Biography on Charles Dickens By Davanna Cimino Table of Contents

Biography on Charles Dickens Table of Contents
By Davanna Cimino

Table of Contents

I. Biography on Charles Dickens
Introduction

Childhood

Professional Beginnings

Charles and Catherine

Work as Novelist

Autumnal years

Notable quotes

Dickensiana

Works Cited

Other Links

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I.

Biography on Charles
Dickens

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Introduction

2012 is a year of celebration – festivals, readings, theatrical shows, films, seminars, tours
– all in honor of the great and inimitable Charles Dickens, on his 200th birthday.

Dickens, one of the most celebrated authors in English-language history, was wildly
popular even during the course of his own life. Known as a prolific and important artist,
unceasingly productive, Dickens wrote, edited, toured, lectured, and acted – sometimes
even in productions of his own plays. In total, Dickens composed twenty-four novels,
plays, books of poetry, and works of nonfiction. He founded, wrote for, and edited the
weekly journal Household Words and in a series of wildly popular readings of his works,
toured Great Britain, Ireland, and America. Dickens began his career as a reporter in the
press gallery of the House of Commons, and ended it as the preeminent man of letters of
his time.

In his biography Dickens, Peter Ackroyd numbers Dickens’s characters at two thousand.
(A sampling of these can be found on David Perdue’s Charles Dickens Page.) Any school
child will have heard of his most beloved characters: Oliver Twist, David Copperfield,
Ebenezer Scrooge, the Artful Dodger, Little Nell, Sydney Carton, Tiny Tim, Little Dorritt. In
fact, Perdue points out, the names of some of the Dickens’s most recognizable
characters have become cultural touchstones of the qualities they embody, “Characters
such as Scrooge (miserly) and Pecksniff (hypocritically affecting benevolence) became
defining terms in everyday vernacular.”

Author G. K. Chesterton, too, wrote admiringly of Dickens, “He was the voice in England
of this humane intoxication and expansion, this encouraging of anybody to be anything.”
Chesterton’s estimation of Dickens’s worth as a writer of enormous importance was early
evidence that Dickens’s reputation had survived him into the next generation; it has since
only increased with the passage of time. Besides Shakespeare, Dickens is the most well-
known author in the English speaking world.

As the actor and author Simon Callow notes in this video on the website Hibrow, Dickens
was notably a man of great humanity. He championed the fight against human misery a

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fight borne of his own deep suffering as a child. At the age of twelve, Dickens was sent to
work at a blacking factory on the banks of the River Thames, located just downstream of
the Hungerford Bridge. Here in the dilapidated, rat-infested factory called Warrens, the
young Dickens was forced to do the repetitive, dreary work that was soul-killing to an
imaginative and intelligent boy.

During Dickens’s life – even at the height of his fame and wealth–he was always
associated with the common man, rather than the aristocracy. His early experiences with
poverty and despair provided the creative engine for his work. Yet his work celebrated
life in all its manifestations – desperate and joyous. It is this embrace of life, and
celebration of the human conditions pathos, humor, injustice, hardship, and adventure –
which has so endeared him to readers across the ages.

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Childhood

“The creative writer perceives his world once and for all in childhood and adolescence,
and his whole a career is an effort to illustrate his private world in terms of the great
public world we all share.” – Graham Greene, The Young Dickens

Dickens was born in an area of Portsmouth, England, known as New Town or Mile End.
His father worked in the Naval Pay Office, where his maternal grandfather also worked.
His mother Elizabeth’s family, the Barrows of Bristol, came from a line of clerics, and
makers of musical instruments. Charles had an older sister, Fanny. A younger male
sibling, Alfred Allen Dickens, died at age six months of “water on the brain”.

Dickens’
birthplace in Portsmouth. Photo by Martyn Pattison via Geograph

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No. 2
Ordnance Terrace, Chatham. The Dickens family home. Photo by Ian Yarham via
Geograph

John Dickens’s work took him to London, and the family moved there when Charles was
still very young. They lived near Tottenham Court Road. Another sister was born during
this time, Laetitia Mary Dickens. From here, the family moved to Sheerness, and
eventually to Chatham.

In the years the Dickens family spent in Chatham, until the family moved again to London
in 1822, Charles nurtured his young imagination by reading volumes from his father’s
library – “Roderick Random, Peregrine Pickle, Humphrey Clinker, Tom Jones, The Vicar of
Wakefield, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and Robinson Crusoe came out, a glorious host, to keep
me company. They kept alive my fancy, and my hope of something beyond that place
and time – they, and The Arabian Nights, and the Tales of the Genii–and they did me no
harm…” His friend, John Forster wrote, “It was the birthplace of his fancy, and he hardly
knew what store he had set by its busy varieties of change and scene, until he saw the
falling cloud which was to hide its picture from him for ever.” (Forster)

When the family moved to London, life became much more fraught for young Charles.
His father, although still well-employed by the Pay Office, was proving himself to be an

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unwise borrower. A baby sister, Harriet, died of smallpox – whether in Chatham, or after
the family moved to London, it is uncertain. Charles was ten-years-old when the family
left Chatham, and he followed them there by himself, after they had already left. Their
new address was in Camden Town. Charles lived in a tiny garret room. Although the fields
of Camden were nearby, Charles remembered it as “… shabby, dingy, damp, and as
mean a neighborhood as one would desire not to see…”

Charles’s tenure at Warrens Blacking, 30 Hungerford Stairs, began due to his parents’
deepening financial problems. Both mother and father eagerly sent him to work in the
factory, while his older sister, Fanny, went to school. Dickens resented this, as he told his
friend John Forster. In his book, The Life of Charles Dickens, Forster relates that his
parents sending Fanny rather than Charles to school “…what a stab to his heart it was,
thinking of his own disregarded condition, to see her go away to begin her education… .”

Dickens described Warrens, “…a crazy, tumble down old house, abutting of course, on
the river, and literally overrun with rats. Its wainscotted rooms and its rotten floors and
staircase, and the old grey rats swarming down in the cellars, and the sound of their
squeaking and scuffling coming up the stairs at all times, and the dirt and decay of the
place, rise up visibly before me, as if I were there again.” This old house is reinvented by
Dickens in the house in Nicholas Nickelby, and in the house in Oliver Twist where Fagin
dwells. (Forster)

By the time Charles was twelve-years-old, his father was taken off to Marshalsea Prison,
as an insolvent debtor. John Forster recounts that his father’s words upon being taken
away to prison were that “the sun was being set upon him forever.” These words, said
Charles, “…had broken my heart.”

His father’s incarceration at Marshalsea provided rich fodder for Dickens future fictions.
When Dickens first came to visit his father at Marshalsea, John Dickens told the boy “ … if
a man had twenty pounds a year, and spent nineteen pounds nineteen shillings and
sixpence, he would be happy; but that a shilling spent in the other way would make him
wretched.” Dickens gave this advice to Mr. Micawber to give to young David in David
Copperfield.

Marshalsea is a setting not only of David Copperfield, but also Little Dorritt, as is the
surrounding neighborhood of Borough, a setting of The Pickwick Papers.

After a period of what might have been six months, or eighteen months, John Dickens
removed his son from employ at Warrens – as he himself had got out of debtors’ prison.
Dickens never forgot that his mother was in favor of his returning to Warrens, rather than

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going to his school as his father wished. His father refused to send the boy back.

A drawing by Fred Bernard of Dickens as a boy at work in the blacking factory. Originally
published in 1904 in the magazine, The Leisure Hour.

Before Charles Dickens’s creations would burst upon the world, after leaving the blacking
factory, Charles attended school. When his parents could no longer afford his schooling,
he went to work as a writing clerk in the law office of Ellis and Blackmore in Holborn
Court. He was fifteen-years-old. He spent fifteen months as a law clerk.

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Professional Beginnings

While working as a law clerk, Dickens taught himself shorthand. With this skill he was able
to become a reporter in the press gallery of the House of Commons.

Dickens began his first serious work as a writer in 1833. It was a short story entitled “A
Dinner at Poplar Walk”. He submitted it to Monthly Magazine, and they published it. He
wrote eight more stories for Monthly Magazine.

Dickens joined the staff of the Morning Chronicle in 1833, which had recently come under
new ownership. He was appointed editor of the Evening Chronicle in 1834. It was through
his work on the Evening Chronicle that he first achieved some measure of renown. He
wrote a series of urban sketches in which he depicted criminal trials, circus
performances, executions. The readers of these sketches “heard” the events depicted
with verisimilitude owing to Dickens’s ability to duplicate the speech patterns of the
common people of his time and place. He began to write these sketches for the
magazine, Bells’ Life in London.

Sketches by Boz was published in 1836. It was great success, and led to another job. In
February of 1836, he began work on The Pickwick Papers. It was to be sold as a serial.
Dickens was contractually obligated to produce around twelve thousand words per
month. The installments were sold for a shilling.

The Pickwick Papers, in today’s parlance, was a best seller. People from all walks of life,
and all stations in society awaited every instalment. The poor of the country were known
to procure a copy from the circulating library, and have one of their number read it aloud
to a crowd of men, women and children–poor folks, who could not read it themselves.
The Pickwick Papers was a resounding national success. And Dickens’s fame was secure.

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Charles and Catherine

Charles Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in April of 1836. Their marriage coincided
with Dickens rapid rise as a famous writer. Their first son was born in January of 1837 and
around this time, Dickens first conceived the germ of the idea for Oliver Twist.

In May of 1837, while living with Charles and Catherine at their new home in Doughty
Street, Dickens’s sister-in-law, Mary Hogarth collapsed, and died shortly after. Dickens
was completely grief stricken.

According to many commentators and biographers of Dickens, Mary’s inspiration was
central to many of his female characters–particularly those of a saintly, or pure persona.
He revisits her death in The Old Curiosity Shop in the death of Little Nell. According to
Peter Ackroyd, Dickens wrote that the writing Little Nell’s death “…casts the most horrible
shadow upon me, and it is as much as I can do to keep moving at all.” (Ackroyd, 318)

Catherine gave birth to their second child in March of 1838, a girl called Mary, or
“Mamie”. In her book, The Other Dickens: A Life of Catherine Hogarth, Lillian Nayder
writes that Catherine was prone to post-partum depression. During this time, Dickens
finished his work on Nicholas Nickleby. His family was growing with the birth of Kate
Macready Dickens in October, 1839.

Charles and Catherine seem to have been not well-suited to each other. And this strain
was making itself apparent in the early years of the marriage. (Ackroyd, 293) Although
they went on to have more children together – ten in all – Catherine was ill-treated by
Charles. This is an aspect of his character which is at odds with his persona as a
compassionate champion of society’s downtrodden. His daughter Kate remarked upon
her father’s treatment of her mother saying, “My father was a wicked man – a very
wicked man.”

Charles separated from Catherine in 1858, after he fell in love with the actress, nineteen-
year-old Ellen Ternan. Catherine never fell out of love with her husband. Dickens claimed
he never loved Catherine, according to his biographer, Michael Slater, in his book, Charles

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Dickens. Dickens’s way of letting Catherine know that the marriage was over, was to
move his bed into a room adjacent to their bedroom, and wall off the communicating
door. He even sought to deflect blame for the failure of the marriage onto her, by
attempting to publish a self-justifying piece in Punch–which was refused publication.

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Work as Novelist

Charles Dickens maintained a strict regimen of work throughout his life. In the period
after the publication of Nicholas Nickleby, he produced The Old Curiosity Shop, Barnaby
Rudge (contained in the periodical, Master Humphrey’s Clock), Martin Chuzzlewit and
Oliver Twist.

Dickens wrote Nicholas Nickleby from February of 1839 to October of 1839. It was
published as a serialized story, as were the The Pickwick Papers and Oliver Twist. Dickens
actually began work on Nickleby before Oliver Twist was finished. His friend, John Forster
describes the impetus of Nicholas Nickleby,

“… he went down into Yorkshire with Mr. Hablot Browne to look up the Cheap Schools in
that county to which public attention had been painfully drawn by a law case in the
previous year; which had before been notorious for cruelties committed in them, whereof
he had heard as early as in his childish days; and which he was bent upon destroying if he
could. I soon heard the result of his journey; and the substance of that letter, returned to
him for the purpose, is in his preface to the story written for the collected edition. He
came back confirmed in his design, and in February set to work upon his first chapter. On
his birthday he wrote to me. ‘I have begun! I wrote four slips last night, so you see the
beginning is made. And what is more, I can go on: so I hope the book is in training at last.’
‘The first chapter of Nicholas is done,’ he wrote two days later.”

From January to June of 1842, Catherine and Charles were in America. Dickens formed
the impression that Americans were vulgar, humorless and overly concerned with money
and business. (Ackroyd, 369)

Upon his return to England, Dickens completed American Notes, and began Martin
Chuzzlewit. The title character Martin journeys to America. In the American episode,
Dickens skewered both the American people and the institution of slavery, which he
abhorred, “so maimed and lame, so full of sores and ulcers, foul to the eye and almost
hopeless to the sense, that her best friends turn from the loathsome creature with
disgust.” So forceful was the anti-Americanism in Martin Chuzzlewit, that over twenty

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years later Dickens added a postscript–in essence apologizing for the negative portrayal
of America and Americans in the novel,

“Also, to declare how astounded I have been by the amazing changes I have seen around
me on every side—changes moral, changes physical, changes in the amount of land
subdued and peopled, changes in the rise of vast new cities, changes in the growth of
older cities almost out of recognition, changes in the graces and amenities of life,
changes in the Press, without whose advancement no advancement can take place
anywhere. Nor am I, believe me, so arrogant as to suppose that in five-and-twenty years
there have been no changes in me, and that I had nothing to learn and no extreme
impressions to correct when I was here first.”

Dickens finished A Christmas Carol in a little over six weeks at the end of 1843. He wrote
this book in part to relieve his financial stress. A Christmas Carol was popular, but
because Dickens had it expensively published in a lavish binding, gilt edging, and hand-
colored illustrations, it realized a low profit.

In January of 1846, Dickens launched the newspaper, the Daily News. He gave up his
editorship by February. His short tenure as editor was due to interference by William
Bradbury of the publishers, Bradbury and Evans. Dickens was relieved to be free of the
fraught editorship. In this preface to Pictures From Italy, he told his readers “… departing
for a moment from my old pursuits, I am about to resume them, joyfully, in Switzerland;
where after another year of absence, I can work out the themes I have in my mind
without interruption…”

During his sojourn in Switzerland Dickens wrote Dombey and Son. It was success, and his
financial woes were cured. By 1849, Dickens began David Copperfield. In the preface of
the book’s 1867 edition, Dickens wrote “Like many fond parents, I have in my heart of
hearts a favourite child. And his name is David Copperfield.”

Many of the events in the life of the hero, David, mirror those of Dickens’s life. Both David
and young Charles were sent to work: David to the warehouse of Murdstone and Grinby,
where he glues labels onto wine bottles; Charles to the Warren’s blacking factory where
he glued labels onto pots of boot blacking. Both warehouses are on the river Thames, and
are rat-infested, tumbledown structures. Mr. Micawber, David’s impecunious friend, is
jailed in King’s Bench debtors’ prison. Charles’ father, John Dickens, was sent to
Marshalsea. John Dickens, like Micawber, was an eloquent, charming, and friendly man
who hadn’t a clue how to manage his own affairs. David, like Charles, started his
professional career as a journalist, and became a novelist.

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In the Fall of 1850 a third daughter was born to Charles and Catherine. They named the
little girl Dora, after the character from David Copperfield, whose death the author was
planning, but had not yet “killed.” John Dickens, Charles’s father, died March 31, 1851. In
April, Dickens’s baby daughter Dora died. By October of that same year, Dickens was
nearly finished with David Copperfield. He wrote to Forster,

“I am within three pages of the shore; and am strangely divided, as usual in such a cases,
between sorrow and joy. Oh, my dear Forster, if I were to say half of what
Copperfield makes me feel to-night, how strangely, even to you, I should be turned inside
out! I seem to be sending some part of myself into the Shadowy World.”

In 1850, Dickens began planning for the publication of a new journal, Household
Words. Dickens, and his friend and collaborator, Wilkie Collins were regular contributors.
By the latter part of the decade, Dickens wished to sever his ties to the publication. His
folding of Household Words into a new periodical, All the Year Round was due to another
disagreement with the publishers, Bradbury and Evans. In a tabloid-worthy scandal,
Dickens separated from his wife, Catherine after he had taken up with the nineteen-year-
old actress Ellen Ternan. To prevent his good name being tainted by the rumors of
adultery, he wished to publish a defense in Punch. Punch seems an unlikely choice for the
self-justifying screed such as Dickens planned, except when one considers that it was
published by Bradbury and Evans, who had close ties to Dickens. Bradbury and Evans
refused. The publishing partners were also part owners of Household Words. In the
contretemps, Dickens closed Household Words, and folded it into a new publication All the
Year Round.

In 1856, Dickens purchased Gad’s Hill Place–a country home in Higham, Kent, which he
had admired since his childhood when his father had pointed it out to him.

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Autumnal years

Dickens and Wilkie Collins collaborated on the play The Frozen Deep in 1856. Dickens
contributed to the writing of the play, and acted in the part of Richard Wardour. Ellen
Ternan had a part in the play. This was the occasion of their meeting. Throughout their
affair, Dickens strove to keep up appearances. He would trudge through muddy fields to
reach a home he had set up for Ellen. He burned every scrap of their correspondence. He
made a great and effective effort to keep their names out of the newspapers when he
and Ellen were involved in the Staplehurst rail crash of 1865.

A Tale of Two Cities was published in 1859. Dickens first conceived of the idea for the
book while working with Wilkie Collins on The Frozen Deep. Both the novel and the play
feature a character–Sydney Carton in Tale, and Richard Wardour in Frozen–who sacrifice
their lives for the love of a woman.

Dickens re-read David Copperfield to prepare for the writing of Great Expectations. Both
novels trace an orphaned child’s trajectory through society. The hero of Great
Expectations, Pip, has an unhappier life than David. At the end of David Copperfield,
David is happily married to Agnes, and is a successful author. At the end of Great
Expectations, Pip is destitute, and has lost his love, Estrella. Dickens wrote a happier
ending for Great Expectations at the behest of his friend, the novelist Edward Bulwer-
Lytton. The original “unhappy” ending is considered to be superior to the contrived happy
ending, and it is included in modern editions of the novel. Great Expectations appeared in
All the Year Round from December 1860 to August 1861.

Dickens gave his first public reading in December 1853. Of these initial his public readings
of

A Christmas Carol, Dickens wrote to Forster “… and animated me to the extent that I felt
we were all bodily going up into the clouds together.” Earlier in his career, in the 1840s,
Dickens had done private readings for friends. At this time, one reading of The Chimes he
did for William Macready, the famous actor-manager, had the man sobbing. Dickens was
quite pleased with his own power as an actor. As a young man, he had considered

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becoming an actor, and it was only the happenstance of missing an audition in Covent
Garden which derailed this ambition.

His effectiveness as an actor, and the wild popularity of his readings, prompted Dickens
to tour incessantly in the last fifteen years of his life. He made another trip to America in
1867, despite the fact that his health was failing. During the American tour, at times he
was seen to grasp the podium tightly for support, so frail and weakened had he become.
Yet, the tour was huge financial and popular success.

In April of 1869 Dickens suffered from what was probably a stroke. He cancelled a
reading scheduled for that night. He continued his performances in 1870 with
appearances at St. James Hall in London. These were his farewell performances.

The first installment of The Mystery of Edwin Drood was published in the American
periodical Every Saturday. Dickens had gotten to the twenty-second chapter, which is
about halfway point, when he collapsed. Georgina Hogwarth, Catherine’s sister, was with
him when he was stricken while at home at Gad’s Hill Place. As he staggered, she
supported him, and told him that he needed to lie down. To which he replied “Yes, on the
ground.” Those were his last words.

Dickens died on June 9, 1870. He is buried in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey under a
bare recitation of his name, and date of birth and death. It was Dickens’s wish to have a
plain burial at a local churchyard, but public opinion prevailed, and his family assented to
his burial at Westminster Abbey.

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Gad’s Hill Place by Kenn Chaplin, via Kenn GC

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Notable quotes

Of his time in the blacking factory, Dickens said “I never said, to man or boy, how it was
that I came to be there, or gave the least indication of being sorry that I was there…I
kept my own counsel and did my work.”

Dickens was well-known for his quick wit. His humor showed him to have an almost
indestructible spirit. Not long after coming out of the blacking factory, a friend noted his
pants were well-worn, and looked as though they needed a rest. Dickens replied, “Ah yes!
You are right, it is a long time since they had a nap.”(Ackroyd, 110)

“Home for good and all. Home, for ever and ever.” Exclamation of the young Ebenezer
Scrooge. This sentiment is shared by Dickens, who cherished an ideal of home – an ideal
reflected in his work. He and his characters struggled with the disconnect between the
ideal, and the reality of home as the ultimate place of peace, and love for the family.

Of his observations of the Marshalsea prison and its captives, Dickens told an American
journalist “In the haunts of squalid poverty I have found many a broken heart too good
for this world. Many such persons, now in the most abject condition, have seen better
days.”

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Dickensiana

The origin of Dickens’s nickname, Boz, came from his younger brother, Augustus. He
called Charles’ favorite character, Moses, in The Vicar of Wakefield, Boses, which
morphed into Boz.

Dickens was fascinated by mesmerism. As he noted in his diary from 1838, he attended
demonstrations of mesmerism. He was able to put others into hypnotic trances, and on
occasion, tried to use his mesmeric powers to heal maladies.

During a sojourn in Italy in 1843, Dickens had a dream of a lady in blue whom he took for
his years-dead sister-in-law, Mary. In the dream, Mary told him that Roman
Catholicism was the best religion for him. He didn’t take his vision up on this suggestion,
and nursed a lifelong dislike for Catholicism, which was in keeping with tenor of the times.

Dickens’s creative process was grounded in reality. His subject matter was the
everyday lives of everyday people which he observed in minute detail. In his actual
writing process, Dickens was concrete and practical as well; he talked to himself and
acted out passages as he wrote. His daughter Mamie reported that during one session
when she was able to observe him at work, he would he would get before a mirror,
gesticulate, and go through a series of facial contortions. He would then resume writing,
and repeat the whole process – talking to himself in a low voice.

Dickens was an indefatigable walker, often walking miles every day after writing. He
did this in an effort to discharge the nervous energy built up in the course of his creative
endeavors.

Charles Dickens was not a long-lived man, yet his life was lived with such energy and
verve that his sprawling, complex, and densely populated fictions were not enough to
contain his creative ferment. He edited a newspaper, mounted theatrical productions,
toured England and America reading from his work. He was a good actor, and his
readings which were so effective, and highly charged, people were said to faint at crucial
scenes, such as the murder of Nancy at the hands of Bill Sykes.

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His pushed himself to the point of exhaustion, over and over returning to his work for
solace when the real world did not respond to his manipulations, as did his fictional world.
In an age where medical treatment was not advanced, he soldiered on despite
debilitating ailments.

In this year of the 200th anniversary of his birth, Dickens’s works of fiction are the focus
of renewed attention, as another age seeks to understand its own existence, regarding
itself in the mirror of his work. Dickens himself lacked psychological insight into his own
personal dilemmas yet there is psychological tension which asserts itself in the fears and
desires of his characters. These dynamics pull and push us in the tide of our will, a will of
which we are almost always unaware, even when we fool ourselves that we are well-
informed about our own condition or motives. So without seeking to explore the life of the
psyche beneath the exterior, Dickens succeeds even at that. The completeness of his
conjured worlds allows for their own organic systems to emerge and develop.
Notwithstanding his miniaturist comprehensiveness, it is the vividness of the characters
themselves which is unmatched in literature. His characters are creatures of action,
inhabiting worlds which are completely alive today.

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Works Cited

David Copperfield, eNotes

David Perdue's Charles Dickens Page

Dickens, Peter Ackroyd

Dickens 2012, British Council

Dickens and Women, Dickens and Londo

The Frozen Deep, Project Gutenberg

In Love With His Public, review of Charles Dickens by Michael Slater, Standpoint

The Life of Charles Dickens, John Forster

Martin Chuzzlewit, Project Gutenberg

Martin Chuzzlewit, eNotes

Mary Hogarth , Victorian Web

The Other Dickens: A Life of Catherine Hogarth, Lillian Nayder

The secret affair that almost ruined Dickens, The Telegraph

Simon Callow on Charles Dickens video, Hibrow

Tracking Charles Dickens: A Chronology of his Whereabouts, Phillip Currah

The Young Dickens, Graham Greene

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Other Links

Charles Dickens and Informal Education, Infed

Charles Dickens-online: The Life and Works of Charles Dickens, Gregory

David Copperfield, Project Gutenberg

The Dickens Project, University of California at Santa Cruz

History, Charles Dickens, BBC

Nicholas Nickleby, Project Gutenberg

Review of Becoming Dickens, New York Times

The Staplehurst rail crash, or how we nearly lost Charles Dickens early, The Victorianist
blog

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Biography on Charles Dickens By Davanna Cimino About The Author
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About The Author

Davanna Cimino
Davanna has a life-long love of literature. She is a copy editor and
copywriter, writes fiction and poetry, and has a law degree. She lives on
the Gulf Coast of Florida. She has three sons, and a Brittany named Jubal.

Get in touch:

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