Dorothy Day: A Biography By Sidot Jean Avignon Table of Contents

Dorothy Day: A Biography Table of Contents
By Sidot Jean Avignon

Table of Contents

I. Dorothy Day: A Biography
Introduction

Background and Upbringing

Major Accomplishments and Awards

Personal Life

Recent News

Dorothy Day Quotes

Trivia and Facts

Conclusion

Sources

Additional Resources

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I.

Dorothy Day: A
Biography

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Introduction

Dorothy Day was an author and activist who fought tirelessly for women's equality and
socialist causes during the early part of the 20th century as well as other social causes
during the latter half of the 1900s. She also was one of the leaders of the Catholic
Workers' Movement, which was the first organization to involve the Roman Catholic
Church in social activism. Without Day's contributions to American history, modern
America might be a very different country than most people know it to be, as she was
instrumental in achieving freedom and equality for many groups of Americans.

Impressively, Day lived to be almost 100 years old and fought for social equality
throughout her life. By studying her life, one can see the changing landscape of American
society and the different issues that needed to be addressed to make America truly the
free country it had been created to be. Dorothy Day fought for women's equality as a
young woman and protested against the Vietnam War as an older one, making her a
unique and interesting figure in American history. She lived through the women's suffrage
movement, the Great Depression, both World Wars, the African-American civil rights
movement and the Vietnam War — and was involved in social action related to all of
these events.

Day's political activities were only one part of what she achieved; she also was an
accomplished writer as well as being instrumental in expanding the Catholic Church's
ability to perform charity all over the United States by setting up non-profit institutions
associated with the Catholic Workers Movement. Her Catholic charities, originally created
to help victims of the Great Depression, are still in existence today; there are 130 Catholic
Workers houses scattered throughout the United States, as well as houses in eight foreign
countries.

There are many reasons to remember Day, from the novels she wrote in pursuit of social
justice to her participation in hunger strikes and other non-violent means of protesting
the oppression of women. Day's most important legacy is her refusal to accept injustice
wherever it was found. If one method of protesting create the social changes she wanted
to see, she moved on to something else. She faced the U.S. government and others in

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to see, she moved on to something else. She faced the U.S. government and others in
power with courage and determination, refusing ever to back down and accept
inequality, poverty or other social ills as the natural order of things. As a result, she
created lasting social change in many areas of American life despite the appearance that
she was drifting from one thing to another.

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Background and Upbringing

Dorothy Day was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1897. Her father, John Day, was a well-
known journalist, and his career probably helped influence Day's later career as a writer
and social activist. John Day, however, was not at all liberal; he had been raised in
Tennessee and harbored prejudices against African-Americans and foreigners.

In any case, the young Day traveled widely throughout the United States because her
father had a hard time finding steady work. For example, in the early 1900s, the family
lived in San Francisco, but in 1906 a major earthquake disrupted John Day's ability to
continue working there, and the family moved to Chicago. As a result of the constant
moves from one part of the country to the other, Day felt isolated. At the turn of the
century the telephone and airplane were new inventions, so it was difficult for people to
keep in touch or visit one another after moving to a distant city. This made it difficult for
Day to keep in touch with children her age after moving. The isolation and loneliness
seriously affected Day, and she later wrote an autobiographical novel about it entitled
The Long Loneliness.

The loneliness and isolation Day experienced may also have been responsible for her life-
long interest in reading and writing. As a child, she was a voracious reader, which may
have helped her to deal with her feelings that she was constantly alone. She also went for
long walks around Chicago's South Side, where she observed that some people lived in
abject poverty. Her own feelings of loneliness and the pain she saw all around her
bothered her immensely. She felt empty and hungry for a spiritual connection because of
all of this pain. Even as a child she read the Bible, which confused her non-religious
parents.

In 1914, Day enrolled at the University of Illinois. Although she only remained at school
for two years, this was an important milestone in her development, as it led to the
beginning of her interest in socialism and social justice. Intellectually, her education was
important because it exposed her to socialist writers such as Upton Sinclair and Leo
Tolstoy. Socially, the University of Illinois allowed her to make friends with people who
were unlike herself. Most of her friends at school were Jews who experienced

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were unlike herself. Most of her friends at school were Jews who experienced
discrimination on a regular basis. Some of them were interested in socialism or
communism as ways to correct the social injustices that they experienced.

After two years of university education, however, Day grew too bored to continue her
studies. She dropped out of the University of Illinois and moved to New York, where she
found a group of radical people who supported the same causes she supported. Day
began working for the New York Call, which was an influential socialist newspaper of the
time. At this point in her life, Day was still trying to be a "good girl” and claimed to be
untempted completely by sex, which her friend Peggy Baird became determined to
change. Baird insisted Day be a nude model and claimed that this would be a victory for
the women's equality movement.

Day's personal successes as a journalist didn't fulfill her. She still felt empty and
purposeless and drifted from one job to another, looking for answers. She needed
spirituality in her life, and finally found it in the Catholic religion in 1927. Nevertheless,
between the onset of World War I and the onset of the Great Depression, she was able to
get some experience writing for various socialist newspapers and to begin her career as
a journalist, as well as initiate her activity advocating for social justice in several other
ways.

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Major Accomplishments and
Awards

Dorothy Day fought for social justice throughout her life by writing as well as by
protesting. When she first came of age in 1917, the women's suffrage movement was in
full force. Day joined protests in an attempt to get women the same right to vote as their
male counterparts. She was arrested for "obstructing traffic" in front of the White House
by joining in daily pickets. After her arrest, she went on a hunger strike to protest both
not being allowed to vote and the poor treatment many of the women involved in the
protest received while in jail. President Woodrow Wilson ordered Day and other hunger
strikers released so that they would not die in jail and be seen as martyrs to their cause.

During this period of her life, Day also worked on a radical newspaper called The Masses.
This newspaper called for an end to World War I, which it believed was caused by
imperialism, and which it believed the United States should stay out of. Although Day
didn't convince the US to change its policies by writing for this paper, her writing, and that
of her friends, must have gotten the government's attention. After entering World War I,
the government ordered The Masses to stop opposing its policies. When Day and the
other socialists working on the paper refused to do this, the government seized back
issues of the paper and rescinded its permit to mail copies out so that it could no longer
distribute the paper through the U.S. Post Office. As a result of this experience, Day felt
so powerless that she quit journalism and go to school to study nursing. Her experiences
as a nurse, as well as some of her personal experiences during the early 1920s, led to the
publication of her autobiographical novel, The Eleventh Virgin, in 1924.

Day didn't return to political activism until the 1930s, instead choosing to live on the edge
of poverty in Mexico City. However, once the Great Depression began, she returned to
the United States, where she and her lover, Peter Maurin, opened a newspaper entitled
The Catholic Worker. The newspaper encouraged the Catholic Church to support pacifist
and socialist causes.

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In addition to running a newspaper, Day and Maurin began opening charity houses
throughout the United States to help people get back on their feet. This aspect of The
Catholic Worker was meant to bring the Catholic faith to the millions of poor and
dispossessed people who had lost everything in the stock market crash of 1929. The
Catholic Worker was important not only because it gave hope to millions of Americans
who needed help, but also because it was the first attempt in US history to combine
Catholic faith with social activism. People who worked for The Catholic Worker continued
to be active in social causes throughout the rest of Day's life; The Catholic Worker was
involved in protests against the nuclear bomb and the African-American Civil Rights
Movement.

The Catholic Worker was controversial for many members of the Catholic faith. Some
objected to the charity houses that The Catholic Worker ran; instead of attempting to
convert poor people to Catholicism, these houses simply gave anyone who wanted it help.
Opponents of this movement claimed it was against Scripture because Jesus said the
poor would always be part of society, and some also claimed that those receiving charity
from The Catholic Worker houses were undeserving drunkards rather than people
Catholicism should truly endeavor to help. Nevertheless, the charity houses remained
open and are still open today.

The Catholic Worker newspaper also came under fire in 1935 because it didn't change its
pacifist stance once the Roman Catholic Church supported Franco in the Spanish Civil
War. Day believed that Franco was a fascist. She didn't care about supporting other
Catholics nearly as much as she did about Jews and other persecuted people. Her direct
disagreement with the Catholic church lost her 66% of her readers, but she didn't care.

The Catholic Worker newspaper supported pacifism throughout Day's life regardless of
public opinion; it didn't support World War II, either, but did encourage readers to care for
the sick and wounded. She believed passionately in compassion, and so she thought that
shifting readers' focus this way would help bring something good out of the horror of war.
She also wanted readers to see Catholicism differently. She saw it as a religion of peace,
carrying Jesus' message to all who were in need, rather than merely following rites and
rituals. This is why she wanted the Catholic church involved.

After World War II, Day continued to be active politically. In the 1950s, she and a small
group of dissidents refused to participate in air raid drills because of lack of belief in the
necessity of nuclear war. Day believed that participating in New York's annual air raid drill
constituted consent to nuclear war and refused to do so, instead sitting on the steps of
City Hall and praying aloud for peace. Day was determined to make her point no matter

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what. In 1955, she and her followers were fined for refusal to participate; the following
year, they were arrested and Day was sentenced to five days in jail for not participating.
The air raid drills, and Day's opposition to them, continued for the next several years, but
as time went on, more and more people joined the protests. Day was arrested several
times but was not arrested during large protests in the late 1950s that involved thousands
of people. Her quiet pacifism attracted all these followers, and the authorities knew that
arresting her would only make her more of a hero to them. Air raid drills ceased
permanently in 1961.

Next, Day began working for the African-American Civil Rights Movement. A Catholic
Worker commune in Georgia was one of the first places to practice integration and was
therefore attacked by the Ku Klux Klan in 1957. As she always did, Day visited personally
to see how her Catholic Worker houses were living up to her vision, and she wasn't scared
of confronting the Klan or other protesters. While she was standing guard against the KKK
at the commune, a passing car shot at her.

Day continued to exhibit bravery well into her later years. At the age of 75, she protested
in favor of farmers' rights and was arrested one last time. In the meantime, she'd been
active in every important social cause of the times, including protesting the Vietnam War
a few years earlier.

Although Day's activities were often controversial, she was recognized by the Catholic
Church for her contributions to society. In 1967, she was one of only two Americans
invited to take communion directly from the Pope, and in 1973 she was featured on the
Jesuit magazine, America, as an example of an American Catholic who had done much to
further Catholic causes. She also received a medal from Notre Dame for her social
activism.

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Personal Life

Although Day's commitment to Catholicism was extraordinary, she certainly did not live
the traditional Catholic life. Her interest in Catholicism mainly sprung from the fact that it
was a religion that gave help to the poor and needy. Her personal life, particularly her
relationships, did not follow Catholic teachings regarding marriage, divorce and sex.

Day was celibate and seemingly immune to sex in the early part of the 1900s, but in 1917
she met her friend Peggy Baird. Baird believed that sex was an important part of breaking
down barriers between men and women that led to inequality, and to this end she
recruited Day to be a nude model.

In 1919, Day married for the first and only time and dissolved the marriage a year later;
however, that did not stop her from taking lovers. Sometime during the years between
1919 and 1924, she became pregnant and had an abortion, which she used as part of the
basis for her first novel, The Eleventh Virgin. Also in 1924, she moved in with an anarchist
named Forster Batterham. Batterham was opposed to both marriage and religion for
political reasons.

The couple lived together for several years and had a daughter together. However, they
broke up when Day chose to baptize her daughter as a Catholic rather than raising her in
a completely non-religious fashion. This break-up seriously hurt her. She truly loved
Batterham and kept hoping he would accept her even though she was now Catholic. They
broke up and got together several times, but eventually she decided to end the
relationship permanently despite her love for him. She never fully got over him, however,
and wrote him letters periodically throughout the rest of their lives.

After the break-up, Day took her young daughter to Mexico City and lived on the edge of
poverty. She may have wanted to experience poverty first-hand in order to be of greater
assistance to poor people, but considering her feelings for Batterham, she probably also
felt she was too weak to stay in the same country as him without returning to him yet
again.

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In any event, the two came back to America in 1932, and soon after Day met Peter
Maurin. Maurin was a fellow Catholic who shared Day's political beliefs, and he became
her partner in opening the Catholic Worker. Day and Maurin remained close until Maurin's
death in 1949. Maurin and Day may or may not have been more than friends, at least in a
sexual sense. However, he clearly inspired her vision, and her heart was broken again
when in 1943 he began exhibiting signs of dementia. He stopped talking incessantly after
his diagnosis — a habit which had formerly driven her nuts — and gradually became
unable to communicate at all or take care of himself. Day stayed with Maurin until his
death and talked fondly about him for the rest of her life. She never took another lover or
had another close friendship with a man after he died.

Day was relatively close with her daughter, Tamar, however, throughout the rest of her
life. Tamar grew up knowing about her mother's activities, and the girl was educated in
boarding schools because it was too hard to raise her while campaigning. Day missed her
daughter terribly when she was in boarding school, especially after Maurin began to
suffer from dementia. She took a leave of absence in 1943 to spend time near her
daughter's boarding school, and after Peter Maurin's death she spent time with Tamar
and her family. She spent time with her daughter on and off throughout the remainder of
her life, and Tamar was with her when she died of a heart attack on November 20, 1980.

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Recent News

Dorothy Day continues to have an influence over modern Catholic social activists more
than 30 years after her death. A recent Catholic blog discussed the passing of another
person who worked for the Catholic Worker and deemed him worthy of rest with Day and
Maurin. There are also many hospitals and charity houses named after Day.

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Dorothy Day Quotes

"I felt a burst of love toward [her] that I have never forgotten."

Dorothy Day was recalling a friend's mother, who was such a devout Catholic that when
she interrupted the woman as a child, the woman simply told her where to find her friend
and then went back to her prayers as if nothing had happened. This experience left a
positive impression on Day's mind and influenced her to look into Catholicism as an adult.

"What we would like to do is change the world, make it a little simpler for people to feed,
clothe, and shelter themselves as God intended them to do. And by fighting for better
conditions, by crying out unceasingly for the rights of the workers, the poor, of the
destitute we can work for the oasis, the little cell of joy and peace in a harried world."

This was Dorothy Day's explanation of all of her activities. She saw social activism as part
of God's calling and fought for equality and a better world as part of her spiritual practice.

"Don't call me a saint. I don't want to be dismissed so easily."

Towards the end of her life, Catholics were beginning to call Day a "saint" because of her
activities. Day, however, was not interested in sainthood. She wanted to be remembered
for the things she did, not just for the benevolent attitude she held.

"There was a great question in my mind. Why was so much done in remedying social evils
instead of avoiding them in the first place?… Where were the saints to try to change the
social order, not just to minister to the slaves but to do away with slavery?"

As a young woman, Day questioned the Catholic Church's positions on social issues. While
she appreciated that the church wanted to help those who were suffering, she believed
they should work on alleviating the social problems that caused suffering in the first
place.

"What was right and wrong? What was good and evil? I lay there in utter confusion and
misery."

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Day's first arrest for civil disobedience confused her. For the first time, she realized how
horribly some human beings treated one another and she questioned the values she was
raised with.

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Trivia and Facts

Here are some noteworthy points about Day, as reported by The Catholic Worker.

Dorothy Day's family was Protestant, but rarely attended church. However, even as a
young girl, Day was interested in religion.

Dorothy Day's father didn't allow her to read dime store novels, so she spent her
childhood reading classic literature.

Day had two older brothers, a younger sister and a younger brother. She was required
to take care of her youngest brother John as a child.

Day had an ambivalent relationship with religion as a young woman. She believed that
organized religion did more harm than good and that there was too much evil in the
world. She also did not want God to see her feeling defeated. She didn't commit to
Catholicism until after her daughter's birth in 1927.

Day thought she was barren following her abortion, and was surprised when she
became pregnant with her daughter. She wanted her child to have stability in her life
and wanted to baptize her in order to achieve this and to thank God for the child's
conception, but knew her lover would leave her if she did this.

The tension between Day and her lover after she became interested in Catholicism
was so great that she had a nervous breakdown. He kept leaving and coming back
because of the conflict, and Day eventually had to end the relationship permanently.

Day returned to America after living in Mexico City partially because she contracted
malaria.

Day was angry in 1932 that Catholics didn't participate in social justice. She felt
separate from other social activists because of her religious beliefs. She prayed that
this would change shortly before she met Peter Maurin.

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Peter Maurin had a habit of talking all the time that seriously annoyed Day. Sometimes
she would snap at him to shut up so she could listen to music, but that only caused
him to find someone else to talk to.

Maurin and Day sold the first editions of The Catholic Worker newspaper for a penny
each.

Maurin suffered from dementia towards the end of his life. Day had a hard time
accepting his decline and eventual death.

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Conclusion

Dorothy Day is important to different people for different reasons. Many view her as a
fiercely independent woman. She certainly was a courageous woman who lived by her
own standards, and in doing so she changed the world more than once.

Her contributions should be remembered both for their social ramifications and because
she came from a spiritual basis. Modern-day activists often despise organized religion,
presuming that people who are religious do so out of an inability to think critically and
that all religious people are bigoted or against their causes. However, Day was none of
these things. She demonstrated that Catholicism could truly be a religion of peace, and
her religious faith enabled her to work towards a better world. This was not an easy thing
for her to do, as she often had to stand up against other people of faith and against the
Catholic Church itself.

It's easy to understand why Dorothy Day was widely considered a saint, given the number
of causes she fought for and the difference she made in people's lives. Both Catholics and
non-Catholics can learn from her extraordinary determination, transcendent courage and
strong commitment to both her spirituality and her social activism.

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Sources

Catholic Worker Movement, An Introduction to the Life and Spirituality of Dorothy Day

National Catholic Reporter, What We Can Learn From a Catholic Worker Life

Spartacus Educational, Dorothy Day

Catholic Worker Movement, A Biography of Dorothy Day

Americans Who Tell the Truth, Dorothy Day

Bookrags.com, Dorothy Day

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Additional Resources

Biography.com, Dorothy Day

Dorothy Day Guild, Her Life

San Diego Catholic Workers, Dorothy Day

The National Catholic Weekly, Dorothy in Love

US Catholic, Day By Day: Letters and Journals of Dorothy Day

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About The Author

Sidot Jean Avignon
Sidot Jean Avignon is an experienced writer and a member of the
Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun
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