www.smdailyjournal.

com
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 76
SCANDAL WIDENS
NATION PAGE 7
M-A BEARS IN
POLO FINALS
SPORTS PAGE 11
DUNGENESS
ON THE WAY
LOCAL PAGE 5
GEN. JOHN ALLEN’S EMAILS CALLED ‘FLIRTATIOUS’
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Bay Area Rapid Transit Director
James Fang has been urged to
recuse himself from ongoing nego-
tiations related to a real estate devel-
opment in Millbrae and has been
accused of unethically lobbying on
behalf of a personal friend’s propos-
al to build a new
hotel on BART-
owned land.
R e p u b l i c
Urban Properties
LLC sent a letter
to the BART
board yesterday
detailing its con-
cerns over a
hotel proposal championed by Fang
from Justin Development that has
been held mostly behind closed
doors.
Fang, however, told the Daily
Journal yesterday that Republic is
simply trying to “put a cloud” over
what is the best deal for BART and
Millbrae.
He also said Justin Development
owner Lawrence Lui “is a friend”
but that staff has done the negotiat-
ing with the developer and that the
board simply votes on the propos-
als. Fang’s family owns a large
commercial building on El Camino
Real in Burlingame just a few
blocks from the Millbrae BART sta-
tion.
“Fang must recuse himself from
the Millbrae BART station real
estate development because he has
flagrantly and unethically lobbied
for a project that would benefit his
family as well as a major contribu-
tor to his political campaigns,”
according to the letter sent to the
BART board from the legal firm
Development conflict alleged
Developer wants Director James Fang to recuse himself
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In a bit of legal maneuvering yes-
terday, prosecutors dismissed a
remaining weapons charge against a
murder suspect so they could refile
three of the same counts later that
afternoon and keep the man in cus-
tody while waiting to learn if he can
be tried for allegedly killing an East
Palo Alto activist at a San Mateo
shopping center in the summer of
2010.
The series of moves Tuesday
gives prosecutors likely a year of
breathing room during which they
can try Gregory Leon Elarms Sr. for
p o s s e s s i n g
h o m e m a d e
weapons in the
county jail while
an appellate
court reviews a
judge’s dis-
missal of his
police confes-
sion and, as a
result, the mur-
der charge.
Elarms pleaded not guilty in the
new case Tuesday afternoon and a
judge set bail at $150,000. As of
later that day, he had not posted the
Judge dismissed murder
case citing illegal confession
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Little Gobbler, a northern fur seal
pup, decided to take a trot across
Airport Boulevard, climb up some
steps and take a nap at the waste-
water treatment plant in Burlingame
Tuesday morning.
Baby seal visits Burlingame
‘Little Gobbler’ takes trek across Airport
Boulevard, into wastewater treatment plant
DA drops, refiles
charges against
shooting suspect
Gregory Elarms
James Fang
GIOVANNI ALBANESE
Authorities say a broken water main is to blame for a flood in a Daly City neighborhood that left vehicles stuck in
mud up to their wheel wells.The break early Tuesday morning unleashed tens of thousands of gallons of water
from a city-owned reservoir on a nearby hill.The torrent brought mud from the hillside down to the area below.
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Twelve homes were evacuated
early Tuesday morning when a river
of mud gushed into a Daly City
neighborhood after a water main
broke nearby.
Firefighters were called to a
neighborhood near Hillside Park at
4:24 a.m., North County Fire
Authority spokesman Matt Lucett
said.
An 8-inch cast-iron pipe leading
down from a nearby water tank had
ruptured, sending about 45,000 gal-
River of mud
Homes evacuated after water main breaks in Daly City
See FLOOD, Page 26 Little Gobbler
See ELARMS, Page 35
See GOBBLER, Page 35
See CONFLICT, Page 26
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Rapper Reverend
Run is 48.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1862
During the Civil War, President Abraham
Lincoln gave the go-ahead for Maj. Gen.
Ambrose Burnside’s plan to capture the
Confederate capital of Richmond; the
resulting Battle of Fredericksburg proved
a disaster for the Union.
“I never gave away anything without
wishing I had kept it; nor kept anything
without wishing I had given it away.”
— Louise Brooks, actress (born this date in 1906, died 1985)
Former Secretary of
State Condoleezza
Rice is 58.
Rock musician
Travis Barker is 37.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A boy performs a Mallakhamb pose on a pole at the Shree Samartha Vyayam Mandir in Mumbai, India.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the upper
60s. Northeast winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the lower 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10
mph.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. Southeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers.
Lows in the upper 40s. South winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of
showers 50 percent.
Friday: Rain. Highs in the lower 60s.
Friday night: Rain. Lows around 50.
Saturday through Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers. Highs around 60. Lows in the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in first place; No.11 Money Bags in second place;
and No.09 Winning Spirit in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:40.23.
(Answers tomorrow)
REBEL GLOAT LIZARD SPLASH
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When King Kong agreed to buy the Empire
State Building, it was a — BIG DEAL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
FLUWA
HEWEL
LEBLUT
MOONIT
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
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e
b
o
o
k
.
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m
/
ju
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le
Answer
here:
2 5 8
6 12 31 46 56 34
Mega number
Nov. 13 Mega Millions
9 16 20 21 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 6 2 4
Daily Four
8 3 5
Daily three evening
In 1851, Herman Melville’s novel “Moby-Dick; Or, The
Whale” was first published in the United States.
In 1881, Charles J. Guiteau went on trial for assassinating
President James A. Garfield. (Guiteau was convicted and
hanged the following year.)
In 1889, inspired by Jules Verne, New York World reporter
Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Cochrane) set out to travel around the
world in less than 80 days. (She made the trip in 72 days.)
Jawarharlal Nehru, the first prime minister of independent
India, was born.
In 1910, Eugene B. Ely became the first aviator to take off
from a ship as his Curtiss pusher rolled off a sloping platform
on the deck of the scout cruiser USS Birmingham off Hampton
Roads, Va.
In 1922, the British Broadcasting Co. began its domestic radio
service.
In 1940, during World War II, German planes destroyed most
of the English town of Coventry.
In 1944, Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded “Opus No.
1” for RCA Victor.
In 1969, Apollo 12 blasted off for the moon.
In 1970, a chartered Southern Airways DC-9 crashed while
trying to land in Huntington, W.Va., killing all 75 people on
board, including the Marshall University football team and its
coaching staff.
In 1972, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above the
1,000 level for the first time, ending the day at 1,003.16.
In 1986, the Securities and Exchange Commission imposed a
$100 million penalty against inside-trader Ivan F. Boesky and
barred him from working again in the securities industry.
Former U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is 90.
Actress Kathleen Hughes is 84. Former MLB All-Star Jimmy
Piersall is 83. Former NASA astronaut Fred Haise is 79. Jazz
musician Ellis Marsalis is 78. Composer Wendy Carlos is 73.
Writer P.J. O’Rourke is 65. Zydeco singer-musician Buckwheat
Zydeco is 65. Britain’s Prince Charles is 64. Rock singer-musi-
cian James Young (Styx) is 63. Singer Stephen Bishop is 61.
Blues musician Anson Funderburgh is 58. Pianist Yanni is 58.
Presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett is 56. Actress Laura San
Giacomo is 51. Actor D.B. Sweeney is 51. Actor Patrick
Warburton is 48. Rock musician Nic Dalton is 48.
Scolionophobia is a fear of school.
***
Iconic author Norman Mailer (1923-
2007) stabbed his wife at a party in their
Manhattan home in
1960. The knife
narrowly missed her
heart, but she
recovered and did not
press charges.
***
The lifespan of a
flamingo is 25 years on
average in the wild. In
captivity, flamingos can live as
long as 50 years.
***
In the United States, Arizona has the
highest number of high school
dropouts, followed by Nevada, then
Colorado.
***
Do you remember which young lover
in “Romeo and Juliet” (1595) was the
first to die? Do you remember how
they each brought on their own
deaths? See answer at end.
***
When Edmund McIlhenny (1815-1890)
first started bottling Tabasco Sauce for
his friends and family, he used discarded
cologne bottles. In 1868, when he started
selling the spicy sauce to the public, he
bottled it in new cologne bottles.
***
Secret brand deodorant added new
scents to their product line in 2001
called Ambition, Genuine and
Optimism.
***
Judy Blume is one of the most banned
children’s authors in the United States.
Her fiction books for young adults, such
as “Are You There God? It’s Me,
Margaret” (1970) and “Forever” (1975),
treat adolescence realistically and
frankly discuss teenage sexuality.
***
One of the requirements to
become a Rockette is
height — a potential
chorus line dancer must
be between 5 feet 6
inches and 5 feet 10
inches. The 36
women that perform in the chorus
line all look the same height; an
illusion made by putting the tallest
dancer in the center of the line and
decreasing the height with the
shortest women at either end.
***
In the song “A Bicycle Built for
Two” (1892), written by Harry
Dacre (1860-1922), Henry asks
Daisy to marry him, but he can’t
afford a carriage for the marriage so they
will need to ride a bicycle built for two.
She says no.
***
Russian ballet dancer Mikhail
Baryshnikov (born 1948) defected from
Russia to the United States in 1974.
***
At an average of 10 to 12 feet long, the
King Cobra is the largest venomous
snake in the world. It is also the only
snake that builds a nest for their eggs.
***
Traditional Japanese Haiku poetry has
three lines of lyric verse that do not
rhyme. The first and third lines have five
syllables each, the second line has sevn
syllables.
***
The world’s first atomic bomb was
dropped on Hiroshima in 1945 by a
plane called the Enola Gay. The pilot
Col. Paul W. Tibbets Jr. (born 1915)
named the plane after his mother Enola
Gay Tibbets (1893–1983).
***
Answer: Romeo. He thought that Juliet
was dead so he killed himself by
drinking poison. His last words were “O
true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick.
Thus with a kiss I die.” Juliet, upon
seeing Romeo dead, stabs herself with
his dagger. Her last words were “This
is thy sheath; there rest, and let me die.”
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
12 14 22 32 46 24
Mega number
Nov. 10 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Marion M. Taylor
Marion M. Taylor known to many as
(Desiree) was born in East St. Louis
Missouri to Edward and Odessa
Pinkston. She confessed Christ at an
early age and loved the Lord Jesus
Christ with all her heart. Marion
graduated from the High School of
Commerce in San Francisco, CA. After
graduation, she completed and earned
a Diploma from Hazmore School of
Dress, San Francisco, CA. It was in San
Francisco that she met Mr.Henry Taylor.
Shortly thereafter they joined in marriage. From this union Donald and Trina
Taylor were born.
Throughout her life Marion was always lending a helping hand to individuals
less fortunate than herself. Marion retired from Mills Peninsula Hospital as a
X-Ray Librarian after 35 years of service. She departed this life on November
10, 2012. She was preceded in death by her parents Edward and Odessa
Pinkston, her brothers Edward Pinkston Jr. and Wilbert Pinkston, her
grandchildren Tricia and Freddie Pierce. She leaves to mourn her passing
long time friends Andrew Huckaby Joan Smith and prayer warrior Betty
Johnson. Her sister Selma Rouzan, children Donald Taylor, Trina Pierce.
Wilbert Pinkston Jr. and Edith Johnson her two adopted children. Nieces
Denee (Dimples) Stallworth, Jean (Alvin) Wills, Penny Scott, Deborah
Rouzan-Ervin. Her nephews George Paramore, and Javan Rouzan her
grandchildren Treyana Pierce Tiersa (Jesse) Aldridge, Tishonda Taylor and
Derrick Markesha Taylor. Daughter in-law Terry Taylor Great grandchildren
Jayla, Jolaiya and Kiera Aldridge and a host of relatives and friends.
Viewing of the body will be held at Crosby-N. Gray Funeral Home from 6:00
to 8:00pm on Thursday November 15, 2012 in San Mateo. Funeral Services
at 1:00 pm on Friday November 16, 2012. Location of funeral services to be
announced. On Monday November 19, 2012 at 1:00 pm there will be a small
service and burial will be held at Greenlawn Memorial Park 3700 River Blvd
Bakersfield, CA 93302.
Obituary
BURLINGAME
Assault. People were reportedly fighting at a
laundromat on the 700 block of California
Drive before 4:17 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12.
Disturbance. A man in a blue car with
orange flames was yelling at pedestrians on
the 500 block of Primrose Road before 2:35
p.m. Monday, Nov. 12.
Suspicious activity. A woman reported
receiving a phone call from a man who said
he was having surgery and wanted the
woman to pray for him on the 2300 block of
Adeline Drive before 4:38 a.m. Sunday, Nov.
11.
DUI. An 18-year-old woman was arrested
for driving under the influence at the inter-
section of El Camino Real and Floribunda
Avenue before 2:59 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10.
Drunk. A teacher was drunk at a school
dance on the 800 block of Burlingame
Avenue before 8:27 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9.
Harassment. A student threatened to choke
a teacher on the 1700 block of Quesada Way
before 2:09 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9.
BELMONT
Suspicious circumstances. The lights of a
vehicle were left on at Bayview Avenue
before 8:38 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 8.
Traffic violations. Vehicles were reported
speeding and failing to stop at stop signs on
Hiller Street before 7:30 p.m. on Thursday,
Nov. 8.
Traffic violations. Ongoing traffic problems
were reported at the intersection of Ralston
and Villa avenues before 7:30 a.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 7.
Found property. A woman’s wallet was
found on El Camino Real before 2:02 p.m.
on Tuesday, Nov. 6.
Stolen vehicle. A person reported their vehi-
cle was stolen on Continentals Way before
9:36 a.m. Monday, Nov. 5.
Battery. A father and son were seen fighting
on Notre Dame Avenue before 7:02 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 4.
Police reports
Better than nothing
A man was wearing nothing but a towel
on Old County Road in Belmont before
3:54 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — A bullet train linking
Northern and Southern California will be an
audacious engineering feat because the line
must cross two mountain ranges and a half-
dozen earthquake faults, experts said.
Planners foresee the 141-mile segment from
Bakersfield to Los Angeles running through
vast tunnels, delving through the Tehachapi
and San Gabriel mountains, plunging 500 feet
underground in some places and soaring over
canyons on viaducts 200 to 330 feet high, the
Los Angeles Times reported.
“It is the project of the century,” said Bill
Ibbs, a civil engineering professor at the
University of California, Berkeley who has
worked on high-speed rail projects around the
world.
The $68 billion first phase of the project is
expected to run more than 500 miles between
San Francisco and the Los Angeles and
Anaheim areas by 2029. Eventually, support-
ers hope for high-speed lines running all the
way from Sacramento to San Diego.
Conditions set for the project say it must be
able to reach San Francisco from Los Angeles
in no more than 2 hours and 40 minutes. The
top speed for the Bakersfield-to-LA segment
could be 220 mph.
In September, the Federal Railroad
Administration approved construction of the
first segment, a 65-mile stretch from Merced
to Fresno in the Central Valley. Construction is
expected to begin next year.
California hasn’t considered such an
immense north-south rail link since the 1870s,
when Southern Pacific Railroad bored through
the Tehachapis. Thousands of Chinese labor-
ers dug and dynamited the way up and through
the mountains, creating 18 tunnels on a route
that climbed more than 4,000 feet.
High-speed rail route
will be engineering feat
4
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Belmont Village Shopping
Center has new owner
A private investor has purchased
the Belmont Village Shopping
Center on El Camino Real for about
$5.7 million, SRS Real Estate
Partners announced yesterday.
The 8,054-square-foot property
is located at El Camino Real and
Ralston Avenue and is anchored by
Safeway.
Other tenants include AT&T,
Peet’s Coffee, Gamestop,
Supercuts, Toto’s and Menchie’s
Frozen Yogurt.
The property’s previous owner
was Swire-Friedkin Group.
Gas prices spiraling down
Months of gasoline volatility
have resulted in a severe drop in
prices throughout the state, with
the average cost of a gallon of gas
in San Mateo down to $3.94, a
reduction of 82 cents, according to
AAA, which tracks the price of gas
as a consumer service.
Every metro area in Northern
California saw a decrease of at
least 69 cents over the past month,
according to AAA.
California’s average for a gallon
of regular, unleaded gasoline is
$3.85, down 82 cents since last
month’s AAA report Oct. 9. For
perspective, that’s 2 cents more
than California’s average price on
this date last year. Among all 50
states, Hawaii has the highest aver-
age price for regular, unleaded
gasoline at $4.41. New York has
the high-
e s t
p r i c e ,
$3.99, in the lower 48
states.
Northern California gas
prices are now averaging
$3.82, down 81 cents from last
month. In the San Francisco
Bay Area, motorists can expect to
pay an average price of
$3.98, which is a 76
cent decrease from last
month. The California
state average price of
$3.85 is down two
cents, which is 41 cents
more than the national price of
unleaded regular gasoline, $3.44.
The least expensive average
price in Northern California can be
found in Modesto, where regular is
$3.65 per gallon in
that metro area.
Yreka has the
highest average
price of $3.99. New
York has the highest for
the 48 contiguous
states at $3.99,
while the
motorists in
Missouri enjoy the
lowest average price, $3.10. The
highest price of gasoline in the
nation’s metro areas is in Wailuku,
Hawaii, at $4.29 per gallon,
according to AAA.
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Local briefs
5
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Commercial crab fisherman at
Pillar Point Harbor on the coast will
set their first pots today as the com-
mercial Dungeness crab season offi-
cially starts Thursday.
There are no delays to the season
this year as there was last year as
fishermen and buyers agreed to a
price early this season, said fisher-
man Jim Anderson, captain of the
Allaine.
Fresh Dungeness will be sold on
the dock for $3 a pound, Anderson
said.
Anderson said there are less boats
coming from Northern California
and Oregon this season and that this
year’s haul will not be as great as
last year’s.
“There’s not the crab we had last
year,” Anderson said.
However, there should be fresh
Dungeness available on
Thanksgiving Day, he said.
Anderson plans to set pots at
about 6 a.m. today and pull the pots
just after midnight tonight to sell on
the docks Thursday.
Rainy weather may impact the
season, although it may be extended
this year due to less boats fishing, he
said.
Recreational crab boats have had
a good haul so far this season, said
Dennis Baxter, captain of New
Captain Pete at Pillar Point.
Baxter has been hauling in about
30 crabs a pot, some the size of hub-
caps, he told the Daily Journal.
“It is a good haul and the crabs are
hefty,” Baxter said.
Last season, he said, was “incred-
ible” for crab fishing but this year
fisherman have tempered their
expectations.
Anderson has heard “mixed
news” from recreational fisherman
who have been pulling pots this past
week.
“Some areas are reporting no
crabs,” he said.
Recreational crab fisherman have
also found their way to the Pacifica
Pier and reportedly bought up all the
bait at the Rusty Hook Sunday,
Baxter said.
The season was delayed last year
as fishermen sought $2.50 a pound
for Dungeness as buyers were only
offering $2 a pound.
The two sides finally settled on
$2.25 a pound nearly two weeks
after the commercial Dungeness
crab season officially started Nov.
15.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email:
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by
phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Dungeness on the way
Commercial crab fisherman set pots today
Pelosi set to announce plans
WASHINGTON — Democratic
Leader Nancy Pelosi says she’ll
announce Wednesday whether she’ll
continue in her
current position
or step down
after her party
failed to gain the
25 seats it needed
to win the House
majority.
When a few
undecided races
are called,
Democrats will gain less than half of
that number. But Pelosi, who raised
millions of dollars to put Democrats
back in power, has refused to say
whether she’ll relinquish or keep her
leadership post, serve out the two-
year term to which she was just elect-
ed, or retire.
Governor names military
leader to oversee parks
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry
Brown appointed a retired Marine
Corps general on Tuesday to oversee
California parks in the wake of a
scandal that uncovered $54 million
kept hidden from the Legislature.
After 36 years in the military, Maj.
General Anthony L. Jackson, 63, will
take the job left vacant when the for-
mer director of the California
Department of Parks and Recreation
resigned last summer amid the finan-
cial scandal. Jackson most recently
commanded installations throughout
the Southwest, overseeing fiscal, mil-
itary, construction, energy and admin-
istration programs involving 13,000
employees and more than 60,000
Marines and sailors.
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Commercial crabbing vessels will soon be underway as the commercial
Dungeness crab season officially starts Thursday.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Redwood City construction
company controller who literally fled
the office when confronted about
$350,000 in missing funds pleaded
no contest to felony embezzlement.
In return, Lili Clay, 50, faces up to
four years in prison when sentenced
Dec. 13 but would serve the time in
county jail under the new realign-
ment guidelines.
Clay also admitted the excessive
taking allegation
as part of the
negotiated deal.
Clay, of
Mountain View,
worked for
L e n c i o n i
Co n s t r u c t i o n
and between
January 2011
and August
2012 and prosecutors say she wrote
herself $350,000 in company
checks under the guise of reim-
bursements.
When the owners discovered the
discrepancies, they confronted her in
the Redwood City office on Aug. 8.
After she ran from the site, they
reportedly gave chase but were
unable to grab her before she reached
her vehicle. Weeks later, authorities
apprehended her in Exeter, Calif.,
which is near Visalia.
She remains in custody in lieu of
$350,000 bail.
Former controller takes embezzlement deal
Lili Clay
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The South San Francisco foster
mom who escaped prosecution for
allegedly burning her 20-month-old
ward with bleach-soaked diapers
after a judge dismissed the case
appeared in court yesterday for the
first time since a criminal grand jury
indicted her on the same charges.
Patricia Ann Moore, 68, pleaded
not guilty to willful cruelty to a
child and infliction of injury on a
child. She waived her right to a
speedy prosecution and will stand
trial in February.
Moore’s court-appointed attorney
Linda Bramy declined comment on
the case, saying she needed to first
look at the criminal indictment.
Bramy also represented Moore in
the original case that was dismissed
last year.
South San Francisco police first
arrested Moore in
August 2010
after hospital
staff tending to
the toddler alert-
ed authorities
that the child had
first- and second-
degree burns on
her buttocks.
According to
prosecutors, Moore later told
authorities she used bleach-soaked
diapers to clean the child who soiled
herself quite often. After Moore’s
adult daughter brought the girl to
the South San Francisco Kaiser
Medical Center for care, doctors
allegedly noted the burns were in a
waffle pattern like that of diaper fab-
ric. Moore allegedly also could not
explain why, if the girl had been
bathed, she didn’t have burns on
other parts of her body that would
have been submerged, such as her
legs.
In May 2011, Judge Richard
Livermore heard from two prosecu-
tion witnesses at a preliminary hear-
ing before finding insufficient evi-
dence to try her on a single count of
willful cruelty to a child likely to
produce great bodily injury.
On Oct. 4, a criminal grand jury
indicted Moore on the same counts.
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe
has said the primary difference in
evidence presented to Livermore
and the jury was a medical doctor
with expertise in child abuse.
The endangerment charge means
a person is accused of acting negli-
gently in a way that is likely to
result in physical injury or death
rather than acting more knowingly,
such as a deliberate blow. The
charge carries up to five years in
prison.
Moore remains free from custody
on $50,000 bail and returns to court
Jan. 29 for a pretrial conference
prior to a Feb. 25 jury trial.
Foster mom in court for toddler’s bleach burns
Patricia Moore
Around the state
Nancy Pelosi
By Ken Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Labor lead-
ers said Tuesday that President
Barack Obama
remains com-
mitted to pre-
serving tax cuts
for middle class
families and
ensuring the
wealthy pay
more in taxes,
outlining plans
for a public
campaign to pressure Republican
lawmakers.
The heads of several labor
unions and Democratic-leaning
interest groups emerged from an
hourlong meeting with Obama
saying they were united with the
president on how to avert the so-
called “fiscal cliff” and prevent
more financial hardships next year.
“We are very, very committed to
making sure that the middle class
and workers don’t end up paying
the tab for a party that we didn’t
get to go to and the president is
committed to that as well,” said
AFL-CIO President Richard
Trumka.
Labor heads say Obama
backs them on ‘fiscal cliff’
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Everyone
who pays income tax — and some
who don’t — will feel it.
So will doctors who accept
Medicare, people who get unem-
ployment aid, defense contractors,
air traffic controllers, national park
rangers and companies that do
research and development.
The package of tax increases and
spending cuts known as the “fiscal
cliff” takes effect in January unless
Congress passes a budget deal by
then. The economy would be hit so
hard that it would likely sink into
recession in the first half of 2013,
economists say.
And no matter who you are, it
will be all but impossible to avoid
the pain.
Middle income families would
have to pay an average of about
$2,000 more next year, the nonpar-
tisan Tax Policy Center has calcu-
lated.
Up to 3.4 million jobs would be
lost, the Congressional Budget
Office estimates. The unemploy-
ment rate would reach 9.1 percent
from the current 7.9 percent.
Stocks could plunge. The nonparti-
san CBO estimates the total cost of
the cliff in 2013 at $671 billion.
Collectively, the tax increases
would be the steepest to hit
Americans in 60 years when meas-
ured as a percentage of the econo-
my.
“There would be a huge shock
effect to the U.S. economy,” says
Mark Vitner, an economist at Wells
Fargo.
Most of the damage — roughly
two-thirds — would come from the
tax increases. But the spending cuts
would cause pain, too.
The bleak scenario could push
the White House and Congress to
reach a deal before year’s end. On
Tuesday, Congress returns for a
post-election session that could last
through Dec. 31.
Most people in U.S. won’t be
able to escape ‘fiscal cliff ’
Barack Obama
6
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Charles Ernest Fletcher Jr.
Charles Ernest Fletcher Jr. died in his home
in Half Moon Bay Nov. 8, 2012 at the age of
75. He had not been ill and
his death came as a com-
plete shock to the family.
Chuck, as he was
known to his friends, was
co-owner of Pacifica
Home Video with his
wife from 1980 until
1992. He was a retired
carpenter from the
Carpenters Union Local 217.
He is survived by his wife of 36 years,
Barbara (Oliver) Fletcher, his brother Mark
Fletcher of Petaluma and his sister Barbara
Hamze of Fremont. He also leaves behind his
sons, Richard Fletcher of Pacifica and Darryll
Fletcher of Kelseyville and his daughters
Charlene (Fletcher) Conley, Cherol (Fleming)
Ockrassa, Bonnie (Nicoll) Burington of El
Granada and Cheryl (Nicoll) Gauthier of
Charlton, Mass.; 11 grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
A memorial will be held 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 17 in the Chapel at Greenlawn
Memorial Park, 1100 El Camino Real, Colma
followed by a gathering at the Sharp Park Golf
Course Restaurant, 1 Sharp Park Road in
Pacifica.
Don Gillman
Don Gillman, 54, died Nov. 10, 2012 col-
lapsed from a heart attack while running on
Sawyer Camp Trail.
Born April 7, 1958 to Robert and Muriel
Gillman. Don lived a full life as a faithful son,
husband, father, grandfather, brother and
friend serving Jesus all over the world. Don is
survived by his mother Muriel, wife Denise
and children, grandchildren and sisters. A
funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Saturday,
Nov. 17, 2012 at Saint Robert’s Catholic
Church, Oak Avenue and Crystal Springs
Road in San Bruno.
In lieu of flowers, donations are received to
Light of Asia, 305 Almond Court, San Ramon,
CA 94583.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the fami-
ly’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — The University of
California is postponing a vote on raising fees
for several professional degree programs.
UC officials said Tuesday the Board of
Regents is tabling the proposal at the request
of Gov. Jerry Brown, who serves on the board
as part of his official duties. Brown wants time
to study the agenda item.
The board had been scheduled to vote
Wednesday on raising tuition by as much as
35 percent for degree programs in business,
nursing, public policy and theater, film and
television.
Brown is expected to make a rare appear-
ance at Wednesday’s regents meeting in San
Francisco.
On Tuesday, the governor attended the
California State University Board of Trustees’
meeting in Long Beach, where he urged them
to indefinitely postpone a vote on three pro-
posed fees.
UC postponing vote on
raising professional fees
LOCAL/NATION 7
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
U.S. general’s emails ‘flirtatious’
By Pauline Jelinek
and Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The sex
scandal that felled CIA Director
David Petraeus widened Tuesday to
ensnare the top U.S. commander in
Afghanistan, Gen. John Allen, in a
suddenly public drama involving a
Tampa socialite, a jealous rival, a
twin sister in a messy custody dis-
pute and flirty emails.
The improbable story — by turns
tragic and silly — could have major
consequences, unfolding at a criti-
cal time in the Afghan war effort
and just as President Barack Obama
was hoping for a smooth transition
in his national security team.
Obama put a hold on the nomina-
tion of Afghan war chief Allen to
become the next commander of
U.S. European Command as well as
the NATO supreme allied com-
mander in Europe after investiga-
tors uncovered 20,000-plus pages
of documents
and emails that
involved Allen
and Tampa
socialite Jill
Kelley. Some of
the material was
characterized as
“flirtatious.”
Allen, 58,
insisted he’d
done nothing
wrong and
worked to save
his imperiled
career.
Kelley, 37,
who had worked
herself into the
center of the
military social
scene in Florida
without having any official role,
emerged as a central figure in the
still-unfolding story that has
embroiled two of the nation’s most
influential and respected military
leaders.
David Petraeus scandal widens
U.S. quickly going
through leaders in
Afghanistan war
By Deb Riechmann
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan — At the
international military headquarters in
Kabul, it’s jokingly being called the
curse of the commander’s job.
The last four U.S. generals to run
the Afghan war were either forced to
resign or saw their careers tainted by
allegations of wrongdoing.
The first, Gen. David McKiernan,
was ousted on May 11, 2009, a year
before his term as commander was set
to end. Then-Defense Secretary
Robert Gates wanted McKiernan’s
resignation as newly elected President
Barack Obama launched a counterin-
surgency strategy of working to
undermine the Taliban’s pull on the
population. It was the first presiden-
tial dismissal of a wartime general
since President Harry Truman ousted
Gen. Douglas MacArthur during the
Korean War.
Obama replaced McKiernan with
Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, who had
a background in special operations
and came in with a mandate to remake
the war effort with the help of “surge”
troops. But he lasted only 13 months.
In June 2010, Rolling Stone pub-
lished an article that quoted scathing
remarks McChrystal and his aides
made about their civilian bosses,
including Vice President Joseph
Biden, as fools who were ignorant of
the complexities of war. Obama called
McChrystal back to Washington to
explain and forced him to resign.
Gen. David Petraeus took over the
Afghan command in July 2010 to fill
the void left by McChrystal’s abrupt
departure and agreed to serve for one
year. He completed that term and then
retired from the military to become
CIA director in September 2011.
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta has demot-
ed the former head of U.S. Africa
Command who was accused of
spending thousands of dollars on
lavish travel and other unautho-
rized expenses, a senior U.S. offi-
cial said Tuesday.
Panetta stripped Gen. William
“Kip” Ward of a star, which means
that he will now retire as a three-
star lieutenant general despite
arguments from the chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff against the
demotion. Ward also has been
ordered to repay the government
$82,000.
The official spoke on condition
of anonymity because the person
wasn’t author-
ized to discuss a
personnel mat-
ter.
The demotion
comes as retired
Army Gen.
David Petraeus
resigned as CIA
director because
of an extramari-
tal affair and Marine Gen. John
Allen is being investigated for
potentially improper communica-
tions with a woman.
According to the official, Panetta
reviewed the Ward matter and con-
cluded that the wrongdoing found
by the Defense Department
Inspector General, in a report
released earlier this year, demand-
ed accountability.
General demoted for
lavish travel, spending
David Petraeus
William Ward
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Without new revenue, San Bruno
schools face a $3 million deficit in
this school year — a problem that
will soon need to be addressed.
The San Bruno Park Elementary
School Board of Trustees hoped to
curb the deficit with Measure G, a
five-year, $199 annual parcel tax
that failed on the Nov. 6 ballot. The
measure would have generated an
estimated $2 million annually.
Tonight, the board will hear a pres-
entation of the fiscal situation devel-
oped by the Fiscal Sustainability
Task Force.
Superintendent David Hutt
explained tonight is simply a start to
the conversation about the budget
and how to proceed.
The board approved a budget with
$19.68 million in revenue and
$21.24 million in expenditures.
Revised budget numbers show the
revenue and expenditures both
increased to $21.62 million and
$24.88 million respectively, accord-
ing to the Task Force report. As a
result, the projected deficit is
expected to increase to $3.26 mil-
lion. The presentation calls for a
$980,000 transfer from a special
savings account and for more than
$500,000 in either cuts or increased
revenue.
What those cuts are or how the
district would increase revenue is
not yet known. The task force did,
however, look at a variety of options
and possible savings in recent meet-
ings.
In terms of cuts, closing a school
could save $236,000; eliminating
contracted physical education in
fourth and fifth grades would save
$110,000; moving a special educa-
tion class back to the district would
save an estimated $450,000; and
furloughs could save hundreds of
thousands. Raising revenue is also
an option. Most notably, the Task
Force notes show renting a closed
school could generate more than
$600,000 annually.
How to proceed will be a difficult
conversation for the district.
In April, the board voted against a
proposal to close two schools — El
Crystal and Crestmoor elementary
schools. The conversation caused an
uproar in the community and meet-
ing protests featured children speak-
ing about the importance of their
teachers and school community. A
petition with more than 900 signa-
tures was presented in opposition to
the idea of school closure. Another
cause for concern was how the talks
of school closure had progressed.
In early April, the board met and
only one possible school was on the
chopping block, Crestmoor. That
San Bruno schools face $3 million deficit
See DEFICIT, Page 26
John Allen
NATION/WORLD 8
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Aya Batrawy and Timothy Dolan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt’s powerful Muslim
Brotherhood sharply criticized Israeli
leaders on Tuesday over airstrikes in
the Gaza Strip, accusing them of heat-
ing up the conflict to score political
points ahead of elections.
The latest round of violence began
Saturday, with rocket attacks from
Gaza militants and Israeli airstrikes that
killed seven Palestinians. More than
100 rockets have exploded in Israel
since the weekend. The exchanges
appeared to die down on Tuesday.
Also, Israeli tanks struck a Syrian
artillery launcher Monday after a mor-
tar shell flew into Israel-held territory,
fueling concerns that Israel could be
dragged into the Syrian civil war.
In its statement, the Brotherhood’s
Freedom and Justice Party referred to
Israel as a “Zionist occupier” and a
“racist state,” placing Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and
Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman
on the “fringes” of the “far right.”
“In the framework of elections that
Israel is witnessing is a recent military
escalation against occupied Gaza and
the occupied Golan Heights,” the state-
ment said. Israel has set parliamentary
elections for Jan. 22.
The Brotherhood’s party called on
Arab and Muslim governments “to stop
the Zionist war that is operating under
electoral calculations for personal gain
far from humanitarian calculations for
peace, security and stability.”
The Muslim Brotherhood itself
released a separate statement shortly
after its party’s, sharpening the criti-
cism and accusing Israel of following a
policy that tries to appear opposite
itself “and God knows they are liars.”
“The killing of tens of our innocent
Palestinian brothers is part of a link in a
chain of oppression and Judaization
that seeks to impose itself on the
ground, and that will never materialize
with God’s will,” it said.
The harsh pronouncements followed
a small demonstration in Cairo Monday
and open letter signed by several liber-
al parties and revolutionary groups
denouncing the Israeli strikes on Gaza.
The statements by both the
Brotherhood and its political party
highlight decades of tensions between
neighbors Israel and Egypt, despite a
1979 peace treaty. The Islamists,
repressed in Egypt under the regime
that was ousted last year, have emerged
as the most powerful group since last
year’s popular uprising. They won par-
liamentary elections and the presiden-
cy.
Egypt slams Israel over Gaza strikes
By Jill Lawless
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Britain’s media are in a
meltdown and its government is gaffe-
prone, so Oxford Dictionaries has cho-
sen an apt Word of the Year: “omnisham-
bles.”
Oxford University Press on Tuesday
crowned the word — defined as “a situ-
ation that has been comprehensively
mismanaged, characterized by a string
of blunders and miscalculations” — its
top term of 2012.
Each year Oxford University Press
tracks how the English language is
changing and chooses a word that best
reflects the mood of the year. The pub-
lisher typically chooses separate British
and American winners. This year’s
American champion is “gif,” short for
graphics interchange format, a common
format for images on the Internet.
The editors said gif was being recog-
nized for making the crucial transition
from noun to verb, “to gif”: to create a
gif file of an image or video sequence,
especially relating to an event. And,
inevitably, to share it online. Cute kit-
tens, Olympic champions, President
Obama — they’ve all been giffed.
Coined by writers of the satirical tele-
vision show “The Thick of It,”
omnishambles has been applied to
everything from government PR blun-
ders to the crisis-ridden preparations for
the London Olympics.
Oxford University Press lexicographer
Susie Dent said the word was chosen for
its popularity as well as its “linguistic
productivity.”
She said “a notable coinage coming
from the word is Romneyshambles” — a
derisive term used by the British press
after U.S. presidential candidate Mitt
Romney expressed doubts about
London’s ability to host a successful
Olympics.
Oxford chooses ‘omnishambles’ as word of the year
Top bishop: We won’t give in on birth control rule
BALTIMORE — A top American bishop said Tuesday the
Roman Catholic church will not comply with the Obama
administration requirement that most
employers provide health insurance cover-
ing birth control.
New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan, pres-
ident of the U.S. Conference of Catholic
Bishops, said church leaders are open to
working toward a resolution with federal
officials, but will meanwhile press ahead
with challenges to the mandate in legisla-
tures and in court.
“The only thing we’re certainly not pre-
pared to do is give in. We’re not violating our consciences,”
Dolan told reporters at a national bishops’ meeting. “I would
say no door is closed except for the door to capitulation.”
The bishops have been fighting the regulation since it was
announced by President Barack Obama early this year. Houses
of worship are exempt, but religiously affiliated hospitals,
charities and colleges are not.
Obama promised to change the requirement so that insur-
ance companies, not faith-affiliated employers, would pay for
the coverage. But details have not been worked out.
Police: Grandmother behind Ohio murder-suicide
TOLEDO, Ohio — Letters found after an Ohio murder-sui-
cide that killed three children indicate it was orchestrated by
their grandmother and uncle, who were found dead with the
youngsters in the family garage amid a disagreement over who
should care for them, police said Tuesday.
Firefighters used a sledgehammer on Monday to force open
a barricaded door to the garage, where a truck was running
with hoses leading from the exhaust into the car that contained
the bodies, police said.
Investigators said the relatives may have died of carbon
monoxide poisoning. Two dogs and a cat also were found
dead.
The family members were identified as 54-year-old Sandy
Ford, her 32-year-old son, Andy Ford, and her grandchildren,
10-year-old Paige Hayes, 6-year-old Logan Hayes and 5-year-
old Madalyn Hayes.
Around the nation
“The killing of tens of our innocent Palestinian
brothers is part of a link in a chain of oppression
and Judaization that seeks to impose itself on the
ground, and that will never materialize with God’s will.”
— Statement from Muslim Brotherhood
Timothy Dolan
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
San Mateo officials could
learn from South City officials
Editor,
I just read with interest the article
regarding the “rumored” Walmart
development in South San Francisco
(in response to “Walmart rumors spark
city policy discussion” in the Nov. 13
edition of the Daily Journal). The site
is in an industrial area and the Walmart
would be replacing an already existing
Lowe’s store. The officials in South
City have had an impact study per-
formed and the issue will be discussed
at this week’s City Council meeting.
South City officials are being proactive
in performing these essential tasks
before Walmart sets up shop.
It’s a stark comparison to the officials
in San Mateo. 7-Eleven has been
allowed to illegally sneak into a resi-
dential neighborhood in San Mateo.
After 7-Eleven opens, the San Mateo
City Council will meet on Thursday,
Nov. 15 to decide whether to adhere to
zoning laws that prohibit this illegal
use of the site or follow the recommen-
dations of the Planning Commission
who has unanimously agreed that a 24-
hour convenience store in a quiet resi-
dential neighborhood would be unduly
burdensome, particularly on police
department resources.
I commend the South San Francisco
officials and invite them to educate the
San Mateo Planning and Building
Department, the city attorney’s office
and other officials or staff that took part
in this uninformed, illegal decision
resulting in a 7-Eleven being inserted
in the middle of a quiet residential
neighborhood.
Please attend the San Mateo City
Council meeting this Thursday, Nov. 15
at 7 p.m. at City Hall at 330 W. 20th
Ave., San Mateo. Let the elected offi-
cials know that we deserve and demand
fair representation.
7-Eleven’s corporation has 46,000
stores. A homeowner has one home.
Erin Shannon
San Mateo
Nob Hill
Editor,
Now that the strike at Nob Hill is
over, it’s time to remind Michael Teel,
CEO of Raley’s, that the consumer
always wins because the consumer
votes first by electing to shop or not.
Everything follows from that. It seems
that he forgot this before eliciting a
strike by the union workers. Perhaps he
will keep this in mind in the future:
don’t forget your customers, they will
provide what you need to run your
business. Every time.
Cole G. Canafax
Redwood City
Using Proposition
30 funds wisely
Editor,
I voted for Proposition 30 and was
pleased to see that it passed. Now that
it has been approved by voters, the
work should begin to make sure that
the funds are prudently utilized so
that they end up in the classroom and
not in unnecessary administration.
Teachers need to be compensated
properly and resources should be
available to them to properly educate
our children. To accomplish this, how-
ever, the school districts in San Mateo
need to become more efficient.
Currently, there are 23 school districts
in this county serving 91,373 K-12
students. The average size of school
districts in California is 10,000 stu-
dents. Applying this ratio in San
Mateo County would mean that we
should have no more than nine school
districts. By consolidating school dis-
tricts, administrative costs and person-
nel could be redirected into the class-
rooms where they could assist the
existing classroom teachers in educat-
ing our children.
Richard Benson
Belmont
Letters to the editor
T
he passage of Proposition 30
and the new supermajority
achieved by Democrats in the
state Legislature is providing some
breathing room for our state represen-
tatives in Sacramento. However, both
are also cause for pause.
The passage of Proposition 30
means this year’s state budget is
indeed balanced. There should be an
estimated $6 billion more revenue in
state coffers, which helps, but it does
not mean the end of one-time borrow-
ing the state has relied upon to bridge
the gap between revenue and expendi-
tures.
The new supermajority also means
the Legislature won’t have its usual
bogeyman for its own ineffectiveness.
Time and again, the Republican
minority has been blamed for its
unwillingness to pass tax increases.
Now that the minority party is no
longer needed, it’s easy peasy right?
Part of the ongoing pull of both mone-
tary easing and Democratic control of
any legislative body is participating in
the, for lack of a better word, payment
to those who went without during the
dry times. A small portion of pension
reform has been agreed upon, enough,
at least, to ensure Proposition 30’s
passage, but nearly everybody agrees
this summer’s legislation was not
nearly enough to ensure our state’s
fiscal solvency in the long term. But
make no mistake, there will be hands
out from those who helped ensure its
passage.
The passage of Proposition 30 was
slim and, though the new supermajori-
ty could be seen as a form of voter
mandate, it was also a narrow victory
likely caused by the influx of young
voters in this particular election com-
bined with the crumbling platform of
the state’s Republican party. So if
there is a mandate, it is not a substan-
tial one but rather a signal that voters
sought to stem cuts to education. That
means fiscal responsibility through
this next session so that cuts won’t be
magnified next year.
If the Legislature can indeed resist
the pull from special interests and
employee groups, then we may be in
good shape. Gov. Jerry Brown has
promised to be frugal for now, so that
is also a good sign. If there is a pull
toward giving some of the money
away and loosening the belt, then it
may be a short tenure for the super-
majority.
In the meantime, school districts
across California will still feel the
weight of budget cuts even without
the “trigger cuts” promised with the
failure of Proposition 30. There will
be no additional money for education
and a number of local school districts
are bracing for difficult budget discus-
sions this spring. This year may be
safe, but next year may not be and
many school officials are still project-
ing millions in cuts across the board.
So that means the state Legislature
must be prudent and fiscally responsi-
ble as legislators proceed through the
next legislative session.
Frugality still needed in Sacramento
Boys’ day?
“F
athers have the power to inspire. By modeling
the best traits of masculinity rather than a cari-
cature of machismo or emotional illiteracy,
fathers have enormous influence over the template of their
sons’ manhood.” — “When Good Men Behave Badly,”
David B. Wexler, Ph.D.
Recently, some concerned
people have suggested that
since there is an
“International Day of the
Girl” that there should also
be the same for boys who
need far better role models
for what it means to be a
man, especially a father. I’m
not sure what particular
approach these people have
in mind in relation to pro-
moting the above, but they
got my attention. Over the
years, I have written several
columns about the plight of boys in our culture, and such
awareness and concern continue to be badly needed.
For some time now, authors who have the welfare of
boys at heart have been trying to inform us about what
boys and men have to deal with daily in our culture. In my
book closet, I find at least 10 books specifically about the
challenges of raising boys other than those quoted here.
One of the best is “Guyland,” by Michael Kimmel. I have
at least 10 more about parenting in general — one of my
favorites, “Raising Happiness,” by Christine Carter Ph.D.
— and many others related to the male dilemma in today’s
culture, including, “Your Children Are under Attack,” by
Jim Taylor, Ph.D.
The premise of all of these books is that male character-
istics should be respected and channeled into productive
pursuits, that this doesn’t just happen and that parents
(hopefully two of them) have an inherent responsibility to
guide them and give them what they need to fulfill their
purpose. They all emphasize that boys must receive dedi-
cated and nurturing parenting to grow into a well-function-
ing adult who contributes positively to society.
As Wexler wrote: “A child has a compelling need to look
into the face of his mother and see reflected back to him
eyes that say, ‘You are wonderful!’ and a smile that says,
‘You make me happy’ … A father’s belief in his son is one
of the most powerful mirrors that a boy will ever experi-
ence ... We never shed the need and longing for positive
mirroring, the need to look in the mirror of an important
person and see a reflection of ourselves as fundamentally
good and valuable.”
It seems that as girls and women have been making so
much of the noise — and earning important advances for
their gender. Many boys and men are feeling somewhat
intimidated — like the wind is being taken out of their
sails. Some haven’t found a good way to compensate for
their perceived losses. Instead of rising to the challenge,
they either shrink back into their shell or pump up their
macho side, unsure of how to cope. They must have a pur-
pose, a way in which they feel accomplished, potent and in
charge on their way to being, as Dr. Phil has said, a
provider, protector and teacher. Boys need to feel important
and challenged and, if they don’t find a positive way, they
will take it out on society by causing all kinds of problems
for themselves, those around them and society.
Kathleen Parker writes in “Save the Males”: “A man who
has been initiated into manhood by his father has no need
to be macho. An insecure, uninitiated man takes on the
symbolic, exaggerated masculine role because he has never
been given the real thing.” Boys need to observe and expe-
rience how good men operate, how they do good things and
make something of themselves instead of the idiots they
see in movies, television and other media.
How about a “National Day (or year) of the Boy” that
would emphasize the following?
l). The importance of dedicated quality parenting by both
mother and father or others who have the boy’s best inter-
ests at heart.
2). The importance of the positive male characteristics
that benefit society and how they can be nurtured.
3). The way our despicable media encourages the nega-
tive aspects of males by featuring terrible role models for
boys to emulate.
4). That studies need to be done to bring to our attention
what has gone wrong when a boy turns to violence and
what to do about it.
It all boils down to this. “Whether isolated or becoming
physically dangerous, even the most hardened young man
began his adolescence as a young boy who yearned,
because of his own internal nature, for his family, commu-
nity and society to provide him with safe risks, important
challenges and deeply felt rites of passage to purposeful
manhood.” — “The Purpose of Boys,” Michael Gurian.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 500
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,756.18 -0.46% 10-Yr Bond 1.589 -1.37%
Nasdaq2,883.89 -0.70% Oil (per barrel) 85.370003
S&P 500 1,374.53 -0.40% Gold 1,723.20
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. stocks closed lower after uneven
trading Tuesday as fears about the “fiscal
cliff” and Greece tipped major indexes
between gains and losses. A surge in
Home Depot’s stock prevented a steeper
drop for the Dow Jones industrial aver-
age.
The Dow closed down closed down
58.90 points, or 0.5 percent, at 12,756.18.
It would have been lower without support
from Home Depot, whose stock jumped
3.6 percent after the big-box retailer beat
expectations for its fiscal third-quarter
earnings. Home Depot is benefiting from
the gradual housing recovery and rebuild-
ing efforts after Superstorm Sandy. Home
Depot rose $2.22 to $63.38.
Stocks had opened lower after
European leaders postponed the latest aid
package for Greece. The Dow turned pos-
itive in the first hour of trading and rose
solidly through the morning, gaining as
much as 83 points. Starting around 2
p.m., the average slid steadily into the red.
Other indexes also closed lower. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index lost 5.50
points, or 0.4 percent, to 1,374.53. The
Nasdaq composite index fell 20.37
points, or 0.7 percent, to 2,883.89.
Investors are trading against the back-
drop of the “fiscal cliff,” a set of U.S. gov-
ernment spending cuts and tax increases
that will take effect automatically at the
beginning of next year unless U.S. leaders
reach a compromise before then.
Worries about the fiscal cliff pushed
U.S. stocks to one of their worst weekly
losses of the year last week after voters
re-elected President Barack Obama and a
deeply divided Congress. Obama met
Tuesday with labor leaders and others
who advocate higher taxes on the wealthy
and want to protect health benefits for
seniors and other government programs.
Obama will meet with business leaders
Wednesday.
“The longer we sit and do nothing”
about the nation’s fiscal issues, “the more
this market is going to oscillate between
positive 40 and negative 60, until we
know what’s going to happen next with
all this uncertainty,” said Craig Johnson,
senior technical research strategist with
Piper Jaffray & Co. in Minneapolis.
Johnson expects the S&P 500 will
reach 1,550 in the next six months as
investors get over their lingering woozi-
ness from the Great Recession and com-
panies understand better how government
policy on taxes, health care and spending
will affect them.
Stocks fall in uneven trading
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
The Home Depot Inc., up $2.22 at $63.38
The home improvement retailer said that its
net income rose slightly in the third quarter,
and it raised its forecast for the year.
Dick’s Sporting Goods Inc., up $2.27 at $50.97
Thanks to a big jump in online sales, the
sporting goods retailer said that its net income
in the third quarter rose 21 percent.
AK Steel Holding Corp.,down 96 cents at $4.50
The steel maker forecast a larger-than-expected
fourth-quarter loss due to lower steel prices
and a large income tax charge.
Greenbrier Cos., up $2.78 at $16.73
The railcar company said that billionaire investor
Carl Icahn bought 2.7 million of its shares for a
9.99 percent stake in the company.
Tronox Inc., down $3.54 at $15.18
The titanium products company reported a
$16.7 million loss during its fiscal third quarter
due to higher costs and weaker demand.
Nasdaq
Microsoft Corp., down 90 cents at $27.09
The technology company said that Steven
Sinofsky, the president of its Windows and
Windows Live operations, is leaving.
Weatherford International Ltd., down $1.73 at
$9.15
Due to a lower rig count in Canada, the oilfield
services company reported disappointing
revenue for its fiscal third quarter.
Diamond Foods Inc., up $2.58 at $20.43
The maker of Pop Secret popcorn said that it
would finally release restated results for the past
two years, and part of this year.
Big movers
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Raley’s super-
market chain reached a tentative con-
tract deal with workers, ending a nine-
day strike at dozens of stores in
Northern California and Nevada, offi-
cials said Tuesday.
Representatives of the United Food
and Commercial Workers union said
picket lines would end immediately at
Raley’s and Nob Hill locations after
more than 7,500 workers went on strike
on Nov. 4.
“As one of the last large family-
owned grocery chains, it will be great to
have everyone back working again,”
Raley’s president Mike Teel said in a
statement.
The chain has 128 stores in the region.
Workers at a Nob Hill store in
Alameda put away glossy printed picket
signs in favor of handmade placards,
including some that read, “We Won!
Strike Over! Come Back!”
“We were persistent and we got what
we wanted,” Antonio Ybarra, a Nob Hill
cashier, told KTVU-TV.
Full details about the agreement were
not provided. However, the union said it
was able to retain one of its most impor-
tant benefits — a union-run health plan.
“This is an important accomplishment
for our members and retirees,” Jacques
Loveall, president of UFCW 8-Golden
State, and Ron Lind, president of UFCW
Local 5, said in a joint statement. “We
were able to address Raley’s competitive
concerns while protecting our member-
ship in a very challenging time.”
Both sides claimed victory in the deal
that came less than a week after rival
Safeway Inc. signed a tentative agree-
ment with its union that left Raley’s as
the only chain in the region without a
labor contract.
Raley’s workers will consider the deal
for possible ratification in the next sev-
eral weeks.
Raley’s reaches contract deal
Cisco 1Q income up as
U.S. businesses buying again
NEW YORK — Cisco Systems Inc., the world’s largest
maker of computer networking gear, said Tuesday that U.S.
companies are starting to spend again, helping Cisco find
more solid footing after some shaky months early this year.
Cisco said its earnings rose 18 percent in the latest quar-
ter, propelled by a renewed willingness by large U.S. busi-
nesses to invest in big-ticket networking gear, even as the
federal government continued to hold back. Orders from
large business customers in the U.S. rose 9 percent from a
year ago.
That helped make up for continued weakness in Europe,
where economic turmoil is still causing a big drop-off in
orders.
“The U.S. has to lead the total globe out of this slowdown.
It’s not going to come from Europe. While we were all
hopeful about emerging countries, they just aren’t going to
be strong enough,” CEO John Chambers said.
The company’s stock rose $1.19, or 7.1 percent, to $18.04
in extended trading Tuesday.
Cisco made $2.1 billion, or 39 cents per share, in its fiscal
first quarter, which ended Oct. 27. That compares with $1.8
billion, or 33 cents per share, in the same period a year ago.
Monster Beverage Oks
buyback of up to $250M shares
CORONA — Energy drink maker Monster Beverage said
Tuesday that its board has approved the repurchase of up to
$250 million of its outstanding common stock.
Earlier this month Monster Beverage Corp. reported that
its third-quarter net income climbed but its revenue growth
slowed.
In the last few months, the company has faced increased
government scrutiny and the Food and Drug Administration
has disclosed that it is investigating reports of five deaths
and a non-fatal heart attack in people who consumed its
highly caffeinated Monster Energy Drink.
Business briefs
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Former Notre Dame de Namur
University basketball standout
Arron Mollet had his mind made
up: If he was going to continue
playing the game he loves, it would
probably take him overseas.
“Especially coming from a small-
er school, it’s hard to get a look,”
Mollet said. Even after a career
where he knocked down 72 3-point-
ers, leading the team in that catego-
ry over a two-year span, it wasn’t
like Mollet’s phone was blowing up
with opportunities.
But as Mollet found out playing
basketball as an Argonaut, some-
times all you need is one shot.
And when you get it, just follow
through and knock it down.
As it turns out, Mollet won’t need
to pack a suitcase just yet.
Mollet will continue his basket-
ball career locally after the Santa
Cruz Warriors of the NBA
Developmental League drafted him
with the 125th overall pick. Mollet,
a 6-3 guard who graduated from
NDNU last May was selected as the
13th pick in the eighth round.
The NBA Development League,
founded in 2001, is the NBA’s offi-
cial minor league system and fea-
tures 16 teams that have direct affil-
iation with NBA franchises.
“It’s a huge opportunity,” Mollet
said. “The D league in general is a
great opportunity for a lot of guys
that can’t get drafted straight into
the NBA. It gives them a chance to
be seen and gives them the potential
to move up. As for me, the tryout
was a great opportunity. It’s a great
thing that they do that for people
who have been overlooked, get a
chance to play and show what they
got. Whether or not I’m here for a
year, or five years, whatever it is, it’s
going to open up a lot of other doors
for me.”
For Mollet, the Warriors offer a
chance to continue his career that
began at Gavilan College before
spending two years at NDNU.
During his time as an Argonaut,
Mollet averaged 11.9 points and 3.1
rebounds per game while starting 41
contests at shooting guard.
“When I found out that I going to
be playing so close to home, where
I have all my support, it was an
amazing feeling. The situation
couldn’t have worked out any better
really,” he said.
The Santa Cruz Warriors are in a
new home this season after making
the move from Bismarck, N.D.
Mollet, originally from Gilroy, grew
up only an hour from Santa Cruz
and seized the opportunity to play
with the D League following an
open tryout.
“I wasn’t really expecting any-
<< Cal’s Tedford in hot water?, page 12
• Hope Solo in domestic violence incident, page 23
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012
ALL BUSINESS: STANFORD RUNNER TO RACE AND TAKE TEST ON SAME DAY >>> PAGE 12
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo-Atherton’s Zach Cogan lines up a shot in his team’s 11-10 win over St. Francis-Moutain View Tuesday night at the CCS Division I semifinal.
RICHARD ROSSI
Arron Mollet led the Argos in 3-
pointers for two seasons.
M-A Bears shock Lancers
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In a season already full of big
splashes for the Menlo-Atherton
boys’ water polo team, the Bears
proved they had at least one more
surprise left in them.
No. 3 M-A shocked No. 2 St.
Francis-Mountain View Tuesday
night at Serra High School in the
second Central Coast Section
Division I semifinal 11-10. The
Bears survived a late surge by the
Lancers to pick up the win and
stamp their ticket to Saturday’s
championship match against No. 1
Bellarmine Prep.
“I don’t think anyone expected us
to be in the final,” said M-A head
coach Dante Dettamanti. “I’ve been
working with these guys for three
years ... and it all came together —
all the stuff we’ve been preaching to
these guys for the last three years.
And it’s stuff you couldn’t get them
to do all year during regular season
games.”
“It means a lot,” said Harrison
Holland-McCowan, who scored six
goals in the win. “The last couple of
years we’ve come up a little bit
short of expectations. I think this
year we really worked hard, [we
have] great team chemistry, I love
the guys and I think we’re blessed to
be in this final game.”
A spot in the final was earned by
a Menlo-Atherton offense that
blitzed the St. Francis defense in
quarters one through three and was
near flawless on the exclusion. It
was just enough of a push to hold
off the Lancers.
“Our coach has been preaching
movement,” Holland-McCowan
said. “We didn’t do a traditional
whole-man offense. We were driv-
ing a lot, getting open that way and
I think that kind of took them by
surprise. We were able to put the
ball away.”
M-A jumped to a 4-3 lead after
one quarter with the teams exchang-
ing goals until Holland-McCowan’s
pair helped M-A forge ahead 4-2 —
the second of which came on a pret-
ty lob over the St. Francis goalkeep-
er.
“All of sudden, they’re scoring
goals on stuff we’ve worked and
talked about,” Dettamanti said.
“One thing, we knew this goalie like
to really overplay one side and
come out of goal. Those [lobs] are
very effective. We tried to take
advantage of that.”
The score stayed close through
the second quarter thanks in large
part to the efforts of Peter Berquist
in the M-A cage. The second period
saw No. 1 make a trio of remarkable
saves that preserved the Bears’ lead.
Holland-McCowan scored twice in
the frame on a pair of nifty back-
hands while John Knox added
another goal.
“He’s amazing,” Dettamanti said
of Berquist and his eight saves.
Up 7-6, M-A got the push they
needed in the third quarter.
First, a huge win on the sprint by
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College of San Mateo head bas-
ketball coach Michelle Warner
summed up the task for her 2012-
2013 team in a simple sentence.
“You gotta teach them how to be
Bulldogs and not poodles.”
The job sounds easy enough. But
CSM women’s basketball head into
the 2012-2013 season with a lot of
youth on its roster. Of the 12 active
players on Warner’s roster, only two
are sophomores. You would have to
go back to the Erica Hayes team of
2008-2009 or the Cindy Rodrigues
squad of 2003-2004 to find that
much youth on a Bulldog roster.
“It’s going to be an interesting
year,” Warner said. “Hopefully, the
learning curve goes quickly. Right
now, we’re just battling a lot of
injuries.”
Battling is right. Warner said only
two of her players, Sierra Nazel and
Vanessa Siega, are currently without
some type of injury. In Saturday’s
loss against College of the
Redwoods, 74-49, the Bulldogs fin-
ished the game with only six play-
ers.
“We’re just not physically where I
would like us to be at this time of
year due to injuries and their lack of
experience,” Warner said.
So, without a game on the sched-
ule this week, priority one for the
See BEARS, Page 14
See CSM, Page 14
Former Argo heads to ‘D’ League
See ARGO, Page 14
CSM Bulldogs
basketball has
plenty of youth
By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Davey Johnson
of the Washington Nationals, and
Bob Melvin of the Oakland
Athletics were chosen as managers
of the year on
Tuesday after
guiding their
teams to huge
turnaround sea-
sons.
Melvin beat
out Baltimore’s
Buck Showalter
for the AL honor
in a close vote
by a Baseball
Writers’ Association of America
panel. Under Melvin, the A’s made a
20-game improvement, finished 94-
68 and won the AL West.
Johnson was an easy choice for
the NL prize after the Nationals —
who had never enjoyed a winning
year — posted the best record in the
majors and made their first playoff
appearance.
Johnson, who turns 70 in January,
was honored for the second time. He
was tabbed as the AL’s top manager
in 1997, hours after he resigned
from the Orioles in a feud with
owner Peter Angelos.
This time, Johnson will get a
while to enjoy the accolade.
The Nationals announced this
See MELVIN, Page 13
A’s Melvin
is Manager
of the Year
Bob Melvin
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tedford plans thorough
evaluation at UC Berkeley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY — California coach
Jeff Tedford said he expects to meet
next week with athletic director
Sandy Barbour to discuss his future
after the Golden Bears finish their
worst season during Tedford’s
tenure.
Tedford said
Tuesday he will
begin a thor-
ough evaluation
of what went
wrong for the
program as soon
as the season
ends Saturday
night at No. 15
Oregon State.
“The first place I will look is in
the mirror,” Tedford said. “We’ll do
a deep dive and figure out where we
can improve.”
Tedford said he will meet with
assistants and each player to get
their input on how to improve the
situation at Cal. The Bears (3-8, 2-6
Pac-12) are having their worst sea-
son since finishing with a 1-10 mark
in 2001 that led to the firing of Tom
Holmoe and the hiring of Tedford.
After a bright start to his tenure
with seven wins his first year, a
school record-tying 10 wins in 2004
and a share of the conference title in
2006, things began falling off the
rails during what started as a prom-
ising 2007 campaign.
The Bears won their first five
games that season and were poised
to move into the top spot in the AP
poll before losing at home to
Oregon State. Starting with that
loss, Tedford has a 34-36 mark over
his last 70 games.
Cal failed to become bowl eligi-
ble for the first time under Tedford
in 2010 and has been even worse
this season. The Bears have lost
four straight games — the longest
skid since Tedford arrived —
capped by a 59-17 loss last week to
Oregon that was the most lopsided
for the school since 1999.
“Teams go through adverse
moments,” defensive back Steve
Williams said. “This is one of our
adverse moments. Coach Tedford
has been here a long time. He’s
been with us a long time. I’m
behind him 100 percent.”
The recent struggles led Tedford
to this thorough evaluation, where
he said he will look at every aspect
of the program from recruiting to
academics to practice format and
scheme.
“We’ll evaluate all of that and
take coaches’ input and all the
coaches and figure out where we
feel like we can improve in every
phase,” he said. “You really have to
put a microscope on it. How can I
be better as a head coach? What can
I do to help the staff? What can I do
to help our players?”
Whether Tedford will get that
chance remains to be seen. If Cal
decides to get rid of Tedford, the
school would owe him $6.9 million
for the final three years of his con-
tract.
With recruiting season picking up
in December, a decision on
Tedford’s status would likely come
soon after the season ends. For now,
Tedford is operating as though he
will be back and is ready to start
looking in depth at recruiting needs
next week.
“We’re moving forward as we
have work to do,” he said. “We’re
moving forward making plans to get
where we need to be and do the
things we need to do.”
While Tedford acknowledged that
recruiting off a down season can be
difficult, he said he believes poten-
tial recruits will see an opportunity
to play immediately at Cal and look
at the improved facilities he helped
get built.
The Bears finished their first sea-
son at renovated Memorial
Stadium, which underwent a $321
million facelift. There is also a $150
million on-campus High
Performance Center attached to the
stadium that has modernized out-
dated facilities.
That is just part of Tedford’s lega-
cy, which also includes a school-
record 85 wins.
“He’s one of the hardest-working
guys you’ll ever be around,” senior
offensive lineman Tyler Rigsbee
said. “He’s kept a great attitude and
kept this team together, which is not
easy to do, especially this year with
some really tough losses. Teams
will disintegrate or guys will start
bickering at each other. He’s done a
good job keeping us as a family.
He’s going to go back to the draw-
ing board and work as hard as he
can to get us in the position to win
games.”
There are also questions about the
future of another key figure at Cal,
star receiver Keenan Allen. Tedford
said he expects Allen to decide next
week whether to return for his sen-
ior season or leave early for the
NFL.
Allen is the career record holder
in receptions at Cal with 205. He
has 2,570 yards receiving and 17
career touchdown catches. He will
likely miss his third straight game
this week with an injured left knee.
Allen is considered one of the top
receivers eligible for the draft and
Tedford said he will research where
Allen would be projected to go if he
decides to leave school early.
“That’s important information,”
Tedford said. “I will try to gather as
much information for him and sit
down so he can make an educated
decision. I’ll support him in whatev-
er he wants to do, but it’s really
important we get him all the proper
information.”
Jeff Tedford
Stanford gets shot
at wounded Ducks
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Oregon Ducks rarely, if ever,
talk about injuries — even season-
ending ones.
So it’s hard to say how depleted
the AP’s No. 1 team is going into
Saturday’s game against No. 14
Stanford. But it’s clear the Ducks
have taken a hit, especially on
defense.
The latest casualty is free safety
Avery Patterson, who seriously
injured his left knee in the second
quarter of Oregon’s 59-17 victory at
California last Saturday night.
Patterson was seen on the side-
lines on crutches and in sweats fol-
lowing the game. Although there
was no official word from the pro-
gram, The Oregonian newspaper
cited an unnamed source as saying
Patterson was out for the season.
Patterson had taken over as starter
for senior John Boyett, who was
hurt early this season. Boyett played
in the opener against Arkansas
State, but was in street clothes the
next week. Later he revealed to his
hometown newspaper that he need-
ed surgery to repair the patellar ten-
dons in both knees. While the Ducks
never formally announced Boyett’s
injury, it ended his career at Oregon.
Sophomore James Scales
replaced Patterson against Cal.
Senior defensive linemen Dion
Jordan (right shoulder) Isaac
Remington (foot) and Ricky
Heimuli (right knee) were dressed
on the sidelines in Berkeley but did
not play. As a result, the Ducks
relied at times on three true fresh-
men — Arik Armstead, DeForest
Buckner and Alex Balducci — on
the defensive line.
Starting nose guard Wade
Keliikipi never made the trip to
Strawberry Canyon because of an
undisclosed injury and was seen
using crutches on Monday.
Defensive end Taylor Hart also hurt
an ankle or foot against Cal and
wore a boot.
The injuries tested coach Chip
Kelly’s “next man in” philosophy.
“It’s part of college football,”
Kelly said. “Can you handle it, or
can you not handle it?”
The Ducks were already hurting
in the secondary with sophomore
backup cornerbacks Dior Mathis
and Troy Hill absent against Cal for
unclear reasons. The situation has
become so serious that there was
speculation this week that the Ducks
might use wide receiver Keanon
Lowe or even multi-purpose back
De’Anthony Thomas on defense.
The move comes after USC used
dynamic wide receiver Marqise Lee
on defense for a few snaps against
Arizona State last weekend, and
Washington played receiver Austin
Seferian-Jenkins on defense against
Utah.
Lowe played at safety at Jesuit
High School in Portland, and came
to Oregon, in part, because he want-
ed to play offense. Thomas played
on both sides of the ball at
Crenshaw High School in Los
Angeles.
“We’re getting thinner, but we’ll
find a way to make it work,” defen-
sive coordinator Nick Aliotti said
without naming names.
The Ducks already moved red-
shirt freshman Koa Ka’ai, who had
played at tight end this season, back
to defensive end, which he played in
high school.
The bright side in all of this for
the Ducks is that even though
they’ve had injuries, their backups
— and even third stringers — have
had plenty of work this season.
In addition to Oregon’s practice of
heavy player rotation on defense to
wear down opponents, the Ducks
often sat their starters after building
up big leads against opponents this
season.
“(That’s) kind of the byproduct of
winning some of those games early,
getting a lot of those guys reps,”
Kelly said.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Stanford’s Miles
Unterreiner will pull off a remark-
able double Saturday that would be
logistically impossible without help
from his school and a huge assist by
the NCAA: He will first compete in
the NCAA cross country meet in
Louisville, then fly to Seattle to
interview for a Rhodes Scholarship
that afternoon.
All that after he begins the inter-
view process as a Rhodes finalist
Friday in Seattle, then travels to
Kentucky that night in time for the
meet.
Stanford athletic director Bernard
Muir said Tuesday the university
received a waiver from the NCAA
on the travel rule so Unterreiner can
take a private plane — the only way
to make this happen. There were no
commercial flights that could get
him from Kentucky to Seattle in
time for the interviews with the
selection committee.
Unterreiner will run his final col-
legiate race. If he receives the pres-
tigious Rhodes Scholarship, he
would study philosophy, politics
and economics at Oxford next year
in England.
The plane ride is being funded
through private support, Muir said.
“It should be a great experience
for him,” Muir said. “We were able
to make this happen through private
support.”
Unterreiner’s parents live in Gig
Harbor, Wash., south of Seattle, and
will pick him up at the airport to get
him to his interview. They are
exploring alternate airports in both
cities in an effort to speed up the
process, as it will be a close call for
him to make it.
He does have a three-hour time
difference working for him.
The race is 1:15 p.m. EDT in
Louisville, then he is due at his ses-
sion in Seattle at 4 p.m. PDT. The
flight is expected to be four hours.
Unterreiner might be running a
little late after running his 6.2-mile
race for the second-ranked Cardinal,
who captured the NCAA regionals
last weekend.
Scott Alexander, Stanford’s asso-
ciate director of development for
major gifts, is a big reason every-
thing came together so perfectly.
So far, anyway.
“There are a lot of people at
Stanford and connected to the uni-
versity that value the full ‘scholar-
athlete,”’ Alexander said. “To me,
it’s not surprising to have that type
of support, and there’s no way this
gets done without it.”
Stanford runner to pull
off remarkable double
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT— Hall of Fame trainer
Emanuel Steward was celebrated by
boxing royalty and the Queen of
Soul at a star-studded memorial
service Tuesday in the Motor City.
Steward, the man who made the
Kronk Gym
famous, died of
colon cancer last
month at the age
of 68.
His family
took its time to
plan a memorial
befitting a
beloved public
figure — and it
was a hit.
Champions he
trained — including Thomas
Hearns, Lennox Lewis, Wladimir
Klitschko and Evander Holyfield —
one he worked out only briefly —
Sugar Ray Leonard — and another
he didn’t train at all — Roy Jones Jr.
— all paid their respects.
“What a spectacular turnout of
support,” HBO Sports commentator
Jim Lampley said. “Over here, you
have a section that I would call the
Hall of Fame section. You would
have to go to Canastota (N.Y.) in
midsummer to the Hall of Fame to
see anything even remotely
approaching this group.
“There are five legitimate heavy-
weight champions sitting in the first
two rows and the No. 1 pound-for-
pound fighter in the world.”
And if that wasn’t impressive
enough, Aretha Franklin sang a stir-
ring rendition of “I’ll Fly Away” in
front of a few thousand witnesses at
Greater Grace Temple. Franklin, a
friend of Steward’s in Detroit for
decades, said she wouldn’t have
missed the memorial for anything.
“He had a million-dollar smile you
couldn’t deny,” Franklin told the
Associated Press from her front-row
seat. “I’m so glad he made the Kronk
Gym what it was, helping countless
young boys become men and many
amateurs become champions.”
A private dinner and party in
Detroit followed the service.
The city closed the original Kronk
Recreation Center — a hot, sweaty
basement gym — after vandals stole
its copper piping in 2006. It was
allowed to remain open, but it put
Steward in a difficult financial situa-
tion and he later rented space at a
gym in Dearborn so his young fight-
ers could train.
Now, there isn’t a Kronk Gym any-
where — and his family is hoping to
change that.
“We closed it after he passed, but
we’re going to restructure it and we
want it done correctly,” Sylvia
Steward-Williams told The AP, sit-
ting in her father’s second-floor
office at his brick home on Detroit’s
west side. “We want to get a good
foundation, like it was in the begin-
ning, and build it back up.”
Steward, who was born in West
Virginia in 1944 and moved 11 years
later to the Motor City, trained box-
ers born and raised in Detroit such as
Hearns. He was hired by boxers from
all over the globe.
Lewis was trained by Steward
from 1994 to 2004, a period that
included victories over Holyfield and
Mike Tyson.
“I’ve been interviewed by a lot of
TV stations around the world, they
have put Emanuel Steward a league
of great trainers,” Lewis said. “And I
say, he is the greatest trainer that ever
lived.”
Steward was an accomplished
amateur boxer who chose to become
a coach in the ring, starting in 1971
with a part-time position at Kronk for
$35 per week.
Steward hailed by Queen
of Soul and boxing royalty
Emanuel
Steward
SPORTS 13
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month that he will guide them in 2013, when he will be the
oldest manager in the majors. He’s set to leave the Washington
dugout and become a team consultant in 2014.
“World Series or bust,” Johnson said on the MLB Network.
“It’s going to be my last year, anyway.”
Melvin also became a two-time winner, having been chosen
in 2007 with Arizona.
Melvin got 16 first-place votes. Showalter got the other 12
firsts, and Robin Ventura of the Chicago White Sox finished
third.
The A’s were one of baseball’s biggest surprises this year,
especially after trades and injuries wreaked havoc with the
roster. Oakland never panicked under Melvin’s cool demeanor
and overtook Texas in the final week to win the division. The
Athletics lost in the first round of the playoffs to Detroit.
Johnson received 23 of the 32 first-place votes, Dusty Baker
of NL Central winner Cincinnati got five firsts and was sec-
ond. Bruce Bochy of the World Series champion San
Francisco Giants got four firsts and was third.
Washington won its second-ever major postseason award.
Bryce Harper was voted NL Rookie of the Year on Monday.
Washington went 98-64 this year, taking over the NL East
lead in late May and staying in first place the rest of the way.
Boosted by Harper, Cy Young candidate Gio Gonzalez and
their fresh “Natitude,” they brought postseason baseball to
Washington for the first time since 1933.
The playoffs didn’t go quite so well. Minus Stephen
Strasburg — team execs decided the ace had pitched enough
while recovering from elbow surgery — Washington blew a 6-
0 lead and lost the deciding Game 5 of the division series to
St. Louis. Voting for the BBWAA awards was done before the
playoffs.
Johnson oversaw a diverse roster, one made up of young and
old, Washington veterans and newcomers. A four-time All-
Star, three-time Gold Glover, two-time World Series champi-
on and the last big leaguer to get a hit off Sandy Koufax,
Johnson spoke with a soft, raspy tone but always held his
team’s attention.
He would occasionally raise his voice — he liked to holler
“whack-o!” when the Nationals homered.
Johnson managed the New York Mets to the 1986 champi-
onship and later guided Cincinnati and the Orioles. He
returned to managing in 1999 with the Los Angeles Dodgers
for two years.
Continued from page 11
MELVIN
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — The Miami Marlins’
spending spree a year ago didn’t work,
so now they’re trying another payroll
purge.
Rebranded in a new ballpark at the
start of 2012, the Marlins were up to
their old ways Tuesday, swapping stars
for prospects. Miami traded shortstop
Jose Reyes, left-hander Mark Buehrle
and right-hander Josh Johnson to the
Toronto Blue Jays as part of a block-
buster deal, a person familiar with the
agreement said.
The person confirmed the trade to The
Associated Press on condition of
anonymity because the teams weren’t
officially commenting. The person said
the trade sent several of the Blue Jays’
top prospects to Miami.
The stunning agreement came less
than a year after the Marlins added
Reyes, Buehrle and closer Heath Bell in
an uncharacteristic $191 million spend-
ing binge as they moved into a new ball-
park. The acquisitions raised high hopes,
but the Marlins instead finished last in
the NL East.
The latest paring of salary actually
began in July, when the Marlins parted
with former NL batting champion
Hanley Ramirez, second baseman Omar
Infante and right-hander Anibal
Sanchez, among others. Bell, the team’s
high-profile bust, was traded to Arizona
last month.
Under owner Jeffrey Loria, long the
target of fan acrimony, the Marlins have
usually been among baseball’s thriftiest
teams. Management pledged that would
change with the new ballpark, but team
officials were disappointed with atten-
dance in 2012, and revenue fell far short
of their projections.
Even so, the blockbuster deal came as
a shock. The players involved must
undergo physicals before the trade
becomes final.
Giancarlo Stanton, the Marlins’ preco-
cious slugger, wasn’t involved in the
deal but wasn’t happy about it.
Stanton said he was mad about the
deal “Plain & Simple,” he tweeted short-
ly after the news broke.
The housecleaning was also the sub-
ject of much mirth on Twitter.
“Good trade, I think we won it,” tweet-
ed FakeSamson, a site that mocks
Marlins president David Samson.
The deal gave an immediate boost to
the Blue Jays, who have not reached the
playoffs since winning their second con-
secutive World Series in 1993. Toronto
went 73-89 this season and finished
fourth in the AL East for the fourth
straight year, again falling short in a
division that includes big spenders.
The Marlins changed their name a
year ago but failed to change their losing
ways, and instead of contending for a
playoff berth, they finished 69-93, their
worst record since 1999.
The Marlins drew more than 2.2 mil-
lion fans but had projected attendance of
nearly 3 million.
Marlins trade 3 stars to Blue Jays
Jake Bassin and subsequent timeout
set up a an even bigger man-advan-
tage situation and goal by Morgan
Olson-Fabbro. The score fueled the
Bears as they’d score three more,
two by Holland-McCowan and one
by Evan McClelland, before St.
Francis found the back of the cage
on the man-advantage. By then, the
Bears were up 11-7.
“Harrison had a phenomenal
game,” Dettamanti said. “He was
just over the place. But we got tired
in the fourth period.”
St. Francis tried to seize that win-
dow of opportunity and pulled to
within one goal with 1:16 left in the
game. After an M-A turnover, it
took a big save by Berquist to keep
the one-goal lead. The Lancer got
one more possession with six sec-
onds left in the game.
“To not let 14 shoot,” Berquist
said asked what was going through
his mind on St. Francis’ final play.
“Don’t foul on the outside. Let them
try to shoot from pressure, but don’t
let them shoot off a foul. That’s not
giving them the game, but it is giv-
ing them a good shot.
“We’re really excited with this
win. We’ve worked hard all season.
The team bonded so well and it just
all came together in this game. The
key to today was our offense.
Everything just clicked and every-
one just connected on their passes.”
Bulldogs is health.
And then, it’s a matter of focusing
on the fundamentals and getting the
most out of a roster that right now is
showing its inexperience.
Take last weekend. In a 1-2 run,
the Bulldogs turned the ball over 26,
29 and then 34 times. Last season’s
team struggled at times on the
boards but had the offensive fire-
power to go up against anyone.
However, the 2012-2013 Bulldogs
have gotten off to a cold start shoot-
ing-wise. Right now, Warner said
the team’s field goal percentage sits
in the high 20s.
“[It’s] probably some of the worst
shooting we’ve had in, I don’t know
how long,” Warner said. “Our
offense is designed for everyone to
score. Scoring is going to come as
they run the offense and as they
learn to pass and not turn the dang
ball over — they’re giving me more
gray hairs with every turnover. It’s
learning to value the ball — typical
freshmen stuff.
“With this many freshmen, we’re
not going to beat anybody if we
keep turning the ball over and
shooting a dismal percentage. Right
now, we’re just beating ourselves.
Until those things get fixed, the
opponent is ourselves.”
And so the weight of this year’s
team falls largely on Angalique
Gibbs, a sophomore 6-0 forward,
and Jenna David, a sophomore 5-4
guard. David scored 21 points in a
CSM win against Hartnell. Gibbs
scored 11 points and pulled down
11 boards in that same game.
The biggest adjustment for the
duo will be a large increase in min-
utes — neither players saw more
than 10 minutes a game last season.
“It’s a big transition for them,”
Warner said.
As far as freshmen support,
Warner said she’ll rely on Amanda
Lee, a former Mills High standout,
to provide offensive spark. Lee
scored 12 points and came up with
seven steals in a 49-41 loss to
Modesto College.
Then there is the likes of former
Half Moon Bay Cougar Marina
Kolomatangi, who Warner said
could be a force on the inside for
CSM.
“We’re all trying to find ways to
push her buttons because she can
toss anyone out of the key at any
time,” Warner said. “Any time she
wants the ball, she can get it. No one
can stop her. But the problem is,
finding that switch, to make her do
that. So, we’ve been trying every-
thing. She can be really, really good
... that’s what they’re trying to push
her toward.”
The rest of the supporting cast
includes Nazel, who led the team in
rebounds over the weekend with 31.
She also scored 14 points. Sela
Tapou of Menlo-Atherton, put
together a 14-point, 11-rebound
performance against Hartnell and
followed that with a 7-point, 6-
rebound game against Redwoods.
“To satisfy me, it would just be
for them to fulfill their potential,
whatever that is,” Warner said.
“Every year is different. You have to
worry about you and what your
potential is going to be and try to
reach that. I just feel like the girls
are nowhere near their potential
right now. Of course, we’re just
starting. But they’re definitely going
to have to put in more work to reach
that potential.”
thing,” Mollet said of his tryout par-
ticipation. “I just wanted to experi-
ence it. I knew I was a good player
but I wasn’t going to go there and
think I was going to be drafted and
make the team. Even the coaches
during the trials said there was a
slim chance that anyone would be
picked up, but that it was still a good
opportunity. I didn’t have huge
expectations going in. I thought I
played alright. I could’ve played
better in the tryout. But I guess they
liked what they saw.”
An affiliate of the Golden State
Warriors, the former Dakota
Wizards participated in their first D-
League draft as the Santa Cruz
Warriors on Nov. 2. But Mollet and
the Warriors begin their inaugural
season Nov. 17 with preseason
action and their home opener sched-
uled for Dec. 23.
“All these guys are from huge-
name schools,” Mollet said.
“They’re from all over the country,
and even from other countries.
They’re some of the top players in
the world. So, the main thing is just
getting comfortable out here.
Playing with them, playing at this
level. There’s a lot of new guys, so
we’re trying to become a team right
now in training camp. The coaching
staff is doing a great job of bringing
us together on and off the court.
“I think the main thing that I take
away from it is no matter where you
are, or how much you’ve been rec-
ognized throughout your life, no
matter what you’re doing, there’s
always opportunities. And if you put
in the work, you’ll get something
out of it. Most often, the smaller
Division II, Division III schools,
there’s not a lot of talk of people
coming out of those schools and
doing big things in athletics after-
wards. But, I hope this story really
inspires other people because it is
possible. If you do the work, you
will be recognized eventually and
you will have your opportunity.”
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Continued from page 11
BEARS
Continued from page 11
ARGO
Continued from page 11
CSM
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo-Atherton goalie Peter Berquist goes up for a save in the Bears’ 11-
10 win over St. Francis. Berquist had eight saves in the game.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Damian
Lillard had 22 points and nine
assists to help the Portland Trail
Blazers stop a four-game losing
streak with a 103-86 victory over
the short-handed Sacramento Kings
on Tuesday night.
Portland used a strong third quar-
ter to build its lead to 16 points and
pushed the cushion to 22 early in
the fourth. The Blazers outrebound-
ed the Kings 44-33 and connected
on 14 of 27 attempts from 3-point
range.
LaMarcus Aldridge scored 19
points for Portland and Wesley
Matthews had 18. Nicolas Batum
had 15 points, seven rebounds and
five assists. J.J. Hickson added 10
points and 13 rebounds.
James Johnson scored 16 points
and Marcus Thornton 14 for the
Kings, who dropped their third
straight.
Jimmer Fredette had 13 points
and a career-high six assists, while
rookie Thomas Robinson scored
12.
The Kings played their second
consecutive game without leading
scorer and rebounder DeMarcus
Cousins, suspended following a
verbal altercation last week with
San Antonio Spurs television
announcer Sean Elliott. Cousins
lost an appeal Tuesday to reduce
the suspension to one game.
It didn’t help that the Kings were
further depleted, missing starting
point guard Isaiah Thomas and
backup Aaron Brooks, who injured
his left ankle in the first quarter and
didn’t return.
A rookie from Weber State,
Lillard shot 5 of 6 on 3-pointers in
scoring 20 points or more for the
fifth time in eight games.
Portland opened the fourth quar-
ter by outscoring the Kings 8-2,
hiking its lead to 22 points on a pair
of free throws by Matthews. The
margin was never less than 17 the
rest of the game.
Lillard continued to shoot well in
the third quarter following a pro-
ductive first half. He made all three
shots, including a pair of 3s, and
had eight points in the third for the
Blazers, who outscored Sacramento
28-16 to assume a 74-58 lead head-
ing into the fourth.
Trail Blazers top Kings to end 4-game skid
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY — California is giv-
ing up far too many offensive
rebounds, and it wouldn’t hurt if
another scorer or two would emerge
for coach Mike Montgomery’s team.
There are plenty of other ways for
the Golden Bears to improve, too,
and Montgomery, a notorious nit-
picker, is sure to find them.
Having Allan Crabbe on the floor
at least makes things a little easier to
handle.
Crabbe struggled with his shot
early but came back to score 24 of
his career-high 33 points in the sec-
ond half, and California overcame
another rough rebounding game to
beat Pepperdine 79-62 on Tuesday
night.
“I told myself this year I can’t let
my offensive game effect the way I
play the whole game,” Crabbe said.
“I started getting some cheap bas-
kets, getting tip-ins on offensive
rebounds. I just got in a rhythm and
was knocking shots down.”
That’s a marked difference from
early in his career, when the soft-
spoken Crabbe would shut down
after missing early shots.
Against Pepperdine, Crabbe never
gave it a second thought after his
early shooting struggles.
He went 7 of 10 from the floor in
the second half and scored 11
straight points for the Bears over a
three-minute span before later sitting
for the final 4:37. The 33 points
topped Crabbe’s previous career
high of 30 points against
Washington State on Jan. 13, 2011,
when he was a freshman.
Cal holds off Pepperdine
2
0
1
2
2
0
1
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and zest for life. Enjoy a healthy life-style.
Stay active. Keep learning. Discover engaging
experiences and relationships. Pool, spa, social
activities, transportation, fne dining. We
surround you on the inside with what you need,
so you can concentrate on what’s outside that
rejuvenates your life.
Foster City Parks and
Recreation Department
Kevin M. Miller, Director of Parks and
Recreation
650 Shell Boulevard
Foster City, CA 94404
Phone: (650)286-3380
Fax: (650)345-1408
www.fostercity.org
Email: recreation@fostercity.org
Parks and recreation make life better.
Participation in recreation activities builds self-
esteem, reduces stress, and improves overall
wellness. Well-maintained, accessible parks
and recreational facilities promote strong, safe,
family-friendly communities. Our services
create a sense of community and improve
quality of life.
Bay City Medical Supplies
Richard Laura
1465-A Chapin Avenue
Burlingame, CA 94010
Phone: (650)347-6606
Fax: (650)347-1460
www.baycitymed.com
Email: info@baycitymed.com
Bay City Medical Supplies is the peninsula’s
premier resource for durable medical
equipment, orthopedic supplies, and
compression therapy. In the long standing
tradition of superior customer service Bay City
strives to meet your medical needs.
Burlingame Villa/Cimino Care
Michelle Jangar, Administrator
A Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Carlos Development Corporation

License #415600135
Hometown Friendliness Meets
Personalized Care
Locally Owned and Operated
650-595-1500
Senior living with hospitality and concierge services
Please call to arrange a personal tour
707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 94070
www.sancarloselms.com
Email: info@sancarloselms.com
Services for Food, Financial Assistance,
Employment, Health Insurance, Children, Youth,
Families, Veterans and more…
Call us at an office near you:
Belmont: 650-802-5018
Daly City: 650-301-8440
East Palo Alto: 650-363-4175
Redwood City: 650-599-3811
San Carlos: 650-802-6470
S. San Francisco: 650-877-5663
www.smchsa.org
HUMAN SERVICES AGENCY
C  S M
Senior Showcase Information Fair Event Program • November 16, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL
Compassionate care and comfort
when needed most
• Bay Area’s lowest patient-to-nurse ratio
• Personalized plan-of-care to meet the unique
needs of every patient and family
• Providing medical, emotional, social and
spiritual support
• Serving the Peninsula since 1979
1670 South Amphlett Blvd., Suite 300, San Mateo
650-554-1000 | www.missionhospice.org
1117 Rhinette Ave
Burlingame, CA 94010
Phone: 650.344.7074
Website: www.CiminoCare.com
Featuring exceptional memory care at affordable
rates, our Burlingame Villa community is located
in the heart of Burlingame. We specialize in
caring for those with Alzheimer’s disease or
other dementia, from mild cognitive impairment
to advanced memory loss. Programs and
services are designed to honor our resident’s
individual needs with dignity and respect.
Mission Hospice & Home Care
Dwight Wilson, CEO
1670 S. Amphlett Boulevard. #300
San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: (650)554-1000
Fax: (650)554-1001
www.missionhospice.org
Email: dwilson@missionhospice.org
Mission Hospice & Home Care is a charitable,
nonproft organization that provides quality
professional care and compassionate support for
patients and families in the San Mateo County
area, with a special focus on end-of-life care.
For more information:
www.missionhospice.org
AT&T Relay
Ken Arcia, Social Media Manager
2600 Camino Ramon
San Ramon, CA 94583

Phone: VP/Voice (510)735-8910
www.crsrelayservices.att.com
Email: ken.arcia@att.com
AT&T Relay enables people with hearing or
speech loss who use a text telephone (TTY)
or other assistive device to communicate with
standard telephone users.
Home Care Assistance
Megan Heinen, Director of Marketing
148 Hawthorne Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94301
Phone: (650)462-6900
Fax: (650)462-6907
www.homecareassistance.com
Email: mheinen@homecareassistance.com
Home Care Assistance provides older adults
with quality care that enables them to live,
happier, healthier lives at home by offering the
industries best caregivers.
Irish Help at Home
2021 Taraval Street
San Francisco, CA 94116
Phone: (650)347-6903
www.irishhelpathome.com
Email: irishhlp@aol.com
Irish Help at Home, established 1996, provides
companions, attendants and respite caregivers to
our clients. We pride ourselves on being reliable,
compassionate and affordable. Insured and
bonded.
SamTrans
Phone: 1(800)660-4287
www.samtrans.com
Email: info@samtrans.com
SamTrans provides bus service throughout San
Mateo. The ride is comfortable, clean, safe and
inexpensive ($1 for seniors; $3 for a Day Pass).
Explore the county via SamTrans.
San Carlos Elms
June Wider, Director of Marketing
707 Elm Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
Phone: (650)595-1500
www.sancarloselms.com
San Carlos Elms is a non-proft, locally owned
and operated, senior living community offering
the fnest in senior living services including:
Independent, Assisted Living, Respite Stay,
Memory Care, and Hospice. Come visit our
award winning community.
Satellite Healthcare/WellBound
Victoria Kline, ASW, MSW Nephrology
Social Worker
2000 El Camino Real
San Mateo, CA 94403
Phone: (650)377-0888
www.satellitehealth.com
Email: klinev@satellitehealth.com
Satellite Healthcare/WellBound, is the Bay
Area’s leading provider of dialysis services
and kidney disease care. Satellite Healthcare/
THE DAILY JOURNAL November 16, 2012 • Senior Showcase Information Fair Event Program
Active Independent & Senior Living
• Day trips & 50+ activities every week
•Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
• Secured underground parking
• Luxurious apartments with full kitchens
crsrelayservices.att.com
WellBound provides early patient wellness
education, personalized clinical services and a
complete range of dialysis therapy choices.
Skylawn Funeral Home & Memorial Park
Leticia Pizziconi, Supervisor-Community
Service
Hwy 92 at Rt 35
San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: (650)376-5030
Skylawn Memorial Park is set amidst 500 acres
of natural beauty with panoramic views of the
Pacifc Ocean and Crystal Springs Reservoir. A
place like no other.
Sons in Retirement (SIR)
229 West 20th Avenue
San Mateo, CA 94403
Phone: (650) 341-8298
www.branch1.sirinc2.org
“An Organization Promoting the Independence
and Dignity of Retirement”
We are a nonproft public beneft corporation
for retired men. Our purpose is to assist men
in renewing friendships and making many
new friends through SIR monthly luncheon
meetings, with a speaker, and numerous
activities. Contact: www.branch1.sirinc2.org, or
call us at: 650-341-8298.
Sterling Court
Darlia Clerico
850 N. El Camino Real
San Mateo, CA 94401
Phone: (650)344-8200
www.sterlingcourt.com
Sterling Court’s active independent senior and
assisted-living apartments are available monthly.
Enjoy social hours, 50+ weekly activities, day
trips, secured parking, and outstanding gourmet
meals.
EXHIBITORS
5A Rent-A-Space
Marisa Boldt, Manager
1221 E. Hillsdale Boulevard
Foster City, CA 94404
Phone: (650)341-2964
Fax: (650)341-2081
www.5Aspace.com
Email: foster_city@5Aspace.com
Aunt Ann’s Home Care
Vicki Paul, Exec. Director
198 Los Banos Avenue
Daly City, CA 94014
Phone: (650)757-2000
Fax: (650)757-2600
www.AuntAnnsHomeCare.com
Email: Eldercare@auntanns.com
BrightStar Care, San Mateo
Ed Sayson, President
16 E. 3rd Ave. #4
San Mateo, CA 94401
Phone: (650)685-6558
Fax: (650)240-8669
www.brightstarcare.com
Email: ed.sayson@brightstarcare.com
Center for Independence of
Individuals with Disabilities
Steve Freier, Assistive Technology
Coordinator
1515 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: (650)645-1780
Fax : (650)645-1785
www.cidsanmateo.org
Email: SteveF@cidsanmateo.org
Chalet Home Services
Management, Concierge Service, Home Care
1900 S. Norfolk, Suite 350
San Mateo, CA 94403
Phone: (650)282-2029
Fax: (650)963-4687
www.chaletyourhome.net
Email: info@chaletyourhome.net
Cloverleaf Care Inc.
Andy C Chatterjea, Executive Director
1390 S. Winchester Boulevard. Ste B,
San Jose, CA 95128
Phone: (408)379-7000
www.cloverleafcare.com
Email: info@cloverleafcare.com
Senior Showcase Information Fair Event Program • November 16, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL
Compassion & Choices
Northern California
Paula Taubman, Executive Director
3701 Sacramento Street, #439
San Francisco, CA 94118
Phone: (866)825-8967
Fax: (866)825-8967
www.compassionandchoicesnca.org
Email: admin@compassionandchoicesnca.org
Duggan’s Serra Mortuary
Call Today for Your Free Personal Planning
Guide!
500 Westlake Avenue
Daly City, CA 94014
Phone: (650)756-4500
Fax: (650)756-0741
www.DuggansSerra.com
Elder Care Network
Mary K. Stegner
P.O. Box 2413
Redwood City, CA 94064
Phone: (415)820-1439
Cell: (415)407-5570
www.TheElderCareNetwork.org
Email: mkstegner@aol.com
Foster City Village
969-G Edgewater Boulevard. #901
Foster City, CA 94404
Phone: (650)378-8541
www.fostercityvillage.org
Get Up & Go Senior
Transportation/Peninsula
Jewish Community Center
Betty Burr, Program Manager
800 Foster City Boulevard
Foster City, CA 94404
Phone:(650)378-2750
Fax: (650)378-2799
www.pjcc.org
Email: bburr@pjcc.org
HIP Housing
Laura Fanucchi, Associate Director
364 South Railroad
San Mateo CA 94401
Phone: (650)348-6660
Fax: (650)348-0284
www.hiphousing.org
Email: lfanucchi@hiphousing.org
Home Helpers of San Mateo County
Peggy Milne and Mitch Williams, Owners
1900 S. Norfolk Street, Ste 350
San Mateo, CA 94403
Phone: (650)532-3122
www.HomeCareSanMateoCA.com
Email: pmilne@homehelpers.cc
mwilliams@homehelpers.cc
Home Safety Services
Erin Frost, M.A. Gerontologist, Community
Relations Manager
1169 Chess Dr., Ste L
Foster City, CA 94404
Phone: (650)571-7774
Fax: (650)571-7775
www.homesafety.net
Email: erin@homesafety.net
Human Services Agency of San Mateo
County
Linda Holman, HS Manager
271 92nd Street
Daly City, CA 94015
Phone: (650)301-8732
Fax: (650)758-5923
www.smchsa.org
Email: lholman@smchsa.org
Matched Caregivers
A nurse managed private duty home care
agency that has serviced peninsula residents for
over 22 years.
Kathy Janz, RN MA
2825 El Camino Real
Redwood City, CA 94061
Phone: (650)839-2273
www.matchedcaregivers.com
Email: kjanz@matchedcaregivers.com
Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Senior
Focus, Wise and Well program
1720 El Camino Real, Suite 10
Burlingame, CA 94010
Wise and Well Program Coordinator: Janel
Jurosky, R.N., M.S.N.
Phone: (650) 696-7663
E-mail: juroskj@sutterhealth.org
Miracle Shred
Tom Barrett, Owner
P.O. Box 25174
San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: (650)455-1820
Fax: (650)393-5018
www.Miracle-Shred.com
Email: Tom@miracle-shred.com
Neurolink Chiropractic
Dr. Katherine McDermont, Chiropractor
177 Bovet Rd. Ste 150
San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: (650)375-2545
THE DAILY JOURNAL November 16, 2012 • Senior Showcase Information Fair Event Program
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Fax: (650)655-6611
www.thebrainlink.net
Email: DrMcDermont@theneurolink.com
Peninsula Community Services, Inc.
Advocates for Peninsula residents struggling
with a hoarding disorder - SINCE 1978
Alan Merrifeld, President & CEO
P.O.Box 90
Burlingame, CA 94011
Phone: (650)343-4380
Fax: (650)343-4380
www.hoarders.org
Email:alamer99@comcast.net
Peninsula Family YMCA
Carrie Herrera, Membership Director
1877 South Grant Street
San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: (650)286-9622
Fax: (650)286-0128
www.ymcasf.org/peninsula
Email: cherrera@ymcasf.org
Redwood Villa Retirement Residence
Judd Cappelletti, Manager
1981 Montecito Avenue
Mt. View, CA 94043
Phone: (650)965-8633
Fax: (650)965-8783
www.redwoodvilla.com
Email: info@redwoodvilla.com
San Mateo County Pharmacists Assn.
Talk With A Pharmacist
Email: smcpharmacy@gmail.com
Security One Lending
Carol Bertocchini, Reverse Mortgage Consultant
Phone: (650)453-3244
Fax: (888)781-9147
www.carolbertocchini.com
Email: cbertocchini@s1l.com
Senior Companions At Home
Ferdinand Gerard B. Contreras, RN,
Care Coordinator
P.O. Box 795
Redwood City, CA 94064
Phone: (650) 364-1265
Cell: (650) 817-5898
Seniors at Home
2001 Winward Way
San Mateo, CA 94404
Phone: (650)931-1860
www.SeniorsAtHome.org
Email: Info@SeniorsAtHome.org
Telesensory Services
Janio Calderon
4545 Stockdale Hwy “F,”
Bakersfeld, CA 93309
Phone: (650)743-9515
Fax: (661)832-6557
www.telesensory.com
Email: janio@telesensory.com
United Healthcare
Melinda Wong, Independent Agent
S.F., Bay Area, Peninsula
Phone: (650)996-9896
Email: Melinda@melindawong.net
Westborough Royale
Eric Ribeiro, Community Outreach Director
89 Westborough Boulevard
So. San Francisco, CA 94080
Phone: (650)872-0400
Fax: (650)872-0415
www.BergCommunities.com
Email: ericr@BergCommunities.com
Senior Showcase Information Fair Event Program • November 16, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL
Thank you for
your participation
BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENINGS PROVIDED BY:
Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Senior Focus, Wise and Well
program. 720 El Camino Real, Suite 10, Burlingame, CA 94010.
ise and Well Program Coordinator: Janel Jurosky, R.N., M.S.N.
Phone: (650) 696-7663 E-mail: juroskj@sutterhealth.org
DOCUMENT SHREDDING PROVIDED BY:
Miracle Shred
ASK THE PHARMACIST PROVIDED BY:
San Mateo County Pharmacists Assoc.
FOOD PROVIDED BY
Bay Area Bagels
Daily Journal
DOOR PRIZES DONATED BY
Health Plan of San Mateo
Daily Journal
Get Up & Go Senior Transportation
Irish Help at Home
The Magnolia of Millbrae
Matched Caregivers
Neurolink Chiropractic
Peninsula Family YMCA
SamTrans
Satellite Dialysis
Skylawn Funeral Home
Sons in Retirement
Sterling Court
SPORTS 23
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 5 0 1.000 —
Brooklyn 4 2 .667 1 1/2
Philadelphia 4 3 .571 2
Boston 4 3 .571 2
Toronto 2 6 .250 4 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 6 2 .750 —
Charlotte 3 3 .500 2
Atlanta 3 3 .500 2
Orlando 2 5 .286 3 1/2
Washington 0 6 .000 5
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 4 2 .667 —
Chicago 4 3 .571 1/2
Indiana 3 5 .375 2
Cleveland 2 6 .250 3
Detroit 0 8 .000 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 7 1 .875 —
Memphis 5 1 .833 1
New Orleans 3 2 .600 2 1/2
Dallas 4 4 .500 3
Houston 3 4 .429 3 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 6 2 .750 —
Minnesota 5 2 .714 1/2
Denver 4 4 .500 2
Utah 4 4 .500 2
Portland 3 5 .375 3
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 5 2 .714 —
Phoenix 4 4 .500 1 1/2
Golden State 3 4 .429 2
L.A. Lakers 3 5 .375 2 1/2
Sacramento 2 6 .250 3 1/2

Monday’sGames
Milwaukee 105, Philadelphia 96
Utah 140,Toronto 133,3OT
Oklahoma City 92, Detroit 90
Boston 101, Chicago 95
Miami 113, Houston 110
Minnesota 90, Dallas 82
Phoenix 110, Denver 100
Atlanta 95, Portland 87
Tuesday’sGames
Charlotte 92,Washington 76
Toronto 74, Indiana 72
New York 99, Orlando 89
Brooklyn 114, Cleveland 101
NBA STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 6 3 0 .667 299 201
Miami 4 5 0 .444 173 186
N.Y. Jets 3 6 0 .333 175 228
Buffalo 3 6 0 .333 211 285
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 8 1 0 .889 250 143
Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 186 201
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 219 311
Jacksonville 1 8 0 .111 127 246
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 7 2 0 .778 254 196
Pittsburgh 5 3 0 .625 191 164
Cincinnati 4 5 0 .444 220 231
Cleveland 2 7 0 .222 169 211
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 6 3 0 .667 271 189
San Diego 4 5 0 .444 209 191
Oakland 3 6 0 .333 191 284
Kansas City 1 7 0 .125 133 240
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 267 216
Dallas 4 5 0 .444 188 204
Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 156 221
Washington 3 6 0 .333 226 248
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 8 1 0 .889 247 174
Tampa Bay 5 4 0 .556 260 209
New Orleans 4 5 0 .444 249 256
Carolina 2 7 0 .222 163 216
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 7 2 0 .778 242 133
Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 239 187
Minnesota 6 4 0 .600 238 221
Detroit 4 5 0 .444 216 222
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 6 2 1 .722 213 127
Seattle 6 4 0 .600 198 161
Arizona 4 5 0 .444 144 173
St. Louis 3 5 1 .389 161 210
Monday’sGame
Kansas City at Pittsburgh, Late
Sunday’sGames
Atlanta at New Orleans, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Denver at Carolina, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at Miami, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at New England, 10 a.m.
NFL STANDINGS
MANAGERS OF THE YEAR
AL Managers of the Year
2012 — Bob Melvin, Oakland
2011 — Joe Maddon, Tampa Bay
2010 — Ron Gardenhire, Minnesota
2009 — Mike Scioscia, Los Angeles
2008 — Joe Maddon, Tampa Bay
2007 — Eric Wedge, Cleveland
2006 — Jim Leyland, Detroit
2005 — Ozzie Guillen, Chicago
2004 — Buck Showalter, Texas
2003 — Tony Pena, Kansas City
2002 — Mike Scioscia, Anaheim
2001 — Lou Piniella, Seattle
2000 — Jerry Manuel, Chicago
1999 — Jimy Williams, Boston
1998 — Joe Torre, New York
NL Managers of the Year
2012 — Davey Johnson, Washington
2011 — Kirk Gibson, Arizona
2010 — Bud Black, San Diego
2009 — Jim Tracy, Colorado
2008 — Lou Piniella, Chicago
2007 — Bob Melvin, Arizona
2006 — Joe Girardi, Florida
2005 — Bobby Cox, Atlanta
2004 — Bobby Cox, Atlanta
2003 — Jack McKeon, Florida
2002 — Tony La Russa, St. Louis
2001 — Larry Bowa, Philadelphia
2000 — Dusty Baker, San Francisco
1999 — Jack McKeon, Cincinnati
1998 — Larry Dierker, Houston
1997 — Dusty Baker, San Francisco
1996 — Bruce Bochy, San Diego
1995 — Don Baylor, Colorado
1994 — Felipe Alou, Montreal
1993 — Dusty Baker, San Francisco
1992 — Jim Leyland, Pittsburgh
1991 — Bobby Cox, Atlanta
1990 — Jim Leyland, Pittsburgh
1989 — Don Zimmer, Chicago
1988 — Tommy Lasorda, Los Angeles
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
National League
CHICAGO CUBS—Agreed to terms with RHP
Scott Baker on a one-year contract.
COLORADO ROCKIES—Named Dante Bichette
hitting instructor.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Named Chuck Crim
bullpen coach, Ken Howell assistant pitching
coach and John Valentin assistant hitting coach.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Agreed to terms
with INF Kevin Frandsen on a one-year contract.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with
C Rob Johnson on a minor league contract. Re-
leased RHP Kyle McClellan unconditionally.
BASKETBALL
USA BASKETBALL—Re-eleted chairman and
managing director Jerry Colangelo. Named Kim
Bohuny, Mark Tatum, Dan Gavitt, Mark Lewis,
Chris Plonsky, Bob Gardner, Billy Hunter, Jim Carr,
Chauncey Billups and Katie Smith to the board
of directors.
National Basketball Association
CHARLOTTE HORNETS—Traded G Matt Car-
roll to New Orleans for F Hakim Warrick.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ATLANTA FALCONS—Placed TE Tommy Gal-
larda on injured reserve. Signed WR Tim Toone
and TE Chase Coffman. Signed TE Andrew
Szczerba to the practice squad.
CHICAGO BEARS—Signed QB Josh McCown.
Released TE Brody Eldridge.
CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed DL Ricky El-
more to the practice squad.
DENVER BRONCOS—Released S Duke
Ihenacho.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Signed LB Shawn
Loiseau and TE Martell Webb to the practice
squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed G Mitch
Petrus. Signed LB Jeff Tarpinian to the practice
squad. Released LB Jerrell Harris from the prac-
tice squad.
CCS PAIRINGS
WEDNESDAY
GIRLS’ VOLLEYBALL
Semifinals
Division I
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (25-7) vs. No. 2 Salinas
(23-8) at Santa Clara High, 5:30 p.m.
Division III
No. 4 Burlingame (23-8) vs. No. 1 Valley Christian
(30-7) at Sacred Heart Cathedral, 7:30 p.m.
Division IV
No. 2 Sacred Heart Prep (28-5) at No. 3 Menlo
School (23-10), 7:30 p.m.
Division V
No. 2 Priory (19-8) vs. No. 3 Santa Catalina (20-
4) at St. Francis-Watsonville High, 7:30 p.m.
GIRLS’ WATER POLO
Semifinals
Division I
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (15-10) vs. No. 2 Leland
(22-5) at Gunn High, 7 p.m.
BOYS’ WATER POLO
Semifinals
Division II
No. 4 Soquel (22-5) vs. No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep
(23-4) at Serra High, 5:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
FOOTBALL
Open Division
No. 5 Serra (8-2) at No. 4 Palo Alto (8-2), 7 p.m.
No. 8 Terra Nova (6-4) vs. No. 1 Bellarmine (9-1)
at San Jose City College, 7 p.m.
Division I
No. 5 Sequoia (8-2) at No. 4 Menlo-Atherton (6-
4), 7 p.m.
Division II
No. 6 South City (7-3) at No. 2 Wilcox (7-3), 7 p.m.
No. 5 Aragon (7-3) at No. 4 Leland (6-4), 7 p.m.
Division IV
No. 5 Monte Vista-Christian (8-2) vs. No. 4 Menlo
School (8-2) at Sequoia High, 7 p.m.
No. 8 Capuchino (6-4) at No. 1 Seaside (10-0), 7
p.m.
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
Division III
No. 6 Burlingame (5-5) at Valley Christian (4-6),
7 p.m
Division IV
No. 7 Pacific Grove (7-3) at No. 2 Sacred Heart
Prep (9-1), 1 p.m.
vs.Miami
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/9
@Rams
10 a.m.
FOX
12/2
vs.Bears
5:00p.m.
ESPN
11/19
@Saints
1:20p.m.
FOX
11/25
vs.Patriots
8:20p.m.
NBC
12/16
@Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/9
vs.Broncos
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
12/6
vs.Browns
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/2
vs.Chiefs
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/16
@Panthers
1p.m.
CBS
11/4
vs.Saints
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/18
@Bengals
10a.m.
CBS
11/25
@Thunder
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/18
@Dallas
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/5
@ Wolves
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/16
vs.Cavs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/7
vs.Hawks
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/14
Rams-49ers tie likely not
enough to alter NFL rule
By Dave Campbell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
When St. Louis and San
Francisco couldn’t produce a win-
ner during 75 minutes of play, the
complaints came from all corners of
the NFL.
Tie games, after all, aren’t much
fun for the fans or the players, who
finish just as unsatisfied as anyone
else.
“I never had to think about it until
now, and I sure don’t like it,” Rams
defensive end Chris Long said. “I
think everybody on the field would
have liked to have gone back out
and just settled it, but that’s where
we are. That’s the rule right now, so
it is what it is.”
The Rams-49ers game Sunday
finished at 24-all, the first tie in four
years and only the fifth since 1990.
So the rule right now that limits reg-
ular-season overtime to one period
is likely to stay the same for a while.
“It’s an occasional event. There is
no real concern we need to change
the system,” said NFL executive
vice president of football operations
Ray Anderson, who happened to
attend Sunday’s game in San
Francisco and was also present for
the Atlanta-Pittsburgh draw in 2002.
The other recent occurrence was
Nov. 16, 2008, when Philadelphia
and Cincinnati played at 13 apiece.
Eagles quarterback Donovan
McNabb infamously acknowledged
afterward he was unaware tie games
were still possible. San Francisco
safety Dashon Goldson said the
same Sunday.
“When I saw both sides walking
onto the field, I was like, ‘Where’s
everybody going?”’ Goldson said.
“Did somebody quit? Forfeit?”
Goldson, for the record, knew
about the new wrinkle that now
gives one team the chance to match
if the other team gets the ball first in
overtime and makes a field goal.
(Touchdowns still immediately end
the game.)
“But I didn’t know there wouldn’t
be a second overtime if nobody
scored,” Goldson said.
Now he does, due to a rare
sequence of events during the extra
period that kept the two teams even.
The Rams had an 80-yard pass on
the first play negated by an illegal
formation penalty. Then stalwart
David Akers missed a 41-yard field
goal for the 49ers. Rams kicker
Greg Zuerlein made one from 53
yards, but that didn’t count because
of a delay-of-game call. His next
attempt from 58 yards was wide
right.
By then, the anticlimactic ending
seemed inevitable.
“Ties just don’t seem to make
sense in football,” said Bengals left
tackle Andrew Whitworth, who
played in that previous draw in
2008. “There’s too much effort, too
much sacrifice that goes into this
game to end in a tie, that’s for sure.”
The 49ers (6-2-1) now have a
hard-to-figure-out lead on the
Seahawks (6-4) in the NFC West,
which makes Sunday’s outcome all
the more maddening.
“A division game? Oh, wow. I
guess that could make it interesting
at the end of the year,” Broncos
wide receiver Eric Decker said.
Overtime was introduced at the
college level in 1996, and there the
teams trade possessions from the
25-yard line until there’s a winner.
But the time when ties were permit-
ted below the NFL was so long ago
that current players never experi-
enced that.
Denver safety Rahim Moore dug
deep in his memory bank to Pop
Warner ball to recall one.
“I believe we went triple overtime
and we ended up winning and I
don’t remember how it all went
down,” Moore said. “It was like the
90s, so I forget. Also, I would say it
was in the rain.”
Even the NHL has abolished ties,
using a penalty shot competition
after scoreless overtimes in a regular
season game with mixed reviews.
(Imagine the NFL switching to a
punt-pass-kick contest to settle the
score!)
“I would’ve loved to see a
shootout,” Seattle coach Pete
Carroll said, joking. “A couple of
guys firing the ball at the goal posts.
Anything to settle the thing.”
Uh, don’t count on that.
Anderson said the NFL’s competi-
tion committee will consider the
overtime rules annually, but in a
league where injuries are common
the likelihood of a change is slim.
“To have these guys going into an
additional overtime period or more,
we would be taking on some risk we
don’t think is prudent to take on,”
Anderson said.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — Former Seahawks
tight end Jerramy Stevens was
arrested on suspicion of assaulting
U.S. women’s soccer team goal-
keeper Hope Solo a day before their
planned wed-
ding day,
according to
police and court
records.
A Kirkland
M u n i c i p a l
Court judge
released Stevens
after a court
a p p e a r a n c e
Tuesday, saying there was no evi-
dence connecting Stevens to any
assault, according to news reports.
He was arrested early Monday for
fourth-degree domestic violence
assault but has not been charged.
The judge determined there was
not enough to hold Stevens, but the
case is still under investigation,
Kirkland Police Lt. Mike Murray
said Tuesday. Charges could be
brought later if prosecutors and
police find other evidence, he said.
Solo appeared in the courtroom
Tuesday afternoon, but left without
saying anything to reporters,
according to KING-TV.
A call to a number listed for
Stevens in court documents rang
unanswered. A message left at a list-
ed number for Solo was not imme-
diately returned.
Stevens, 33, and Solo, 31, applied
for a marriage license Thursday,
according to King County records.
The two, who have been in a rela-
tionship for two months, were set to
get married Tuesday and argued
over whether to live in Washington
or Florida after their marriage,
according to court documents.
Police in the Seattle suburb of
Kirkland responded to a disturbance
at a home around 3:45 a.m. Monday
involving a physical altercation
between eight people during a party,
said Lt. Murray.
He said officers contacted several
people in the home who appeared
intoxicated and didn’t cooperate
with police, but determined based
on information and observations
that there was probable cause to
arrest Stevens for investigation of
fourth-degree assault. Murray didn’t
identify the alleged victim, but court
records show it was Solo, who
received a cut to her elbow.
Court documents show that Solo’s
34-year-old brother, Marcus, called
911, and that he and Solo told offi-
cers there was a party and blamed
the disturbance on two to three
unknown men who were at the
party. Marcus Solo told police he
used a stun gun on one of the men,
who left the party before police
arrived, according to court records.
According to court documents, a
police officer found Stevens, “who
appeared to be hiding,” lying
between the bed and the wall in an
upstairs bedroom. Stevens told offi-
cers he was sleeping on the floor and
didn’t hear the fight. The officer saw
signs of a fight, and dried blood on
Stevens’ shirt.
The officer noted in his affidavit
for probable cause for arrest that he
arrested Stevens based on his admis-
sion that he argued with Hope Solo,
the injury to her elbow, signs of a
fight in the bedroom where Stevens
was found and blood on Stevens’
shirt.
One 32-year-old woman was
taken to the hospital for treatment of
a hip injury, and another man suf-
fered multiple bumps, scrapes and
contusions, Murray said.
Ex-Seahawk TE arrested;
Hope Solo ID’d as victim
Hope Solo
FOOD
24
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: November 30, 2012
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By Michele Kayal
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
He’s played a charming chef in a
feature film that he also co-wrote, and
had his breakthrough role in an off-
Broadway play about a restaurant. Yet
actor-comedian Aasif Mandvi still
can barely tell dosas from Devil
Dogs.
“I enjoy eating Indian food, but I’m
not an aficiona-
do,” says
Mandvi, best
known as
“ S e n i o r
Correspondent”
for South Asia
(or the Middle
East, or any-
where else
Muslims may
live) on Comedy Central’s “The Daily
Show.” He admits to cooking only
when it strategically suits him.
“I usually cook when I’m in a rela-
tionship,” he says. Yes, he can turn out
a basic curry, “but ultimately, I just go
to my mom and say ‘This is what I
did. It doesn’t taste right. What did I
do wrong?”’
But his lack of skill hasn’t stopped
him from tackling food topics.
Through mid-June, Mandvi, 46, is
cruising the South Asian restaurants
of New York with Madhur Jaffrey, the
grande dame of the cuisine, sampling
tandoori chicken and sticky sweet
jalebis from Midtown to the boroughs
in a special on the Cooking Channel.
“It’s as he says, he is not a foodie,
he doesn’t cook, he doesn’t know too
much about Indian food,” Jaffrey said
in a telephone interview. “And that is
why he’s the perfect person to be on
the show. He asks the questions that
anyone might want to know, and I
give the answers.”
But just because he works a takeout
menu as easily as an audience doesn’t
mean he lacks an appreciation for
great food. For Mandvi, food — and
especially the food of South Asia —
can be a metaphor for personal trans-
formation.
A bite at a time, Aasif Mandvi earning foodie cred
Aasif Mandvi
FOOD 25
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A basic chicken soup is fine for when you
need warmth and comfort.
But what about those particularly blustery
fall evenings when fine isn’t sufficient? For
those evenings, we have created this more
robust take on the basic chicken soup, a ver-
sion that oozes even more comfort and
warmth thanks to the starches and savory
ingredients.
First, the latter. We amplify the savory side
of this soup by sauteing a half pound of
mixed mushrooms. And for good measure,
we also add a handful of dried porcini mush-
rooms. For starchy comfort, we top the soup
with pillowy soft dumplings. And to tie it all
together, we lace the dumplings with savory
Parmesan cheese.
Want to make it vegetarian? Just substitute
vegetable broth and leave out the chicken.
MUSHROOM AND CHICKEN BARLEY
SOUP WITH PARMESAN DUMPLINGS
Start to finish: 45 minutes
Servings: 6
For the soup:
1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms, chopped
2 tablespoons vegetable or canola oil
1 pound mixed sliced mushrooms
Salt
2 medium shallots, sliced
1 leek, white part only, sliced
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs,
cubed
1/2 cup pearled barley
2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary
1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme
Ground black pepper
6 cups low-sodium chicken broth
For the dumplings:
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
Pinch cayenne pepper
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted
In a small bowl, combine the porcini mush-
rooms with 1 cup of boiling water. Set aside.
In a large deep pot, such as a Dutch oven,
heat the oil over medium-high. Add the
mixed mushrooms and sprinkle lightly with
salt. Saute until browned, about 10 minutes.
Add the shallots and the leeks and continue
to cook until softened, 6 to 8 minutes.
Add the chicken and cook just until
browned. It does not need to cook through.
Add the barley, rosemary, thyme, a few
grinds of black pepper, the broth and the
porcinis with the soaking water. Cover and
reduce the heat to maintain a simmer.
Simmer until the barley is tender, about 45
minutes.
Meanwhile, prepare the dumplings. In a
medium bowl, whisk together the flour,
sugar, baking soda, baking powder, salt,
black pepper and cayenne. Stir in the parme-
san. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs
and buttermilk, then the melted butter. Gently
stir the liquid ingredients into the dry ingre-
dients just until combined.
Drop the dumpling mixture by the table-
spoon onto the top of the soup. Cover, bring
to a boil and cook for 5 to 7 minutes.
Nutrition information per serving: 760
calories; 310 calories from fat (41 percent of
total calories); 35 g fat (16 g saturated; 0.5 g
trans fats); 170 mg cholesterol; 72 g carbo-
hydrate; 6 g fiber; 10 g sugar; 40 g protein;
1260 mg sodium.
Bowl of comfort: Mushroom,
chicken soup with dumplings
DATEBOOK 26
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14
Collegeof SanMateoVolunteer Fair.
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. CSM College Center
Building 10, Bayview Dining Room,
1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo.
Meet with organizations from around
the Bay Area and find out how you can
get involved in your community. For
more information call 574-6142.
Peninsula CommunityConnections
— LGBT Group. Noon to 1 p.m.
Peninsula Family Service, 24 Second
Ave., San Mateo. Peninsula Family
Service invites you to a friendly,
supportive discussion group for
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender
(LGBT) adults over 55 who live in San
Mateo County. Meetings are free and
are held the second Wednesday of
each month. For more information, call
403-4300, ext. 4325.
Senior Classic Dance, Hustle,
Argentine Tango. 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.,
7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. 1:30 to 2 p.m. Waltz
lesson followed by two hours of
Seniors Classics Dance Party, $5. 8 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Hustle, 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Beginning Argentine Tango, 8:30 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. Intermediate Argentine
Tango, 9:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Practica.
For more information call
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Belmont Library Presents Tenn
Movie: ‘The Amazing Siper-Man.’
3:30 p.m. 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
contact conrad@smcl.org.
BUILD with CuriOdyssey. 3:30 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. There will be an
engineering activity at the Book
Bubble involving straws, pipe cleaners
and other everyday materials. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
HICAP Program on Medicare:
Overview of Medicare and
Prescription Part D. 7 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Free.
For more information call 697-7607.
A Screening of the Film: ‘Bag It.’ 7
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont.The story of an
average American who decides to give
up using plastic grocery bags. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Preview Night: HowTo Succeed In
Business Without Really Trying. 7
p.m. Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.The
show is rated PG. $10. For more
information visit aragondrama.com.
The Club Fox Blues Jam: Cold Feat.
7 p.m. The Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Musicians should sign up early to play.
$5. For more information visit
rwcbluesjam.com.
TheCreativeWritersSeries. 7:30 p.m.
Wiegand Gallery, Notre Dame de
Namur University, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Authors Jan Ellison and Peter
Orner will do a reading followed by a
reception. Free. For more information
call 508-3713.
THURSDAY, NOV. 15
Connecting Ready Kids to Ready
Schools: Silicon Valley’s Campaign
for ThirdGrade Achievement. 8 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. San Mateo Marriott, 1770
S. Amphlett Blvd., San Mateo.There will
be speakers and breakout sessions for
discussion. For more information and
to register call 450-5512 visit
siliconvalleycf.org/content/calendar.
AARP Chapter 139 Meeting. 11 a.m.
Beresford Recreation Center 2720
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. 11
a.m. will be the social hour, the
meeting will be at noon. Meeting will
be followed by Tony Castle,Vaudeville
Entertainer. Free. For more information
call 345-5001.
Caminar SanMateo’sOpenHouse. 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. Caminar, 2600 El Camino
Real, San Mateo. Please join us to
celebrate the opening of our newly
consolidated Caminar San Mateo
office, meet our staff and learn about
our programs and services. To RSVP
call 372-4080.
Energy Efficiency Workshops. 6:30
p.m. to 8 p.m. Westlake Community
Center, Merced Room, 145 Lake
Merced Blvd., Daly City. For more
information call 520-4869.
Lecture by Ray Kurzwell. 7 p.m.
Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way,
Palo Alto. Ray Kurzwell, inventor,
futurist and author of ‘How to Create
a Mind’ will deliver a lecture on
artificial intelligence. $12 for members,
$20 for non-members and $40
premium (includes a copy of his book
and premium seating). For more
information email
ggehue@commonwealthclub.org.
Speaker Ray Kurzweil. 7 p.m.
Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way,
Palo Alto. Kurzweil is an inventor,
futurist and author of ‘How to Create
a Mind.’ He explores how artificial
intelligence can enrich and expand
human capabilities. $20, $12 for
members, $7 for students. For more
information and for tickets visit
commonwealthclub.org/events.
Pairing Wine with Food. 7 p.m. to 8
p.m. San Bruno Library, Downstairs
Community Room. 701 Angus Ave.
West, San Bruno. Wine pairing
program that will teach you how to
pair wine with your holiday menu. 21
and over. Limited to 30 people, pre-
registration is required. Free. to
pre-register or for more information
call 616-7078.
Preview Night: HowTo Succeed In
Business Without Really Trying. 7
p.m. Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.The
show is rated PG. $15 for adults and
$10 for students and seniors online.
$17 for adults and $10 for students
and seniors at the door. For more
information visit aragondrama.com.
‘Get Ready’ Basic Disaster
Preparedness Training. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Beresford Recreation Center at
2720 Alameda de las Pulgas San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
522-7960. To register visit
www.erecreg.
Waltz, Bachata, Salsa. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City, 7 p.m. to
8 p.m. International Standard Level II
Waltz, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. International
Standard Level I Waltz, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Bachata, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Salsa. For
more information call
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Dragon Productions Presents:
‘March.’ 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 535
Alma St., Palo Alto. $25 general, $20
seniors, $16 student. To purchase
tickets visit
www.dragonproductions.net. For
more information call 493-2006.
FRIDAY NOV. 16
Aida Opera Candies Reopening. 10
a.m. Aida Opera Candies, 1375
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Free
admission. For more information visit
aidacandies.com.
Senior Showcase Information Fair.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd. (at Hillsdale
Boulevard), Foster City. Learn about
senior services from more than 40
exhibitors at this free community
event. Free blood pressure check, free
document shredding. Ask pharmacists
your questions about medications.
Free goody bags for the first 250
guests. Sponsored by the Daily Journal
and the Health Plan of San Mateo.
Everyone welcome. Free admission.
For more information call 344-5200.
J. Stephen Morrison Lectures on
Global Health Policy and HIV/AIDS
Authority. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Skyline
College, Building 6, Room 6202, 3300
College Drive, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call 738-4346.
Open House/Adoption Event. Noon
to 7 p.m. Nine Lives Foundation, 3015
Rolison Road, Redwood City.The Nine
Lives Foundation is a nonprofit, no kill
cat shelter in Redwood City. Free
admission. For more information visit
ninelivesfoundation.org.
Invest Yourself with Guest Speaker
Bella Schneider. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Il
Fornaio, 327 Lorton Ave., Burlingame.
For more information contact
gallagherbren@gmail.com.
The Progressive International
MotorcycleShow.3 p.m. to 8 p.m. San
Mateo County Event Center, 2495
South Delaware St., San Mateo. $15 for
adults. $6 for children ages 6 to 11. To
purchase tickets or for more
information visit
www.motorcycleshows.com.
Hillsdale Shopping Center Presents
a Live Broadway Performance from
Disney’s The Lion King. 5:30 p.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 345-8222.
Burlingame High School Presents:
‘Wyrd Sisters.’ 7 p.m. Burlingame
High School Theater, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $12 for general admission
and $10 for students, seniors and
children. For more information or to
reserve tickets call 558-2854.
Pied Piper Players presents ‘The
Wizard of Oz.’ 7 p.m. Bayside
Performing Arts Center, 2025 Kehoe
Ave., San Mateo. $16 for adults, $11 for
children and seniors. For more
information visit
http://baysidetheater.com.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
Presents ‘The Dracula Kidds.’ 7 p.m.
Mustang Hall, Central Middle School,
828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. $12 in
advance and $14 at the door. This
mystery-farce follows students on
their spring vacation in the gloomy
old mansion on Blood Pudding Lane,
which is haunted by a werewolf’s
curse. For more information and to
order tickets visit
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
changed the Friday night before a vote
was scheduled when Hutt released a
report recommending two schools be
closed in the succeeding school year if
the district faces a budget deficit of
$250,000 or more in October or the
neighborhood enrollment dropped by 30
or more students at any of the elemen-
tary schools compared to current enroll-
ment.
The committee charged with making a
recommendation about which district
school to close found there were no
overwhelming reasons to close a school,
but suggested combining two schools if
the board were to move forward.
Enrollment at the elementary schools
dropped this year as San Bruno students
started attending elementary school
through fifth grade and start at Parkside
Intermediate in sixth grade. Changing
which school serves sixth grade shifted
about 280 students from the elementary
schools. In addition, the district has seen
an overall drop in enrollment.
As a district, San Bruno has previous-
ly tackled the possibility of closing a
school during the 2006-07 school year
due to a drop in enrollment. An uptick
for the following school year caused the
district to drop the discussion. Declining
enrollment forced the closure of two
schools in the 1970s. Carl Sandburg
Elementary School was closed in 1978
and was sold for $30.5 million in 2006.
The district leases 20 acres for a driving
range operated by VB Golf Inc. on what
was once Engvall Middle School at
Interstate 280 and Sneath Lane.
The board meets 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 14 at El Crystal School, 201 N.
Balboa Way, San Bruno.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 7
DEFICIT
lons of water downhill, he said.
“It had undermined a hillside, so there
was a lot of mud and debris that was
flowing (toward) several streets in the
neighborhood,” Lucett said.
The flooding went down Lausanne
Avenue and affected a handful blocks
coming off that street including Bonnie
Street, Clayton Court, East Moltke
Street, Ford Street and Price Street.
No homes were flooded, but streets
were left covered in a layer of mud so
thick it reached the top of parked cars’
wheels. Clayton Court resident Angel
Vega, 83, was in his flip-flops late
Tuesday morning, shoveling mud out his
driveway. He himself was covered in
mud.
“I thought it was raining,” Vega said of
his reaction when the main broke. “It
was much worse.”
The 12 homes were evacuated as a
precaution, and no injuries were report-
ed. As of 11:30 a.m., all residents had
been allowed to return home.
“We did open up an evacuation center
with the Red Cross there,” Lucett said.
Evacuees were directed to the Teglia
Community Center, but only one family
with a baby had sought assistance at the
site, Lucett said.
Another Clayton Court resident, 36-
year-old Eric Reyes, said he woke up to
the muddy mess at 6:30 a.m. He said
was unable to get himself to work and
his son to school because his car was
stuck.
“No one has informed us of anything,”
said Reyes, who works in nursing at
Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco.
“We’re getting all our information from
reports on TV.”
He said his family wasn’t asked to
evacuate and that his home still has
water service.
“We’re pretty much stuck here,” he
said.
Lucett said there was a shutoff valve
between the water tank and the spot
where the rupture occurred, which
allowed crews to stop the water flow rel-
atively quickly.
He said the cause of the water main
break has not yet been determined.
Cars were being towed out of the
muddy area to facilitate cleanup efforts.
Patrick Sweetland, director of water
and wastewater resources for Daly City,
was at the scene Tuesday morning as
trucks scooped up mud at Lausanne
Avenue and Clayton Court. The mud
was consolidated into a pile that was
being hauled away bit by bit in dump
trucks.
Engineers were assessing the integrity
of the hillside.
Continued from page 1
FLOOD
Moscone, Emblidge, Sater and Otis on
behalf of its client Republic.
BART requested proposals for the site in
2008 and asked both Republic and Justin
to resubmit “best and final” offers for the
development Sept. 28 despite the BART
board voting 6-2 in May 2011 to negoti-
ate exclusively with Justin to build a
hotel on the site.
Lui is the driving force behind the
Justin Development proposal and is a
friend of Fang who contributed $3,500
to Fang’s re-election campaign to the
BART board last year.
The cozy relationship between the two
is a “conflict of interest,” Republic con-
tends, especially since Fang lobbied on
behalf of the hotel project to the
Millbrae City Council last month.
Republic’s proposal to BART
includes a commercial, mixed-use
transit-oriented development it says
will be more beneficial to both BART
and the city of Millbrae.
An independent study showed the
hotel proposal to be infeasible and
BART staff previously determined
Republic’s proposal offered more new
riders to the system and would generate
more money for BART than other pro-
posals, according to the letter Republic
sent to the BART board yesterday.
But Fang said the hotel project would
generate significant hotel tax for
Millbrae, more revenue than the other
project would generate in taxes for the
city.
He also said the commercial property
the Fangs own nearby, mostly medical
offices, would not benefit from the con-
struction of a hotel on the BART site.
“It’s a cheap shot,” Fang said about the
accusations. “We will let the board
decide and Republic has friends on the
board, too.”
Moving forward, Republic wants
future project discussions to be held in
public to ensure transparency and “an
open debate about the merits and bene-
fits of the competing proposals.”
Fang, however, will not have to recuse
himself from voting on the project.
“BART is not aware of any legal con-
flict of interest that would prevent Fang
from participating in these discussions,”
said BART spokeswoman Luna Salaver.
Fang was first elected to the BART
board in 1990 and is its longest-serving
director.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
CONFLICT
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2012
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Financial trends
continue to run in your favor. There’s a strong pos-
sibility that you could derive material benefts from
something that comes totally out of left feld.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Some new social
contacts could have greater signifcance than usual,
even though a few of them will be extremely brief in
duration. All of them will be worth cultivating.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Chances are there
will be two unrelated rainbows in your life, with each
having a pot of gold at its base. In all probability, they
will yield something that you haven’t earned.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- A close friend of
yours may also be a good chum of someone who
could be of real assistance to you at the present
time. Ask your friend to act as an intermediary.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Lucky you, because
situations that have pronounced elements of chance
could work out to your advantage, especially those
that pertain to your career or fnances.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It’s one of those
unexplainable days when, for whatever reason, you
are likely to be unusually charismatic. You’ll enjoy
members of the opposite gender fnding you more
appealing than usual.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Lady Luck is likely to be
smiling at you, especially in involvements with your
friends. Pals with whom you spend your day will do
nice things for you purely on impulse.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t leave important
decisions up to others, especially if they will affect
your friends. Any judgment call you make will be
constructive for everybody.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Something exception-
ally unusual is likely to develop that will be instru-
mental in helping you fulfll an ambitious objective.
Jump on it, because it won’t stick around too long.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Dan Cupid is likely to take a
new interest in your love life, especially for those of
you who haven’t been enjoying much activity lately in
the romance department.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Those changes you’ve
been contemplating that you believe will enhance
your material security could be right on target.
Believe in your thinking and implement things as
quickly as possible.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Trust in your judgment,
even if you have to make some snap decisions under
pressure. Your frst thoughts are likely to be as sound
as those you make after lengthy deliberation.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
11-14-12
TUESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Artichoke morsel
6 He jilted Medea
11 Huge fowers
12 Former Dolphins QB
13 Next to bat (2 wds.)
14 Clear, as a drain
15 Spacious
16 Brood
17 Emu cousin
18 Cartoon shriek
19 Part of Caesar’s boast
(2 wds.)
23 Ocean fshes
25 Happen
26 Doze off
29 Sellers or Lorre
31 Great Lakes cargo
32 Inventor -- Whitney
33 Battery post
34 Unnaturally pale
35 Cut at an angle
37 Bloodhound clue
39 Travel far and wide
40 Even one
41 Marshal Wyatt --
45 Pleads
47 Comics orphan
48 Unit of current
51 To no avail
52 Diadems
53 Landlord
54 The thick of things
55 Bowler’s hangout
DOWN
1 Vietnam capital
2 Grant money for
3 Lacking zip
4 Risque
5 For shame!
6 Tarzan’s mate
7 Frigid region
8 RSVP word
9 She loved Lennon
10 Fruitcake go-with
11 Fishing foat
12 Gloom
16 Decks the halls
18 Blissful spot
20 Trash hauler
21 Mystique
22 Brown bird
24 October’s stone
25 Hydrox rival
26 Wyo. neighbor
27 Ersatz butter
28 Prima donna
30 Dust devil
36 Barbecue coals
38 Tuxedo, often
40 A long time
42 Biscotto favoring
43 James Whitcomb --
44 Duke, e.g.
46 QED part
47 Novelist Jean --
48 PIN prompter
49 Twice DI
50 Waterlily leaf
51 Sunshine st.
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE®
GET fUZZY®
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 27
THE DAILY JOURNAL
28
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNA’s
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimer’s or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
FT/PT Live-In caregiver on the Penin-
sula and in the South Bay. Valid driv-
er’s license and car a must.Must have
exp. and refs. Call 415-683-3171 or
visit www.sageeldercare.com.
EXPERIENCED DAY CARE ASSIS-
TANT needed for busy in home facility,
(650)245-6950
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
RESTAURANT -
BROADWAY GRILL HIRING
BARTENDER. We are an upscale Amer-
ican wood fired grill restaurant looking for
the best people to grow with our very
successful concept. Flexible full schedul-
ing, top $$ potential & more!
BROADWAY GRILL BURLINGAME
1400 Broadway Burlingame, CA 94010
Apply in person Tues-Saturday between
3PM and 5PM.
Or e-mail resume to Jobs@BWGrill.com
110 Employment
HOUSE MANAGER
Hillsborough
20 hours per week, $16 per
hour, perfect for a retired cou-
ple. Responsibility includes car-
ing for executive property duties
include housekeeping, schedul-
ing, oversight of contractors,
and supervising the upkeep of
the property. Must have excel-
lent communication skills, be
computer literate and have at-
tention for details. Background
check and references are re-
quired. Must live in the San Ma-
teo Burlingame area
To apply email your resume to
box5711@live.com
HOUSEKEEPING - RETIREMENT
COMMUNITY. Full time, understand,
write & speak English. Experience re-
quired, $10.hr + benefits. Apply at 201
Chadbourne Ave., Millbrae.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part-time + Seasonal
Start up to $13 Exp up to $20
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
RESTAURANT -
LOOKING FOR FT/PT American
breakfast cook at the Pantry
Restaurant, Call (650)345-4544
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
PUBLIC WORKS
Maintenance Worker I/II
City of San Bruno,
California
Maintenance Worker I -
$3,678 - $4,513 Monthly
Maintenance Worker II -
$4,229 - $5,190 Monthly
The City of San Bruno, lo-
cated 12 miles south of San
Francisco, is offering an ex-
citing opportunity for a Main-
tenance Worker I/II. Select-
ed candidates may be as-
signed to the Water, Waste-
water, Street or Storm divi-
sions. This position performs
a variety of semi-skilled
and/or skilled tasks in main-
tenance work, operates
equipment in construction,
performs repair, mainte-
nance, and replacement of
City water, wastewater,
street, and storm drainage
facilties and systems.
Minimum Qualifications
The Public Works Mainte-
nance Worker I/II requires
graduation from high school
or GED equivalent.
Possession of , or ability to
obtain and maintain, a valid
California drivers license
and a Commercial Driver’s
License certification (class B
license) by completion of
probationary period.
Final Filing Date: Tues-
day, November 20, 2012 at
5:00pm
Apply on line at www.cal-
opps.org or contact the City
of San Bruno, Human Re-
sources, 567 El Camino Re-
al, San Bruno CA 94066
(650) 616-7055.
110 Employment
WATER QUALITY
Technician I/II
City of San Bruno,
California
Water Quality Technician I
- $4,229 - $5,190 Monthly
Water Quality Technician
II - $4,864 - $5,969 Monthly
The City of San Bruno, lo-
cated 12 miles south of San
Francisco, is offering an ex-
citing opportunity for a Wa-
ter Quality Technician I/II.
This position is assigned to
the Water Division and per-
forms a variety of activities
to ensure that the City’s wa-
ter system complies with
current and future Federal
and State regulations. This
position may perform field,
office and technical work
and may supervise mainte-
nance workers, consultant,
and contractors in duties re-
lated to flushing, water quali-
ty and other regulatory re-
quirements.
Minimum Qualifications
Education:
Graduation from high school
or GED equivalent.
Certifications and Licens-
es:
Possession of Grade Two
Water Treatment Operator
(T2) license issued by the
California Department of
Health Services.
Possession of Grade Three
Water Distribution Operator
(D3) license issued by the
California Department of
Health Services.
Possession of a valid Cali-
fornia drivers license.
Final Filing Date: Tues-
day, November 27, 2012 at
5:00pm
Apply online at www.cal-
opps.org or contact the City
of San Bruno, Human Re-
sources Department, 567 El
Camino Real, San Bruno CA
94066 (650) 616-7055.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
November 13, 2012
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
29 Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252437
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Alex Nails, 801 Woodside Rd
#9, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Tam Le, 1877 Messina Dr, San Jose, CA
95132 and Anh Pham 3061 Pavan Drive,
San Jose, CA 95148. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 09/21/12.
/s/ Tam Le /
/s/ Anh Pham /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/12, 10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252856
The following person is doing business
as: Mia Bella Boutique Salon, 1375 Bur-
lingame Ave., Suite 288, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Cindy Lay Phun, 29
Woodland Ave., Daly City, CA 94015.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Cindy Lay Phun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/12, 10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252639
The following person is doing business
as: California Aircraft Dispatch Academy,
533 Airport Blvd., Suite 400, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Sandra M. Cea, 7
Putnam St., San Francisco, CA 94110-
6213. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/17/2012.
/s/ Sandra M. Cea /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/12, 10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252803
The following person is doing business
as: Poppy’s Crab Shack, P O Box
370060, MONTARA, CA 94037 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Tho-
mas Borden, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 11/10/2012.
/s/ Thomas M. Borden /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/12, 10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252508
The following person is doing business
as: WB Limousine Services, 248 Wick-
low Drive, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Wausiman P. Borges,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Wausiman P. Borges /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/12, 10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252822
The following person is doing business
as: Halika Tours, 1840 Gateway Dr., Ste.
200, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Paz
Management, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on May 1, 2012.
/s/ Celeste A. Paz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/12, 10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252823
The following person is doing business
as: Gangnam Chicken, 213 G 3rd Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: J & J Glob-
al Enterprises, Inc. CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ John Kang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252832
The following person is doing business
as: CTPartners, 3 Lagoon Drive, Suite
130, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
CTPartners Executive Search, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
04/23/2007.
/s/ David C. Nocitora /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252817
The following person is doing business
as: Shenphen Ling Healing Center, 61
Renato Court, Suite 15, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94061 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Lingyun Zhu, 35971
Brandywine St., Newark, CA 94560. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/01/2008.
/s/ Lingyun Zhu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252848
The following person is doing business
as: K Spa, 21 South B St., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Ly My H., 145 Sadoua
St., San Francisco, CA 94112. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Ly My H. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252826
The following person is doing business
as: JumpUStart.com, 2400 DeKoven
Ave. BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Rosa-
linda Garza, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Rosalinda Garza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/12, 11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253029
The following person is doing business
as: JSW Consultants, 98 McLellan Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: John
Scott Wellwood, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/01/2012.
/s/ John Scott Wellwood /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252997
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Gamma Productions, 482 West
San Bruno Avenue, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Erick Gamaliel Navarro &
Claudia Marlene Gutierrez, 649 6th Ave.,
San Bruno, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by Husband & Wife. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/01/2012.
/s/ Erick G. Navarro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252977
The following person is doing business
as: Goldlory, 1 Mandalay Place, #1708,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Hyungjin Kim, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Hyungjin Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253063
The following person is doing business
as: Otenba, 1458 Hudson Street, #108,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Eliza-
beth Melendez, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Elizabeth Melendez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253020
The following person is doing business
as: Turnkey Communications, 2995
Woodside Road, #620604, WOODSIDE,
CA 94062 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Nick Kromat, 240 Old
Ranch Road, Woodside, CA 94062. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/12.
/s/ Nick Kromat /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252966
The following person is doing business
as: Taqueria Rapidito, 218 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Man-
ubhai B. Tandel, 336 Alden St., Red-
wood City, CA 94063. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Manubhai B. Tandel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253080
The following person is doing business
as: F.E.R.M., 2029 Shoreview, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Alex Martinez, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Alex Martinez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/12, 11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252934
The following person is doing business
as: JC Engineering, 848 Burns Ct., PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered
by the following owner: JCE Buildings
and Development, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/11/2012.
/s/ Javier Chavarria /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12, 12/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253083
The following person is doing business
as: MFactor, 1070 Buckland Avenue,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: The Kim-
berly Group, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/01/2003.
/s/ Kimberly Kondo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12, 12/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253090
The following person is doing business
as: Digital Chaos Control, 198 Cedar
Street, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Patricia Dwyer, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Patricia Dwyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12, 12/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253154
The following person is doing business
as: Humanitees 101, 347 Cherry Ave-
nue, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: An-
drew Combs, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 11/11/2012.
/s/ Andrew Combs /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12, 12/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252809
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Chimney Sweep, 147-B
West Hillsdale Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Jeffery Soares, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Jeffery Soares /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12, 12/05/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253121
The following person is doing business
as: Gardens By Marsetti, 683 Jenevein
Avenue, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
John Gerard Marshall, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
04/01/1978.
/s/ John Gerard Marshall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28/12, 12/05/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Oct. 19, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
J & J GLOBAL ENTERPRISES, INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
213 E 3RD AVE
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 31, November 7, 14, 2012
NOTICE OF INTENDED BULK SALE
Notice is hereby given that Jane Guy-
ette, whose business address is 80
Eureka Square, Suite 107 and 111,
Pacifica, California 94044, intends to
make a bulk sale to Ora Mayana
Crutcher, who business address is
P. O. Box 1054, Pacifica, California
94044, of the following property now
located at 80 Eureka Square, Suites
107 and 111, Pacifica, California
94044; all the stock in trade, mer-
chandise, fixtures, equipment, good-
will, and trade of the business known
as “Inner Awakening Healing Center”.
To the knowledge of the undersigned
buyer, within the past three years,
Jane Guyette has used the following
additional business names and ad-
dresses: None.
The transfer of the property is subject
to Commercial Code Section 6106.2
which applies to transfers for which
the consideration of $2 million or less
and is substantially all cash, an obli-
gation to pay cash in the future, or a
combination of these. Claims for
debts may be filed with Michael J.
Kallis, Esq., 63 East Fourth Avenue,
San Mateo, California 94401. The
last date for filing claims is November
30, 2012.
The intended sale will be closed on or
after December 3, 2012, at 63 East
Fourth Avenue, San Mateo, California
94401.
Dated: November 3, 2012
Signed: Ora Mayana Crutcher
Published in the San Mateo Daily
Journal on 11/07/12, 11/13/12,
11/21/12, 11/28/12.
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Pamela Jo Urbanick
Case Number 122849
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Pamela Jo Urbanick,
aka Pamela J. Urbanick and PamelaUr-
banick. A Petition for Probate has been
filed by Greg Schelkun. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that
Greg Schelkun. be appointed as person-
al representative to administer the estate
of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: Decenber 10, 2012
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. Probate, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Kerry J. Frisch, CSB#108022
Frisch & Frisch
1114 Franklin Street
Napa, CA 94559
(707)226-3404
Dated: November 5, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 7, 14, 21, 2012.
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-248451
The following persons have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name:
Rock Paper Scissors, 1199 Laurel
Street, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. The
fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on
01/17/2012. The business was conduct-
ed by: Kelsey Gallegos & Jaime Galle-
gos, 245 F Street, Redwood City, CA
94063.
/s/ Kelsey Gallegos /
/s/ Jaime Gallegos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 10/30/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 11/07/12,
11/14/12, 11/21/12, 11/28,12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
210 Lost & Found
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. SOLD!
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1 BAG of Hot Wheels and Matchbox
Cars, from the 70s, Appx 40, SOLD!
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, playgoer August pro-
gram, featuring Gloria Stuart, George
Sanders, Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20.,
San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE - Special Issue,
“Off to the Moon”, featuring Armstrong,
Aldrin, and Collins, and a special article
by Charles Lindburgh, $25., San Mateo,
(650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 (650)787-8600
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
LIONEL TRAIN Wall Clock with working
train $45 (650)589-8348
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures, SOLD!
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
2 MODEL ships in box $30
(650)589-8348
PLASTIC ARMY MAN SET - from the
70’s, set inludes tanks, soldiers, vehicles,
landscape, $75.obo, (650)589-8348
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. SOLD!
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
30
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Harebrained
prank
6 Casino freebie
10 Slow-cooked
entrée
14 End of a series
15 Away from the
breeze
16 The gallbladder is
shaped like one
17 Noted
storyteller
18 Circulate, as
library books
19 Like some
borrowed library
books
20 Blast cause
21 Good name for a
Gateway City gun
dealer?
24 Slugging pct., e.g.
25 Be ready (for)
26 Good name for a
Windy City nudist
festival?
31 Air traffic control
device
32 Thing
33 “Holy Toledo!”
36 The Bard’s river
37 Dig (into)
39 Andean capital
40 Actress Harris of
“thirtysomething”
41 Stink
42 World Series
game
43 Good name for a
Motor City
butcher shop?
46 Certifiable
49 Civil disturbance
50 Good name for
an Empire City
comedy club?
53 Geologic time
frame
56 Colorless
57 Fall from above
58 Swinelike beast
60 Just sitting
around
61 Hamburg’s river
62 Are
63 Didn’t let out of
one’s sight
64 They’re below
average
65 Floors
DOWN
1 Winter wear
2 “You said it,
sister!”
3 Crop threat
4 It might need a
boost
5 Andre 3000, for
one
6 Beckon
7 Pats on
pancakes, maybe
8 Array of choices
9 Dog’s breeding
history
10 Impact sounds
11 Result of a sad
story?
12 Invitation on a
fictional cake
13 Take forcibly
22 Place for a price
23 Appear to be
24 Read quickly
26 Pull an all-nighter,
maybe
27 Contain
28 One put on a
pedestal
29 Sitcom noncom
30 Off-rd. conveyance
33 User-edited site
34 Broken mirror, say
35 Serious hostilities
37 Dissuaded
38 Racket or rocket
extension
39 Booty
41 Gambling town
on I-80
42 Schemed
43 Convertible sofa
44 Castle and Cara
45 “Whether __
nobler ...”:
Hamlet
46 Many a low-
budget film
47 Totally square
48 Low, moist area
51 Leafy veggie
52 Correspond
53 Many a high-
budget film
54 Game of world
domination
55 Skills
59 Cut from the
staff
By Dan Schoenholz
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
11/14/12
11/14/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 SOLD!
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH & LOVE SEAT- Floral Design.
Great Condition, $350.00, SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
304 Furniture
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LARGE DESK, with 3 drawers, 1 in
center. Oak color, $150 obo,
(650)348-5169
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
304 Furniture
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
306 Housewares
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
BUFFET SERVER, stainless, cook &
serve same dish, $20 (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, Italian, in original box, clear
color, $12., (650)578-9208
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size bed pillow. Allergy-free ticking.
Gently cushions pain, stiffness. Almost
new. $20.00 (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., SOLD!
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , elegant, durable. $25.,
(650)578-9208
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw, SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1” BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, SOLD!
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case $75 OBO,
(650)345-7352
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
perfect condition ideal gift, SOLD!
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SMALL SIZE Kennel good for small size
dog or cat 23" long 14" wide and 141/2"
high $25 FIRM (650)871-7200
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEAMER TRUNK $65 OBO (650)345-
7352
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TOILET - very good condition, white,
SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, SOLD!
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
SOLD!
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
31 Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
311 Musical Instruments
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
316 Clothes
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MEN’S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened package, XL, High Sierra, long
sleeves and legs, dark green plaid, great
gift, $12., (650)578-9208
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
318 Sports Equipment
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole , SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - Proform XB 550S, local
pickup, $100., SOLD!
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, SOLD!
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., SOLD!
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
67-68 CAMARO PARTS - SOLD!
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors Cleaning Concrete
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
32
Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
LOPEZ HANDYMAN
Bath & Kitchen
Remodels
Specializing in granite,
tile & flooring.
(650)219-4050
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JM PAINTING &
PLUMBING
New Construction,
Remodel & Repair
(415)350-1908
Lic.# C36C33
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Business Services
PUT YOUR
BUSINESS INFO
ON THE
INTERNET
FREE
Link the phone number
in your classified ad
directly to online details
about your business
ZypPages.com
Barbara@ZypPages.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
Food
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
33 Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
2
0
1
2
2
0
1
2
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
—over 40 exhibitors!
Fer mere ìn|ermcIìen cc|| ó50·344·5200 º www.smdcì|yjeurnc|.cemJsenìershewccse
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Free Services include
Refreshments
Door Prizes and Giveaways
Blood Pressure Check
Ask the Pharmacist
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
FREE Document Shredding
by Miracle Shred
and MORE
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, November 16
9:00am to 1:00pm
Foster City Recreation Center
650 Shell Blvd. Foster City
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Health & Medical
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
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Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
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ERRANDS WITH
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Cooking,
Appointments, Errands
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LASTING IMPRESSIONS
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1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
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Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
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Seniors
MANUFACTURED
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34 Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
By Zeina Karam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — France on Tuesday
became the first Western country to for-
mally recognize Syria’s newly formed
opposition coalition as the sole legiti-
mate representative of the Syrian people.
The U.S. also recognized the leader-
ship body announced in Qatar on
Sunday as a legitimate representative,
but stopped short of describing it as a
sole representative, saying the group
must first demonstrate its ability to rep-
resent Syrians inside the country.
“We look forward to supporting the
national coalition as it charts a course for
the end of Assad’s bloody rule, and
marks the start, we believe, of a peaceful
just and democratic future for the people
of Syria,” said U.S. State Department
spokesman Mark Toner in Washington.
Under intense international pressure to
form an opposition that includes repre-
sentatives from the country’s disparate
factions fighting to topple President
Bashar Assad, the anti-government
groups struck a deal Sunday in Doha,
Qatar, to form a coalition headed by for-
mer Muslim preacher Mouaz al-Khatib.
The coalition includes representatives
from the main opposition group, the
Syrian National Council, which was
harshly criticized by many, including
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton, for being cut off from rebels
fighting the war on the ground and for
failing to forge a cohesive and more rep-
resentative leadership.
The new group is lobbying the inter-
national community for more powerful
weapons to break the stalemate with the
regime. The U.S. and French recognition
is a welcome boost, but the opposition
still has a long way to go to convince the
international community the weapons
will not fall in the wrong hands.
“We now have a structure in place that
can prepare for a political transition, but
we’re looking for it to still establish the
types of technical committees that will
allow us to make sure our assistance gets
to the right places, both non-lethal and
humanitarian,” Toner told reporters in
Washington.
The French move was announced by
French President Francois Hollande,
who used his first news conference since
taking office six months ago to formally
recognize the group.
France recognizes new Syria group
U.N. once again votes to condemn Cuba embargo
The U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday voted overwhelm-
ingly to condemn the U.S. commercial, economic and finan-
cial embargo against Cuba for the 21st year in a row.
The final tally Tuesday was 188-3, with Israel and Palau
joining the United States. The Marshall Islands and
Micronesia both abstained. Last year’s tally for the symbolic
measure was almost identical, 186-2, with three abstentions.
The embargo was first enacted in 1960 following Cuba’s
nationalization of properties belonging to U.S. citizens and
corporations.
Around the world
“We look forward to supporting the
national coalition as it charts a course for the end
of Assad’s bloody rule, and marks the start, we believe, of a
peaceful just and democratic future for the people of Syria.”
— U.S. State Department spokesman Mark Toner
35 Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD
funds. On Nov. 19, prosecutors will ask a
judge to increase bail. Elarms is also set for a
preliminary hearing Nov. 26 after refusing to
waive his right to a speedy trial.
The new case “ensures public safety in the
interim,” said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Defense attorney Jonathan McDougall said
he anticipated both the dismissal and refiling
but questioned the addition of the two extra
weapons charges two years later.
“My educated guess is the DA needed him
to have more exposure. If there was just one
charge and Mr. Elarms decided to plead no
contest, he would get time served. They need-
ed a way to keep him in custody during the
appeal,” McDougall said.
The new case involves three instances of
Elarms allegedly having weapons in his jail
cell in February 2011 — a spork, a toothbrush
and two pencils strapped together, all which
had been sharpened to points. The items were
reportedly discovered during cell searches
while Elarms awaited trial on the more serious
case.
Elarms, 60, is accused of shooting David
Lewis, a childhood friend, in the parking
garage of Hillsdale Shopping Center June 9,
2010 because he thought the man was now his
enemy. Elarms, of Pittsburg, allegedly fol-
lowed Lewis from the San Mateo Medical
Center where he was an outreach worker to
the shopping center. Police responding to the
calls of a shot fired found a dying Lewis, 54,
uttering the name “Greg” but made no arrests
until six months later after Elarms called them
seeking protection.
Two police sergeants went to Elarms’ home
and he voluntarily followed them back to the
San Mateo police station. During the conver-
sations in the vehicle and at the station,
Elarms asked or referenced the need for an
attorney nine times but was not given his
Miranda rights until near the end.
The District Attorney’s Office contended
Elarms did not legally require Miranda before
that point because he initiated contact with
police, he voluntarily went to the department,
was not handcuffed or searched and told
repeatedly he was free to leave.
But in his ruling last week, Judge Stephen
Hall concluded police violated Elarms’ rights
and suppressed the confession. Without the
man’s own words, Hall also found insufficient
evidence to try Elarms for murder and being a
felon in possession of a weapon.
The ruling came five days into the murder
trial and let stand the unrelated charge of pos-
sessing a shank in the county jail.
Wagstaffe was not immediately certain why
only one of the three weapons charges was
filed alongside the murder count.
The dismissal and refilings are just the lat-
est wrinkle for Elarms’ case. His prosecution
was on hold for the better part of a year while
he was hospitalized in a state mental facility
as incompetent but returned to San Mateo
County after doctors sent him back as able to
aid in his own defense. Since then, he has
unsuccessfully attempted to fire his court-
appointed attorney several times.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
By Alexa Olesen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — During China’s last party
congress, the cadres in charge of the world’s
most populous nation didn’t know a hashtag
from a hyperlink. But five years on, there’s a
new message from Beijing: The political
transition will be microblogged.
Party officials have this fall embraced
social media with unprecedented enthusi-
asm, hoping it can help guide public opinion
and stir up excitement about the staid and
scripted party meeting taking place this
week in Beijing that kicks off a transition to
a new, younger set of top leaders.
Dozens of the more than 2,000 party dele-
gates, among them Chairman Mao’s grand-
son, are using social media to wax rhapsod-
ic about China’s rise and Party General
Secretary Hu Jintao’s live 90-minute reading
of highlights from this year’s party work
report. Typical posts include pictures of
grinning delegates on Tiananmen Square
and mobile snapshots of poinsettia arrange-
ments and chandeliers from inside the Great
Hall of the People, where the congress is
meeting.
Guo Mingyi, a miner from the frigid
northeast who was making his debut as a
party delegate, tweeted: “On this land with
great affections, how can I not sing, how can
I not tear up, I love this piece of land, the
people and the great Chinese Communist
Party!”
State media also are posting microblog
interviews with officials and shooting out
updates about the congress schedule via
Twitter-like accounts.
But apart from being a tool to deliver
Beijing’s approved policy messages to the
mobile phones of ordinary Chinese, the
Internet is a two-way street that’s also being
used by the public to poke fun at and cri-
tique the propaganda. Online commentators
have compared the gushy crying and clap-
ping of some delegates over Hu’s speech to
North Korean style mass hysteria.
Continued from page 1
ELARMS
At about 5:30 a.m., a worker noticed some-
thing moving in the dark. Raccoons are fre-
quent visitors to the site, but the employee
quickly noticed whatever was moving seemed
to scamper along differently than a raccoon,
said Plant Manager Bill Toci.
Workers were concerned about the little guy
who was wandering near tanks containing
water in which the seal couldn’t swim, said
Toci. Thankfully, Little Gobbler went right on
by those tanks.
The Marine Mammal Sanctuary responded
to the visitor around 9 a.m. By then, Little
Gobbler was taking a nap. Toci said their
unique visitor must have been tired. The plant
is near the Bay but it still needed to cross the
road and stairs before it decided to rest.
It’s the first time Toci has seen a seal visit
the plant. Traditionally, those who call in wan-
dering sea mammals have the opportunity to
suggest a name. Toci decided on Gobbler
given that it’s almost Thanksgiving and he
hoped the little guy would grow up to be
someone who likes to eat.
The seal pup was taken to the Marine
Mammal Center in Sausalito. Little Gobbler is
doing well, said Jim Oswald, public relations
manager for the Marine Mammal Center. The
pup is about 13 pounds and feisty, which is a
good sign, said Oswald. At the moment, the
focus is on dealing with getting the pup’s
strength up in hopes of releasing it back in the
wild.
Little Gobbler is the fourth northern fur seal
pup to be picked up this season, said Oswald.
Burlingame’s visitor is unique — rarely do
seals cross the road, he said.
Seals do get lost. When that happens,
Oswald said people should keep their distance
and call the distressed marine mammal hotline
at (415) 289-7325.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
GOBBLER
At Mao-style conclave, China embraces Twitter age
36 Wednesday • Nov. 14, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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