includes log analysis, file integrity checking, policy monitoring, rootkit detection, real-time alerting, and active response. Installation of OSSEC on a Windows host is straight forward: as usual, I downloaded the agent from the link provided by OSSIM, installed it on the Windows host, imported the symmetric communication key from OSSEC server and finally started the agent.

5.4. OCS inventory
OCS inventory is an open source software that allows a network administrator to build an inventory containing details about every machine on the network, like type of the OS, installed software, hardware resources, etc... This tool is perfectly integrated in OSSIM. Like OSSEC, OCS inventory has an agent-server architecture. The server is already installed in OSSIM, while agents can be downloaded from the web UI. 18 / 30

Inventory overview

After deploying a couple of OCS agents on a Linux server and a Windows host, I saw the pie-charts appear under (Dashboards > Inventory) in the web UI. Clicking on the Windows host's name showed a variety of useful information, as the screen-shot below demonstrates.

Inventory details

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5.4. Nagios 
Nagios is an availability monitor. Like OCS and OSSEC, deploying a Nagios agent on a Linux server allowed me to monitor the availability of its different services.

Nagios availability monitor in OSSIM
Once a service is down, Nagios generates events to alert the network administrator.

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6. Risk and correlation setup
6.1. Risk configuration 
As explained previousely; risk formula in OSSIM is: Risk = (Asset * Priority * Reliability) / 25 It is important to configure each of these three variables. Combined, they will determine the risk of any particular event. Indeed, I already defined the value of my Assets (section 2.2.). Now time to fix the Priority and reliability of plugin-events. Hopefully, those values can be easily modified using the web administration UI.

Availability and Reliability setup

6.2. Aggregated Risk and CALM algorithm
CALM (Compromise and Attack Level Monitor) is an assessment algorithm used by OSSIM to aggregate risk. Its input is a high volume of events, and its output is a single indicator of the general state of security of each asset.

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Top 10 nets risk
As shown in the previous figure, CALM algorithm displays in real time the compromise and attack level of networks. • • Compromise (C), measures the probability that an asset is compromised; Attack (A), measures how frequently an asset is being attacked.

Each asset has its A and C variables. Those are incremented according to three rules: 1. Any possible attack launched from machine 1 on machine 2 will increase the A of machine 2 and the C of machine 1. 2. When there is an attack response (an event that indicates the attack’s success), the value of C will increase for both machines 1 and 2. 3. If the events are internal, the C value will go up only for the originating machine. CALM is intended for real-time monitoring, hence, the algorithm should have a short-term memory that places importance on the most recent events and discards the oldest ones. Indeed, “Threshold” and “Recovery ratio” are two variables intended to periodically lower the C and A levels for each machine by a constant value. Those variables can be set in (Configuration > Main).

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Recovery ratio and Threshold setup

6.3. Correlation directives
Correlation is perhaps the most interesting feature in a SIM system. Correlation allows the security manager to both detect complex attacks, and avoid false positives. OSSIM has three types of correlation: cross correlation, inventory correlation, and logical correlation. Only logical correlation is part of my project's scope. OSSIM has a set of written logical correlation directives. A correlation directive is a sequence of rules for OSSIM server to follow in order to correlate events. In each rule, one can specify: • • • • • event's signature to detect; reliability of the rule; occurrence of that event along with timeout; source and destination ports/IP addresses; etc.

Note that risk is calculated for each rule using the classic formula. Just like normal events, rules (and directives) can generate alarms.

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Correlation directives in OSSIM
Creating correlation directives between events related to various devices requires a deep understanding of one's network architecture, security devices, and, most of all, attack scenarios and their impact on each device. Since I don't have that kind of knowledge, I tested the correlation feature in OSSIM by creating simple directives. Once a new directive is created, one should restart OSSIM server in order for that directive to be effective. #/etc/init.d/ossim-server restart Restarting the ossim-server service should prompt error messages if any problem is detected in the structure of the directive.

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Correlation directive creation

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7. OSSIM tuning 
7.1. Least privilege account creation 
In Configuration > users, selecting “create a new user” prompts the following:

Web UI Account creation
I chose which network related events the new user will be able to see. I also selected which sections of the web UI I wanted the new user to have access to.

7.2. Extending partitions
During OSSIM installation, I used LVM to set the disk size of each key repertory. For instance, I assigned 6.5GB to /home Logical Volume. I tried to follow the disc usage in each LV through the days, using #df -h command.

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#df ­h Filesystem Size /dev/mapper/OSSIM­root 322M /dev/mapper/OSSIM­home 6.0G /dev/mapper/OSSIM­tmp  368M /dev/mapper/OSSIM­usr 4.6G /dev/mapper/OSSIM­var 2.8G

Used 161M 173M   11M   1.2G   388M

Avail 145M 5.5G   339M  3.3G   2.3G

Use%  53%   3% 3% 27% 15%

 Mounted on  / /home /tmp /usr /var

The MySQL database stored events under /var. Indeed, I noticed that /dev/mapper/OSSIM-var use percentage grew rapidly through time. Hence I needed to allocate more space to OSSIM-var Logical Volume. #lvextend -L+200G /dev/mapper/OSSIM-var lvextend will allocate more space to the logical volume. But I needed a second command to write changes to the disk effectively. /var is a key partition that cannot be unmounted from the system. Hence, I needed to write changes to OSSIM-var “online”, using resize2fs. #resize2fs /dev/mapper/OSSIM-var Note that in other Unix systems, namely HP-UX and IBM-AIX, LVM tools like resize2fs are not free software.

7.3. Filtering noise
Redundant events are likely to trigger false positives. So I needed to filter those. For instance, I had OSSEC plugin running to monitor Apache events, and cisco-pix plugin for the firewall-related events. But OSSEC understands Cisco logs. So, basically, I had two plugins parsing the same log file and generating the same events out of it. Hence, I needed to filter some OSSEC events to solve the issue. To do so, I firstly created a “Plugin Group” named Ossec pix. I inserted in this group all the event signatures I wanted to get rid of.

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Ossec­pix plugin group
Second, from (Intelligence > Policies), I selected “create a new policy”. I wanted this policy to drop all the events in “Ossec pix” plugin group, so I selected “ANY” as Source, Destination, Time range, and Ossec pix as a plugin group.

Policy creation
As a “Policy Consequence”, I opted for “Drop events”. Finally, I got the following policy that filters all OSSEC events related to the Cisco PIX firewall.

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Ossec­pix Policy up and running
As it can be noticed, creating policies in OSSIM is an easy task, yet, it is very efficient in case one needs to filter some events out, which was the case for me.

7.4. Tuning panels 
When browsing the different links of the web UI, I noticed that several tabs where showing unneeded information. Like “Backbone traffic” or “Global throughput” tabs. Those are network traffic related tabs, and I had no network traffic to monitor, so basically, they are useless. Hence, I looked for their PHP code on OSSIM server, and omitted it.

Cisco PIX and Cisco FWSM events

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8. Conclusion
This document was a brief “hands-on” for OSSIM. Feel free to contact me if you need more details or encounter problems with OSSIM. Reach me at http://about.me/houcem.

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