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Buettner brothers take ‘Honor Flight’
By STEPHANIE GROVES sgroves@delphosherald.com DELPHOS – On Sept. 8, Pfc. Thomas L. Buettner and Petty Officer 2nd Class Ellis “Gene” Buettner were honored with a trip to Washington, D. C., to visit and reflect at their memorials. Both Gene and Thomas feel as if the experience brought them the recognition they did not receive when they returned home from war — there were no parades, no hero’s welcome and very few thank-you’s. “We felt humbled and appreciated,” Gene explained with emotion. “It gave me goose bumps.” Thomas’ son Michael and grandson Travis traveled alongside both as guardians throughout the trip. Their “Honor Flight,” which was a day trip, began with a flight from Port Columbus International Airport to Baltimore Washington International Airport. After landing, they were honored with a water canon salute sprayed onto the plane by a fire truck. The brothers then boarded a tour bus and were transported to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., where the tour took them to the National World War II Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. A short bus ride later, Gene and Thomas arrived at Arlington National Cemetery, where they experienced the reverence of the The Tomb of the Unknowns, which has been perpetually guarded since July 2, 1937, by the U.S. Army, and the Iwo Jima Memorial/U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial. The day of sightseeing wrapped up with a flight back to Columbus, where they were surprised with quite a homecoming celebration. Family members, service members, Boy Scouts and OSU band members welcomed them back.

Saturday, November 10, 2012

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

HERALD
Delphos, Ohio

Rain delay gives Jays wings to 54-21 win over Fremont St. Joe, p6

‘Supper’s On Us’ cook passes

Wilcox

Jim Wilcox, 66, of Delphos, and owner of the former Knotty Pine in Fort Jennings, died Thursday at Zusman Community Hospice in Columbus. Wilcox also worked for Clark Equipment for 18 years. He was the kitchen manager at the Delphos Eagles Lodge for 12 years and was currently enjoying his retirement by volunteering his cooking skills to whoever needed them, especially with Community Unity’s “Supper’s On Us” program every Thursday evening. His true passion was cooking for others. He served in the Navy Reserves in Lima then went into active duty on the U.S.S. Wasp during the Vietnam War. He was also a member of the St. John’s Band Boosters and Athletic Boosters and a devoted St. John’s supporter. See the full obit on page 2.

Looking through scrapbook photos of their “Honor Flight”, brothers Thomas, left, and Gene Buettner reminisce about their trip to D.C. ahead, I ran ahead and was the first soldier back to the barracks.” In 1945, Thomas began his tour of duty in France after the Battle of the Bulge, where his company, the 42nd Rainbow [Infantry] Division, replaced the soldiers of the 242nd Regiment wiped out by the Germans in Hattan, France. He trained for combat as an assistant BAR gunner and was required to carry extra ammunition and clips of solid tracers used to destroy sniper-ridden houses and train stations. In case of capture, he could disassemble a BAR in

Stephanie Groves photo

Today’s Regional Semifinal Pairings (7 p.m.) Division I: Region 1: 1 Lakewood St. Edward (11-0) vs. 4 Mentor (10-1) at Parma Byers Field; 2 Cle. St. Ignatius (10-1) vs. 6 North Royalton (10-1) at Lakewood Stadium - Region 2: 1 Massillon Washington (10-1) vs. 5 Canton McKinley (8-2) at Kent State Univ. Dix Stadium; 2 Toledo Whitmer (11-0) vs. 6 Hudson (9-2) at Sandusky Strobel Field at Cedar Point Stadium - Region 3: 1 Hilliard Darby (11-0) vs. 4 Pickerington North (10-1) at Gahanna Lincoln Stadium; 7 Hilliard Davidson (9-2) vs. 3 Lewis Center Olentangy (10-1) at Upper Arlington Marv Moorehead Memorial Stadium Region 4: 1 Cin. Colerain (11-0) vs. 4 Cin. Elder (8-3) at Univ. of Cincinnati Nippert Stadium, 6 p.m.; 7 Liberty Township Lakota East (8-3) vs. 3 Cin. Archbishop Moeller (8-3) at Univ. of Cincinnati Nippert Stadium, 2 p.m. Division III: Region 9: 1 Chagrin Falls (10-1) vs. 5 Ravenna (7-4) at Solon Stewart Field; 7 Hubbard (8-3) vs. 6 Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary (9-2) at Austintown-Fitch Falcon Stadium Region 10: 1 Napoleon (10-0-1) vs. 4 Bryan (11-0) at Toledo Central Catholic Gallagher Athletic Complex; 2 Bellevue (10-1) vs. 6 Sandusky Perkins (10-1) at Clyde Robert Bishop Jr. Stadium Region 11: 8 Poland Seminary (8-3) vs. 4 Dover (9-2) at Green Infocision Field; 2 Millersburg West Holmes (10-1) vs. 3 Steubenville (9-2) at New Philadelphia Woody Hayes Quaker Stadium - Region 12: 1 Dayton Thurgood Marshall (10-1) vs. 4 Gallipolis Gallia Academy (9-2) at Western Brown HS Kibler Stadium at Larosa’s Field; 7 Springfield Shawnee (8-3) vs. 3 The Plains Athens (10-1) at Hamilton Twp. Alumni Field Division V: Region 17: 1 Kirtland (11-0) vs. 4 Columbiana Crestview (110) at Warren G. Harding Mollenkopf Stadium; 7 Youngstown Ursuline (7-4) vs. 3 Cuyahoga Heights (10-1) at Infocision Field at Copley Stadium - Region 18: 1 LCC (11-0) vs. 4 Liberty-Benton (10-1) at Wapak Harmon Field; 7 Patrick Henry (9-2) vs. 3 Columbia Station Columbia (10-1) at Fremont Ross Harmon Field at Don Paul Stadium - Region 19: 1 Lucasville Valley (11-0) vs. 4 Bucyrus Wynford (9-2) at Reynoldsburg Raider Stadium; 2 Oak Hill (9-2) vs. 6 Baltimore Liberty Union (9-2) at Nelsonville-York Boston Field - Region 20: 1 Coldwater (11-0) vs. 4 West Liberty-Salem (11-0) at Piqua Alexander Stadium-Purk Field; 2 Summit Country Day (11-0) vs. 3 Covington (11-0) at Centerville Stadium

Sports

Thomas served in the United States Army from 1944-46 as a Private First Class (Pfc.). He received his basic training at Camp Robinson in Little Rock, Arkansas, and was assigned to the 7th Army, 42nd Infantry Division, 1st Battalion, 242 Regiment, Company B. “We were on a 25-mile hike and left at suppertime. Toward the end [of the hike], guys in the platoon were falling behind and I had the energy to move faster,” Thomas reflected with a grin, “I caught up with the serEngraving of Kilroy on the World War II Memorial in geant, asked if I could run ahead and after getting the go Washington, D.C.

seconds so that the enemy could not use the weapon. Thomas also served as a “human tripod” for Parker, his BAR man. Throughout World War II, the 42nd covered 6,000 square miles, captured 45,000 prisoners and felt their duty was to “Never Forget.” “I was in a foxhole and my commanding officer called me to his headquarters,” Thomas fondly recalled the opportunity. “My captain presented my brother Donald to me, who had arrived on a mail truck. We [Don and See FLIGHT, page 12

Guardsman Gorman returns home from Bahrain
BY NANCY SPENCER nspencer@delphosherald.com DELPHOS — Things often change for soldiers with little notice. National Guardsman Jim Gordon, 49, was given orders he would be going with a brigade to Afghanistan with 1st Charlie Co. 37th Special Troops Battalion out of Springfield last October. He ended up in Bahrain. “We went to Camp Shelby in Mississippi and the mission was cut by almost 67 percent or 900 troops,” Gordon explained. “Myself and 17 soldiers were then assigned to Task Force Buckeye and sent to Kuwait and then Bahrain. There were four separate missions for 500 troops with the main focus on entry control. We had four guard towers and were a quick-reaction force.” Bahrain is a small island country situated near the western shores of the Persian Gulf. It is an archipelago of 33 islands, the largest being Bahrain Island, at 34 miles long by 11 miles wide. Saudi Arabia lies to the west and is connected to Bahrain by the King Fahd Causeway. Iran lies 120 miles to the north of Bahrain, across the Gulf. The peninsula of Qatar is to the southeast across the Gulf of Bahrain. Gordon’s job was in administration near the Royal Bahrain Air Force Base and his troops were there for protection. “They like the U.S. They were happy we were there. They were very polite. We got along with them great,” he said. “We helped protect them. Bahrain is an island about 40 miles long and 15 miles wide.” Bahrian is also near the Strait of Hormuz, the only sea passage from the Persian Gulf to the open ocean and one of the world’s most strategical-

Index

Mostly clear tonight with lows in the upper 40s. Partly cloudy Sunday. Highs in the upper 60s. Partly cloudy Sunday night with a chance of showers and a thunderstorm after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s. 2 3 4 5 6-7 9 10 11 12

Forecast

National Guardsman Jim Gordon spends time with Tyler and Taylor Strayer, his neighbors, the day he arrived home from a year-long deployment. The Strayers told their mom they wanted to meet a real soldier. ly-important choke points. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz if the U.S. and E.U. impose sanctions against Iran. Life in Bahrain was not easy. It made Gordon and his men thankful for the simple things in the U.S. “Drinking water was questionable and there was no grass or trees,” he expounded. “The days are hot and the nights are cold. There was very little rain.” The troops did have more recreation time than their counterparts in Afghanistan and other more volatile places. “We could go to dinner See GORDON, page 12

Photo submitted

Obituaries State/Local Politics Community Sports Kids page Classifieds TV World News

Ellen Gordon catches a moment to relax with her husband, Jim, who recently returned from a year-long deployment in Bahrain.

Nancy Spencer photo

2 – The Herald

Saturday, November 10, 2012

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Where has NANCY SPENCER the year gone? It’s already November. To many people’s surprise, we’ve already had a Christmas story in the paper. I’m sure with the economy, the Delphos Community Christmas Project will need every bit of time they have to pull together a nice holiday for those who need a little boost. It’s tough out there and every penny will count. It will be that way for many of us, I fear. Most of us are fortunate and have jobs. It may not be the one we want or need but a job none the less. I’ve written several times of how I feel perhaps one of the most necessary of holidays — the one where we are supposed to count our blessings and be thankful for what we have — is going to be lost in the commercial frenzy known as Christmas shopping season. Stores are already offering Black Friday pricing to move as much merchandise as they can before the dreaded Christmas markdown. Trees and tinsel have popped up everywhere. Enter Facebook. If you’re a fan, you’ve been seeing all the “thankful” posts. In my little corner of the world, I’m already plotting and planning that special meal that brings our families and loved ones together for food, fellowship and yes, football. The turkey will roast and fill the house with that delectable, mouth-watering smell. The potatoes will be bubbling on the stove and the deviled eggs will disappear before the meal hits the serving dishes. We’ll bow our heads and say a prayer of thanks for all who are around our table and those who could not be there — for whatever reason. My mom, friends and my sister-in-law and I will chat while we clean the table, put away leftovers and do the dishes. The men will head into the living room to watch a game and soon the soft contented sound of snoring will waft into the kitchen as us girls play Spite and Malice. Now that’s what I’m talkin’ about. Thanksgiving will be a tough holiday for some, too. A Thanksgiving feast may be out of reach and some will find little to be thankful for. But it’s the little things we need to give thanks for. If you are breathing, be thankful. Many will face a Thanksgiving with one or more empty chairs. If you have a roof over your head, be thankful. Many are homeless. If you have food, be thankful. Many people are wondering where their next meal will come from. If you have a job, rejoice. You all know what it’s like out there. If you have your health, dance. There is always someone else who has less and is more thankful for it than those who have more.

Creepin’ up
On the Other hand

For The Record
OBITUARY

The Delphos Herald
Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald, Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager
Vol. 143 No. 108

Donna J. Williams
Jan. 16, 1938 - Nov. 8, 2012 Donna J. Williams, 74, of Gomer passed away Thursday at St. Rita’s Medical Center. She was born on Jan. 16, 1938, in Cairo to Hugh and Merle (Sandy) Fisher, who preceded her in death. On Sept. 15, 1956, she was united in marriage to William ‘Bill’ Williams, who survives in Gomer. Survivors also include her children, Wayne (Lori) Williams of Elida, Debra (Bob) Ritchey of Elida, Susan (Jim) Siefker of Delphos and Jan (Louie) Siefker of Elida; 10 grandchildren, Chris Lester, Ray Thomas and Brooke Liebrecht, Kayla Williams, Nicholas Siefker, Angie Siefker, Doug Siefker, Joe Siefker, Katie Siefker and Emily Siefker; and four great grandchildren. Mrs. Williams was a teller at The Commercial Bank for 22 years, mostly at the branch in Gomer. She enjoyed bowling and truly loved to go watch her grandchildren’s sporting events. She was a member of Gomer United Church of Christ and Fidelis Woman’s Circle. She also served on several committees throughout her lifetime. Funeral Service will be at 1 p.m. on Monday at Gomer United Church of Christ. Burial will be in Pike Run Cemetery. Visitation will be from 2-8 p.m. Sunday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home and one hour prior to the service at the church. Memorial contributions may be made to Gomer United Church of Christ.

By The Associated Press Today is Saturday, Nov. 10, the 315th day of 2012. There are 51 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Nov. 10, 1972, three armed men hijacked Southern Airways Flight 49, a DC-9 with 24 other passengers on board during a stopover in Birmingham, Ala., and

TODAY IN HISTORY
demanded $10 million in ransom. (The 30-hour ordeal, which involved landings in nine U.S. cities and Toronto, finally ended with a second landing in Cuba, where the hijackers were taken into custody by Cuban authorities.) On this date: In 1775, the U.S. Marines were organized under authority of the Continental Congress. In 1871, journalist-explor-

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Allen County Interstate 75, Lima, at Fourth Street and Reservoir Road bridge replacement projects will have the following impacts to traffic in the coming weeks. Work is being performed by Eagle Bridge, Sidney. The bridge replacements are Phase 1 of a 3-phase project which will reconstruct Interstate 75 from the Auglaize County line to just north of Ohio 81, including the city of Lima. Work on the mainline of Interstate 75 will er Henry M. Stanley found not begin until 2013: Scottish missionary David Fourth Street Livingstone, who had not Fourth Street over Interstate been heard from for years, 75 reopened to traffic on near Lake Tanganyika in cenWednesday. Reservoir Road tral Africa. Reservoir Road over In 1919, the American Interstate 75 closed May 1 until Legion opened its first national late November for a bridge convention in Minneapolis. replacement project. As part of In 1928, Japanese Emperor the project, Bryn Mawr Road Hirohito (hee-roh-hee-toh) was from Reservoir Road to Elm formally enthroned, almost Street also closed May 1 until two years after his ascension. late November. Work on the In 1938, Kate Smith first project will continue after the sang Irving Berlin’s “God bridge reopens to traffic. Bless America” on her CBS Traffic on Interstate 75 in radio program. Turkish statesthe area of the bridge is mainman Mustafa Kemal Ataturk tained, two lanes in each direcdied in Istanbul at age 57. tion, with occasional daytime In 1942, Winston Churchill and nighttime lanes closures delivered a speech in London necessary at times. in which he said, “I have Interstate 75 northbound not become the King’s First from Breese Road to Ohio Minister to preside over the 309, and from Napoleon liquidation of the British Road to Ohio 696 will be restricted through the work Empire.” zone on Monday and Tuesday In 1951, customer-dialed of the week, respectively, for long-distance telephone sersealing of pavement cracks. vice began as Mayor M. Leslie Interstate 75 southbound Denning of Englewood, N.J., from Fourth Street to called Alameda, Calif., Mayor Breese Road will be restrictFrank Osborne without operaed through the work zone for tor assistance. sealing of pavement cracks on In 1954, the U.S. Marine Wednesday of the week. Corps Memorial, depicting the U.S. 30 from Ohio 65 raising of the American flag to Beaverdam is restricted on Iwo Jima in 1945, was dedto one lane in each direcicated by President Dwight D. tion for pavement repair and Eisenhower in Arlington, Va. resurfacing. Work is expectIn 1961, the satirical war ed to be completed before novel “Catch-22” by Joseph Thanksgiving. Heller was first published by Ohio 65 from Ohio 115 Simon & Schuster. to Columbus Grove is now COLUMBUS*On select— A w/approved credit. Limited time offer. (AP) models evidence about his childhood, complete. In 1969, the children’s condemned killer scheduled to including his early diagnosis as educational program “Sesame Putnam County Street” made its debut die next week for stabbing an a disturbed adolescent needing Akron woman to death in 1997 intense psychological counselOhio 613 between Ohio 15 on National Educational asked the U.S. Supreme Court ing. and Ohio 108 will be reduced Television (later PBS). on Friday to delay his execuNo “court has been presented to one lane through the work In 1975, the ore-hauling tion. with the full picture of Hartman’s zone for tile installation. ship SS Edmund Fitzgerald www.superior-auto.com health hisAttorneys for 38-year-old upbringing or mental Apply online at Ohio 65 at the south edge and its crew of 29 mysteri- Brett Hartman told the court they tory,” Hartman’s lawyers said. or at 1053 S. Shannon St., Van Wert of Ottawa is restricted to one ously sank during a storm in need time to renew arguments “As a consequence, no Lake Superior with the 419-238-7314 court has been able to consider lane through the work zone for loss of that Hartman’s original attora project adding turn lanes at all on board. neys didn’t present the proper how this upbringing may have the Williamstown Road interexplained his behavior in the section. Work will continue murder or mitigated against a through mid November. Thanksgiving sentence of death,” they said. Ohio 613 between Hartman’s lawyers also Putnam County Road 5 and Drive Food argue that attorneys handling appeals didn’t do going on now! Hartman’s raise questions about McComb is complete. enough to Van Wert County Reduce the price of your problems with Hartman’s origiU.S. 30 between Middle new vehicle purchase by nal defense. making a donation Point and Van Wert will be Federal courts have already restricted through the work * See dealer for details, limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. rejected this claim, but Hartman’s zone for repair of pavement attorneys say a change in fed- joints. Online at www.superior-auto.com Online at www.superior-auto.com or at EXTENDED HOURS: or atS. Shannon Shannon St., Van Wert 2094 Allentown Rd., 1053 1053 S. St., eral law involving claims of bad Open Until Ohio 118 in Ohio City is Now Lima Van Wert legal aid allows the issue to be now open. rdays! 6 p.m. Satu 419-238-7314 419-238-7314 419-229-3487 raised again. 00049084

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Jan. 8, 1930-Nov. 8, 2012 Gertrude R. Schmitz, 82, of Ottawa, died Thursday at St. Rita’s Medical Center. She was born Jan. 8, 1930, in Ottoville to Theodore and Bernadine (Hellman) Beining, who preceded her in death. On May 5, 1951, she married Alvin Schmitz, who died June 1, 1989. Survivors include a son, Thomas (Gretchen) Schmitz of Glandorf; four daughters, Marilyn (Roger) Ellerbrock of Glandorf, Eileen (Dennis) Vennekotter of Continental, Diane (Douglas) Deitering of Glandorf and Nancy (Gary) Erhart of Kalida; 16 grandchildren, Michelle (Joel) Rampe, Dana Ellerbrock, Jenna Ellerbrock, Rachel (Jeremy Marx) Schmitz, Josh Schmitz, Andrew Schmitz, Evan Barrett, Kyle (Jessica Brown) Vennekotter, Ryan (Cobin) Vennekotter, Cody Vennekotter, Heather Deitering, Ross Deitering, Benjamin Deitering, Emily Erhart, Matt Erhart and Lindsey Erhart; a brother, Ray Beining of Delphos; three sisters, Mary (Herb) Hempfling of Delphos, Alice Arnzen of Delphos and Irene (Joe) Schroeder of Ottawa. She was also preceded in death by a grandchild, Joseph Schmitz; two sisters, Mildred Beckman and Angela Kimmett; a brother, Rudy Beining. Mrs. Schmitz was a homemaker. She was a member of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Glandorf, were she was a Eucharistic Minister, religion teacher for over 30 years and a member of the Altar Rosary Society, Catholic Ladies of Columbia, Ladies CHIRP and nurtured the flowers in church; and also a volunteer at The Meadows of OttawaGlandorf. She was a companion of the Ministeries of the Precious Blood. She was very active in Rightto-life, loved spending time with her grandchildren and attending their activities. She was a wonderful caregiver and enjoyed making food for the sick. Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 10:30 a.m. Monday at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, the Rev. Tony Fortman officiating. Burial will follow in church cemetery. Visitation will be from 6-8 p.m. Saturday and 2-8 p.m. Sunday at Love Funeral Home, Ottawa where there will be a parish rosary at 7:30 p.m. Memorials may be given to the charity of donor’s choice. Condolences may be sent to: www.lovefuneralhome.

Gertrude R. Schmitz

Killer asks court to stop execution

Nov. 26, 1945 Nov. 8, 2012 James Lee “Jim” Wilcox, 66, of Delphos, died at 9:35 a.m. Thursday at Zusman Community Hospice in Columbus. He was born Nov. 26, 1945, in Lima to Eugene Robert and Theola (Faulder) Wilcox, who preceded him in death. Her was formerly married to Connie (Kimmet) Wilcox, who survives in Delphos. He is also survived by his special lady friend Linda Guthrie. Survivors also include four daughters, Jenny (Jeff) Fischer of Columbus, Sarah (Benjamin) Abernethy of Dayton, Katie Wilcox of Columbus and Ashleigh Wilcox of Dayton; six grandchildren, Logan and Ethan Fischer and Eden, Seth Isaac and Elise Abernethy; and other survivors, Renee (Keith) Burritt, Megan Klausing and Laura Klausing; and lifelong friend, Larry Grothous. He was also preceded in death by a brother, Willbur “Bill” Wilcox. Jim was owner and operator of the Knotty Pine in Fort Jennings for 15 years and worked for Clark Equipment for 18 years. He was the kitchen manager at the Delphos Eagles Lodge for 12 years and was currently enjoying his retirement by volunteering his cooking skills to whoever needed them. He served in the Navy Reserves in Lima then went into active duty on the U.S.S. Wasp during the Vietnam War. Jim was a member of St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church and also attended Trinity United Methodist Church. He was a Golden Eagle member of Eagles Lodge 471, a life member of American Legion Post 268 and VFW Post 3035, Lima Moose Lodge 199, Van Wert Elks 1197 and the Masonic Lodge. He was also a member of the St. John’s Band Boosters and Athletic Boosters. Jim’s true passion was cooking for others. He was an Notre Dame and Cleveland Browns fan and a devoted St. John’s supporter. Funeral services will begin at 10 a.m. Monday at Trinity United Methodist Church, the Rev. David Howell officiating. Burial will be in Walnut Grove Cemetery, with military graveside rites conducted by the Delphos Veterans Council. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Sunday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, where a Lima Masonic service will begin at 7 :30 p.m.; and one hour prior to the service Monday at the church. Preferred memorials are to St. Jon’s Tuition Assistance, Trinity United Methodist Church (Kitchen Fund) or Zusman Community Hospice,

James Lee ‘Jim’ Wilcox

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The following is a weekly report concerning construction and maintenance work on state highways within the Ohio Department of Transportation District 1 which includes the counties of Allen, Defiance, Hancock, Hardin, Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert and Wyandot.

REPORT

ODOT

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Delphos St. John’s Week of Nov. 12-16 Monday: Beef and cheese nachos/ breadstick, green beans, romaine salad, applesauce, fresh fruit, milk. Tuesday: Chicken nuggets/roll, broccoli, romaine salad, apple crisp, fresh fruit, milk. Wednesday: Sub sandwich/ lettuce/ tomato/ pickle, corn, romaine salad, pears, fresh fruit, milk. Thursday: Coney dog/ onions, baked beans, romaine salad, peaches, fresh fruit, milk. Friday: Stuffed crust pepperoni After the Civil War had pizza, carrots/dip, romaine salad, ended in 1865 and the survivmixed fruit, fresh fruit, milk. Delphos City Schools Week of Nov. 12-16 Monday: Charbroiled hamburger sandwich, oven potatoes, pineapple and oranges, lowfat or fat free milk. Tuesday: Chicken strips, dipping sauce, bread and butter, green beans, apple crisp, lowfat or fat free milk. Wednesday: Assorted pizza, tossed salad, fruit, lowfat or fat free milk. Thursday: Turkey slice, bread and butter, mashed potatoes w/gravy, sherbet, lowfat or fat free milk. Friday: Cheddarwurst sandwich or deli sandwich, baked beans, fruit cup, lowfat or fat free milk. Landeck Elementary Week of Nov. 12-16 Monday: Breaded chicken strips, butter/peanut butter bread, corn, fruit, milk. Tuesday: Spaghetti with meat sauce, breadstick, lettuce salad, fruit, milk. Wednesday: Tacos, butter/peanut butter bread, peas, fruit, milk. Thursday: Mini corn dogs, potato rounds, fruit, milk. Friday: Macaroni and cheese, butter/peanut butter bread, green beans, fruit and milk. Ottoville Week of Nov. 12-16 Monday: Turkey slice, mashed potatoes w/gravy, butter bread, applesauce, milk. Tuesday: Hamburger w/tomato slice, corn, carrot stix, peaches, milk. Wednesday: Taco salad w/ cheese, lettuce, tomato (4-12); Tacos (K-3); refried beans, corn chips, pineapple, milk. Thursday: Corn dog, french fries, romaine bl. lettuce, strawberries, milk. Friday: Chicken breast, baked potato, butter bread, green beans, mixed fruit, milk. Fort Jennings Local Schools Week of Nov. 12-16 Monday: Grilled cheese or tuna salad sandwich, green beans, sherbet, fruit. Tuesday: Chicken gravy over mashed potatoes, peas, dinner roll, fruit. Wednesday: Pepperoni pizza, carrots, G-force bar, fruit. Thursday: Taco, refried beans, broccoli, fruit. Friday: Ham and cheese wrap, baked beans, dessert round, fruit. Spencerville Schools Week of Nov. 12-16 Monday: Grilled cheese sandwich, tomato soup, crackers, pears, milk. Tuesday: Grades K-4: Popcorn chicken, cheesy mashed potatoes, peaches, milk. Grades 5-12: Popcorn chicken bowl, mashed potatoes w/ gravy, corn, peaches, milk. Wednesday: Super nachos, salsa, Mexican beans w/cheese, pineapple, milk. Grades 5-12 will also have carrot chips with dip. Thursday: French toast, sausage patties, smiley fries, orange smiles, milk. Friday: Cheese pizza, salad with carrots, applesauce, milk. Grades K-4: Fresh broccoli with dip instead of carrots.

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STATE/LOCAL

On the banks of yesteryear ...
ing soldiers had gone home, after the horrible images had faded somewhat, many of them began to miss the friendships and camaraderie that they had shared during the war. Out of this, the Grand Army of the Republic was formed. In Delphos, Post #95 of the GAR was named after Captain Rudolph Reul, a local doctor who had formed a company of all Delphos men to fight for the Union. Because this group never opened to other war veterans, it eventually died out. The Spanish American War in 1898 was the first our country fought on foreign soils. At the end of the war these veterans, many who came home sick or wounded, found there were no provisions for medical care or veteran’s pensions for them, nor did the government show any interest in providing for their sacrifices. In their misery, a group formed that would become the VFW or Veterans of Foreign Wars. The Delphos VFW Post #3035 was not chartered until 1935 and was named in memory of two Delphos soldiers who were killed in WWI., Charles S. Walterick and George H. Hemme. To be a member of this group, one has to have been in combat on foreign soils. This group still has an active post in Delphos. At the end of World War I, hundreds of thousands of American soldiers found themselves trapped in France, told that logistically it would be weeks or months before they could be transported home. To boost morale, a patriotic group was formed and named the American Legion. Locally, Commemorative Post #268 of the American Legion, was chartered in 1920 and the first commander was Leonard Stallkamp. The Legion is open to all persons who served their country during times of conflict. This post is also still active. World War II ended in 1945 and as the number of returnees swelled into the millions, it was evident that some sort of nationally organized assistance for them would be needed. The older established national groups were available to them, but the leaders of this new generation of veterans wanted their own organization and formed the American Veterans of World War II. AMVETS Post #27 of Delphos was organized that same year with Roger Hoverman as commander. It was named

Ohio to weigh more time on its health care plan

Veterans groups

From the Delphos Canal Commission

COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio officials are evaluating a move by the federal government to give them more time to work on plans for a key component of President Barack Obama’s health care law. The administration sent in a letter to governors Friday saying it still wants to hear by the end of next week if states will be setting up new health insurance markets under the law. States that can’t or won’t set up these new insurance exchanges will have theirs run by Washington. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said states can now take another month, until midDecember, to submit detailed blueprints. States considering a partnership with the federal government have until midFebruary. An Ohio Department of Insurance spokesman said officials received the letter and were weighing its impact.

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in honor of John A. Peltier who lost his life while serving on the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor when it was bombed by the Japanese. The AMVETS no longer have a post in Delphos, but their banner is proudly hanging in the military section of our museum. Although the museum is gearing up for the annual Christmas Tree Festival, there is still plenty of history to see. We are open every Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m. and every Thursday from nine to noon or by appointment.

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4 — The Herald

POLITICS

Saturday, November 10 2012

www.delphosherald.com

“Let the world know you as you are, not as you think you should be, because sooner or later, if you are posing, you will forget the pose, and then where are you?” — Fanny Brice, American actress and singer (1891-1951)

A Salute to All Veterans! Back in 1957, 11 young men from the area were sitting in Dickman’s Restaurant shooting the breeze and trying to solve the problems of the world. The employment situation was not very good at the time so these guys decided to join the Army. Nine of them went to Lima on Monday to enlist. They were: Bob Calvelage, Bob Heitmeyer, Kenny Kramer, Gene Krietemeyer, Gene Metzger, Jim Miehls, Orville Neidert, Louie Saum and John Wittler. All nine of the young men became part of the 4th Armored Division of the U. S. Army. After surviving boot camp, eight of the guys were sent to Germany but Kenny Kramer was kept back in the states to fill a position of clerk. This was during the Berlin Crisis in Operation Gyroscope. While Bob Heitmeyer and John Wittler were stationed in Nurnberg as MP’s, the other six were stationed in Schwabisch. The best thing about their tour of duty was that four of the guys lived in the same barrack, with the other two living in the barrack next door. Their job in Germany was to guard the Czechoslovakian Border. It wasn’t just a picnic, sometimes the temperature dropped to 30 degrees below zero. This was peacetime in Bavaria so there were weekends for relaxin’ time. Now for the project at hand. The Jennings Memorial Association has plans for a Hall of Honor (for all veterans) in the Jennings Memorial Hall. A temporary chart is in the hall but we need your help to make the list complete. The Bicentennial Book committee could not locate a complete list of veterans. The list in the book was compiled from church and local history books, cemetery plaques, records kept by Alfred “Jack” Schimmoeller and continued by Carl Schimmoeller and by the American Legion Post 715 membership records. The following is a revised list of veterans of or from the community of Fort Jennings. This includes any veteran from the town, school district, Jennings Township and parts of Jackson Township and Sugar Creek Township. This includes those who live there now or have lived there in the past. If you have a name to be added or a correction to be made, please call Helen Kaverman at 419-695-3378 or Dickman’s Insurance at 419-692-2236. War of 1812 veterans 1812 – 1814 William Cochran, Jim Cochran, Thaddeus Harris, Ellison Ladd, James Martin, James Thatcher and Elias Wallen. Civil War - 1861 to 1865 Simon Allen, Isaac Barnes, Frederick G. Bauman or Bowman Mathias Boberg, Henry Bode, Amos Boehmer, Fred P. Bowan Jr, W. H. Chandler, Emanuel Clapper, John Discher, Lester Dunlap, Ferdinand G. Eggeman, Frederick Eggerman, John Evans, John W. Fields, Robert Good, Presley Good, William Green, John Grothaus, Theodore R. Hageman, Nathaniel Harris, Henry Hershey, Jonas Hofer, Thomas Hunt, Henry Hunter, Aaron Huysman, Walter Huysman, Adam Jamison, Francis Jamison, Henry Jenkins, Evan H. Jones, Robert Keller, Art Kortier, Bernard H. Lehmkule, Ferd Leininger, John L. McEowen, Joseph McEowen, Timothy McGill, Joseph Menke, John M. Nichols, Amos Point, Sigmund Rekart, Asbury Riggle, Isaac Riswer, Morris Roberts, Frederick G. Schuerman, Henry Schuerman, Alden Smith, Joseph Stephan, George

We salute you his and we thank and That you — each and every one!

T

by HELEN KAVERMAN

DEAR EDITOR: Having voted since the election of Franklin Roosevelt, I have never seen such a disparity between the rural voters and the big city voters. Three-fourths of Putnam County voted for Romney. Also everywhere we drove in Ohio and part of Michigan the Romney signs outnumbered the Obama signs by at least ten to one. It makes me happy to know that such a large percentage of the rural area voted Christian values, but sad that so many Ohio voters did not. Did they not know the intrinsic evils that they were buying into or was there that much voter fraud? Ed Luersman Fort Jennings

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

One Year Ago • The Canal Days Committee doled out proceeds for the 2011 event on Wednesday. Committee member Jim “Buge” Grothouse presented a check to Delphos Police Chief Kyle Fitro as Canal Commission Museum Trustee Marilyn Wagner accepted a check from Eric Fritz. Committee member Diane Sterling presented a check to Delphos Boy Scout Scoutmaster Steve Heiing. Also receiving checks were Kiwanis, Community Christmas Project, Delphos Stadium Club, D.A.R.E. Program and Delphos Fire Association. 25 Years Ago — 1987 • Eight members of the Elida Future Farmers of America will attend the National FFA convention. Jay Vincent of the Commercial Bank, Elida Branch, presented a $50 check to FFA members Eric Layman to help defray some of the costs of attending the convention. Other members attending are Bret Blymyer, Brad Long, Gary Keasler, Scott Stewart, Drew Fields, Brian Hines and Randy Kline. • A jitney auction was the highlight of the Catholic ladies of Columbia’s monthly meeting with Bertha Schmelzer in charge. Bingo winner was Valeria Siefker, 50-50 winner, Mary Topp, Edna Baldauf, and Theresa Alspaugh and attendance Mary Hughes and Agnes Sadler. • The Delphos Young Farmwives met recently in the home of Terri Miller. Marge LaFollette of “The Herb Barrel” gave a presentation on using herbs for cooking, medicinal and decorative purposes. The Young Farmwives will be participating in the Christmas Tree Festival at the Delphos Library. Committee members are Dee Dee Shelby, Kathy Renner, and Marlene Pohlman. 50 Years Ago — 1962 • An all-out one-day membership drive will be held by the Delphos Chamber of Commerce on Nov. 20, Mel Westrich, chairman of the membership committee, reported. The membership drive, designed particularly to recruit additional business firms and others into the Chamber of Commerce, will start with coffee. A dozen or so committee members will then spend most or all of the day contacting non-members to ask them to join. • The cast for the junior class play at Delphos Jefferson High School “Mother Is a Freshman” which will be presented Nov. 16 in the auditorium has been announced by Winnifred Strayer, who is directing the production. Cast members include Ann Dienstberger, Carol Adam, Kathy Kissell, Paula Stetler, Eileen Brinkman, Susan Truesdale, Jeanne Mox, Kathy Lucas, Fred Lentz, Lynn Ladd, Monte Druckmiller, Kenneth Jackson, Neal Yocum, Charles Plikerd and Jeff Copeland. • More than 600 persons were served at the recent Lions Club Pancake Day, it was announced by John Pitsenbarger, publicity chairman. Pitsenbarger, and the other chairmen, Gene Buettner, John Helton and Rod Tierman, expressed their appreciation of the community’s support at the regular meeting of the Delphos Lions this week. 75 Years Ago — 1937 • A most interesting session of the Delphos Kiwanis Club was held at the Beckman Hotel Tuesday evening when the members of the Van Wert Kiwanis Club joined the local Kiwanians for a joint session. Bruce Reed served as master of ceremonies and with the aid of his Van Wert friends, made the meeting a most enjoyable occasion. Among those who were called upon to speak were Robert Wilkinson, Benjamin Waitman, Ray Morton, Richard Webster and John Albright. • Using six letterman as his nucleus, Coach L. W. Heckman of the Ottoville High School, has prospects for a strong cage team this season. The following are the available lettermen: Becker, Koester, Weber, Hoersten, Giesken and Leis. With the exception of Weber, these boys played every game last season. Weber saw action towards the end of the season. • The K of C bowling teams will swing into action Wednesday night at the Delphos Recreation Club alleys. Team One is composed of Harold Lause, Don Imber, Charles Reinemeyer, Frank Scherger and Ralph Weger. Team Two is made up of Jerome Schmit, Robert Say, Henry Gemke, Jr., Eugene Gremling, Thomas Weger. Members of Team Three are Dr. Robert Brown, Herbert Fast, Richard Mueller, Walden Wannemacher, John Shenk. Those on Team Four are Paul Wulfhorst, Vincent Metzner, Arnold Hesseling, Carl Birkmeier, and Hubert Burger.

IT WAS NEWS THEN

The Delphos Herald welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be no more than 400 words. The newspaper reserves the right to edit content for length, clarity and grammar. Letters concerning private matters will not be published. Failure to supply a full name, home address and daytime phone number will slow the verification process and delay publication. Letters can be mailed to The Delphos Herald, 405 N. Main St., Delphos, Ohio 45833, faxed to 419-692-7704 or e-mailed to nspencer@delphosherald.com. Authors should clearly state they want the message published as a letter to the editor. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Military tent acts as an apartment in the field. W Sybert, Isaac Thurston, Hampton Wade, Wm Walls, Simeon Wells and John Wiechart. World War I 6 April 1917 to 11 November 1918 Fred Arn, Edward Biedenharn, George Birkmeyer, Harold Birkmeyer, Frank. H. Broecker, Henry M. Broecker, Andrew Brokamp, Ben Calvelage, Grover H. Calvelage, Lawrence J. Calvelage, Bert Carpenter, George Dickman, Henry Dickman, Louis Dickman, August Ebbeskotte, Albert H. Fisher, Frank H. Fisher, Wilfred F. Fisher, Victor G. Greulich, John Grof, Louis W. Hanefield, William J. Hellman, Albert Hofstetter, George J. Hofstetter, Frank J. Hohenbrink, Frank Honigford, John Hunt, Elmer Army soldiers at chow time. Kalt, Alois Kesner, Carl Kloeppel, Oscar Kloeppel, Edward A. Kortier, Jerome W. Kracht, Fred Kramer, Julius Kramer, Theodore B. Krietemeyer, Leo B. Martin, Leonard Martin, Ebbie McGue, Harold J. Miehls, Joseph Ostendorf, Lawrence Ostendorf, Elmer Raabe, Fredrick A. “Fred” Raabe, Ralph C. Raabe, Lester Ratliff, Joseph Rekhart, Bernard F. “Barney” Ricker, Christian M. “Crist” Rose, George Rumschlag, John H. Sarka, John H. Schimmoeller, Norbert Schimmoeller, Charles H. Schlatman, Nicholas H. “Nick” Schlueter Anton Slottman, Harry I. Stechschulte, Joseph A. “Joe” Suever, George Louis Suman, Robert G. Suman , George J. Von Sossan, Joseph VonSossan, William L VonSossan, Edwin L Wannemacher, Joseph Wiechart, Frank Wueller and Jacob H. Yenner. World War I Casualty Matt Wiechart kneeling at his dad’s grave while the Jacob H. Yenner Huey flies over with a salute to a Vietnam veteran. World War I Influenza Ronald Dunlap, Cletus A. Leatherman, Herman Frank Victims Grover H. Calvelage, Eggeman, Lawrence W. Luersman, James Henry William J. Hellman and Eggeman, Gilbert Ellerbrock, Mack, Joseph Mack, Linus Wilfred “Bill” Erhart, Mack, Donald Martin, Elmer Kalt. Sylvester H. Ernst, Leroy Norman F. Martin, Kenneth World War II Veterans 7 December 1941 to 31 Etgen, James Fecker, George McNamara, James David J. Fisher, Robert Fisher, McWiley, Joseph Menke, December 1946 Gerald Adams, John A. Arn, Richard A. Friemoth, Arthur Paul John Menke, Ralph Wendell D. “Bud” Askins, G. Gasser, Albert J. Geckle, Menke, Carl M. Metzger, Paul Baumgarte, James John Geise, Louis F Geise, Charles Meyer, Lawrence Becker, Norman Becker, Leonard Gerdeman, Urban Meyer, Philip Meyer, Eugene Lawrence Bensman, Leonard Gerker, Robert Good, Newell J. Minnig, Thomas Minning, Bensman, Albert Berelsman, Gray, Victor G. Greulich, Clarence E. Mowery, Jerome Hubert J. Berelsman, Linus Norbert Grote, Francis T. Frederick Moenter, Donald Berelsman, Norbert S. Hageman, Harold Hamel, G. W. Myers, John A. Nichols, Berelsman, Fred Berry, Basil Heller, John Heitzman, Milton E. Nichols, Ben D. Walter Lynn Berwinkle, Thomas Hellman, William J. Norbeck, Paul Ostendorf, Alfred C. Blockberger, Hellman, Victor H. Hoehn, Ralph J. Ostendorf, Thomas Fred P. Bowen Jr., Louis A. Louis G. Hoffman, Anna Ostendorf, Walter Ostendorf, Hofstetter, Benjamin Plescher, James Brenner, Cleo H. Brinkman, (Youngpeter) W. “Hobby” Plescher, Bernard Plescher, Mary A. Brockman, Norbert Raymond L. Brockman, Carl Hofstetter, John Hohenbrink, John Plescher, Raymond Broecker, Elmer Broecker, Benjamin Arthur “Art” Plescher, Gilbert Pohl, James George Broecker, Louis Hughes, Oral Hughes, Leo R. Quinn, George F. Raabe, Broecker, George G. Bullis, Hunt, William Hunt, Harley Rudolph Raabe, Julius W. Hilary Burgei, Bernard “Bob” Keller, Stanley L. Recker, Urban Recker, Paul “Bernie” Calvelage, Florence Kennedy, George Klausing, Rellinger, Alvin L. Ricker, Calvelage, Harold Calvelage, James B. Klausing, Franklin Margaret M. (Hoffman) Hubert Calvelage, Richard Kleman, James Kleman, Ricker, Paul Ricker, Arthur Calvelage, Robert Calvelage, Robert W. Kleman, Edward Rose, Leonard Rose, Ottmer Joseph F. Carpenter, Earl L. Klima, George Klima, Rose, Robert Rose, Wilbur H. Chandler, Frank Columbo, Howard Kloeppel, Melvin Sadler, Norbert Saum, Alfred Rev. John Cox, John E. Davis, Kloeppel, William Knippen, L. “Jack” Schimmoeller, Schimmoeller, Lewis E. Degroft, Elmer B. Arthur F. Kramer, Elmer Ernest Dickman, James Dickman, Kramer, Kenneth F. Kramer, James Schimmoeller, Roger Valerius “Dick” Dickman, Harold Krietemeyer, William A. Schimmoeller, Henry William J. Dickman, Russell F. Lauf, Walter M. Laughlin, Schramm, Ralph Schramm, Donaldson, David B. Dray, Norbert Lause, Richard See SALUTE, page 9 Robert B. “Bob” Dray, Lause, Lester P. “Cappy”

www.delphosherald.com

Saturday, November 10, 2012

The Herald – 5

LANDMARK

COMMUNITY

YWCA of Van Wert County

CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY 8:30-11:30 a.m. — St. John’s High School recycle, enter on East First Street. 9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. St. Vincent DePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School parking lot, is open. Cloverdale recycle at village park. 10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. SUNDAY 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 1-4 p.m. — Putnam County Museum is open, 202 E. Main St. Kalida. MONDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 6 p.m. — Middle Point Village Council meets 7-9 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Annex Museum, 241 N. Main St., will be open. 7 p.m. — Marion Township trustees at township house. Middle Point council meets at town hall. 8 p.m. — Delphos City Schools Board of Education meets at the administration office. Delphos Knights of Columbus meet at the K of C hall. TUESDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 6:30 p.m. — Delphos Lions Club, Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth St. 7:30 p.m. — Ottoville Emergency Medical Service members meet at the municipal building.

St. John’s High School class of ’57 holds reunion

Photography by Mac photo

St. John’s High School class of 1957 met in October to celebrate its 55th reunion. Members enjoyed dinner, socialization and reminiscing. Those attending were, front from left, Janice (Kill) Mace, Tonja (Wiley) Moening, Darlene (Grohouse) Schulte, Ruth (Klausing) Gerdman, Jeanette (Bockey) Miller, Agnes (Bonifas) Krietemeyer, Barbara (Carder) Butler, Marylou (Mueller) Schwaiger and Janelle (Kroeger) Friedrich; row two, Kenneth Kundert, Tom Hempfling, Marilyn (Friedrich) Hemker, Sonja (Briggs) Mazur, Cliff Rahrig, Melvin Heitz, Stan Wiechart; row three, Joe Ulm, Jim Spieles, Roger Odenweller, Frank Meyer, Ken Blankmeyer, Bob German, Don Kundert, Jim Falke and Eugene Wagner; and back, Gerald Fischer and Norman Osting. Not shown is Joan (Gerdeman) Ricker.

Keep Your Retirem on Solid Ground –

PET CORNER
The following animals are available through the Van Wert Animal Protective League: Cats: M, F, 7 years, fixed, front dew clawed, grey, longhaired tiger Kittens : F, 12 weeks, gray tiger, long-haired F, 12 weeks, gray and white Tabby M, 12 weeks, wormed, black with white feet and belly; Dogs: Pit Bull, F, 5 years, fawn, name Cocoa Jack Russell Papillion, F, 8 years, spayed, black and white, name Sally Lhasa Apso, M. 10 years,; white, shots, name Oliver For more information on the pets or if you are in need of finding a home for your pet, contact The Animal Protective League from 9-5 weekdays at (419) 749-2976. If you are looking for a pet not listed, call to be put on a waiting list in case one you’re looking for becomes available. Donations or correspondence can be sent to PO Box 321, Van Wert, Ohio, 45891. The Humane Society of Allen County has many pets waiting for adoption. Each comes with a spay or neuter, first shots and a heartworm test. Call 419-991-1775.

Even If Things at Wor Up in the Air.

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6 – The Herald

Saturday, November 10, 2012

All-Star Volleyball match Wednesday
All-Star Volleyball match Wednesday The District 8 Senior AllStar match will be held 7 p.m. Wednesday at Wapakoneta High School. Players of the Year for the respective divisions include: Division I, Kayce Krucki of Findlay; Division II, Demma Strausbaugh of Defiance; Division III, Kelley Selhorst of OttawaGlandorf; and Division IV, Claire Heitkamp of Marion Local (West) and Briana Herr of McComb (East). Earning first-team honors in Divisions I-II-III were Michaela Wenning – Celina; Macy Reigelsperger – Coldwater; Demma Strausbaugh – Defiance; Kayce Krucki – Findlay; Allison Twining – Findlay; Rachel Myers – Liberty-Benton; Sarah Pajka – Lima Central Catholic; Karli Jones – New Bremen; Kelley Selhorst – Ottawa-Glandorf; Niki Ellerbrock – Ottawa-Glandorf; Nicole Brown – Wapakoneta; and Amber Dickerson - Wapakoneta. Honorable mention were Jamie Bills – Coldwater; Sam Murray – Defiance; Emma Schluecher – Findlay; Kirsten Davis – Bath; Julie Brown – New Bremen; and Alexa Dunlap – Van Wert. Playing in the senior all-Star match are: EAST: Katrina Wireman – Allen East; Kayce Krucki – Findlay; Allison Twining – Findlay; Emma Schluecher – Findlay; Liz Streacker– LibertyBenton; Sarah Pajka – Lima Central Catholic; Shanna Farler – Lima Central Catholic; Bethany Pohjala – Lima Shawnee; Kelley Selhorst – Ottawa-Glandorf; Kelsey Baldwin – OttawaGlandorf; Kristi Jerwers – OttawaGlandorf; and Sarah Benson – Van Buren. Co-coaches are Cristy Gray – Liberty-Benton; and Wes Horstman – Lima Central Catholic. WEST: Beth Homan – Celina; Jamie Bills – Coldwater; Emily Kahlig – Coldwater; Demma Strausbaugh – Defiance; Paige Mathewson – Defiance; Kyra Allen – Lima Senior; Haley Moeller – New Bremen; Lexi Roop – St. Marys; Sydney Collins – Van Wert; Nicole Brown – Wapakoneta; Amber Dickerson – Wapakoneta; and Megan Hayzlett - Wapakoneta. Co-coaches are Brooke Shindler – Defiance; and Vicki Smith – Van Wert. Coach of the Year is Brooke Shindler of Defiance. In Division IV, first-teamers

include Madison Stuby – Arcadia; Adrienne Shepard – Arlington; Julia Wynn – Columbus Grove; Kelly Nadler – Leipsic; Amber Gerdeman – Leipsic; Claire Heitkamp – Marion Local; Hannah Arling – Marion Local; Briana Herr – McComb; Haley Horstman – New Knoxville; Megan Maag – Pandora-Gilboa; Taylor Clune – St. Henry; and Kylie Koesters – St. Henry. On the second unit were Kirstin Hicks – Crestview; Kayla Siefker – Kalida; Abbie Patton – Perry; Megan Wendel – Marion Local; Hannah Bundy – McComb; Jenna Huffman – McComb; C l a i r e McGowan – Minster; Tonya K a u f m a n – Ottoville; Morgan Steinbrunner – Parkway; Amanda Sutton – Temple Christian; Aspen Rose – Upper Scioto Valley; and Bailey Collins – Waynesfield-Goshen. Honorable Mention Earning honorable-mention status were Rachel Schumacher – Columbus Grove; Tessa Heitmeyer – Cory-Rawson; Gina Kramer – Marion Local; Whitney Arseneau – Ridgemont; Abby Freewalt – Spencerville; and Ally Mikesell – St. Henry. For the AllStar Match, representing the East (headed by Kelly Lepley of Columbus Grove and Diana Inbody, Arlington) are Taylor Willeke – Ada; Madison Stuby – Arcadia; Adrienne Shepard – Arlington; Jordyn Webb – Arlington; Faith Huff – Columbus Grove; Tessa Heitmeyer – Cory-Rawson; Kendra Gerten – Leipsic; Abbie Patton – Perry; Briana Herr – McComb; Hannah Bundy – McComb; Becca Leppelmeier – McComb; Aspen Rose – Upper Scioto Valley; and Bailey Collins – Waynesfield-Goshen. On the West team (coached by Jill Roode of New Knoxville and Heather Crow of Lincolnview) are Mekale Clifton – Crestview; Kelsey Fiely – Ft. Recovery; Kayla Siefker – Kalida; Claire Heitkamp – Marion Local; Hannah Arling – Marion Local; Claire McGowan – Minster; Taylor Niemeyer – New Knoxville; Abby Siefker – Ottoville; Morgan Steinbrunner – Parkway; Taylor Clune – St. Henry; Kylie Koesters – St. Henry; and Danielle Uhlenhake – St. Henry. Coaches of the Year are Amy Steininger of Marion Local (West) and Leslie Kahle, McComb (East). The SEI Nominee is Kevin King of Elida. The Hall of Fame Nominee is Ann Ellerbrock, head coach of Ottawa-Glandorf.

Blue Jays rally in BIG way to demolish Crimson Streaks
By JIM METCALFE jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

SPORTS

www.delphosherald.com

By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with C Manuel Pina, 1B/DH Ian Gac and OF Luis Durango on minor league contracts. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP Justin Germano on a minor league contract. National League NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with C Mike Nickeas on a minor league contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with RHP Ryan Reid, OF Darren Ford, INF/OF Jared Goedert, INF Stefan Welch, INF Anderson Hernandez, INF Jeff Larish and LHP Kris Johnson on minor league contracts. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES LAKERS — Fired coach Mike Brown. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined the Pittsburgh Steelers $35,000 and WR Emmanuel Sanders $15,000 for faking an injury during an Oct. 21 game in Cincinnati. Suspended New England RB Brandon Bolden four games for violating the league policy on performance enhancing substances. Fined Carolina S Haruki Nakamura and Green Bay TE Ryan Taylor $21,000; Tennessee S Michael Griffin $20,000; Oakland CB Tyvon Branch, Carolina DE Greg Hardy and Arizona LB Quentin Groves $15,750; Baltimore LB Dannell Ellerbe $10,000; and Philadelphia QB Michael Vick, Indianapolis CB Cassius Vaughn and Pittsburgh S Will Allen $7,875 for their actions during last week’s games. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed S Mana Silva from the practice squad. Released S Delano Howell. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Activated DT Pat Sims from the physically-unable-to-perform list. Rreleased LB Roddrick Muckelroy. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed DB De’Andre Presley to the practice squad. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Released DE Ernest Owusu from

TRANSACTIONS

BOWLING GREEN — Fremont St. Joseph Central Catholic came out like a house a-fire versus St. John’s in a Region 22 semifinal Friday night at Doyt Perry Stadium on the campus of Bowling Green State University. They built up a 21-7 lead behind the right arm of Zack Yeckley with just 13 minutes gone in the contest. The Blue Jays then dominated the rest of the night, scoring 47 unanswered points to rout the Crimson Streaks 54-21 in a game delayed by lightning in the fourth period. St. John’s (8-4) will now play McComb, who ousted Tiffin Calvert, Friday night in the regional finals. The Blue Jays had got within 21-13 to start the second half and Tom Morris photos made their halftime adjustments Fullback Luke MacLennan bulls through the line and over a St. Joe defender for the lead. on both sides of the ball. Whatever head coach Todd virtually untouched to the end then busted loose once more. sojourn, including a 28-yard Schulte and defensive coordina- zone. Jettinghoff swept left end He took a toss off right tackle, scoring toss to Marcus Kerr (7 tor Steve “Peanut” Recker did, for a 27-21 edge with 1:38 show- got through the traffic downfield catches, 104 yards) on a perfect they should bottle it. ing in the period. and then turned on the jets to seam route on the right hash. “We just put our kids in betSt. Joe’s tried to retaliate, the end zone. Metzger made it Yeckley hit Stierwalt for the 2 ter positions to do their jobs and driving from the 29 to the Jays’ 47-21 with 8:27 left and another and a 21-7 edge with 11:28 left make plays. That’s what adjust- 27 in 11 plays. An apparent personal foul was called on the in the half. ments are all about,” Schulte 27-yard touchdown connection Streaks. That would be the final points explained. “They were hurting from Zack Yeckley to Jordan Once more starting at the 20, that Fremont St. Joseph would us with their passing game early Sessler (4 grabs, 92 yards) was St. Joe’s reached the Jays’ 44 in score in the game and the year. on and we started to get more nullified by an offensive pass three plays. However, Yeckley The Jays tried to retaliate and pressure on their quarterback. interference penalty and resulted went over the middle and Troy did march from the 20 to the Offensively, outside of a couple in a loss of down as well, forcing Warnecke got the pick instead, Fremont 28 but a holding call of our own mistakes, they really a punt. setting up the Blue and Gold at stymied the drive and it ended on only stopped us once. We were It took the Jays one play to their 47. The Jays finished off an interception by Alex Valeba very effective.” go the 79 yards. Jettinghoff (21 the scoring with an 8-play drive. at the Streaks’ 14. The Jays received a 64-yard rushes, 244 yards, 2 scores) took At the Fremont 13, MacLennan Though Fremont got a first kickoff return by Tyler a toss off right tackle, found a took a trap inside right guard, down, they had to punt as the Jettinghoff to start the half at the nice hole, followed the blocking bounced it outside and found Jays began to pressure Yeckley. Fremont (10-2) 31. Four plays through the traffic and emerged paydirt with 1:56 remaining. The Jays then went on an later, including a pass interfer- toward the sideline. He broke Metzger added the final point. 11-play, 66-yard drive that ence on the Streaks and their a tackle at the Fremont 35 and “We’ve been waiting for this chewed up 4:02. At the St. Joe own holding penalty, the Jays headed toward the middle to kind of execution on the option 8, Boggs dropped and threw to fumbled, with Mitchell Gonya finish off the scoring jaunt. The and we’re getting it. Tyler seems Youngpeter in the right corner recovering at the 6. 2-point pass failed for a 33-21 always a shoestring away from of the end zone for the tally with The Jays gave up a first down edge with 9:26 left. breaking a big play and that’s a 23 ticks left. Metzger’s kick was but forced a punt; the 21-yard That is when lightning was big part of our offense,” Schulte wide left for a 21-13 halftime shank gave them field position spotted — a common occurrence added. “What makes us more lead. at the Fremont 41. Mark Boggs during the regular season this effective is that Luke is running That set up the Jays’ second(5-of-9 passing, 72 yards) hit fall — and it resulted in a 1-hour, better and better and gives us half dominance. Andrew Metzger for 22 and then 35-minute delay. that second option when teams two running plays put the pigOn the score, a personal foul tried to take Jett away. When ST. JOHN’S 54, FREMONT ST. JOE skin at the 6. Boggs (11 rushes, was called on Fremont and the they try to take those two away, 21 56 yards) then took an option Jays kicked off — once play Mark is doing a good job reading St. John’s 7 6 14 27 - 54 8 0 0 - 21 to the right, kept it and hit the resumed — at the St. Joe 45, it and making plays. The offen- Frem. St. Joe 13 defensive back head-on at the with Metzger putting the ball in sive line is doing ag reat job in FIRST QUARTER goal line for the six. The fake the end zone. front of them; even though teams FSJ - Jordan sessler 6 pass from Zack extra-point pass failed and the A 4-yard pass put the ball may stack the line, it’s hard to Yeckley (Corey Durbin kick fail) 8:52 Jays trailed 21-19 with 5:58 left on the 24 but on the next play, take everything away.” SJ - Luke MacLennan 36 run (Andrew in the third. Jettinghoff stepped in front of a The Crimson Streaks got off Metzger kick) 7:16 The Jays forced a 3-and-out Yeckley aerial at the 25 and was much quicker than they ended. FSJ - Luke Stierwalt 7 pass from Yeckley They took the opening kick- (Durbin kick fail) 4:03 and the offense commenced at down the right sideline to paySECOND QUARTER the 36. With a 9-play drive (all dirt. Metzger tacked on the kick off, starting at the 26, and went FSJ - Marcus Kerr 28 pass from Yeckley up with an 8-play drive, where but one play — an incomplete for a 40-21 edge with 8:53 left. pass — on the ground), the Jays On the very next play from Yeckley (22-of-40 passing, 284 (Stierwalt pass from Yeckley) 11:28 SJ Ben Younpeter 7 pass from Mark took the lead for good. At the scrimmage — at the Fremont 29 yards, 3 picks, 3 TDs) completed Streak 16, Luke MacLennan (14 — Yeckley went deep but Ben a torrid 4-of-6 (67 yards); that Boggs (Metzger kick fail) :23 THIRD QUARTER totes, 146 yards, 3 scores) took Youngpeter leapt and got the included a 53-yarder to Seesler SJ - Boggs 6 run (Pass fail) 5:58 the practice squad. Signed DE a quick trap up the gut and was pick at the Jays’ 36. Jettinghoff on the very first play. On the SJ - MacLennan 16 run (Tyler Jettinghoff George Johnson to the practice eighth play at the Jays’ 6, a 4th- run) 1:38 squad. and-5, Yeckley threw to Sessler FOURTH QUARTER HOCKEY SJ - Jettinghoff 79 run (Pass fail) 9:26 on a quick slant to the left side American Hockey League SJ - Jettinghoff 25 interception return for the score. Corey Durbin’s AHL — Suspended Peoria RW extra point made it 7-0 with 8:52 (Metzger kick) 8:53 Cody Beach two games for his SJ - Jettinghoff 64 run (Metzger kick) showing in the opening period. actions during Thursday’s game. 8:27 The Jays retaliated with SJ - MacLennan 13 run (Metzger kick) M A N C H E S T E R a 4-play, 62 yarder, set up 1/56 MONARCHS — Signed D by a 15-yard kick return by Vincent LoVerde to a professional Warnecke. Three running plays TEAM STATS tryout agreement. St. John’s Frem. St. Joe put them at the Fremont 36 and ECHL 23 18 from there, MacLennan took an First Downs ECHL — Fined Elmira LW 528 336 option handoff over the left side, Total Yards Brad Peltz an undisclosed amount 53-456 19-52 broke through tacklers at the Rushes-Yards for a violation of the league’s Passing Yards 72 284 line of scrimmage and veered Comps.-Atts. 5/9 22/40 exclusive equipment policy. toward the left sideline for the Intercepted by 3 1 Suspended Idaho F Mathieu six. Metzger tied it at 7 with 7:16 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1.0 Tousignant four games and fined showing in the first. Penalties-Yards 5-39 7-79 him an undisclosed amount for Back came Fremont with Punts-Aver. 1/335 4/27 his actions during Wednesday’s an 8-play, 67-yarder. Yeckley game. INDIVIDUAL was 3-of-5 (55 yards), includREADING ROYALS — ST. JOHN’S: ing a 7-yard score on a toss to Traded F Chris Langkow to South RUSHING: Jettinghoff 21/244, the right side of the end zone Carolina for future considerations. MacLennan 14/146, Boggs 11/56, Troy to Luke Stierwalt (8 catches, Warnecke 2/8, Nick Martz 4/3 Central Hockey League 61 yards). Durbin’s point-afterPASSING: Boggs 5/9, 72 yards, 1 interARIZONA SUNDOGS — touchdown was wide to make it ception, 1 TD Waived G Mike Spillane. Signed 13-7, Streaks, with 4:13 to go in RECEIVING: Jettinghoff 2-16, Jake Hays F Don Maloney Jr. 1-27, Metzger 1-22, Youngpeter 1-7 the first. BLOOMINGTON BLAZE — FREM. ST. JOE The Blue and Gold tried to Waived F Kyle Laughlin. RUSHING: Yeckley 9/36, Kerr 10/6 get it going and gained one first FORT WORTH BRAHMAS Clay Courtney pressures the punter into a poor kick. The Jays PASSING: Yeckley 2-40, 284 yards, 3 down but had to punt. — Waived F Stuart Jacobson. took advantage of the field position to take the lead on Mark Yeckley was a perfect 4-of-4 interceptions, 3 TDs RECEIVING: Stierwalt 8/61, Kerr 7/104, Signed F Bradley Gallant and D Boggs touchdown. (64 yards) on a 7-play, 74-yard Sessler 4/92, Alex Valeva 3/19 Nick Schneider. LACROSSE National Lacrosse League WASHINGTON STEALTH — Named Mike McQuaid vice By JOHN MARSHALL Homestead next weekend. Parker Kligerman had his couldn’t make up any ground until president of communications. The Associated Press Scott took advantage of the championship hopes dashed in late. SOCCER caution from Buescher’s wreck, one of wrecks, getting loose out That cleared the way for Major League Soccer AVONDALE, Ariz. — Brian slipping past Kyle Larson on the of a corner and slamming into two Buescher to build on his lead. He MLS — Suspended D.C. United M Andy Najar three games Scott used a pass on a restart with restart and holding on over the other trucks. Third in the points just couldn’t hold on. He overcame a pit mishap with and Dallas F Blas Perez two games two laps left to win a wreck-filled final lap for his second career heading into the race, he finished NASCAR Truck Series race at trucks victory — first since 2009 27th. about 100 laps left — he slid into and fined them, along with New Dillon got caught up later. the wall in his stall — to get back England M/F Fernando Cardenas, Phoenix International Raceway on at Dover. He is the 15th different He started 21st, but moved up into the top 10. undisclosed amounts for their Friday night that tightened up the winner this season, a trucks series season championship. record. quickly, grabbing the lead after a Buescher just needed to avoid actions during recent games. James Buescher appeared to Scott drove Kyle Busch string of crashes midway through trouble to give himself a comCHIVAS USA—Fired Robin manding lead, but got a bad break Fraser head coach, Greg Vanney well on his way to padding his Motorsports’ No. 18 Toyota, the the race. Dillon’s day took a bad turn with three laps to go. assistant coach, Simon Elliott points lead, running in the top 10 truck that won the series’ last race Running seventh, he had his technical director and head scout late in the race, but slammed into at the track in February 2011 with when he was involved in a wreck the wall with three laps left to fin- Busch at the well. with about 40 laps to go after right front tire go down, sending and Brian Lee athletic trainer. PIR was repaved and recon- German Quiroga hit Brendan his No. 31 truck hard into the wall. NEW YORK RED BULLS — ish 17th. He’s 11 points ahead of figured after that, and they ran fast Gaughan from behind. His crew tried to repair the heavy Announced the contract of coach Gaughan was infuriated by damage to the right side of his car, Hans Backe will not be extended. Timothy Peters, who avoided the in qualifying, with Nelson Piquet Jr. earning the pole with a track- the wreck, immediately climbing but couldn’t get it fixed before the Named Mike Petke interim coach. wrecks to finish fourth. Ty Dillon, second in the points record 134.439 mph. out of his car and reaching into race was over. Named Andy Roxburgh sporting entering the race, couldn’t avoid About 40 laps into the race, the Quiroga’s window as he screamed Peters took a gamble by taking director. a crash with about 40 laps left track started to get slick and trucks at the Mexican driver, pulling his four tires when everyone stayed COLLEGE BYU — Suspended DB Joe and finished 15th, putting him 12 started careening off the walls and helmet back at one point before out during a caution with 90 laps each other, crashing six times in storming off. left and avoided all the wrecks, Sampson and LB Zac Stout from points behind Buescher. That sets up what could be a 40 laps — four on consecutive Dillon managed to stay on giving himself a shot at the title the football team and announced the track and restarted 18th, but next weekend. they have withdrawn from school. wild finish in the season finale at restarts.

Brian Scott wins trucks race at Phoenix

www.delphosherald.com

Saturday, November 10, 2012

The Herald — 7

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DENVER: Panthers playI am going to have Dave Boninsegna incarcerated for ing better as of late, especially continuing to be the luckiest Cam Newton. Broncos seem man on the face of the earth on verge of playoff run behind — perhaps the entire cosmos! Peyton Manning and improving defense. Road team gets — and beat me again! He went 10-2 — 5-1 in this one. DAVE BONINSEGNA each of the college ranks and College: the pros — to improve to an Oregon State: Any chance overall mark of 54-30 (29-13, these teams have of catching 25-17). I went 8-4 — not too bad unbeaten and second-ranked but definitely NOT GOOD Oregon in the Pac-12 North ENOUGH!! I was 4-2 in each standings likely hinges on wincategory to better my mark to ning this game; Stanford is coming off a hard-fought over46-38: 22-20, 24-18. The Guest Picker was Bub time loss to Notre Dame, while Lindeman and he went 7-5 (3-3 Oregon State beat Arizona and 4-2) to improve that mark State. Stanford is unbeaten at home this season but the to 33-26 - 17-12, 16-14. There is not guest picker Beavers play well on the road; let’s take the Beavers to give this week. its their first home loss of Here are the games. the year. College: Oregon West Virginia: West State at Stanford; West Virginia has really startVirginia at Oklahoma ed to fall apart after an State; Mississippi State impressive beginning. at LSU; Texas A&M at The Mountaineers have Alabama; Notre Dame lost three in a row; this at Boston College; week they turn it around Kansas State at TCU. against State. NFL: Detroit at Jim LSU: LSU still feels Minnesota; Houston Metcalfe the sting of its last-minat Chicago; Dallas ute loss to top-ranked at Philadelphia; San Diego at Tampa Bay; Atlanta Alabama 21-17; the Tigers at New Orleans; Denver at should have an easier time this Saturday against Mississippi Carolina. State, State has been blown out JIM METCALFE in their last two games, includCOLLEGE STANFORD: The Cardinal ing a 38-7 loss to Bama. LSU are doing pretty well without gets big-time win. Alabama: This could be a Andrew Luck under center. Beavers may be the surprise good test for Alabama ... could team of the nation. These teams be but probably not. The Tide are pretty close and since this is rolling and it will roll over game is in Palo Alto, give the the Aggies on Saturday. Notre Dame: The Fighting edge to the Cardinal. OKLAHOMA STATE: Irish (9-0) haven’t been undeWest Virginia was an “It” team feated this late in a season since not too long ago but a couple of winning their first 10 games losses have brought them back in 1993 and with the Eagles to earth. Since this battle is in coming in just a bad team; who Stillwater, where the winds can picked this one for us to choose be very unnerving if you’re not (Editor’s Note: I did!!!!)? The used to them (edge to Okies Irish win by four touchdowns. Kansas State: Kansas State there), give the Cowboys the is pushing towards national “W”. LSU: Bayeaux Bengals championship title hopes; they very nearly — probably should should make a step closer this have — upset the Tide. They week with the Horned Frogs. I may be prime for an upset but think they come away with an MSU got destroyed by Texas impressive win at TCU. A&M at home; they are not the NFL: team to do it. Detroit: Detroit is last in the ALABAMA: Read above NFC North but has a chance for LSU. Tide may be primed to move ahead of Minnesota. for upset bid but not in The Lions have won 3 of 4 Tuscaloosa. Aggies are playing since a 20-13 home loss to the very well but not sure Vikings on Sept. 30. they can handle the I think the Lions win spotlight like this on round two against the the road. Vikings and get to the B O S T O N .500 mark. COLLEGE: Another Chicago: This upset bid here. game couldn’t be any However, this one is more even as two of legit. Irish have played the NFL’s top teams close to the vest — meet Sunday night at like last week against Soldier Field when the Pitt — and have gotten Texans try to prevent Dave many, many breaks to Boninsegna the Bears from winning go their way. At some seven straight games point, that won’t continue and for the first time in six years. Chestnut Hill can be an upset A possible Super Bowl prebid waiting to happen. Pick view?? Such a toss-up game; here says it happens in a low- let’s go with the home team. scoring affair. Dallas: Philadelphia tries to TCU: Another potential avoid dropping five straight for upset special. K-State is anoth- the first time under coach Andy er surprise team but if quarter- Reid when it hosts Dallas, back Collin Klein isn’t up to which has lost four of five. his usual play for Wildcats after With both teams struggling, head injury, Horned Frogs can maybe Jerry Jones wont get spring the upset. Plus, K-State locked out of the locker room is plus-20 in turnovers, another this week. Between the two, one of those stats that tends to the Eagles are struggling just a even out. Give the Fort Worth bit more; I’ll take Dallas to get home team the edge here. the win. NFL: Tampa Bay: The San Diego DETROIT: One of the pre- Chargers have the same record mier playmakers in the NFL, and are also just outside the Minnesota’s Percy Harvin, playoff picture but they haven’t is doubtful. That means All- looked much like a contender Day Petersen is going to lately. The surging Buccaneers get more attention from the try to win for the fourth time Lion defense. That will force in five games Sunday when Christian Ponder to play better they host the underachieving than he has and others to step Chargers. The Chargers have up. Detroit gets big win in the lost 4 of their last 5 and go on Metrodome. the road to Tampa where the CHICAGO: My only con- Buccs have won 3 of their last cern in this pick is if Charles 4. Tampa Bay get the win this Tillman doesn’t play for Da week at home. Bears because his wife-mateNew Orleans: In what could spouse is giving birth. Still, I be a high-scoring affair at the like Chicago to get a big win in Superdome, the Falcons look Soldier Field on Veterans Day. to remain unbeaten when they PHILADELPHIA: Two very face a Saints team trying for disappointing teams. Both teams’ a fourth win in five games. head coaches are on the hot seat. Atlanta (8-0) is running away Methinks Eagles will play harder with the NFC South, ahead for Andy Reid than Cowboys for of second-place Tampa Bay “coach” Jason Garrett. by four games -- the largest TAMPA BAY: I just division lead in the league. changed my mind on this pick. However, the Saints are startDoug Martin gives Buccaneers ing to make a comeback; this a serious running game to go could be the week that the with a solid passing game. Falcons get loss number one. Chargers will score points, too, New Orleans hands the Falcons but not enough. their first loss of the season. NEW ORLEANS: Atlanta Denver: Peyton Manning vs. 8-0. Saints fighting for what’s Cam Newton. Manning and the left of playoff lives. I believe Broncos are really starting to they have a little more incen- hit their stride; they get another tive in this one. win this week in Carolina.

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NWC Tourney champs

Photo submitted

The Jefferson seventh-grade volleyball unit captured the NWC title. Members of the team are, bottom from left, Maggie Kimmet and Kristi Claypool; middle, Maddy Spring, Sara Zalar, Tristine Lehmkuhle, Macy Wallace and Sam Kehres; and top, Coach Danielle Carder, Devyn Carder, Sarah Miller, Katie Pohlman, Jenna Dunlap and Alaina Kortokrax.

OHIO DIVISION OF NATURAL RESOURCES Division of Wildlife Weekly Fish Ohio Fishing Report LAKE ERIE Regulations to Remember: The daily bag limit for walleye on Ohio waters of Lake Erie is 6 fish per angler with a minimum size limit of 15 inches. The daily bag limit for yellow perch is 30 fish per angler on all Ohio waters of Lake Erie. The trout and salmon daily bag limit is 2 fish per angler. The minimum size limit for trout and salmon is 12 inches. The black bass (largemouth and smallmouth bass) daily bag limit is 5 fish per angler with a 14-inch minimum size limit. Wind, waves and muddy water have limited most opportunities on Lake Erie over the past week (as of Tuesday) As the lake starts to clear up expect walleye fishing to improve around the islands and from Cedar Point to Lorain; most walleye are caught in the fall by trolling crankbaits in open water or by fishing at night nearshore and around piers. Fall yellow perch fishing can also produce some of the best catches of the season; most perch anglers fish around the islands or within a few miles of the ports from Huron to Conneaut. ... The water temperature is 45 degrees off of Toledo and 50 degrees off of Cleveland according to the nearshore marine forecast. ----WILD OHIO Tree Stand Safety…. Better And Easier Than Ever Wear a full body safety harness and use a climbing safety strap whenever your feet leave the ground. Columbus — The ODNR, Division of Wildlife, would like to remind hunters to wear a Full Body Safety Harness (FBSH) and use a climbing safety strap whenever their feet leave the ground. Tree stands (elevated platforms) are one of the most popular pieces of equipment used by deer hunters in Ohio and nationwide. However, due to human error and/ or equipment failure, the number of debilitating or fatal injuries resulting from their use is higher than it should be. Statistically, one out of three hunters will fall from a tree stand at some point in his or her hunting career. Given that statistic, it is imperative that the proper safety gear be used--and used correctly. In the past, hunter-education organizations stressed the need for hunters to use either a single waist belt or a chest harness that was directly attached to the tree with a strap or tether. Unfortunately, it has been found that a waist belt or chest harness can severely restrict a person’s breathing and upper body movements in the event of an unexpected fall. In some instances, these devices have even caused death because they failed to properly support the weight of a person who remained suspended for long periods of time after falling. Today, all hunter and huntereducation organizations recommend wearing a FBSH that distributes the hunter’s weight throughout their shoulders, chest, waist and legs thus securely supporting a fallen person without causing added harm or injury. Here are a few tips to help prevent accidents this hunting season. • Always use a FBSH and read manufacturer instructions before use. • Before using your FSBH in the field, practice using it at ground level. • Always use a climbing safety strap. Most accidents occur when climbing up or down from a tree stand. • Never climb with anything in your hands. Always use a haul line to raise and lower your equipment. For more safety tips, visit the DOW’s Tree Stand Safety page or to check your knowledge of tree

stand safety take a free, online Tree Stand Safety Course from The Treestand Manufacturer’s Association (TMA). Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com. ----Rabbit, pheasant and quail hunting seasons underway COLUMBUS — The hunting seasons for some of the state’s

WILDLIFE OHIO

most popular game species — ring-necked pheasant, cottontail rabbit and bobwhite quail — began Nov. 2. The state’s cottontail rabbit population has been very good recently. However, Nathan Stricker, project leader with ODNR’s Olentangy Wildlife Research Station, said rabbit populations tend to go through an upand-down cycle every 7-10 years. “Rabbit numbers are lower this year but this type of decline is expected with this cycle,” Stricker explained. “Regardless of these cyclical changes, cottontail rabbit populations are excellent throughout Ohio and provide plenty of opportunities for a family hunting outing.” Quail and pheasant populations may be lower than previous years; Stricker added these are heavily dependent upon quality habitats on private lands provided by the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Williams and Defiance counties in northwest Ohio have strong pheasant populations because of the habitat contributions by local landowners. Upland game populations are responding positively to habitat programs in other areas around the state, especially in counties with significant enrollment in the Scioto Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program and Quail Buffer practices in CRP known as CP33. Cottontail rabbit hunting continues through Feb. 28, 2013. Ring-necked pheasant hunting is open through Jan. 6, 2013. Both seasons are closed during the statewide 2012 deer-gun hunting season, Nov. 26-Dec. 2. Rabbits, pheasants and quail may be hunted from sunrise to sunset. The daily bag limit for all three species remains unchanged from last year: four rabbits, two pheasants (roosters/males only) and four quail. Hunters are reminded that snowshoe hares are not legal game in Ohio and should not be hunted. These were recently reintroduced to northeastern Ohio after nearly a century of absence. They are brown early in the season, which makes them resemble cottontail rabbits; to avoid confusion between cottontail rabbits and snowshoe hares, portions of Geauga and Ashtabula counties will be closed to all rabbit hunting through Dec. 2. At that time, hunters will be able to distinguish between the two rabbits since most snowshoe hares will have turned white by early December. Two restricted hunting zones cover portions of Geauga and Ashtabula counties. The first encompasses parts of the counties bordered by U.S. 6 to the north, U.S. 322 to the south, Kile Road to the west and SR 534 to the east. The second restricted area is in Ashtabula County bounded on the north by CorkCold Springs Road, on the west by Windsor-Mechanicsville Road, on the south by New Hudson Road and on the east by U.S. 45. A map of these two areas can be viewed in the 2012-13 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations and at wildohio.com. Pheasants are released in selecting hunting areas throughout the state by the DOW prior to opening day of the pheasant season, the second Saturday of the season (today) and Thanksgiving Day. Bobwhite quail hunting is open in 16 counties in southern Ohio:

Adams, Athens, Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Highland, Jackson, Meigs, Montgomery, Pike, Preble, Ross, Scioto, Vinton and Warren. The season continues through Nov. 25. Additional hunting information is contained in the 201213 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations, which are available where hunting licenses are sold, online at wildohio.com or by calling 800-WILDLIFE. ---Get those cameras ready The fifth annual Ohio Wildlife Legacy Stamp Photo Competition will feature Ohio’s many native turtle species found throughout the state in many different habitats, from woodlands to lakes to swamps. ----Extended Hotline hours The 1-800-WILDLIFE (9453543) hotline hours will be extended during the deer-gun hunting season until 7 p.m. To report wildlife violations and other illegal activity, Ohioans are encouraged to call TIP (Turn-In-a-Poacher) at 1-800-POACHER (762-2437). ----Populations steady for upcoming Furbearer Hunting, Trapping seasons COLUMBUS — Ohio’s annual furbearer hunting and trapping seasons begin today for certain species. Good furbearer populations are expected this year, according to the ODNR. “Following the mild winter of 2011-12, most populations of furbearing species are doing very well,” said DOW Biologist Suzie Prange. “We anticipate fur takers will have a good season for most species.” Fox, raccoon, opossum, skunk and weasel hunting and trapping seasons are open through Jan. 31, 2013. Mink and muskrat trapping seasons are open through Feb. 28, 2013. However, raccoon, opossum, skunk, weasel, mink and muskrat trapping seasons will remain open through March 15, 2013, only in Erie, Ottawa and Sandusky counties as well as Lucas County east of the Maumee River. Coyote hunting and trapping has no closed season with an unrestricted bag limit. Special hunting regulations for coyotes apply during the statewide deergun season, Nov. 26-Dec. 2 and Dec. 15-16, and deer-muzzleloader season, Jan. 5-8, 2013. Beaver and river otter trapping seasons are open Dec. 26

through Feb. 28, 2013; beaver trapping is open statewide. For the eighth year, 43 counties will be open for river otter trapping. These were reintroduced into Ohio from 1986-93 and have increased their range in the state. River otters were removed from Ohio’s Endangered Species List in 2002. Full details of open counties as well as checking and permit requirements can be found in the Ohio River Otter Trapping Regulations or at wildohio.com. There will be no daily bag limits or restrictions on hours for hunting and trapping furbearers, with the exception of river otters. These are dependent on the

county where it was trapped. A fur taker permit is required in addition to a valid Ohio hunting license to hunt or trap furbearing animals, except for coyotes, which may be hunted or trapped yearround without a permit. A special ODNR Division of Wildlife permit is required to trap beaver and river otter on state public hunting areas. River otters that are accidentally captured, either in excess of bag limits or in closed counties, must be released unharmed. Those that cannot be released must be turned over to ODNR DOW. Beaver trappers in particular are advised to watch for river otter sign and modify set placements where necessary. The Ohio State Trappers Association and DOW have published a guide on how to recognize river otter sign and use avoidance techniques while trapping for beaver in areas closed to river otter trapping. A copy of the publication can be ordered by calling 800-WILDLIFE. Ohio is among the nation’s leading producers of raw furs. Last year, 22,195 fur taker permits were sold in the state. The state currently has 65 licensed fur dealers. Additional hunting and trapping information is available in the 2012-13 Ohio Hunting Regulations, at wildohio.com or by calling 800-WILDLIFE. ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.com.

Quotes of local interest supplied by EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Close of business November 9, 2012 Description Last Price
DJINDUAVERAGE NAS/NMS COMPSITE S&P 500 INDEX AUTOZONE INC. BUNGE LTD EATON CORP. BP PLC ADR DOMINION RES INC AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC CVS CAREMARK CRP CITIGROUP INC FIRST DEFIANCE FST FIN BNCP FORD MOTOR CO GENERAL DYNAMICS GENERAL MOTORS GOODYEAR TIRE HEALTHCARE REIT HOME DEPOT INC. HONDA MOTOR CO HUNTGTN BKSHR JOHNSON&JOHNSON JPMORGAN CHASE KOHLS CORP. LOWES COMPANIES MCDONALDS CORP. MICROSOFT CP PEPSICO INC. PROCTER & GAMBLE RITE AID CORP. SPRINT NEXTEL TIME WARNER INC. US BANCORP UTD BANKSHARES VERIZON COMMS WAL-MART STORES 12,815.39 2,904.87 1,379.85 376.89 71.49 49.05 40.84 49.33 41.80 46.36 35.93 17.03 14.82 10.93 64.45 25.04 11.53 58.64 60.96 29.95 6.16 69.87 40.62 51.66 31.47 84.74 28.83 68.85 67.01 1.05 5.55 44.67 32.10 9.11 42.64 72.31

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After three bumpy years, Europe turns corner on crisis
By DAVID McHUGH and DON MELVIN The Associated Press FRANKFURT, Germany — The worst of Europe’s financial crisis appears to be over. European leaders have taken steps to ease the panic that has plagued the region for three turbulent years. Financial markets are no longer in a state of emergency over Europe’s high government debts and weak banks. And this gives politicians from the 17 countries that use the euro breathing room to fix their remaining problems. Threats remain in Greece and Spain, and Europe’s economy is forecast to get worse before it gets better. But an imminent breakup of the euro now seems unlikely, analysts say. “We are probably well beyond the worst,” says Holger Schmieding, chief economist at Berenberg Bank in London. He says occasional flare-ups in financial markets are likely, but “coming waves of turmoil will be less severe.” Evidence that Europe has turned a corner can be found in countries’ falling borrowing costs, rising stock markets and a slow but steady stabilization of the region’s banking system: — The interest rates investors are demanding to lend to struggling countries such as Spain and Italy have plunged — a sign that investors are less fearful about defaults. Spain’s two-year bonds carry an interest rate, or yield, of just under 3 percent — down from a July 24 peak of 6.6 percent. Italy’s bond yields have dropped just as sharply. — The Stoxx 50 index of leading European shares has surged 26 percent since June 1, while the euro has risen from $1.26 to $1.29 over the same period. — After months of withdrawals, deposits are trickling back into Greek and Spanish banks, signaling that fears of their imminent financial collapse are abating. And U.S. money market mutual funds loaned 16 percent more to eurozone banks in September. That was the third straight monthly increase in short-term funding to European banks, and follows a 70 percent reduction since May 2011. More proof the crisis is easing: Gatherings of European financial ministers no longer cause global stock and bond markets to gyrate with every sign of progress or a setback. As financial-market panic recedes, euro leaders have more time to try to fix the flaws in their currency union. Among the challenges are reducing regulations and other costs for businesses in order to stimulate economic growth, and imposing more centralized authority over budgets to prevent countries from ever again spending beyond their means. That’s important because a major cause of the crisis was Greece’s overspending during the calm years after the euro’s introduction in 1999, and Italy’s failure to cut the high levels of debt it joined with. Other governments — such as Spain and Ireland — were saddled with debt piled up by banks and real estate developers during boom years. Much of the credit for easing Europe’s financial crisis goes to the European Central Bank, which has become more aggressive over the past year under the leadership of

8 – The Herald

Saturday, November 10, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Up to 11,000 people flee Silver’s a pop-culture star Syria in 24-hour period
By JOCELYN NOVECK The Associatec Press By ZEINA KARAM and JOHN HEILPRIN The Associated Press BEIRUT — As many as 11,000 people fled Syria in 24 hours, some of them desperately clambering through a razor-wire fence into Turkey on Friday to escape fierce fighting between rebels and government forces for control of a border town. The exodus is a sign of the escalating ferocity of the violence, which has killed more than 36,000 people since March 2011. Despite the bloodshed, embattled President Bashar Assad insisted there was no civil war in Syria, saying in a rare TV appearance that he was protecting Syrians against “terrorism” supported from abroad. The flood of Syrians into neighboring Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon was “the highest that we have had in quite some time,” said Panos Moumtzis, the U.N. refugee agency’s regional coordinator for the region. About 2,000 to 3,000 people are fleeing Syria daily, and the recent surge brings the number registered with the agency to more than 408,000, he said. During the 24-hour period that began Thursday, 9,000 Syrians crossed into Turkey — including 70 who were wounded and two who then died, U.N. officials said. Jordan and Lebanon each By ROBERT BARR The Associated Press absorbed another 1,000 refugees. The largest flow into Turkey came from the fighting at Ras al-Ayn in the predominantly Kurdish oil-producing northeastern province of al-Hasaka. The town hugs the border, practically adjacent to the Turkish town of Ceylanpinar. On Thursday, rebels captured a border crossing between the two towns, Ceylanpinar’s mayor, Ismail Aslan, told The Associated Press by telephone. Rebels on Friday overran three security compounds in the town belonging to the military intelligence, air force intelligence and general intelligence directorate agencies, according to the Britainbased Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, an opposition activist group. More than 20 soldiers were killed in the fighting, the Observatory said. Regime forces shelled rebel positions Friday morning, Aslan said. Regime tanks were also moving in to join the fight, according to another opposition activist group, the Local Coordination Committees. Syria’s more than 2 million Kurds, long marginalized, have largely stayed out of the fighting, although some have taken part in demonstrations against Assad. But like other minority groups, they have increasingly been drawn into the fighting. NEW YORK — The other night, Nate Silver got a little taste of what things are going to be like for him, post-Election 2012. The 34-year-old statistician, unabashed numbers geek, author and creator of the muchread FiveThirtyEight blog at The New York Times had gone out for a drink with friends on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. But he couldn’t stay incognito; immediately, he says, people sitting at the bar recognized him. He was surprised, but probably shouldn’t have been. After all, for 24 hours, ever since his election forecasts had proved uncannily successful — he correctly predicted the presidential winner in all 50 states, and almost all the Senate races — he’d been hailed as the election’s “other winner,” who’d silenced doubters and proved the value of a cool-headed, math-based approach. That very night, he’d appeared on Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show” for the second time in three weeks. “Don’t you want to stand up and say, ‘I am Nate Silver, bow down to me!!”’ Stewart roared, as the bespectacled Silver sat and chuckled. His name was trending on Twitter and he was the subject of a satirical Twitter hashtag, “Drunk Nate Silver.” The Hollywood Reporter said he’d “made statistics sexy again.” Many called his story a real-life “Revenge of the Nerds” tale. My email program, which And, oh, his new book had touts itself as the best in the soared to No. 2 on Amazon, world, promises effective spam filtering, easy-to-organize mailing lists and hassle-free access from anywhere. It does ment was positive. Jonathan Gledhill, bish- all of that. And, like all other op of Lichfield, called the email programs, it randomly appointment “daring and throws real email into the spam file. imaginative.” It’s like hiring a moving “Everybody seems to like company to get your furniture him, those who know him,” said Stephen Parkinson, U.K. across town and finding out director of the traditionalist six months later that the box with your wedding pictures group Forward in Faith. The Rev. Bob Callaghan of didn’t make the trip because Inclusive Church, which cam- the van driver threw it out on paigns against discrimination a whim. “Sorry. Who knew based on sexuality or gender, you’d want something like said Welby’s appointment that?” It’s only when you get an was “quite a brave statement email from something that by the church: We’ll have should have automatically something fresh and new and been put in your spam file, like see where it goes.” “worldsraunchiestsexvideos” Rod Thomas, chairman or “tryviagrafree,” that you of the conservative evan- investigate. Sure enough, gelical group Reform, said most of the stuff in the junk Welby “has great credibility file will be junk -- amazing as a mediator and a friend of junk, obvious junk. Africa, so we will be prayYou wonder who would ing” that he can heal some respond to “Get prescriptions of the splits in the Anglican at half price” from A. Communion. Nonymous. How can he afford Women and the Church, to do it? Because he makes which has campaigned for the pills in his basement from female bishops, said it was sawdust, cornstarch and food encouraged that Welby had coloring and there isn’t any worked with women as equals real medicine in them, that’s in the business world. how. And he passes the savings Welby supports the ordi- along to you, the soon-to-benation of women as bishops, dead consumer. One of his and indicated that his think- big selling points is that he’s ing on legally defining same- never had a complaint. How sex unions as “marriage” — could he? All his customers which he and other bishops are dead or in comas. Now have opposed — was evolv- there’s a business plan. ing. Sex, medicine and money

Mario Draghi. The ECB said Sept. 6 that it was willing to buy unlimited amounts of government bonds issued by countries struggling to pay their debts. The ECB’s pledge instantly lowered borrowing costs for Spain and Italy, which earlier in the year had faced the same kinds of financial pressures that forced Ireland, Greece and Spain to seek bailouts. “Financial market confidence has visibly improved,” Draghi said Thursday during a press conference. The ECB’s actions are reminiscent of the aggressive action by the Federal Reserve in the United States in late 2008 and early 2009 after the financial crisis hit. The Fed offered banks cheap loans and started buying bonds to ease long-term borrowing rates and boost the confidence of consumers and businesses. The Fed didn’t solve the problem of high unemployment. But its actions defused panic in the financial markets and helped restore the health of U.S. banks. The Fed bought time for the economy to begin to heal.

after he linked to it on Twitter an hour after the first network call for President Barack Obama. (”This is probably a good time to link to my book,” he’d tweeted at 12:13 a.m. — the closest he came to gloating.) Even so, Silver says he wasn’t quite prepared for that incident in the bar. “It’s odd,” he said Thursday in a telephone interview from his Brooklyn home. “Is this going to happen every day, as opposed to once a month? I still have to get accustomed to this.” Silver, who uses computer models that he runs on a beatup laptop at home, is quick to acknowledge the accomplishments of others using similar methods. “It’s a little strange to become a kind of symbol of a whole type of analysis,” he said. And he noted that similar work was being done with, for example, weather, all the time. “You have to give those forecasters way more credit,” he said. “Their forecasts have real life-and-death consequences” In politics, too, others have used similar computer models to predict races. What Silver has done, though, is not only arrive at a formula that uses aggregated polls and other weighted factors to achieve his predictions, but to write about them in an accessible and engaging way.

ACROSS 1 Vast chasm 6 Generously 11 Natural well 12 Removed the tangles 13 Tempest in a -14 Raises 15 Viper 16 Smelting waste 17 Plug away 19 Two fives for -- -23 Yuck! 26 Stir to action 28 Mr. Milland 29 Put oil on 31 Draws close 33 Urgent 34 Give a hard time 35 Bear -36 First-magnitude star 39 Retiring 40 Flower holder 42 Trappist, e.g. 44 Arizona city 46 Keep in stitches 51 Seldom 54 Lopped off branches 55 Items in squirrel’s hoard 56 Overdoes a role 57 High-IQ group 58 Church law DOWN 1 Imitated 2 Actor -- Pitt 3 “Omigosh!”

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 16 18 20 21 22 23 24 25 27 29 30 32 34 37 38 41 43 45 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

Pony’s comment Barracks off. Ibsen heroine Greek alphabet ender U.K. network Give the go-ahead Fabric meas. RR terminal Yo-Yo Ma plays it Polite word Choose Rubbish Bright and -Big Board letters Rough, as a diamond Chisel Web-search result Forensic science tool Contented murmurs Reno loc. Hairpin curve Leia’s rescuer Tube trophies -- -- step further Mike of “Wayne’s World” Cause-and-effect law Arm bone Physics particle Golden Rule word Watched Sullivan and Murrow Leader of the flock Expert Prez after Jimmy Chest muscle, for short

27 inmates killed in Sri Lanka prison shootout
By BHARATHA MALLAWARACHI The Associated Press COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — A shootout between rioting prisoners and security forces at a prison in Sri Lanka’s capital killed at least 27 inmates, while police said today that they arrested five prisoners who had managed to escape and were searching for others. Another 42 people were wounded in the shootout Friday between inmates and army and police commandos that broke out after the rioting prisoners briefly took control of at least part of the Welikada prison in Colombo. The situation at the prison had returned to normalcy by this morning. “The prison is now totally under our control,” said prison chief P.W. Kodippili, whose facility was the site of another riot earlier this year. Dr. Anil Jasinghe, director of the Colombo National Hospital, said the bodies of 16 inmates were at his hos-

Spamming the globe
Jim Mullen

pital. Kodippili said that security forces had found the bodies of 11 other inmates inside the prison premises, and that the total number of deaths stood at 27. Twenty-three inmates who were injured in the clash were receiving treatment at the hospital, Jasinghe said. Thirteen police officers, four soldiers, a prison guard and a passer-by also were being treated there for injuries. Police spokesman Prishantha Jayakody said five prisoners who escaped from the prison had been arrested. Kodippili declined to say how many inmates may have escaped, but said search operations were under way to find others who may have fled. Jayakody said the fighting began when police commandos went to the prison to conduct a search and were attacked by inmates hurling stones. He declined to provide more information. Officials often conduct raids for narcotics and communication devices.

Ex-oilman Welby named archbishop of Canterbury
LONDON — How will Justin Welby lead the world’s Anglicans and heal their deep divisions? Even he is not sure yet. Welby generated high hopes but few clear expectations Friday as British Prime Minister David Cameron announced the 56-year-old former oil executive was being promoted to archbishop of Canterbury after only a year’s experience as a bishop. “We don’t know much about him and there are very few expectations because he has been a bishop for such a short time,” said Paul Handley, managing editor of the Church Times newspaper. But, he said, initial signs were “very encouraging and impressive.” Welby, appointed last year as bishop of Durham in northeastern England, worked for 11 years in the oil industry, rising to treasurer of Enterprise Oil before deciding he was called to the priesthood. A skilled mediator who has worked to resolve conflicts in Nigeria and elsewhere in Africa, he will lead a global Anglican Communion riven by sharply divided views on gay people and the place of women in the church. As the 105th holder of a post that stretches back to the 6th century, Welby takes over after Rowan Williams retires in December. Welby said he felt privileged and astonished to be chosen to lead the church at “a time of spiritual hunger.” “It’s something I never expected,” Welby told reporters, saying he had been “overwhelmed and surprised” to be offered the job. Welby declined to take questions about the contentious issues of female bishops and the church’s attitude toward homosexuals and said “I don’t have a detailed plan” for promoting growth in the church. Reaction to his appoint-

The Village Idiot
are the three big junk mail themes. Apparently, no one with an email address is getting enough of these three things -- or, if they are, they’re paying too much for them. So when you see an email for half-price Viagra, it’s a spam trifecta: sex, medicine and money, all in one email. Not that there is any getting away from ED. The commercials are all the same: A guy in good shape, about 45, is windsurfing or rock climbing or cycling or jogging. He couldn’t be in better shape; he couldn’t be more attractive. But he suffers from a horrible affliction that I had never thought of as a big problem until Viagra was advertised on TV in 1999 in a commercial starring Bob Dole, who never mentioned the product. It’s odd that now impotence can be talked about a thousand times a day on TV, but I feel awkward mentioning it here, because people will write letters saying how disappointed they are to read about this kind of filth in a family newspaper. Because, as we all know, the family that reads the newspaper together -- hey! Would you stop

Answer to Puzzle

sexting and listen to me? I’m over here! Look down! Watching ED commercials with the sound off, you’d think the companies were selling a cure for rock climbing, surfing, cycling, jogging, cooking or gardening. And while a cure for those activities is desperately needed and would no doubt improve countless lives, that’s not the drug that’s being sold. It is a cure for a condition that, in many cases, is caused by consuming too much beer and/or watching too much TV instead of exercising. How many windsurfers and rock climbers suffer from ED compared with men whose only exercise is climbing in and out of their cars when they go to the doctor who is treating their adult-onset diabetes? And then to Hooters for lunch? Why do I never get spam telling men there’s a free cure for some cases of ED? All you have to do is take a shower and shave and stop walking around the house in dirty sweatpants. Coming home sober, washing the dishes and cleaning the bathroom without being asked have been known to work, too. But who is going to spam you with that? There’s no money in it. (Jim Mullen’s newest book is called “Kill Me, Elmo: The Holiday Depression Fun Book.” You can reach him at JimMullenBooks.com.

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Saturday, November 10, 2012

The Herald —9

Salute
(Continued from Page 4) Cletus H. Schuerman, Valita A.?? Schuerman, William B. Schuerman, Alfred Seffernick, Matthew Seffernick, William Seffernick, Benjamin E. Sergeant, Ralph Spicer, Don Stanz, Harold I. Stechshulte, Albert E. “Al” Suever, Elmer J. Suever, Joseph A. Suever, Thomas W. Swick, Albert E. Thomas Jr., John Trentman, James Tourjee, Linus Peter “Pete” Vetter, Donald E. VonLehmden, Alfred Wallenhorst, Hilary Wannemacher, Justin Wannemacher, Robert F. Wannemacher, Roman Wannemacher, Leander Warnecke, Richard W. Warnecke, Ed Watkins, Albert Wieging, Herbert Wieging, Leonard W. Wieging, Norman H. Wieging, Ralph W. Wieging, Vincent Wieging, Paul J. Wildenhaus, Roland J. Wildenhaus, Albert Wittler, Alberta Wittler, Elmer J. Wittler, Harold Wittler, Leander Wittler, Ralph Wittler and Francis E. Wreede. World War II Casualties Hubert J. Berelsman, Raymond L. Braockman, Elmer Broecker, Francis T. Hageman, William F. Lauf and Francis E. Wreede. Korean Conflict Veterans 25 June 1950 to 32 January 1955 Hilary Allemeier, Ralph Barnhart, Albert A. Berelsman, Fred Berry, Robert K. Bigelow, Donald Broecker, Elwood “Pats” Broecker, Donald Bruskotter, Fred Calvelage, Wendell E. Dempster, Wilbur Dickman, Eugene Dray, Norman Eversole, Felix Fenbert, Raphael Fischbach, Donald A. Fisher, William I. “Bill” Vietnam War veterans 5 August 1964 to 16 August 1973 Fred Berry, James Boehmer, Gerald Brinkman, Gerald Brockman, Paul Broecker, Michael N. Burgei, Dale Calvelage, John Calvelage, Lewis Calvelage, Ronald Calvelage, Robert Dray, Jr. Thomas Dunlap, Gary Ehrnsberger, Walter Fischer, Daniel Friemoth, Dennis Gasser, Donald Gasser, Thomas “Tom” Gasser, Robert Gerker, Carl Gerker, Robert J. Gerker, Michael Grothause, Lawrence “Larry” Heitmeyer, Lyle Heller, Harvey Hildebrand, Douglas Hoehn, Jerome Hoehn, Richard Hohenbrink, Michael Hughes, Ted W. Hunt, Patricia Hunt, Ed Jackson, Steven V. Kerner, Melvin Klima, Joseph A. Klir, Ronald Korte, Ralph. E. Kramer, Bernard G.?? Lauf, Donald Lauf, John Lucke, Ronald Mack, John Menke, David Metzger, Gerald Metzger, Ronald Metzger, Tom Metzger, Gene McGraw, Tim Michel, Kenneth Miehls, Michael “Mike” Miehls, Donald E. “Tex” Moening, Larry Moore, Tom Nichols, Steve Ostendorf, Carl Osting, Ralph Osting, Ronald Osting, Louis Pothast, John Potts, Tim Potts, David “Dave” Recker, James Recker, Robert J. Recker, Kenneth J. Rekart, George Rellinger, Tom Reynolds, Mark Rode, Michael “Mike” Rode, Thomas C. Sadler, David Schimmoeller, Raymond Schimmoeller, Robert Schuerman, Ronald Schweller, Steve Schilling, Steven Schleeter, Theodore Sealts, Robert Stanz, Daniel Stechschulte, Daniel Swick, Bernard “Sam” Utrup, James Utrup, John Vetter, Raymond Vogt, Robert VonLehmden, Sue (Odenweller) VonLehmden, Dan VonSossan, Vincent Vorst, Ronald Wannemacher, Philip Warnecke, Gary Wiechart, David Wieging, Dennis Wieging, Inez Wieging, Verl “Bud” Wieging, David “Dave” Will, Doyle Wittler and Ronald Young. Peacetime veterans Daniel Askins, Fred Askins, John Berelsman, Roger Broecker, Dale Bruskotter, Robert Calvelage, Raymond Coffey, Wendell Dempster, Steve Dickman, Tom Dickman, James “Jamie” Fischer, Jeff Fischer, James Gasser, Randy Gasser, Rick Gasser, Steve Geise, Richard German, Dale Good, Deborah (Minnig) Griffith, Ronald Grote, Darryl Hanf, Mike Hanf, Robert Heitemeyer, Robert M. “Bob” Hellman, James Hofstetter, Carol Kloeppel, George Knebel, Kenneth Kramer, Rick Kramer, Donald Krietemeyer, Eugene Krietemeyer, Roger Ladd, Timothy Landwehr, Gregory Louis McGue, Brian McNamara, James McKowen, Joseph Mesker, Eugene Metzger, Paul Metzger, Raymond Metzger Steve Metzger, William Metzger, Robert H. Meyer, Robert “Jude” Meyer, James Miehls, Larry Moore, Charles Murphy, Orville Neidert, Donald Ostendorf, Drew Roeder, Tom Rose, Brian Saum, Louis J. Saum, Louis Schimmoeller, Gilbert Schulte, Jr, Daniel Stemen, Carl Wieging, Thomas Wieging, Jeff Wittler, John Wittler and Robert Vorst. Persian Gulf Conflict 2 August 1990 to 28 February 1991 Todd Burgei, Jamie Fischer, Randy Gasser, Monte Kleman, CharlesKnebel, Mike Knebel, Robert Knebel, Janice Kloeppel and Lynn Lucke. Afghanistan War “Enduring Freedom” October 2002 Michael Boehmer, Ryan Calvelage, Randy Gasser, Dayne Kimmet, Jim Landwehr, Tim Landwehr, Brandon Miller, Jeremy Neidert, Brian Recker, Kyle Recker, Matt Schram, Zach Weber and Robert Will. Operation “Iraqi Freedom” March 2003 Michael Boehmer, Todd Burgei, Nathan Elston, Craig Elwer, Jeffrey Fischer, Randy Gasser, David Ketcham, Sharon Maenle, Brandon Miller, Lana (McGue) Mitchell, William “BJ’ Romes, Matt Schram, Travis Tenwalde, Jason Wagner and Zach Weber. Operation Northern Watch Turkey Joy Noriega West Pack Operations Japan A. J. Noriega National Guard Kenneth Beining, Harold Birkemeier, Kenneth Burgei, Terry Gasser, James Grone, Andy Hofstetter, Tom Hofstetter, James McNamara, Daniel Schimmoeller and Robert VonSossan. Coast Guard Kevin Smith More young men are on the delayed entry list. Following their induction, the Recker family will have three boys in the Marines and four Kleman brothers will be in other branches of the service. We need more information on Adam Mesker, Francis Suever and Glen Carpenter. We are proud of and thankful to all those who have served our country.

Church Steeples of a cathedral in Ulm, Germany.

Gasser, Virgil Gerdeman, Elmer L. German, William “Bill” German, Thomas “Tom” Grubenhoff, John “Jack” Hanf, Frank Heitz, Ralph Heitz, Albert Hellman, George Hellman, Mark Hohenbrink, Richard Hohenbrink, Harry Howbert, Eugene Kleman, Gordon Kohls, Paul R. Korte, Kenneth F Kramer, George Krietemeyer, Norman Kunz, Charles J. Landwehr Jr., James A. Landwehr, L. Walter M. Laughlin, Paul Legg, Norman F. Martin, Wendell W. McKee, Robert Menke, Harold “Sonny” Merschman, Robert “Jude” Meyer, Jerome Miller, Clarence E. Mowery, Joseph Pequignot, Arthur Ricker, Ralph Rode, Tom

Rose, Donald E. Sadler, Kenneth L. Sadler, Richard Sadler, Thomas C. Sadler, Gerald Saum, Cleo J. “Click” Schimmoeller, Norman Schimmoeller, Thomas Schimmoeller, Paul Schramm, Richard Schuerman, Gilbert G. “Gip” Schulte, Paul J. Stechschulte, Melvin Suever, Thomas “Tom” Suever, Wilford Francis Suever, Donald Tourjee, Walter “Slim” Trenkamp, Dennis E Traynor Jr, Robert J. Vorst, Edwin L. Warnecke, Eugene Warnecke, Thomas F. Wieging, William Wieging, Leonard Wildenhaus, Eugene Wittler and Gerald J. Youngpeter. Korean War casualty Hilary Allemeier

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But slowapartment complex. be self ment involving financing, tail oriented individuals business opportunities, or Massage therapist on-site. ly, my siblings startMarketing Admission RepADVERTISERS: YOU can who take pride in their work at home opportuni- Laundry facilities, socializ- ed to bail out. The resentative – Immediate ing area, garden plots. place a 25 word classified work. Applicants must also ties. The BBB will assist opening for a successful, first to go was their Appliances and utilities ad in more than 100 news- be able to work independin the investigation of goal-oriented Community favorite (and ungrateincluded. $675-$775/mo. papers with over one and ently, read and comprethese businesses. (This Services/Marketing Repre419-233-3430 ful) daughter. a half million total circula- hend shop drawings and notice provided as a cussentative. The successful tion across Ohio for $295. measure with a micrometomer service by The DelDad died three candidate must have a four It's easy...you place one ter and calipers to hold phos Herald.) year degree and either 5 800 House For Sale months ago. It was order and pay with one strict tolerances. Marching years of Long Term Care exhard on those of my Annie’s Mailbox check through Ohio training and or experience perience or Healthcare Mar290 Wanted to Buy 7 VAN Wert area homes sisters who gave up Scan-Ohio Statewide is a plus but not required. keting/Sales experience. available! Owner financing their weekends to Classified Advertising Net- Competitive wages, health showers, etc.) for to clean rent to own or work. The Delphos Herald insurance, 401K plan, paid Director of Dining Sercare for my folks and her immediate famadvertising dept. can set holidays and vacations are vices – Immediate opening Raines land3+contract candidates. put their families on ily, and the invitaAll bedroom, garages, this up for you. No other all available. Apply in perfor a culinary chef with miniJewelry remodeled with items such the back burner in tion always requests classified ad buy is sim- son or send resumes to mum of 2 years Head Chef as new roofs, flooring, guests bring a to pler or more cost effective. Teem Wholesale, 200 W. experience. Cash for Gold lighting, mechanical up- order by do the right that dish. The party Call 419-695-0015, ext Skinner St., P.O. Box 278, thing our parents. side Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, dates and much more! In138. Ohio City, Ohio 45874. No Meadows of Kalida Health the is never in her home. Silver coins, Silverware, dividual address, pics, de- Meanwhile, phone calls please. Campus tails at chbsinc.com or ungrateful daughter I don’t think she Pocket Watches, Diamonds. 755 Ottawa Street, 45853 040 Services 419-586-8220 2330 Shawnee Rd. and another sister wants to take the Send Resume to CDL-A Solos, Stephanie.Clark Lima were listed as ben- time to clean, and it Auto Repairs/ @MeadowsofKalida.com LAMP REPAIR 810 Parts/Acc. (419) 229-2899 Teams. eficiaries on Dad’s is too small to hold Table or floor. EOE Regional/OTR, life insurance pol- all the people she Come to our store. Palletized, Truckload, Hohenbrink TV. 340 Garage Sales Midwest Ohio icy. We talked to invites.throw a party Van. 419-695-1229 To them about leaving Our Business is Growing! HIRING DRIVERS Auto Parts the money to Mom, for your spouse or 2 yrs. Exp. Req. with 5+ years OTR experi- 4-FAMILY GARAGE Sale who needed it, and child and expect 080 Help Wanted Specialist RisingSunExpress.com ence! Our drivers average Friday Nov. 9th, 10-6 suggested they give the invited guests to 42cents per mile & higher! Saturday Nov. 10th, 9-12. Windshields Installed, New House1-800-288-6168 Home every weekend! 7671 Shenk Rd.furniture, Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors, her at least half. One bring a gift and proCARRIER WANTED $55,000-$60,000 annually. wares, antiques, 2 Routes Available sister did. The other, vide the food strikes winter clothing, toys Hoods, Radiators in Delphos: DRIVERS: DEDICATED Benefits available. 99% no however, pocketed me as wrong. I was touch freight! We will treat 4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima OPEN IMMEDIATELY Account! No-Touch so turned off last time all of it. Carolyn Dr. Freight! Top Pay, Benefits, you with respect! PLEASE 501 Misc. for Sale 1-800-589-6830 How can she live that I didn’t attend. CALL 419-222-1630 N. Main St., Miles, Weekly Home-Time with herself? Why She could easily N. Washington St., & More! Werner Enter 100 FEET good used, N. Franklin St. prises: 1-888-567-4856 are some siblings so throw a more lowheavy duty, outdoors ex- 840 Mobile Homes PA R T-TIME SEC R E No Collecting tension cord. $80 new selfish? What can key event. What do FULL AND Part-time em- TARY needed for estab- cost now, sell for $30. Call the Delphos Herald you think? Am I mak1 BEDROOM mobile we do? — Saddened ployees needed in local lished Delphos business. Circulation Department Phone 419-695-2887 home for rent. Ph. Sibling ing too much of this? at 419-695-0015 ext. 126 retail business. Send re- Please, only those with plies to Box 179 c/o Del- prior secretarial experi - CUSTOM BUILT solid oak 419-692-3951. Dear Sibling: We — Living Within My phos Herald, 405 N. Main ence or secretarial educa- Entertainment Center. Classifieds Sell Budget in Redding, tion apply. Job requires 2’x7’x9’. Must see! Call MOVE IN ready, remod- can’t explain why St., Delphos, OH 45833 eled 14’x70’. 3 bedroom, 2 some kids turn out Calif. good people skills, excel- 419-453-3523 bath, new c a r p e t , the way they do. The lent phone and computer Dear Budget: If skills along with the will- FIREWOOD FOR sale washer/dryer/stove. Lo- psychological fac- you know in advance ingness to work toward $30 a truckload. Call cated in Delphos Ulms II. that the party is pot$8000. Call Donna at tors are too numerbetter knowledge of office 567-712-7789 419-605-8136 ous to mention. luck, and everyone software and operations. Job opening is for 20 FOR SALE: JD 4020D RENT OR Rent to Own. 2 Unfortunately, you brings a dish to share, hours a week Monday with Front Loader. 1997 bedroom, 1 bath mobile cannot force your it is tolerable to have through Friday along with Buick Skylark 4-door. 16ft. home. 419-692-3951. sister to return any this type of party, the flexibility to occasion- 2-axle flatbed trailer. Call 9am-5pm Fri., Sat. & Sun. of the money or to be even though the gifts ally cover vacation and 419-667-3161 890 Autos for Sale possible situations for 19176 Venedocia-Eastern Rd., Venedocia gracious enough to benefit her family other staff members. Ap- JACK LALANNE’S Power Beautiful country 4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, oversized 2 car give it to Mom. Chalk members. Where the plication deadline is No- Juicer with books. Excel- ‘01 SILVER Chevy Silgarage. Updated everywhere. Must See! $89,900. event takes place vember 16th with an an- lent condition. $49.50. Ph: verado. 2 wheel drive, it up to a frustrating Approx. monthly payment - $482.60 and sad loss, not only is irrelevant unless ticipated orientation/start 419-230-9738 automatic, power steering. date of December 10th. she’s asking you to www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com $2500/OBO. C a l l of the money, but Send cover letter along also of your close- foot the bill for that, 419-692-0136 Pets & Supplies

Classifieds
www.delphosherald.com

10 – The Herald

Saturday, November 10, 2012

590 House For Rent THE

To place Rent ad phoneAnnie: I am ness to your sister. an Dear 419-695-0015 ext. 122 600 Apts. for

2 BEDROOM, 1Bath house available soon. No Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869 pets. Call 419-692-3951

Who knows why some kids DELPHOS out the way they do HERALD turn

www.delphosherald.com

OPEN HOUSE

UNION BANK COMPANY
Would you like to be part of a winning team and serve your community? If so, The Union Bank Company has a full-time Assistant Controller position open in Columbus Grove. Must have a bachelor’s degree (accounting or finance preferred) and 3-5 years experience in a related position. The bank is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. Please send your resume, along with cover letter and salary requirements to: hrresumes@theubank.com ATTN: (AC) or The Union Bank Company, P.O. Box 67, Columbus Grove, OH 45830, ATTN: Human Resource Manager (AC).

with resume to Box 178 c/o Delphos Herald, 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 PAT’S DONUTS & KREME Hiring 1st shift Customer Service 5am-1pm. Weekends mandatory. Fast-paced and strong multi-tasking skills required. Drug screen contingent upon hiring. Apply at Pat’s Delphos bakery or Lima bakery. No phone calls.

550

as well. You could, of course, say that your side dish is also your gift, or, as you did previously, you could simply not attend. Dear Annie: My heart goes out to “In the Middle.” We, too, have a grossly overweight daughter and have tried every way we know to help her. I have paid for just about every diet there is, only to find her cheating. It kills me to see her this way. She is the most beautiful girl and has a heart to match. She is now 35 and still can’t see what she is doing to herself. She has three children and teaches kindergarten. She nearly lost her job because she could not bend down to the children’s level. She is often at the doctor’s office. Her knees ache, and she can’t walk very far, but no physician has said a thing about her weight. I know we must let her lead her own life, but I can’t stand to hear her complain about her knees and then find candy wrappers all over the house. We are so afraid she may end up with diabetes, heart disease and who knows what else. A parent never gives up on their child, no matter what. — We Are There and It Hurts Dear Hurts: It is not “giving up” to allow your daughter to see that she is responsible for her own health. All you can do is love her as she is for as long as you can.
20.0 acres, Sugar Creek Township to April S. Halker. April S. Halker and Peter Dwayne Halker, 36.00 acres, Sugar Creek Township to Lukara Investments LLC. Brian Ladd, Jessica Lawrence aka Jessica Ladd, Steven Steele and Phyllis Steele, Lot 19 and Lot 1, Vaughnsville, to Brian Ladd and Jessica Ladd. Elton Lammers and Amy Jo Lammers, Lot 107 Columbus Grove, to Gary Lee Rayle. Angela D. Raines and Drew A. Raines, Lot 347, Lot 348 and Lot 36, Pandora, to Jeffrey A. Rutschilling and Kathleen S. Rutschilling. Laurabelle Crawfis, Lot 35 and Lot 46, Gilboa to Cynthia M. Crawfis. Kenneth L. Warnimont and Joyce M. Warnimont, Lot 401, Lot 402, Lot 403, Lot 404, Leipsic, to Harvest Assembly of God.
“The Key To Buying Or Selling”

AMERICAN BULLDOG/BOXER mix. FREE to a good home. Had some shots and wormed at Kessen’s. Answers to Bella. 567-712-1729, ask for April. FREE TO a good home, 4mo old female mixed breed. Will be a small dog. Call 567-259-5084 SHIH TZU Puppies, 8 wks old. Females, $300, vet checked and first shots. Call 419-532-2040

www.DickClarkRealEstate.com

OPEN HOUSES
CLARK Real Estate

Putnam County Paul E. Ruen and Joan R. Ruen, Lot 260, Ottoville to Paul E. Ruen and Joan R. Ruen. Alice Wolke, 24.0 acres, Greensburg Township and .50 acre, Greensburg Township, to Alice Wolke TR and Karl R. Wolke TR. Glenn W. Steele and Kaylene S. Steele, Lot 55, Vaughnsville, to Michael E. Luke and

SATURDAY, NOV. 10 • 2:00-4:00 p.m.
503 W. First St. 507 N. Broad 10453 Bockey Rd. Delphos Kalida Delphos $85,000 Chuck Peters 419-204-7238
Dick

SUNDAY, NOV. 11 • 1:00-2:30 p.m.
$215,000 Melanie Thorbahn 419-234-5493 $174,900 Jaime Elwer 567-204-1555

SCHRADER REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
Office: 419-692-2249 Fax: 419-692-2205 202 N. Washington Street Delphos, OH 45833

Dick

Don’t make a move without us!

View all our listings at dickclarkrealestate.com
675 W. Market St., Suite 120, Lima, OH 312 N. Main St. Delphos, OH Phone: 419-879-1006 Phone: 419-695-1006

S
950 Car Care

Schrader Realty is pleased to announce Lynn Claypool as the newest Broker/Realtor to our staff. Lynn can be reached at 419-234-2314 She may also be contacted via email at: claypool@woh.rr.com or thru our website at www.schraderrealty.net.

Trish L. Bowers. Wells Fargo Bank NA, Lot 40, Fort Jennings, to Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Gregory Allen Palte TR and Lori Christine Palte TR 28.288 acres, Ottawa Township and 4.812 acres, Ottawa Township to Craig J. Vorst and Sheila A. Vorst. William Lee Kelley and Angela Marie Kelley 1.50 acre, Van Buren Township, to JP Morgan Chase Bank NA. Jeremy L. Larson, Lot 535 and Lot 536, Ottawa, to JP Morgan Chase Bank. Brian D. Young TR and Duane M. Young TR, 27.028 acres, Sugar Creek Township to Sheri L. Sybert. Brian D. Young TR and Duane M. Young

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

ervice
POHLMAN POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential & Commercial • Agricultural Needs • All Concrete Work

AT YOUR

VIEW PICTURES AND DETAILS

JIMLANGHALSREALTY.COM Since 1980 419-692-9652
integrity • professionalism • service

TR, 16.467 acres, Sugar Creek Township and 55.124 acres, Sugar Creek Township to Brian D. Young. Brian D. Young TR and Duane M. Young TR, 36.00 acres, Sugar Creek Township and 22.190 acres, Sugar Creek Township, to April S. Halker. April S. Halker and Peter Dwayne Halker, 22. 190 acres, Sugar Creek Township, 20.00 acres, Sugar Creek Township and 20.0 acres, Sugar Creek Township, to Halker Estates LTD. Sheri L. Sybert and Bruce L. Sybert, 27.028 acres, Sugar Creek Township to WYRYSY LTD. Brian D. Young and Kendy C. Young, 16.467 acres, Sugar Creek Township and 55.024 acres, Sugar Creek Township to Lukara Investments LLC. Lukara Investments LLC, 20.0 acres, Sugar Creek Township and

CLARK Real Estate

OPEN HOUSE!
SUNDAY, November 11 • 1 TO 2:30

7000,7002,7003,7004 DEFIANCE TRAIL
4 HOMES ON ONE PARCEL INCLUDING A 4 bdrm. 3 ½ bath home on 7.26 acres, just east of Delphos, 2 ponds, wooded area, very unique, rentals could pay entire mortgage!

Geise
Transmission, Inc.
• automatic transmission • standard transmission • differentials • transfer case • brakes & tune up
2 miles north of Ottoville

Fitzgerald Power Washing & Painting
Interior, Exterior, Residential, Commercial, Decks, Fences, Houses, Cleaning, Sealing, Staining, Barn Painting FREE ESTIMATES Insured • References

950 Tree Service

940 E. FIFTH ST., DELPHOS
419-692-7773 Fax 419-692-7775 www.rsre.com

TEMAN’S
OUR TREE SERVICE
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning • Deadwooding Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal Since 1973

BY APPOINTMENT
$350,000-Delphos SD FARM FOR SALE. Approximately 64.757 acres in Marion Township, apx 22.6 acres tillable. Includes 3BR/1BA 1.5 story home with barn. (105) Ralph Haggard 419234-0605 $49,900-Van Wert SD Cape Cod home with 2BR/1BA with approx 1700 sq ft living space on .84 acre lot. Enclosed porch, outbuilding. (47) Allison Sickles 567-204-3889 $83,000-Delphos SD 1-1/2 story home with 3BR/1BA and over 1800 sq ft living space. Many updates including updated bath w/whirlpool tub/shower, newer windows, roof & water heater. Basement. Detached garage w/loft. (75) Barb Coil 419302-3478 $30,000-Delphos SD Price Reduced 2BD/2BTH mobile home, freshly painted, new 14í x 30í carport, appliances included. City water and sewer. (95) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607 $55,000-Delphos SD Vinyl two-story on .197 acre lot. 3 bdrms/1 bth, approx 1387 sq ft living space. Basement. 22íx24í two car detached garage. (140) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607 $58,900-Spencerville SD Price Reduced Vinyl two-story home with 4 bedrooms, 1 full bath and 2 half baths, approx. 2826 sq. ft., 2 car detached garage, handicap accessible entry. (141) Mike Reindel 419-2353607 $73,500-Delphos SD 4BR/2BA 1-1/2 story home with over 1800 sq ft living space. 19x20 workshop, 18x16 storage shed. New water main August 2012. 1 car attached garage. (151) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607 $42,000-Delphos SD 1-1/2 story home with 3 bdrms/1 bth on .176 acre corner lot. Approx 1574 sq ft living space. 1 car detached garage. (178) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607 $55,000-Delphos SD Two-story home on .167 acre lot. 4 bdrms/2 bths, approx 2580 sq ft living space. Crawl space. 1 car detached garage. (201) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607

SCHRADER REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
Office: 419-692-2249 Fax: 419-692-2205 202 N. Washington Street Delphos, OH 45833

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084 cell 419-233-9460

419-303-3020

419-692-7261
Bill Teman 419-302-2981 Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

419-453-3620

950 Construction

POHLMAN BUILDERS
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

950 Miscellaneous

Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling Bathrooms • Kitchens Hog Barns • Drywall Additions • Sidewalks Concrete • etc. FREE ESTIMATES

COMMUNITY SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES NEWER FACILITY

Mueller Tree Service
Tree Trimming, Topping & Removal

Schrader Realty is pleased to announce Del Kemper as the newest realtor to our staff. Del can be reached at 419-204-3500 He may also be contacted via email at: dskemper@msn.com or thru our website at www.schraderrealty.net.

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084 cell 419-233-9460

419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s

419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com Fully insured

SCHRADER REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
Office: 419-692-2249 Fax: 419-692-2205
Jodi Moenter ................ 419-296-9561 Judy M.W. Bosch ......... 419-230-1983 Lynn Claypool .............. 419-234-2314 Del Kemper .................. 419-204-3500

419-733-9601 950 Home Improvement

202 N. Washington Street Delphos, OH 45833
Krista Schrader ................ 419-233-3737 Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ... 419-234-5202 Amie Nungester ............... 419-236-0688 Janet Kroeger .................. 419-236-7894

Joe Miller Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry Roofing, remodeling, concrete, pole barns, garages or any construction needs. Cell

SAFE & SOUND
SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence •Pass Code •Lighted Lot •Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?

OPEN HOUSES
L.L.C.

SUNDAY, NOV. 11, 2012

1:30-2:30 p.m. 706 E. Fourth St., Delphos
Brick 3BR ranch, newer roof & windows, basement, garage. Ruth will be there.

DELPHOS

• Trimming & Removal • Stump Grinding • 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured

629 N. Elm St., Delphos
Cozy 2BR, basement, garage, large back yard, only $60’s. Janet will greet you.

KEVIN M. MOORE

567-644-6030

419-692-6336

(419) 235-8051

FOR A FULL LIST OF HOMES FOR SALE & OPEN HOUSES:

WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET

www.delphosherald.com

Saturday, November 10, 2012

The Herald – 11

Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Your ability to effectively communicate with people from all walks of life will be greatly enhanced in the year ahead. You’ll be able to make your points whether you do so in person or through one of your usual avenues. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Several endeavors to which you’ve given considerable time yet have never received the type of returns that you hoped for could finally begin to pay off. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You might begin undergoing some major transformations regarding your fondest hopes and expectations. At the head of the list will be establishing a better set of values. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Chances are you’ll be far more effective over the next few weeks if you can operate independently. Only if a partnership arrangement guarantees certain advantages should one be made. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you’ve wanted to make a trip of some distance and duration, this is a good day to start getting your act together. You’re in an excellent cycle for traveling to faraway places. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Plans to which you have already given considerable thought should not be changed at the last minute. If your concepts are good, everything will work out to your satisfaction. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -In a partnership arrangement, greater control and influence might be given to your counterpart. In order to keep the peace, don’t make any waves. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If you make it your greatest priority, the possibility of achieving an important objective is excellent. Give it your undivided attention, and it will pay off. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- There are strong indications that you are likely to meet someone new who will end up having a strong and wonderful influence on your social life. If not today, then soon. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Make those necessary alterations to a financial development that hasn’t lived up to expectations. Chances are, the adjustments you’ll make will turn out to be perfect. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- A new cycle you recently entered could turn out to be not only exciting but also extremely fortunate in terms of new friends and social contacts. Be sure to get out and mingle a lot. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- The general trends that affect your material well-being over the coming months are likely to turn out to be extremely favorable. It’s time to dedicate your time to profitable endeavors. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you rely more upon yourself and less upon others, your success will be substantially enhanced. Establish your own goals and set your own timetable. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2012 Before moving on to some new endeavors in the year ahead, make sure the ones you are presently involved in have nothing of quality left to offer. You might be pleasantly surprised at what you find. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Those with whom you have dealings will immediately sense that you’re not apt to be making idle promises. Your mind will be focused on making good on your commitment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Your financial prospects look to be quite promising. It’s possible that you might receive some extra gains through your own efforts and an arrangement set up by another. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Taking a situation at face value is not likely to be one of your weak points. In fact, you’re more likely to be interested in what’s behind a facade than what is in front of it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Although you’re in a good achievement cycle right now, you still might not get everything you pursue on your first try. If you should fall short of your mark, simply regroup and try again. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Should a bright idea flash through your mind regarding how you can constructively revitalize a flagging relationship, try it. Chances are it’ll work. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Because you are so easily motivated, your possibilities for achieving your goals are better than usual. You’ll know what you want, and you’ll know how to get it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Your situation might dictate needing to concentrate strictly on the immediate, but it wouldn’t hurt to look ahead a bit as well. Plan now for future action. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -If there is something that you feel can be changed for the better, don’t suffer in silence. Instead of waiting for others to take action, make the adjustments yourself. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Difficult decisions won’t be resolved by ignoring or sidestepping them. Look these problems straight in the eye and take whatever steps necessary to remedy them. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -Even if you get a few additional responsibilities dumped in your lap, you’ll be able to handle them. In fact, getting successful results will give you a sense of pride. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Your managerial skills are functioning at all levels. Associates will find you to be quite compatible and easy to get along with, yet you can be quite serious and dedicated when necessary. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although this could be a rather hectic day, you should still be able to find the time to conclude several matters that need to be completed. They may all be interrelated, which could help.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

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12 – The Herald

Saturday, November 10, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Flight

class mechanic. En route to their sacrifices. The organizaKorea, Gene pulled liberty in tion transports “our heroes” Hawaii with his brother-in- to Washington, D.C. to visit law, John Feather, who was on and reflect at their memorials, the USS Mansfield. During the at no cost to the veterans. Top next year, Gene had liberty in priority is given to the senior Tokyo and Yokosuka, Japan. veterans – World War II survi“We were the first to send vors, along with other veterans drone F6Fs into the tunnels who may be terminally ill. of the hydro-electric plants. The Honor Flight Network This plugged-up tunnels to program was conceived by keep trains from supplying the Earl Morse, a physician assisNorth Koreans,” Gene said. tant and retired Air Force capA “sailor’s worst fear” tain, to honor the veterans he came true on Aug. 6, 1952. had taken care of for the past Fire on the hangar deck of 27 years. After retiring from USS Boxer started when a the Air Force in 1998, Earl sailor improperly removed a was hired by the Department Thomas Buettner on a water-cooled 30-caliber machine shell from a machine gun on of Veterans Affairs to work in an aircraft, which discharged a a small clinic in Springfield. gun guarding SS soldiers. bullet, striking a 1,000-pound After the completion and (Continued from page 1) War II Army of Occupation bomb. dedication of the World War Service Medal and World War “The bomb went off under II Memorial in May 2004, it Thomas] went back to the II Victory Medal. the flight deck and the concus- became the topic of discusfoxhole and spent the night Petty Officer 2nd Class sion raised us up about six sion among his World War II together under heavy artillery Ellis (Gene) Buettner gradu- inches off the deck,” Gene veteran patients. fire.” ated from high school on May, detailed the incident. “I The inaugural Honor Flight The vast majority of World 24, 1949, and choose to enlist couldn’t stay at the fire station. took place in May 2005. War II vets are very familiar — along with five friends — The ship was too hot. Sixty- Six small planes flew out of with the phrase “Kilroy Was in the Navy that very day. three sailors jumped for safety Springfield, taking 12 World Here” found written just about He was recruited in Lima and out of the ship’s portholes and War II veterans on a visit to everywhere on every piece traveled to Columbus, where nine died from smoke inhala- the memorial in Washington, of equipment from Tokyo to he was sworn in for a 3-year tion or shrapnel wounds.” DC. In August 2005, an everBerlin. Quite a few Korean enlistment. He wanted the In February 1953, the USS expanding waiting list of vetWar vets also saw it. opportunity to learn a trade Boxer returned to the States erans led the program’s transiScreaming Mimies but more importantly, he did by way of Hawaii to San tion to commercial airline car[Nebelwerfers] were used in not want to get drafted by the Diego. Gene was discharged riers with the goal of accomevery campaign of the German Army. After enlisting, Gene two months early because the modating as many veterans Army during World War II was sent by train, which was USS Boxer was due to return as possible. Partnering with with the exception of the a 3-day trip, to San Diego for to Korea. HonorAir in Hendersonville, Balkans Campaign. boot camp. Gene received a Korean North Carolina, we formed the “If you could hear it “Basic training consisted of Service Medal, Navy Good “Honor Flight Network.” HFN [screaming mimi] flying over- marching, marching and more Conduct Medal and a United has continued to expand its head, you were safe,” Thomas marching,” Gene said. Nations (UN) Korean Service programs to other cities across mused. “If you heard it flyAfter three months of basic Medal commemorating his the nation. By the end of the ing toward you and then you training, Gene boarded a train service in the Armed Forces 2011 flying season, more than could not hear it, you were in to Memphis, Tenn., for avia- of the United States during 81,000 veterans of World War trouble.” tion machinist school — Class operations in the Korean area. II, Korea and Vietnam visited Following the end of the (A) AD school for 9 months. the memorials built to honor war, Thomas was transferred In April 1950, Gene left The Honor Flight Network their suffering and sacrifice. to Hallein, Austria, where he Memphis and was sent by train (HFN) is a non-profit organiPlease visit these sites for guarded a stockade of 3,000 to Alameda Naval Air Station zation created solely to honor more information honorflight. prisoners for approximately 6 for two weeks. He was then sta- America’s veterans for all org/ and mywarhistory.com. months and worked on the tioned in Monterey, Calif., for confiscation of guns and motor almost two years, working on vehicles. In July of 1946, the line as an aircraft mechanic Thomas was discharged from and plane captain. Gene was the Army, took a taxi home, rated AD3 third class aircraft found a job and settled back engine mechanic. into life in the States. “Even though our barracks Thomas received many were up off the ground, we had awards while serving his coun- to fight off the cockroaches. try, including: Army Good I’d reach into my closet to get Conduct Medal BAR Badge, my clothes and I would have Bayonet Badge, Bazooka cockroaches all over them,” Badge, Bronze Star Medal, Gene mused. “It [the base] Carbine Badge, Combat smelled all the time.” Infantry Badge, European/ In June 1951, the Korean African/Middle Eastern War started and Gene’s enlistCampaign Medal, M-1 Badge, ment was extended one year. Marksman Badge, Overseas While assigned to Aircraft Service, Presidential Unit Carrier USS Boxer (CV21), Ellis G. Buettner at the flight controls of a Hellcat. Citation, Rifle Badge, World Gene was rated (AD2) second-

Gordon

(Continued from page 1)

and get afternoon passes,” he said. “We were more fortunate than others.” The Delphos native also enjoyed some sightseeing, visiting museums and mosques and the Tree of Life, which turned out to be a little disappointing. “The Tree of Life doesn’t live up to its name,” he said. “It was a little rough looking.” Part of Gordon’s job was to make soldiers realize many of their fellow soldiers are not so lucky. With 29 years of service to his country under his belt, Gordon returned home and quickly left again to attend Sergeant Majors Academy, the final leadership course for enlisted soldiers. Once completed, Gordon will attain the highest rank. Grodon began his military career to help pay for college. After three years in the Army, he was ready to hang up his uniform and hit the books. Then he talked to an in-service recruiter who told him more college benefits were available. After six years with an additional year for schooling, Gordon stayed on to reach 10 years.

“Once you hit 10 years, you might as well do 20. I’m at 29 and I’m playing it by ear. I’ll stay in as long as they’ll have me,” he said. “I’ve had three knee surgeries and I’m not a young man anymore. They don’t let you stay if you can’t make the physical requirements. I want to stay as long as I enjoy it and am actively producing. I don’t want a desk job. So I’m playing it by ear.” Gordon’s wife of 22 years, Ellen (Odenweller), is pleased to have her husband back. During the year he was gone, she ran the couple’s business, JP Drainage Solutions, and kept up with household maintenance and repairs. She did have help from Gordon’s brothers, Nick and Joe. “We both have certain ways we do things so I did things my way while he was gone,” she said. “The hardest part was during the winter. I missed him a lot more then. It’s dark when you get up and dark when you go to bed. It got a little lonely. The family support meetings help and there are excellent family readiness groups.” Nonetheless, Ellen will be happy to spend the upcoming holidays with her soldier.

Answers to Friday’s questions: The bombing of Pearl Harbor prompted Norman Mailer to write The Naked and the Dead.” James Adams is better known as Grizzly Adams. Today’s questions: What famous clown had his own comic book from 1970-71? What is the pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson? Answers in Monday’s Herald. Today’s words: Miniver: an ermine in its winter white Witzchoura: a large-sleeved woman’s cloak fashioned in the early 19th century
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The way newspapers are sold may have changed, but fact is, newspapers are still the most “value-added” source of information around. Where else can you find facts, food, fashion, finance, “funnies”, football, and of course good old-fashioned reporting, for just pennies a day? With something new to greet you each day, from cover to cover, your newspaper is really one extraordinary buy, so pick it up and “read all about it” daily!

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