www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 77
‘FISCAL CLIFF’
NATION PAGE 8
GATORS SWEEP
MENLO IN CCS
SPORTS PAGE 11
ALGAE BIOFUEL
COMES TO BAY
LOCAL PAGE 3
OBAMA PRESSES GOP ON TAXING RICH TO
AVERT ECONOMIC CRISIS
Elegant Home Design Since 1952
650•227• 4882
FREE ESTIMATE
165 N. Amphlett
San Mateo
www.rudolphsinteriors.com 650•591•0301
Don’t miss Lazare’s Diamond
Event & Giveaway October 26 & 27
REUTERS
An Israeli airstrike killed the commander of the military wing of Gaza’s Hamas rulers Wednesday,Hamas officials
and Israel confirmed, in a dramatic resumption of Israel’s policy of assassinating Palestinian militant leaders.
Above, Palestinians help extinguish the fire of Ahmed Jabari’s car that was hit in the strike. SEE STORY PAGE 18
BLISTERING AIRSTRIKE OFFENSIVE
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California’s
nonpartisan budget analyst says the
state now faces a much smaller
deficit of $1.9 billion through the
end of the next fiscal year and could
even see surpluses after that.
The Legislative Analyst’s Office
released a positive but cautious fore-
cast Wednesday in the state’s first
budget assessment since
Californians last
week approved
Gov. Jerry
Brown’s sales
and income tax
i n i t i a t i v e ,
Proposition 30.
“The state’s
e c o n o m i c
recovery, prior
budget cuts and
the additional, temporary taxes pro-
vided by Proposition 30 have com-
bined to bring California to a prom-
ising moment: the possible end of a
decade of acute state budget chal-
lenges,” wrote analyst Mac Taylor.
Taylor projected a much smaller
deficit of $1.9 billion through the
end of the 2013 fiscal year in July
2013, compared with the $15.7 bil-
lion deficit lawmakers faced earlier
this year.
He said state expenditures will be
State deficit shrinks to $1.9B
By Tom Verdin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The board
overseeing California’s efforts to
establish an insurance marketplace
for providing affordable health
care approved its
operational blue-
print Wednesday,
an essential step
toward meeting a
key deadline
Health board OKs plan
for insurance exchange
Jerry Brown
See page 5
Inside
State debuts
landmark cap-
and-trade system
See HEALTH, Page 22
See DEFICIT, Page 22
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Manager Chuck Manoiki waited
for customers to come in during the
lunch hour in his nearly empty
restaurant in downtown Redwood
City. He looked out at the construc-
tion fences and equipment that now
fill the view from the windows of
Arya Global Cuisine on Middlefield
Road and Theatre Way.
“We usually have around 40 or 50
customers at lunch,” said Manoiki,
looking around at his almost vacant
dining room. “It’s been this way
since this started.”
Work began about a month ago to
relocate a storm culvert underneath
the Middlefield Road parking lot.
This is the first stage in the city’s
Redwood Tower development proj-
ect, which is the construction of two
mid-rise office and retail buildings
Businesses contend
with construction
City preps for Redwood Tower development
SALLY SCHILLING/DAILY JOURNAL
Chuck Monoiki, manager of Arya
Global Cuisine on Middlefield Road
in Redwood City, waits for
lunchtime customers in his empty
restaurant near a new city
construction site. See BUSINESS, Page 30
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 7-Eleven is set to open soon in
a San Mateo neighborhood that
nearby residents oppose for many
reasons but how long it will be
allowed to operate in the old
Stangelini’s Italian Deli & Hilltop
Market will be the subject of a pub-
lic hearing tonight.
The City Council will consider
tonight whether to terminate the
non-conforming use for the site and
revert the land back to residential as
it is technically zoned for.
The Planning Commission
already voted to terminate the mar-
ket use for the site and recommend-
ed to the City Council to allow the
7-Eleven to operate at 501 N. San
Mateo Drive for at least five years,
the maximum city code allows for,
despite the property’s owner indi-
cating it could take up to 14 years to
recoup its investment in the proper-
ty.
But the council tonight could vote
7-Eleven: How long will it last?
Council to vote on whether to terminate market use for old deli property
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
El Crystal Elementary received
approval to become a magnet school
last night, however, the heated con-
versation leading up to the green
light showcased a divided district
and lingering fiscal problems within
San Bruno.
The proposal to convert the school
into one that focuses on a science,
technical engineering and mathe-
matics (known as STEM) began in
the 2013-14 school year and gener-
ated universal praise from those in
the audience last night. But, as the
San Bruno Park School District
faces a $3 million deficit, it also
raised questions for some trustees
about possibly spending more than
$100,000 in startup costs.
Ultimately a 3-1 vote, with Trustee
Kevin Martinez dissenting and
Magnet school approved,
budget troubles remain
The future for a new 7-Eleven at 501
N. San Mateo Drive in San Mateo
will be the subject of a public
hearing at tonight. See 7-ELEVEN, Page 30 See SCHOOL, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Ed Asner is
83.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1942
The naval Battle of Guadalcanal ended
during World War II with a decisive
U.S. victory over Japanese forces.
“News reports don’t change the world.
Only facts change it, and those have
already happened when we get the news.”
— Friedrich Durrenmatt, Swiss author, playwright (1921-1990)
Judge Joseph
Wapner is 93.
Actor Yaphet Kotto
is 73.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Emirati weightlifter Amna Al Haddad pushes a tire during a training session at Fast Performance Center in Ahdaaf Sports Club
in Dubai.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. South winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance
of showers. Lows in the upper 40s. South
winds 10 to 20 mph. Gusts up to 35 mph in
the evening.
Friday: Rain. Highs in the lower 60s. East
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Rain. Lows in the lower 50s. South winds
around 5 mph.
Saturday: Rain likely. Highs in the lower 60s.
Saturday night: Rain likely. Lows around 50.
Sunday and Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers. Highs around 60. Lows in the upper 40s.
Monday and Monday night: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 07 Eureka
in first place; No. 03 Hot Shot in second place;
and No.12 Lucky Charms in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:48.83.
(Answers tomorrow)
AWFUL WHEEL BULLET MOTION
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He was able to recover the fumble because
he was — ON THE BALL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GANTE
DUNMO
OSLAIR
FAMEAL
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
A:
4 6 8
6 12 31 46 56 34
Mega number
Nov. 13 Mega Millions
17 18 24 34 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 6 6 9
Daily Four
3 7 3
Daily three evening
In 1777, the Second Continental Congress approved the
Articles of Confederation.
In 1806, explorer Zebulon Pike sighted the mountaintop
now known as Pikes (cq) Peak in present-day Colorado.
In 1889, Brazil was proclaimed a republic as its emperor,
Dom Pedro II, was overthrown.
In 1935, the Commonwealth of the Philippines was estab-
lished as its new president, Manuel L. Quezon, took office.
In 1937, the House and Senate chambers of the U.S.
Capitol were air-conditioned for the first time.
In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt laid the corner-
stone of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C.
In 1948, William Lyon Mackenzie King retired as prime
minister of Canada after 21 years; he was succeeded by
Louis St. Laurent.
In 1958, actor Tyrone Power, 44, died in Madrid, Spain,
while filming “Solomon and Sheba.” (Power’s part was
recast with Yul Brynner.)
In 1961, former Argentine President Juan Peron, living in
exile in Spain, married his third wife, Isabel.
In 1966, the flight of Gemini 12 ended successfully as
astronauts James A. Lovell and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin Jr.
splashed down safely in the Atlantic.
In 1969, a quarter of a million protesters staged a peaceful
demonstration in Washington against the Vietnam War.
In 1979, the British government publicly identified Sir
Anthony Blunt as the “fourth man” of a Soviet spy ring.
In 1982, funeral services were held in Moscow’s Red
Square for the late Soviet President Leonid I. Brezhnev.
In 1985, Britain and Ireland signed an accord giving
Dublin an official consultative role in governing Northern
Ireland.
Statesman Howard H. Baker Jr. is 87. Actor John Kerr is 81.
Singer Petula Clark is 80. Comedian Jack Burns is 79. Actress
Joanna Barnes is 78. Actor Sam Waterston is 72. Classical con-
ductor Daniel Barenboim is 70. Pop singer Frida (ABBA) is 67.
Actor Bob Gunton is 67. Former New Mexico Gov. Bill
Richardson is 65. Director-actor James Widdoes is 59. Rock
singer-producer Mitch Easter is 58. Fox News reporter John
Roberts is 56. Former “Jay Leno Show” bandleader Kevin
Eubanks is 55. Comedian Judy Gold is 50. Actress Rachel True
is 46. Rapper E-40 is 45. Country singer Jack Ingram is 42. Actor
Jay Harrington is 41. Actor Jonny Lee Miller is 40.
Loose gorilla alert?
Electronic road sign hacked
LOOMIS — A prankster is changing
the message on an electronic traffic
warning sign in Northern California.
The sign is supposed to tell people that
a road in the Placer County city of
Loomis will be closed for pipeline con-
struction.
Instead, it read, “Smoke Weed
Everyday” last week. The Sacramento
Bee reports that it has also read,
“Caution Loose Gorilla!”
Placer County Water Agency Senior
Engineer Tony Firenzi told the Bee it
took skill to change the message. The
unknown hacker needed a keyboard and
had to bypass some systems.
Boat needed in one
Minneapolis voting precinct
MINNEAPOLIS — Not one voter
cast a ballot in one Minneapolis precinct
on Election Day. That’s because the only
living species in Ward 10, Precinct 3B,
is of the aquatic variety.
A newly redistricted precinct map
shows 3B is located entirely in the east-
ern half of Lake Calhoun — the biggest
lake in Minneapolis. City Clerk Casey
Carl says the watery precinct is the
“unintentional result of a programming
error” made in drawing new ward
boundary lines.
Charter Commission chairman Barry
Clegg tells the Star Tribune that the
mapping software couldn’t draw a line
around the edge of the lake without put-
ting a census block in the wrong ward.
Clegg says it was supposed to be
cleaned up for the final map, but never
was.
City proposes citizens’
well-being study
SANTA MONICA — Once referred
to as the “people’s republic of Santa
Monica” because of its socially con-
scious government, the Los Angeles
coastal suburb now wants to find out
whether its citizens are feeling groovy.
The Los Angeles Times says Santa
Monica officials are seeking a grant to
create the nation’s first municipal well-
being index.
City officials and Rand Corp.
researchers propose tracking the physi-
cal health, social connectedness and
community resilience of residents.
Santa Monica made the proposal in
hopes of winning a $5 million
Bloomberg Philanthropies grant. It’s one
of 20 Mayors Challenge finalists named
last week.
The city has already completed a
youth well-being study that found most
students were healthy and felt safe at
school.
People magazine says
Channing Tatum is sexiest man
NEW YORK — Channing Tatum is
People magazine’s “sexiest man alive”
for 2012.
The 32-year-old
actor says his first
thought on hearing
the news was:
“‘Y’all are messing
with me.”’
Tatum’s film roles
include “Magic
Mike” and the
u p c o m i n g
“Foxcatcher.”
Other actors who have received the
“sexiest” label include George Clooney,
Matt Damon, Brad Pitt, Johnny Depp
and Ryan Reynolds. Last year’s “sexiest
man” was Bradley Cooper.
People announced its 2012 list
Wednesday.
Elizabeth Banks welcomes
second baby to the nest
LOS ANGELES — Elizabeth Banks
has something else to be grateful for this
Thanksgiving — she and her husband
have welcomed their second child.
Banks recently starred in the ensemble
comedy “What to Expect When You’re
Expecting” and announced Wednesday
on her website the arrival of Magnus
Mitchell Handelman, who was born via
gestational surrogate.
The new baby joins his older brother,
20-month-old Felix, who also was born
via surrogate after the 38-year-old star
of “The Hunger Games” and producer
husband Max Handelman faced infertil-
ity issues.
11 15 25 31 32 18
Mega number
Nov. 14 Super Lotto Plus
Channing
Tatum
3
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
2
0
1
2
2
0
1
2
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
—over 40 exhibitors!
Fer mere ìn|ermcIìen cc|| ó50·344·5200 º www.smdcì|yjeurnc|.cemJsenìershewccse
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Free Services include
Refreshments
Door Prizes and Giveaways
Blood Pressure Check
Ask the Pharmacist
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
FREE Document Shredding
by Miracle Shred
and MORE
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, November 16
9:00am to 1:00pm
Foster City Recreation Center
650 Shell Blvd. Foster City
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
THIS FRIDAY!
SAN CARLOS
Under the influence. A woman was arrested
for being under the influence of a controlled
substance on Belmont Avenue and El
Camino Real before 4:23 a.m. on Tuesday,
Nov. 13.
Arrest. A man was arrested on an outstand-
ing warrant on the 1300 block of El Camino
Real before 11:24 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 12.
Arrest. A woman was arrested on an out-
standing warrant on El Camino Real and
Belmont Avenue before 10:09 p.m. on
Monday, Nov. 12.
DUI. A man was arrested for driving under
the influence on El Camino Real and F Street
before 12:12 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11.
FOSTER CITY
Unlicensed driver. A man was cited for driv-
ing without a license on East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 2:29 p.m. on Sunday, Nov.
11.
Battery. A person was transported to the
hospital after being assaulted during a road
rage incident at Safeway on East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 10:29 p.m. on Sunday,
Nov. 11.
Vandalism. A man found his vehicle keyed
and the tires deflated after disputing over a
parking spot at Costco on Metro Center
Drive before 1:51 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11.
Police reports
Slice of life
A woman was issued a warning after
stealing a piece of pizza she placed in a
folded newspaper at Safeway on East
Hillsdale Boulevard in Foster City before
8:06 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 13.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Michael Keefe, the current fire chief for
both the San Mateo and Foster City fire
departments, may soon lead the Belmont Fire
Department as well as its council voted unan-
imously Tuesday night to enter into negotia-
tions with the two cities for Keefe’s services.
If approved by both the San Mateo and
Foster City councils this Monday, the deal
could ultimately save the Belmont Fire
Protection District about $500,000 a year.
The move comes after Belmont split with
San Carlos in October 2011 for shared fire
services when the two cities voted to dissolve
the Belmont-San Carlos Fire Department after
a disagreement over how the department was
funded. The two cities participated in a joint-
powers agreement for nearly 32 years before
dissolution.
Belmont Fire Chief Doug Fry actually
retired before the city re-established its own
stand-alone fire department but was rehired as
an interim chief and has been exploring con-
tracting out management oversight since.
Belmont residents assess themselves nearly
$7 million annually to provide fire service in
the city but it is not enough to maintain a
stand-alone department for the long term,
according to a staff report.
Foster City and San Mateo currently share
Keefe, as well as a deputy chief and battalion
chiefs under a shared-services agreement
reached two years ago that will save the cities
about $1.5 million over a 36-month period.
San Mateo and Foster City will provide
Belmont with a fire chief, battalion chiefs and
an administrative battalion chief.
Belmont will provide a deputy fire chief and
the term of the contract will be for 18 months,
starting Jan. 1, according to the staff report.
Currently, Belmont pays about $1.3 million
in management costs for the department but
that figure will shrink to about $780,000 under
the shared-services agreement.
The Belmont Fire Department currently has
25 employees but that number will reduce to
22 through attrition, according to the staff
report.
The deputy fire chief will report to the
Belmont city manager and the fire personnel
in the district will still be Belmont employees.
Foster City Vice Mayor Pam Frisella told
the Daily Journal that sharing services on a
regional basis should be considered even more
by cities in San Mateo County.
“We have to do anything we can to save
money,” Frisella said. “I don’t see a downside
to this. All three communities will be kept
safe.”
Escalating pension costs are eating into all
three cities’ budgets.
The arrangement will not only save
Belmont money but allow the city to maintain
its own autonomous fire department, Belmont
Mayor Dave Warden said.
Both the San Mateo and Foster City coun-
cils meet this Monday to consider the propos-
al.
In other Belmont City Council news: The
council voted unanimously to raise garbage
rates by 13.84 percent next year. Most of the
rate increase is due to migration adjustments
and migration recovery surcharges to
Recology for residents opting to use smaller
trash cans.
Belmont OKs fire deal
San Mateo and Foster City to vote next on whether to share fire chief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Drivers in the San Francisco Bay Area
have become the first motorists in the nation
to fill up their gas tanks with an algae-based
biofuel.
The fuel, known as Biodiesel B20, went
on sale Tuesday at gas stations in Berkeley,
Oakland, Redwood City and San Jose as part
of a month-long pilot program.
Biodiesel B20 is made from 20 percent
algae and 80 percent petroleum, and can be
used by any vehicle that runs on diesel.
Advocates say it is the first in a wave of
clean fuel to hit the marketplace.
“We are putting a stake in the ground,”
said Matt Horton, chief executive officer of
Propel Fuels, as he prepared to fill the first
tank with the algae-based product at a Valero
station in Redwood City. “We hope to build
hundreds of stations like this in California.”
The fuel’s algae was grown by South San
Francisco-based Solazyme Inc. and already
has been used in trials by the military and
industrial companies.
It was sold for about $4.25 a gallon at the
Redwood City station, about the same as the
average price for diesel fuel in California.
“We’re talking about fuels that are offered
at standard diesel pricing,” said Bob Ames,
Solazyme’s vice president in charge of fuels
and commercialization.
Horton said most diesel vehicles could run
on 100 percent algae fuel, but doing so
would result in higher costs for consumers.
He added that many automakers oppose
allowing a mix higher than 20 percent.
Bay Area drivers first with algae biofuel
4
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Permanent fix for
water main in works
Officials are working to repair as
quickly as possible a water main
that broke and flooded a Daly City
neighborhood Tuesday.
At the Daly City City Council
meeting Tuesday night, the council
unanimously agreed to allow City
Manager Patricia Martel to waive
the formal bidding process to
quickly get workers in place to
make a permanent fix to the water
main.
The water main in Reservoir 3
by Hillside Park ruptured at about
4:25 a.m. Tuesday, causing 45,000
gallons of water and mud to flow
down a hill and onto Lausanne
Avenue, Water and Wastewater
Resources Director Patrick
Sweetland said.
Crews were at the scene all day
cleaning up the sludge, concluding
at about 6:15 p.m., Sweetland said.
Twelve homes were evacuated as
a precaution, but no injuries were
reported. By 11:30 a.m., all the
residents had been allowed to
return.
No homes were flooded, but
streets were left covered in a layer
of mud so thick it reached the top
of parked cars’ wheels.
Four blocks were affected by the
flood along Lausanne Avenue,
including Bonnie, East Moltke,
Ford and Price streets and Clayton
Court.
Legislators offering
inauguration tickets
Although President Barack
Obama’s inauguration for his sec-
ond term is not until January, Bay
Area legislators are already col-
lecting requests from constituents
who hope to attend the ceremony.
Tickets for the 57th presidential
inauguration on Jan. 21, 2013, in
Washington, D.C., can be request-
ed through local Congressional
representatives’ websites, includ-
ing those of U.S. Reps. Jackie
Speier, D-San Mateo; Anna Eshoo,
D-Palo Alto; Barbara Lee, D-
Oakland; and George Miller, D-
Martinez.
A maximum of two tickets can
be requested, and only through the
online forms on congressional
websites. Requests will not be
accepted by phone or email.
A random lottery will be held by
Dec. 13 to determine who will
receive tickets to the ceremony.
Those seeking more information
about the inauguration and how to
request tickets can visit the Joint
Congressional Committee on
Inaugural Ceremonies’ website at
www.inaugural.senate.gov/2013/g
etting-tickets.
Native American
remains discovered
at construction site
Native American remains were
unearthed by construction crews
working in Menlo Park on
Tuesday, police said.
The discovery was reported to
police after workers who were
removing a concrete surface in the
1000 block of Hamilton Avenue
found what appeared to be two
human skulls and other bone frag-
ments, Menlo Park police spokes-
woman Nicole Acker said.
Construction was halted, and the
San Mateo County Coroner’s
Office was called to the scene. The
Coroner’s Office determined that
the remains were Native
American.
Menlo Park lies within an area
once occupied by the Ohlone tribe,
according to the city’s planning
department.
A known burial site lies just
west of the property on Hamilton
Avenue, which is owned by the
biological research firm Pacific
Biosciences, Acker said.
She said proper protocol for han-
dling archeological remains is
being followed.
The Native American Historical
Society was notified of the find,
and was expected to take posses-
sion of the bones.
Construction work remains sus-
pended.
Natural gas venting in
Hillsborough Thursday
Pacific Gas and Electric will be
venting natural gas in the late
afternoon/early evening today in
Hillsborough at the Crystal
Springs Golf Course to perform
work on sections of pipe, accord-
ing to the utility.
Customers in the area may smell
natural gas and hear the sound of it
venting from the pipe. It will
quickly dissipate into the atmos-
phere and is not harmful, accord-
ing to PG&E. Anyone with con-
cerns can call (800) 743-5000.
Local briefs
5
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo Planning
Commission will take a field trip this
Saturday to make site visits to some
development projects in the city. The
commission will visit Prospect Row
Townhomes; the former San Mateo
County Times building project called
Arbor Rose; and the Kaiser medical office building on Franklin
Parkway. The commission meets 8:45 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 17,
City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo. The field trip is expect-
ed to conclude at noon and the public is invited to attend.
By Jason Dearen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — California
began auctioning permits Wednesday for
greenhouse gas emissions, launching one
of the world’s most ambitious efforts to
cut heat-trapping gases from industrial
sources.
The California Air Resources Board
said it began selling the pollution
“allowances” in a closed, online auction
expected to create the world’s second-
largest marketplace for carbon emissions.
Under the program, the state sets a
limit, or cap, on emissions from individ-
ual polluters. Businesses are required to
either cut emissions to cap levels or buy
allowances through the auction from
other companies for each extra ton of pol-
lution discharged annually.
The board said the results of the auc-
tion — what price is paid for a ton of car-
bon, and how many companies participat-
ed — would be released Nov. 19.
The cap-and-trade plan is a central
piece of AB32, the state’s landmark 2006
global warming regulations.
The auction was being closely watched
nationally, as the world’s ninth-largest
economy institutes a program that has
eluded lawmakers in Washington.
Only the European Union has imple-
mented a similar plan in terms of scope,
and it currently operates the world’s
largest carbon marketplace. A much less
inclusive cap-and-trade scheme covers
only electricity producers in the north-
eastern United States.
Failure of the California program
would be a devastating blow to carbon
control efforts nationally, said Severin
Borenstein, a professor at the University
of California, Berkeley, an expert on
energy economics.
California debuts landmark
program to cap emissions
City’s revenue may
exceed expectations
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Foster City will finish the fiscal year with about $200,000
more than it thought it would based on early projections,
according to a quarterly financial report the City Council will
hear at its Monday meeting.
The addition of a 130-unit extended stay hotel planned by
the owner of the Crowne Plaza at the former Black Angus
restaurant site also has the potential to add nearly $400,000
in annual hotel tax revenue to the city, according to the quar-
terly report.
The county controller estimates Foster City will receive
more than $15.4 million in property taxes for the fiscal year,
about $150,000 greater than original projections, according
to the quarterly report.
Sales tax revenue is also projected to be $60,000 greater
than anticipated.
Other city funds are also operating at expected levels in the
first quarter, which ended Sept. 30.
Statewide projections of gas tax revenue indicate that
Foster City’s portion will be $410,000 for the current year,
$66,000 higher than original forecast, according to the
report.
Water revenue is down but so are expenditures as the city’s
residents are using less water, according to the report.
Other projects, such as the completion of the first phase of
the Pilgrim-Triton project, expected to open its doors of lux-
ury apartment units in early 2013; the 15-acre site adjacent to
City Hall; the expansion of the Gilead Sciences campus; and
a renewed interest by a developer to build an office project in
the Chess-Hatch area are also expected to boost the city’s tax
base in the coming years.
The report also takes note of the so-called “fiscal cliff” —
the combination of lapsing tax cuts and spending cuts neces-
sary to reduce the federal deficit — that could send the U.S.
economy back into recession.
Without action by Congress and President Barack Obama
by Jan. 1, state and city governments have the potential to see
a further deterioration of tax revenue and the loss of federal
support for transportation and social services, according to
the quarterly financial report.
The city’s general fund budget is roughly $30 million.
The Foster City Council meets 6:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 19,
City Hall, 620 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
CSU seeks $372M more from state in $4.5B budget
LOS ANGELES — The California State University board of
trustees has approved a $4.5 billion budget for 2013-14 that
includes a request for $372 million in additional state funds.
The board on Wednesday approved the spending plan that
calls for increasing enrollment by 5 percent, or 20,000 students,
as well as funding additional courses for current students.
Robert Turnage, the assistant vice chancellor for budget, says
the budget strikes a reasonable balance between the state’s fis-
cal realities and student demand at Cal State, which serves
427,000 students at 23 campuses.
Around the state
CALIFORNIA PERMITTING: California
has begun auctioning permits for
greenhouse gas emissions, launching
what is expected to be the world’s
second-largest carbon market.
CENTRAL PIECE: The plan is a central
piece of the state’s 2006 global
warming law, a suite of regulations
meant to dramatically reduce
emissions of heat-trapping gases.
Businesses must either cut emissions
to cap levels or buy allowances from
other companies for each extra ton of
pollution discharged annually.
CHAMBER OPPOSITION: The auction
occurred despite a last-minute lawsuit
from the California Chamber of
Commerce, which has argued the
program should be invalidated as an
illegal tax.
What’s happening
6
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The fight to keep Pete’s Harbor
from converting into 411 waterfront
residences is still afloat after tenants
of the Redwood City boating com-
munity appealed the project’s
approval and asked the City Council
to slow down and scale back any
development.
As its basis for the appeal, the
group Save Pete’s Harbor 2012 cited
the city’s general plan’s statements
to include liveaboard tenants in any
new development, the historical ele-
ments and the “insufficiency” of the
decade-old environmental document
used as part of the approval process.
“The 2010 General Plan specifi-
cally lauded liveaboard floating
communities as a feature to be pro-
tected at Pete’s Harbor and else-
where in Redwood City,” said group
representative Alison Madden in a
prepared statement regarding the 18-
page appeal.
The City Council has 90 days
within which to hear the appeal and
a specific meeting date has yet to be
set, said city spokesman Malcolm
Smith.
But even if the appeal staves off a
decision, owner Paul Uccelli’s attor-
ney Ted Hannig said the remaining
tenants will still be evicted come
Jan. 15.
“Paula has given notice to every-
one whether the project goes
through or not as part of her retire-
ment plan,” Hannig said. “The mari-
na and the rest of Pete’s Harbor will
be vacated probably well before we
know if the project goes forward.”
The Planning Commission unani-
mously approved the planned devel-
opment permit and a parking excep-
tion Oct. 30. The decision came
after several hours of testimony
across two meetings from opponents
who argued the plan was moving too
fast and does away with precious
affordable housing. Supporters
countered that development was the
ultimate goal of the marina’s
founder, Pete Uccelli, and selling the
21-acre harbor to developer Pauls
Corporation is his widow’s right.
The project, to be located on the
north side of Highway 101 between
Bair Island Road and Redwood
Creek, calls for 411 multi-family
housing units in buildings between
three and five stories, a community
pool and approximately 263 slips in
a private marina. All existing com-
mercial operations at the marina will
cease and any future boat mooring
limited to apartment tenants.
The proposal didn’t require zon-
ing changes and therefore no special
approvals by the city because it does
not include high-rise buildings or
the filling in of the Bay. The city also
said the previously certified environ-
mental impact report for the earlier
now-defunct Marina Shores Village
project that included Pete’s Harbor
was sufficient.
But those who filed the appeal
disagree, arguing the EIR was not
enough and should have required
public circulation. Madden also
argued the city “fast-tracked” the
application to get it before the
Planning Commission within three
months of the July 23 filing rather
than the more standard four to six
months and, along with Uccelli
and the developer, kept the process
concealed from the tenants.
If the Planning Commission and
City Council knew the breadth of
the public opposition, the process
would have been extended rather
than brushed aside, Madden said.
The appeal asks the council to
“immediately shift the discussion
into an Inner Harbor Precise Plan”
for consideration of the impact on
the entire inlet including public
access and parking.
Since June 2002, Paula Uccelli
has required all live-aboard leases to
include language acknowledging the
possibility of relocation. All leases
the past 12 years have also been
month-to month because of the sale
potential. At the last meeting,
Hannig, told the Planning
Commission that as of that point, 52
live-aboard tenants, or 41 percent,
had already left voluntarily and he
added yesterday the number contin-
ues being a steady stream.
Even if Uccelli and developer
Paul Powers prevails before the City
Council, Uccelli will probably need
permission from the California State
Lands Commission and the Bay
Conservation and Development
Commission.
Hannig said what is frustrating is
not so much the appeal, as that is the
group’s right, but what it means.
“What frustrates me is that 2,000
people won’t get jobs right away.
What frustrates me is the millions of
dollars our schools won’t get and the
roads that won’t get built,” he said.
Michelle Durand can be reached by
email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com or
by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Pete’s Harbor tenants appeal
development plans approval
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Carlos residents tonight can
get a peek and offer insight into the
second phase of Burton Park’s
makeover that includes a bocce ball
court, covered stage and renovated
basketball courts.
The community meeting is one of
two held this week by the city to let
the public weigh in on the proposed
designs before they become a reality.
Interestingly, nobody from the gener-
al public attended a Tuesday night
meeting, instead drawing individuals
otherwise connected to the city such
as commission and Parks and
Recreation Foundation members, a
tenant and a former city coun-
cilmember, said Doug Long, the
city’s parks and recreation director.
However, the group offered the
type of insight the city wants more of
Thursday night — thoughts on land-
scaping, color and amenities, Long
said.
Burton Park, at 900 Chestnut St., is
the city’s oldest developed park and
is heavily used year-round for recre-
ation. The park also houses the city’s
teen center and Kiwanis Recreation
Center.
The park already completed an
$850,000 facelift in 2008 that added
the county’s first fully inclusive play-
ground compliant with the
Americans with Disabilities Act. The
two-year renovation added ramp
access, a rubbery safety surface and
perimeter fencing.
The San Carlos City Council
signed off on the Phase II conceptual
design in November 2010 before
working on ways to fund it. Both
parts rely heavily on donations raised
by the San Carlos Parks and
Recreation Foundation and fundrais-
ers like naming rights. The price tag
for the second phase is $1.15 million
and, while fundraising will begin in
earnest in January, the foundation has
already raised $15,000 for the chance
to name benches, trees and a dance
area in front of a planned stage, Long
said.
The stage, in particular, was the
main focus of Tuesday night’s com-
munity meeting discussion, with
attendees wanting to make sure it
functions for a variety of shows like
music and theater as well as smaller
events. The city estimates drawing
1,200 to 1,500 people based on atten-
dance at the existing summer con-
certs.
The park renovation also includes
two standard-size bocce ball courts
with a storage shack and shaded seat-
ing and new backboard for the bas-
ketball courts. The talk Tuesday
included the colors that should be
used on the bocce and basketball
courts and the possibility of includ-
ing a bottle filler instead of just a
fountain in the bocce area, Long said.
The community meeting is 7 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 15 at the San Carlos
Library community rooms, second
floor, 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
Michelle Durand can be reached by
email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com or
by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Public input sought
for upgrades to park
NATION 7
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
advertisment
By Allen G. Breed, Tamara
Lush and Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA, Fla. — Jill Kelley’s
attempt to climb the Tampa social
ladder — the rungs of which
included some high-ranking mili-
tary officials — has come to an
ignominious halt. Accounts of lav-
ish parties at her bayfront mansion
have been replaced by reports of
her family’s financial woes and
other dirty laundry, and claims that
she traded on her acquaintance
with David Petraeus to try to fur-
ther lucrative business dealings.
Now, even her “Friends of
MacDill” Air Force base access
pass has been unceremoniously
revoked.
The tangled web enveloping the
daughter of Lebanese refugees, her
twin sister, for-
mer CIA chief
Petraeus, and
Marine Gen.
John Allen,
who succeeded
Petraeus as the
top American
commander in
Af ghani s t an,
has spread to
include questions about a cancer
charity Kelley and her doctor-hus-
band, Scott, founded.
Although Petraeus’ affair with
his biographer, Army Reserve offi-
cer Paula Broadwell, was the
immediate cause of his downfall,
Kelley and her relations with the
Tampa base and the U.S. Central
Command have surfaced as a sort
of connective tissue for the grow-
ing scandal.
Socialite’s climb halted by scandal
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama said Wednesday that
his administration has not done
enough to combat global warming
but said he hopes to begin his second
term by opening a national “conver-
sation” on climate change.
Obama said at a news conference
that he took some steps in his first
term to slow global warming, such
as sharply increasing fuel efficiency
standards for cars and trucks.
“But we haven’t done as much as
we need to,” Obama said in his sec-
ond comments on global warming
since winning re-
election last
week.
C l i m a t e
change was vir-
tually absent
during the presi-
dential campaign
until Hurricane
Sandy hit the
East Coast. The
d e v a s t a t i n g
superstorm — a rarity for the
Northeast — and an election that led
to Democratic gains have elevated
global warming as a subject of
renewed political debate.
President wants to open national
‘conversation’ on climate change
By Pete Yost and Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Responding
warily to his administration’s sud-
den sex scandal, President Barack
Obama said Wednesday he’s seen
no evidence that national security
was damaged by the revelations
that ended his CIA director’s career
and imperil that of his Afghan war
commander.
But the president said he is
reserving judgment about how the
FBI has handled the investigation
that began in the summer but didn’t
reach his desk until after last
week’s election.
“I have a lot of confidence, gen-
erally, in the FBI,” Obama said,
qualifying his words of support for
the agency and its actions in the
case.
As Obama spoke about the scan-
dal from the White House, legisla-
tors on Capitol Hill were grilling
FBI and CIA officials privately
about the same issues: whether
national security was jeopardized
by the case and why they didn’t
know about the investigation soon-
er.
Obama responds warily
to sex scandal, FBI probe
U.S.generals in
troublerocking
militaryculture
By Lolita C. Baldor
and Robert Burns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — When
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta
pointedly warned young troops
last spring to mind their ways, he
may have been lecturing the wrong
audience.
The culture of military miscon-
duct starts at the top.
At least five current and former
U.S. generals at the rank of one-
star or higher have been repri-
manded or investigated for possi-
ble misconduct in the past two
weeks — a startling run of embar-
rassment for a military whose
stock among Americans rose so
high during a decade of war that its
leaders seemed almost untouch-
able.
From adultery and malfeasance
to potentially inappropriate
emails, the four-star foibles have
rocked the military establishment
and shocked the Obama adminis-
tration even as it wrestles with a
host of international challenges
and a postelection redo of its
national security team.
The missteps suggest the possi-
bility that the senior officer corps
— including many who led or sent
thousands of troops into battle
since 2001 — are troubled by the
same strains that sent suicide, sex-
ual assault and stress disorder rates
soaring among the rest of the
force.
REUTERS
Jill Kelley, a friend of the Petraeus family, walks out of her home toward
her car on Bayshore Boulevard in Tampa, Fla.
David Petraeus
Barack Obama
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama challenged congres-
sional Republicans Wednesday to
let taxes rise on the wealthiest
Americans on both economic and
political grounds, noting he cam-
paigned successfully for re-election
on the point and contending it
would instantly ease the threat of
the “fiscal cliff” plunging the nation
back into recession.
“A modest tax increase on the
wealthy is not going to break their
backs,” Obama said of the nation’s
top income earners. “They’ll still be
wealthy,” he said at his first news
conference since winning a second
term.
At the same time, the president
stressed he was amenable to com-
promise on other approaches from
Republicans who say they will
refuse to raise tax rates. “I believe
this is solvable,” he said during the
news conference.
At a news conference of his own a
short while later, House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, agreed that a
bipartisan “spirit of cooperation”
has been evident since the election
that augurs well for talks expected
to begin Friday at the White House.
However, he said of the presi-
dent’s proposal, “We are not going
to hurt our economy and make job
creation more difficult which is
exactly what that plan would do.”
Obama seemed eager to avoid
issuing any ultimatums. Asked if it
would be a deal-breaker for
Republicans to refuse to allow the
top tax rate to revert to 39.6 percent
from the current 35 percent, he side-
stepped. “I just want to emphasize I
am open to new ideas if the
Republican counterparts or some
Democrats have a great idea for us
to raise revenue, maintain progres-
sivity, make sure the middle class
isn’t getting hit, reduces our deficit.”
Wall Street wasn’t encouraged
that agreement was becoming more
likely. The Dow Jones industrial
average dropped 185 points for the
day.
The president’s remarks were his
first extended public discussion of
the issue that is dominating the post-
election session of Congress, and
they followed statements earlier in
the week from Boehner and Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky, the Senate
GOP leader.
Obama presses GOP on
taxing rich to avert ‘cliff’
By Tom Raum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
House Democratic leader Nancy
Pelosi’s decision to serve another
term in that post will probably have
a big influence on efforts by
President Barack Obama and
Congress to reach an agreement to
avert the so-called fiscal cliff.
Pelosi announced Wednesday
she’ll continue to lead her party in
the House despite the Democrats’
failure to win back the majority it
lost in 2010. “We have work to do,”
she said. “It isn’t about the gavel,
although we’d like to have it.”
Obama and leaders of both parties
have sounded conciliatory since his
re-election last week, saying they’ll
work together toward a deficit-trim-
ming budget deal to ward off auto-
matic tax increases and deep spend-
ing cuts set to take effect in January.
Obama urged Congress on
Wednesday to vote first to extend
expiring tax breaks for the middle
class, then turn to his proposal to
raise them on households earning
over $250,000. “We should not hold
the middle-class hostage while we
debate tax cuts for the wealthy,” he
said at a White House news confer-
ence.
Republicans oppose any increase
in tax rates and want spending cuts
in “entitlement” programs.
Pelosi has been one of the biggest
defenders of entitlement programs
such as Medicare and Social
Security. And she gave no ground
Wednesday.
While saying “everything is on
the table” in talks that Obama will
convene on Friday with congres-
sional leaders, Pelosi also said she’ll
continue to resist efforts to pare
back either program.
Pelosi decision may
impact budget talks
REUTERS
House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference
on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
“A modest tax increase on the wealthy is not
going to break their backs. ...They’ll still be wealthy.”
— President Barack Obama
By Raf Casert
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRUSSELS — Hundreds of
thousands of Europe’s beleaguered
citizens went on strike or snarled the
streets of several capitals Wednesday,
at times clashing with riot police, as
they demanded that governments
stop cutting benefits and create more
jobs.
Workers with jobs and without
spoke of a “social emergency” crip-
pling the world’s largest economic
bloc, a union of 27 nations and half a
billion people. In Madrid and
Barcelona, where the crisis is hitting
particularly hard, protesters and
police fought street battles resulting
in dozens injured and numerous
arrests.
The protests were met with tear
gas in Italy and Spain, but were
largely limited to the countries hard-
est hit by the austerity measures
designed to bring government spend-
ing into line with revenues. Wealthier
nations like Germany, the
Netherlands and Denmark saw only
small, sedate demonstrations.
Governments backing the line of
stringent austerity were not
impressed by the show of force.
“We must nevertheless do what is
necessary: break open encrusted
labor markets, give more people a
chance to work, become more flexi-
ble in many areas,” German
Chancellor Angela Merkel said.
Austerity protests stall several European nations
OPINION 9
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
— The Globe and Mail, Toronto
D
avid Petraeus made an enormous
contribution to his country. He
helped rescue the war effort in Iraq.
He led the troop surge in Afghanistan. He
was accepted by Democrats and Republicans
— 94-0 — when President Barack Obama
nominated him to be chief of the Central
Intelligence Agency. Now he is gone because
of an affair with his biographer. It would be
nice if someone in authority said straight out
why he had to go.
The simplest answer is the one Petraeus
gave in his resignation letter — that he
showed “extremely poor judgment.” But
extremely poor judgment in one’s personal
life should not necessarily be a firing offense
in one’s professional life.
Another answer is that his lover, Paula
Broadwell, gave a speech at the University of
Denver in which she claimed that the United
States Embassy in Benghazi held Libyan
militia members prisoner — a statement that
runs counter to official CIA and White House
comments. She may not have obtained this
information from Petraeus (no evidence
shows that she did), but her statement makes
people wonder, fairly or not, if he was
spilling secrets. He put himself in that posi-
tion.
A third answer is that he was “blackmail-
able.” “That’s the operating premise” in that
world, according to a Canadian familiar with
security matters, and holds true in Canada.
Some questions: Does it have the air of reali-
ty that Petraeus, after an exemplary 37-year
career, would sell out to an enemy to avoid
being revealed as an adulterer? Doesn’t it
enhance the opportunity for blackmail if hav-
ing an affair becomes a firing offense?
Couldn’t the national security director who
reportedly told him to resign have said
instead: Tell your wife, and then you’re no
longer blackmailable?
A fourth answer is that his behavior is an
embarrassment to the president who nomi-
nated him, in which case he would have been
held to a higher standard than many presi-
dents, such as Eisenhower, Kennedy and
Clinton.
Petraeus knew the rules of the game and,
by having an affair, acted as if they didn’t
apply to him. For that, he lost his job.
Whether all the rules make sense is another
question.
General Petraeus
Editor,
Isn’t it about time that the government lay
off General Petraeus and his unzipped pants?
He, of all people, has done more for us in the
wars that we have been involved in than any-
one else. He is an incredible human being.
Now, because he had an affair, he is treated
like the most loathsome person in the United
States? Get a grip people. It’s not like we
haven’t seen someone in a high position have
an affair. Our national security was not in
any danger, but the people who wanted to
expose him wanted you to think so. I am
ashamed to be an American when others
stoop so low for what? Twenty-five cents
worth of fame.
Betty Wyren
San Mateo
Council, please say no to 7-Eleven
Editor,
I am a resident of the San Mateo Heights
neighborhood. I am against having a new 7-
Eleven on North San Mateo Drive. I cannot
attend the Nov. 15 meeting.
When you are considering the 7-Eleven,
please know that I do not want the 7-Eleven
in my neighborhood.
It was made clear that the approval of the
site should revert back to residential. There is
already a liquor store on Poplar, near San
Mateo Drive, just a few blocks from the pro-
posed 7-Eleven location (I know 7-Eleven is
calling themselves a “market,” but it is com-
mon knowledge that is not the case).
No one in the neighborhood wants this 7-
Eleven. We are making a great effort to come
together and even hire a lawyer to fight this.
We are going through the correct legal
process to stop this. But in the end we are
appealing to you as families and neighbors,
to save our neighborhood. Would you want a
7-Eleven in your backyard? Why not?
Do the right thing for your city.
Kerry McArdle
San Mateo
Opposed Measure A
Editor,
I was amazed to learn that Measure A was
not in response to any immediate need. It is
for some unidentified need at some unknown
time in the next 10 years. When I was a
homeowner, I voted for all parcel taxes that
increased school funding. I considered it to
be an investment in students’ future. I have
never met a politician who can resist a pile of
money just sitting around earning interest. It
reminds me of the thinking I saw in the
defense industry. If you are near the end of
the fiscal year and you haven’t spent your
entire budget, find something to spend it on.
Take some admirals on a Pebble Beach golf
outing. Go to that NATO meeting in
Copenhagen. Spend it on something, even if
it is not needed! If you don’t use it, you lose
it. Here is an idea. How about returning the
money to the 35 percent of voters who
opposed Measure A?
Robert Baker
San Mateo
Why did Petraeus resign?
Other voices
— The Daily Sentinel, Grand Junction, Colo.
G
en. David Petraeus is a highly
respected and well-liked military-
leader-turned-CIA-chief who
allowed his home and his professional repu-
tation to be jeopardized for the sake of an
illicit sexual liaison.
Well, there are no prudes here. We realize
Petraeus is neither the first person in a posi-
tion of power to put his personal life and
career at risk due to lust, nor will he be the
last. In most cases, the damage caused by
such relationships is to that individual and
those closest to the person.
What makes Petraeus’ indiscretion so dis-
turbing is that he was in a unique position as
CIA chief to know — and possibly reveal to
a lover or a lover-turned-blackmailer —
information that could compromise the secu-
rity of the United States.
Sure enough, when the FBI gained access
to personal items of Paula Broadwell —
Petraeus’ paramour — it discovered classi-
fied documents on her computer, according
to The Wall Street Journal.
FBI officials later determined that
Broadwell hadn’t obtained the classified doc-
uments from Petraeus.
However, given the fact that Broadwell
was working on another research project,
with Petraeus’ assistance, related to the
involvement of the Army’s 101st Airborne
Division in Afghanistan, and that she alleged-
ly displayed a vindictive streak in harassing
another young woman who is a friend of
Petraeus, it’s no great leap to believe she
could have pushed the CIA chief for classi-
fied information on Afghanistan if their rela-
tionship had continued.
A disturbing indiscretion
Other voices
Generally speaking
T
hank you David Petraeus and company
for giving the world a reason to
remember there is still military action
overseas.
Granted, Afghanistan is but a side note in the
tawdry tale of more intimate action being had
stateside but still, so close to Veterans Day, it is
nice to recall matters of actual importance. It’s
also nice to have a soap opera to hold the pub-
lic over until the Lindsay Lohan-starring biopic
“Liz & Dick” joins
the collection of
Lifetime movies.
Since former
general Petraeus
abruptly resigned
as CIA director
because of his rela-
tionship with biog-
rapher Paula
Broadwell, the
story continues
growing more and
more salacious.
The cast of charac-
ters is also swelling so large and with so many
interconnected links, one needs a bulletin board
full of clues and red string just to keep up.
Don’t be surprised if Kevin Bacon shows up
somewhere. Remember, all he needs is six
degrees of separation.
The matter of any real consequence is
whether Petraeus shared confidential informa-
tion with Broadwell and also if President
Barack Obama should have been informed of
the investigation sooner than he has claimed to
have been. But that stuff is almost as boring as
continually reading about the fiscal cliff. What
most prefer is reading the Harlequin Romance
style moves of folks a little closer to the emo-
tional edge.
Yet, politicians, celebrities and others in the
public eye show off their feet of clay all the
time. The public rolls its eyes and snickers, the
late-night comedians lob shots, the wife stands
by her man, he eventually resigns and history
moves on to the next scandal du jour. Why then
is Petraeus all that different?
For one thing, the story so far has more
twists and turns than a rerun of “Dynasty” dur-
ing its heyday and at least one of the women
involved looks like she came out of central
casting for “The Real Housewives of Miami.”
The real key, though, is the man — actually,
with the additional of Gen. John Allen, make
that men — at the center.
When news broke of Petraeus affair, the col-
lective response was incredulousness. Aren’t
these military guys built like an asexual G.I.
Joe doll? Forget his age or lack of pinup quality
(despite Ms. Broadwell’s assessment that he is
quite the “specimen”). Generals just aren’t sup-
posed to be thought of like that. They’re pre-
sumed to be focused, stoic and dictate orders
rather than be ordered by their — never mind.
Retired general Stanley McChrystal might be
slightly more believable. After the Rolling
Stone interview that cost him his post,
McChrystal seems like the kind of fella who
doesn’t give much thought to public opinion or
toeing the White House policy line. But others?
Never. Gen. Colin Powell seems beyond
reproach. Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf isn’t
stormin’ his way through the Ten
Commandments. Retired general Wesley Clark
barely merits a blip on most people’s con-
sciousness for his unsuccessful presidential bid.
Patton, MacArthur, Washington — it’s proba-
bly safe to say the only conquests the public
wants to think of them having was on enemy
soil.
Granted, generals are not alone with this ele-
vated stature. Others whose lives and careers
require dedication, extreme training and strong
dose of patriotism also qualify, which makes all
so much more titillating their downward spiral.
Recall former astronaut Lisa Nowak who
decided the best way out of a love triangle with
a fellow astronaut and another woman was to
drive all night cross-country wearing adult dia-
pers to kill her romantic rival in a parking lot.
The story was shocking. The mug shot price-
less. The moral? Even the most educated and
decorated are not immune to love, jealousy and
the occasional streak of all-out crazy — at
least, generally speaking.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached
by email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by
phone (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you
think of this column? Send a letter to the editor:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those
who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis
and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state,
national and world news, we seek to provide our readers
with the highest quality information resource in San
Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and
we choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Blanca Frasier
Charles Gould Gale Green
Jeff Palter Bryan Sims
Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Kore Chan Elizabeth Cortes
JD Crayne Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Brian Grabianowski
Ashley Hansen Erin Hurley
Melanie Lindow Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Sally Schilling
Kris Skarston Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not
be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number where
we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred. No attachments please.
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are
those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent
the views of the Daily Journal staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors. If you question the
accuracy of any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,570.95 -1.45% 10-Yr Bond 1.589 0.00%
Nasdaq2,846.81 -1.29% Oil (per barrel) 86.279999
S&P 500 1,355.49 -1.39% Gold 1,730.50
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Investors drew little
hope Wednesday for a quick compromise
in U.S. budget talks after President
Barack Obama insisted that higher taxes
on wealthy Americans would have to be
part of any deal.
Stocks fell sharply, and even a signal
from the Federal Reserve that it could
launch a program in December to speed
job growth failed to encourage investors.
The Dow Jones industrial average
dropped 185 points.
Obama made clear he would seek
higher tax revenue from the wealthiest
Americans, which faces opposition
among some Republicans in Congress.
Obama said that a modest increase on the
wealthy “is not going to break their
backs.”
“The Street was looking for him to say
some magic buzzwords about avoiding
the ‘fiscal cliff,’ about cooperation,” said
Sal Arnuk of Themis trading, a New
Jersey brokerage. Instead, Arnuk said,
the remarks were “unyielding.”
The “cliff” is a package of tax increas-
es and government spending cuts that
will take effect Jan. 1 unless Obama and
Congress reach a deal first. They would
total about $700 billion for 2013 and
could send the country back into reces-
sion.
Stocks have fallen steadily since voters
returned Obama and a divided Congress
to power Nov. 6. The Dow has fallen 675
points, or 5.1 percent, including three
daily drops of more than 100 points.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index has
dropped 5 percent in that time, returning
to where it stood in late July.
“Investors’ hopes that the election
would end uncertainty remain unful-
filled,” said Lawrence Creatura, a portfo-
lio manager at Federated Investors in
Rochester, N.Y. “It’s very tough to deter-
mine what happens next.”
Obama said Wednesday that he would
not to cave to Republicans who have
pressed for tax cuts first passed by
President George W. Bush to be extended
for all income earners.
Obama has long opposed extending the
cuts for families making more than
$250,000 a year, but he gave in to GOP
demands in 2010, when the cuts were up
for renewal. They were extended two
years.
Stocks continue slide
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., up $10.74 at $41.92
Higher sales helped push the teen retailer’s
third-quarter net income up 41 percent. It also
raised its full-year earnings guidance.
Medifast Inc., down $1.42 at $28.17
The weight-loss company said that Brendan
Connors, its chief financial officer, is resigning
immediately to pursue other interests.
LDK Solar Co. Ltd., down 9 cents at 98 cents
The solar company is ending a solar wafer
agreement with an unnamed European
customer that was scheduled to last for 10 years.
The Mosaic Co., down $1.65 at $49.10
The phosphate and potash seller cut its second-
quarter production guidance due to weak
international demand for its crop nutrients.
Iamgold Corp., down $2.89 at $11.97
The gold mining company reported results for
the third quarter that missed Wall Street
analysts’ expectations.
Nasdaq
Cisco Systems Inc., up 81 cents at $17.66
The computer networking gear maker said that
its first-quarter earnings rose 18 percent as U.S.
companies started spending again.
ZaZa Energy Corp., up 15 cents at $1.96
The exploration company said it will sell its
French assets,a day after posting a profit for its
third quarter.
Woodward Inc., up $2.46 at $34.53
A KeyBanc analyst kept a “Buy” rating on the
energy and aerospace controls maker, a day
after it posted strong quarterly results.
Big movers
Starbucks has a new caffeine addiction: Tea
NEW YORK — Starbucks wants to make the tea shop as
ubiquitous as its namesake cafes.
The Seattle-based company said Wednesday that it will
pay $620 million in cash to buy Teavana Holdings Inc.,
which sells high-end loose leaf teas in 300 shopping mall
locations. The plan is to expand Teavana’s footprint beyond
the suburban mall with stand-alone shops around the world,
while adding tea bars where customers can buy hot and cold
drinks.
CEO Howard Schultz noted in an interview that Starbucks
cafes had modest beginnings as well. The company’s 11
locations only sold coffee by the pound in 1987, with its
dizzying menu of specialty drinks and baked goods evolving
over time. Schultz said the company would use that experi-
ence to transform Teavana and tap into the $40 billion glob-
al tea market.
Starbucks Corp. already owns the Tazo tea brand, which it
purchased in 1999. And the company has signaled its grow-
ing interest in tea, with plans to open its first Tazo tea shop
this Friday. Starbucks has described the Tazo shop as a place
where customers can buy specialty drinks, packaged choco-
lates and dozens of loose leaf teas — not unlike the shops it’s
now envisioning for Teavana.
Diamond Foods restates results, shares tumble
Diamond Foods Inc. effectively wiped away $56.5 million
in profit from its books Wednesday after it restated two full
years of results.
Its battered stock fell another 20 percent in after-hours
trading on the news.
The San-Francisco based snack company is restating its
results for 2010 and 2011 after an internal investigation last
year found that the company improperly accounted for pay-
ments to walnut growers, which skewed its financial results.
Diamond suffered mightily from the fallout. Its stock price
sank on concerns about the payments, it lost its bid to buy the
Pringles brand from Procter & Gamble Co. and it eventually
replaced its CEO and chief financial officer over the issue.
The company, which makes Emerald Nuts and Kettle
Chips, said Wednesday that the restatements are an important
step toward it becoming current in its financial reporting.
Software founder McAfee denies killing neighbor
SAN PEDRO, Belize — Software company founder John
McAfee said Wednesday he is in hiding, unarmed and
accompanied only by a young woman, changing locations
and telephones frequently to stay one step ahead of a Belize
police unit he says wants to kill him.
Belize police have said they want to question McAfee,
who they describe as a “person of interest” in the slaying of
fellow American Gregory Viant Faull. Faull, 52, was shot to
death over the weekend on the Caribbean island where both
men lived.
McAfee, 67, who had a run-in with police earlier this year,
told the Associated Press in a telephone interview from an
undisclosed location that he didn’t kill Faull, though he
acknowledged he had differences with the dead man.
Business briefs
<< 49ers’ Smith returns to practice, page 12
• U.S. soccer ties Russia, page 13
Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012
ROOKIE REVELATION: HARRISON BARNES RECORDS DOUBLE-DOUBLE IN WARRIORS’ WIN OVER ATLANTA >>> PAGE 13
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Sacred Heart Prep and Soquel boys’
water polo teams have met in the Central
Coast Section Division II semifinals the previ-
ous two seasons, with the Gators pulling out a
pair of exciting and dramatic one-goal wins.
The Gators and Knights faced off again
Wednesday night at Serra in another semi-
final showdown. Would there be more
offensive fireworks again?
Not this time. Sacred Heart Prep put togeth-
er another masterpiece as the top-seeded
Gators buried the Knights 15-3.
“I am surprised (at the final score),” said
SHP coach Brian Kreutzkamp. “The last two
years, we’ve been down in the fourth quarter
and we we’re the heavy favorites. We came
out (Wednesday night) a bit more sharp, espe-
cially on defense.”
With the win, SHP moves into
Saturday’s championship match against
either Los Gatos or St. Ignatius.
The opponent may not matter as the Gators
are on top of their game. Against Soquel, the
Gators got goals from 11 different players.
Bret Hinrichs scored three times, while
Conner Will and Harrison Enright each scored
a pair of goals to pace SHP.
“The biggest thing I’m pleased about is
the number of people who can score,”
Kreutzkamp said. “(Opponents) kind of
have to pick [their] poison. It’s great, as
a coach, knowing one guy doesn’t have
to carry the whole team.”
How effective were the Gators offensively?
They score 15 goals on 22 shots, which is a 68
percent shooting percentage, which is a stat
not usually employed in water polo. They also
converted on 7 of 9 man advantages. They
scored in every conceivable way: power plays,
penalty shots, from the wings, from the set
and from the perimeter.
The Gators scored on 4 of 5 shots in the first
Sacred Heart Prep back in CCS polo finals
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sacred Heart Prep and Menlo School have
established themselves as volleyball powers
not only on the Peninsula but in the Central
Coast Section. There is not much that sepa-
rates the two as they split a pair of matches
this season to finish as co-champions of the
West Bay Athletic League.
Wednesday night was the rubber match with
a lot more on the line: the winner would
advance to the finals of the CCS Division IV
tournament. A battle between the two was
expected.
It never materialized. In a surprise to nearly
everyone in attendance, Sacred Heart Prep ran
away with a 25-16, 25-17, 25-10 sweep of
Menlo to advance to its fourth straight
Division IV championship game.
“Menlo is always a tough match,” said SHP
coach Damien Hardy. “We were just better
tonight.”
Better in every sense of the word. The sec-
ond-seeded Gators (29-5) could virtually do
no wrong, while the third-seeded Knights (23-
11) seemingly could do nothing right.
“It was going to be a great matchup,” said
Menlo coach Atlee Hubbard. “And we didn’t
show up. We let the emotion overwhelm us a
little bit. One of our weaknesses is, when
things are going wrong, we struggle to have a
Plan B.”
The match got so bad for Menlo that
Hubbard, who is always carrying a binder as a
shield to hide signals and plays from the other
team, abandoned it early in the third set. She
had run out of things to tell her team, knowing
it was up to them to try and right the ship.
“When you get to that point as a coach, it’s
awful,” Hubbard said.
It got to that point early and stayed that way
throughout the match. SHP’s play was a big
reason things went so bad for the Knights. The
tandem of Ellie Shannon and Payton Smith at
the net proved to be too much for the Knights
to overcome. Those two blocked so many
A surprising sweep
W
hen Courtney Tyler was 11 or
12 years old, she sat down with
her dad and had a heart-to-heart
talk. Tyler was a member of the West Bay
Nuggets softball team and her dad, Steve,
was her coach. He wanted to know if his
daughter was serious about taking her soft-
ball to the next level and shoot for a college
scholarship.
“I said, ‘Yes. I want to be a college soft-
ball player,’” Tyler
said she told her dad.
Now recently
turned 18, Tyler, a
senior at Hillsdale,
will realize her dream
as she signed an offi-
cial Letter of Intent to
play softball for Cal
Poly-San Luis
Obispo. She signed
the letter during a
ceremony at school
Wednesday after-
noon.
“It was definitely surreal,” Tyler said. “I
(orally) committed as a sophomore. I
always knew I was going there. I was
thinking (Wednesday), ‘Whoa. This is it.
This is awesome.’”
Tyler has already had quite a career with
the Knights. This season will be her fourth
as a varsity player, something very few
high school athletes can achieve. She is
already a three-time Peninsula Athletic
League First Team All-League player and
there is nothing to suggest she won’t
accomplish the same thing this season. She
has been named Freshman of the Year by
the PAL, as well as Sophomore of the Year.
She was part of a group of Hillsdale play-
ers that turned the Knights from an after-
thought into a perennial PAL and Central
Coast Section power.
“I always dreamed about it (being a four-
year varsity player),” Tyler said. “I’m try-
ing so hard for (league) MVP this year.
That’s my goal.”
Tyler has excelled no matter where she
A dream
realized
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
SacredHeart Prep’s Ellie Shannon tries to tip a ball over the Menlo block during the Gators’
three-game sweep of the Knights.
By Mike Fitzpatrick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — David Price of the Tampa
Bay Rays and knuckleballer R.A. Dickey of
the New York Mets won baseball’s Cy Young
awards on Wednesday.
Price barely beat out 2011 winner Justin
Verlander for the American League prize in
one of the closest votes ever. Dickey was an
easy choice for the NL honor in balloting by
the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.
The 38-year-old Dickey became the first
knuckleball pitcher to win the Cy Young
Award, an achievement mentors such as Hall
of Famer Phil Niekro are quite proud of.
“I am not a self-made man by any stretch of
the imagination,” Dickey said on MLB
Network. “This is a victory for all of us.”
Runner-up two years ago, Price was the
pick this time by the slimmest of margins. He
received 14 of 28 first-place votes and fin-
ished with 153 points to 149 for Verlander,
chosen first on 13 ballots.
Other than a 1969 tie between Mike Cuellar
and Denny McLain, it was the tightest race in
the history of the AL award.
Rays closer Fernando Rodney got the other
first-place vote and came in fifth.
“It means a lot,” Price said. “It’s something
that I’ll always have. It’s something that they
can’t take away from me.”
Price went 20-5 to tie Jered Weaver for the
American League lead in victories and win-
ning percentage. The 27-year-old lefty had the
lowest ERA at 2.56 and finished sixth in
strikeouts with 205.
Verlander, also the league MVP a year ago,
followed that up by going 17-8 with a 2.64
ERA and pitching the Detroit Tigers to the
World Series. He led the majors in strikeouts
(239), innings (238 1-3) and complete games
(six).
Price tossed 211 innings in 31 starts, while
Verlander made 33. One factor that might
have swung some votes, however: Price faced
Price, Dickey named Cy Young winners
Sacred Heart Prep dominates Menlo in advancing to CCS finals
See POLO, Page 16
See LOUNGE, Page 16 See GATORS, Page 14
See AWARDS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Alex Smith insists it’s
too early to guess whether he will return from
a concussion in time to start at quarterback in
San Francisco’s key Monday night NFC
showdown against the Chicago Bears.
The decision is not up to him, anyway.
Smith went through position work with the
NFC West-leading 49ers (6-2-1) in a non-con-
tact black jersey Wednesday, his status still
unclear after he sustained a concussion in the
second quarter Sunday against the St. Louis
Rams.
“I feel good, better,” Smith said Wednesday
in his first comments since the injury. “I’m
just going along with the process right now.
Nothing’s been decided. It’s a whole long
process that’s up to the
doctors. I just kind of do
what they tell me. Contact
obviously is the final
straw.”
Coach Jim Harbaugh
kept a watchful eye on
Smith from several yards
away as he worked with
backup Colin Kaepernick
and No. 3 QB Scott
Tolzien to get his reps.
Smith had to pass concussion tests given by
a neurologist — he went to Stanford on
Monday — to get this far and return to the
practice field, but there are still further steps
in the process for him to be medically cleared
for game action.
“Right now it looks like Alex will be our
quarterback for sure,” optimistic tight end
Vernon Davis said. “I would think so. With all
those concussions, you can’t really tell, but he
was out there and threw the ball around a lit-
tle bit.”
Smith said he experienced blurred vision on
a 1-yard quarterback sneak early in the second
quarter of Sunday’s 24-24 tie. But six plays
earlier, he scrambled to his left and started to
slide before turning when St. Louis linebacker
Jo-Lonn Dunbar hit him in the back of the
neck with 1:10 left in the first quarter. Smith
briefly grabbed his face mask and grimaced
but stayed in the game.
He isn’t sure whether that hit contributed to
the concussion, because he didn’t experience
any symptoms right away.
“It’s all speculation. It certainly didn’t
help,” Smith said. “Talking to the neurologist,
it probably contributed, for sure. Whether it
loosens you up for the next one, I don’t know.
I felt fine after that though. The sneak was
definitely when I came up and my eyesight
went wrong.”
So, just how did he manage to complete all
three passes he threw afterward with blurred
vision, including a 14-yard touchdown to
Michael Crabtree?
“That’s a great question,” Smith said. “No
idea. It certainly wasn’t like I was blind.”
But he was hurting.
Smith said he experienced headaches and
nausea with the concussion, and the symp-
toms were “more severe” than what he felt
after a concussion last season against Dallas
in the team’s home opener. By Monday morn-
ing after sleeping overnight, Smith said he
had improved.
“It’s tough to describe. For me, the vision
was the biggest thing, for sure,” Smith said.
“I’ve taken a lot of hits over the years, and to
try to play quarterback when you’re vision is
not what it should be was difficult,” Smith
said. “For me, ultimately it didn’t get better. It
wasn’t one of those things I could blink off
and my focus was returning. I went on the
sidelines and sat down and it seemed to get
worse. It wasn’t getting better. It was not good
for the team to go out there. I didn’t think I
could help us much.”
Second-year backup Colin Kaepernick
took over for the second series in the second
quarter and rallied the Niners in the fourth
quarter, even running for a 7-yard touch-
down. He finished 11 for 17 for 117 yards
with three sacks.
Smith practices for 49ers in non-contact jersey
Alex Smith
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State &Local taxes associated
with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily
Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be acting in vio-
lation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name &photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the Daily Journal,
Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s from all liability, claims, or actions
of any kind whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros,
Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE EIGHTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week ELEVEN
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 11/16/12
Green Bay Detroit
Jacksonville Houston
Philadelphia Washington
NY Jets St. Louis
Cleveland Dallas
Tampa Bay Carolina
Arizona Atlanta
Cincinnati Kansas City
New Orleans Oakland
Indianapolis New Englando
San Diego Denver
Baltimore Pittsburgh
Chicago San Francisco
TIEBREAKER: Chicago @ San Francisco __________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest
is free to play. Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop off by 11/16/12 to:
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Carson Palmer knows he
will have to have a big day to get the Oakland
Raiders back on the winning track.
With a defense that has allowed 97 points the
past two weeks, a running game decimated by
injuries and the high-powered New Orleans
Saints offense led by Drew Brees coming to
town, the Raiders (3-6) will be counting on
Palmer even more than usual.
“Being a quarterback you don’t want to think
that,” Palmer said Wednesday. “You still want
to go through your reads. Sometimes a sack is
the best play, sometimes a punt is the best play.
But you can’t do it too many times against these
guys. ... I don’t let myself go into a game think-
ing ‘we have to score on this drive, we have to
score on this drive.’ You get yourself in trouble
and your team in trouble doing that. But I
understand what we’re up against. I understand
that we have to keep up with these guys.”
Palmer has carried a heavy burden in his first
full season as Raiders quarterback, throwing
the second-most passes in the league so far with
375 — 13 behind Detroit’s
Matthew Stafford. Palmer
has thrown for 782 yards
the past two weeks and is
looking to put together
three straight 300-yard
games for the first time in
his career.
He is on pace to set the
Raiders’ record for yards
passing in a season, aver-
aging more than 300 per game so far.
“He’s big, he can see the field, he’s got great
vision,” Saints interim coach Joe Vitt said.
“There’s not a coverage that he can’t throw a
ball into, and there’s not a coverage he hasn’t
seen.”
The only team that has passed the ball a high-
er percentage of time this season than Oakland
is New Orleans, with both teams calling passes
on about two of every three offensive plays.
Part of that has to do with the fact that both
Oakland and New Orleans have two of the
worst defenses in the league. The Saints have
allowed the most yards per game in the NFL,
giving up more than 400 every week.
Palmer adds responsibility
while defense still struggles
Carson Palmer
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Active Independent & Senior Living
• Day trips & 50+ activities every week
•Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
• Secured underground parking
• Luxurious apartments with full kitchens
$
$
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Rookie Harrison Barnes
scored 19 points and grabbed 13 rebounds,
making a pair of critical free throws in the final
minute to help the Golden State Warriors hold
off the short-handed Atlanta Hawks 92-88 on
Wednesday night.
David Lee added 18 points and 10 rebounds,
and Stephen Curry scored 12 to put the
Warriors ahead by 13 points early in the fourth
quarter. The Hawks hacked that lead to two but
Barnes and Jarrett Jack each made a pair of
free throws to seal Golden State’s victory.
Lou Williams scored 18 points, including
three straight 3-pointers that whittled the
Warriors’ lead to a basket with 11.2 seconds
remaining. Josh Smith added 16 points and 10
rebounds for Atlanta, which had Al Horford
and Devin Harris out because of a stomach ill-
ness.
The way the Warriors’ defense finished was
enough to make coach Mark Jackson sick.
Williams made the second of his three con-
secutive 3s to bring Atlanta within 90-85 with
21.8 seconds left. Curry,
who had made a layup over
Smith on the previous pos-
session, missed a 3-pointer
that Barnes tracked down.
Barnes, drafted seventh
overall out of North
Carolina, was fouled and
made both free throws. He
had not had more than 14
points or five rebounds in
his first seven games.
Williams made another 3-pointer to slice
Golden State’s lead to 90-88. Jack, who fin-
ished with nine points and four rebounds, was
fouled and swished both free throws to secure
the victory.
Atlanta has had multiple players get sick
during its West Coast trip. The latest bug side-
lined Horford and Harris. Zaza Pachulia start-
ed at center in Horford’s place, and even he
had to overcome a setback.
Pachulia was cut above his right eye in the
first quarter, with blood dripping down the side
of his face. He received stitches in the locker
room and returned.
With the Hawks hurting on the inside, the
Warriors went to work.
Lee led the charge by going at Atlanta’s
depleted front line and allowed Golden State
to play inside-out. He had 14 points and seven
rebounds in the first half to help the Warriors
take a 54-46 lead.
Golden State withstood several shots from
Atlanta before hanging on.
The Hawks started the third quarter on a 7-1
run to trim the Warriors’ lead to two. Ivan
Johnson then inadvertently elbowed Warriors
second-round pick Draymond Green in the
face while going for a rebound late in the quar-
ter.
Green stayed down for a couple of minutes
until walking gingerly to the locker room, with
Johnson patting him on the chest on the way
off the court. The team said X-rays on the right
side of Green’s jaw came back negative. He
later returned.
In the meantime, another rookie helped the
Warriors create some separation.
Barnes ignited an 18-7 spurt the lasted
through the opening minute of the fourth quar-
ter to put Golden State ahead 73-60. He threw
down a putback dunk that brought roaring fans
to their feet, including Warriors owner Joe
Lacob sitting in his usual courtside spot, and
mixed in a turnaround jumper and a driving
layup.
Atlanta closed within two on Williams’ 3-
pointer in the final minute but never got closer.
NOTES: The Warriors honored former
coach Don Nelson at halftime for his Hall of
Fame induction in September. The 72-year-old
Nelson, who has an NBA-record 1,335 wins,
said he has no plans to get involved in basket-
ball again and is enjoying retirement at his
home in Maui, Hawaii. ... The Hawks have
added more hand sanitizer in the locker room
and separated infected players from others
because of the stomach illness that has swept
through part of the team. ... Warriors C Andrew
Bogut will rehab his surgically repaired left
ankle in the Los Angeles area during the
team’s three-game road trip starting Friday in
Minnesota.
Rookie helps Warriors hold off Hawks
Warriors 92, Hawks 88
Harrison
Barnes
Santa Clara beats Saint Louis 74-62
ST. LOUIS — Kevin Foster scored 30
points to break Kurt Rambis’ Santa Clara’s
career scoring record, leading the Broncos to
a 74-62 victory over Saint Louis on
Wednesday night.
Foster also had seven steals and five assists
for the Broncos (2-0). He was 10 of 18 from
the field with a pair of 3-pointers, and 8 for 9
from the free-throw line. Foster has 1,748
points, 13 more than Rambis, the former NBA
player and coach who played at Santa Clara
from 1976-80.
Marc Trasolini, who missed last season with
a knee injury, had nine points and 10 rebounds
for the Broncos.
The game was part of the CBE Hall of Fame
Classic.
Rob Loe led Saint Louis (1-1) with 13
points. Cody Ellis had 11 points for the
Billikens, who beat South Carolina-Upstate in
their opener Friday night.
The Billikens led in the game’s first minute
on Wednesday but Santa Clara led 44-31 at
halftime behind Foster’s 17 points.
Sacramento State beats
Cal State Bakersfield 85-67
SACRAMENTO — Mikh McKinney
scored 23 points and Dylan Garrity had 21
points and seven assists as Sacramento State
beat Cal State Bakersfield 85-67 Wednesday
night.
John Dickson added 15 points for the
Hornets (2-0), who only trailed in the first two
minutes of the game. Sacramento State led 34-
28 at halftime and built a 20-point lead with
less than 5 minutes to play.
Jackson Carbajal scored 10 points for the
Hornets.
Bakersfield’s Javante Maynor matched
McKinney with 23 points. Adam Young and
Stephon Carter scored 12 points apiece for the
Roadrunners (0-3). Young had a game-high
nine rebounds.
Bogut to rehab in L.A.
during Warriors’ road trip
OAKLAND — Golden State Warriors
center Andrew Bogut will be in the Los
Angeles area during part of the team’s
upcoming road trip to rehabilitate his sur-
gically repaired left ankle.
The team said Wednesday that Bogut will
be under the supervision of Dr. Richard
Ferkel, who performed the surgery on the 7-
foot Australian on April 27. The Warriors
begin a three-game road trip at Minnesota on
Friday.
The team had said last week Bogut would
be out 7 to 10 days. Instead, Bogut, who sat
out his third straight game Wednesday night
against Atlanta, will be out even longer.
The 2005 No. 1 overall pick fractured his
ankle Jan. 25 with Milwaukee and missed the
rest of the season after being traded to Golden
State for guard Monta Ellis. He sat all of the
preseason and played four of the five regular-
season games and appeared to be slowed by
the injury.
Basketball briefs
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
816 Middlefield Road, Redwood City
New Location
*
*according to our customers
30 year Bay Area Tradition
Lic. #41131012
Middlefield Rd B
ro
a
d
w
a
y
WHY NOT START WITH THE BEST GOLD BUYER?
BASED ON KARAT PURITY
We Pay 75% of
Gold & Silver
Market
Menlo attacks, they mentally beat Menlo. The
Knights were constantly looking for the pair
all match long and even when Shannon and
Smith didn’t get the block, the Menlo attacks
sailed out of bounds as its hitters tried to avoid
the Gators’ block.
“Dominating,” is how Hardy described
Shannon and Smith’s play. “If they can read
where the set is going, I want to see who can
get past them.”
Shannon finished the match with 11 kills
while Smith added 12 kills and five aces.
Sonia Abuel-Saud had seven kills. Menlo was
led by Maddie Huber, who had nine kills, far
below her season average. Lida Vandermeer
had just five kills and the Knights’ other main
weapon, Maddie Frappier, managed just a pair
of service aces.
“Some of our key players, who perform on
a daily basis, struggled a bit and they couldn’t
get out of that hole,” Hubbard said.
Said Hardy: “We forced them away from
their strengths and forced them to our
strengths.”
Menlo led only twice in the match, taking 1-
0 leads to start Game 2 and Game 3. Other
than, the match belonged to SHP. In Game 1,
SHP led 5-3 before reeling off seven unan-
swered points to take a 12-3 lead. Menlo final-
ly found a bit of a rhythm, moving a couple of
points closer and trailed 17-10. The Gators
responded with a 5-1 run to push their advan-
tage to 22-11 and it was only a matter of time
before they closed out the Knights.
SHP committed only two errors in the open-
ing set, compared to 12 for Menlo.
Menlo took a brief 1-0 lead in Game 2 when
SHP sent the first serve into the net, but the
Gators won five of the next six points. The
Knights got as close as 6-4 on a block for a
kill from Mogan Dressel before two straight
kills from Sonia Abuel-Saud and a block from
Shannon to push their lead to 9-4.
Menlo did not wilt, however, and stayed
close with SHP. Trailing 15-9, the Knights put
together their most consistent run of the
match, winning eight of the next 12 to close to
19-16.
Menlo’s chances took a big hit moments
later, however, when sophomore setter Elisa
Merten went down with an ankle injury with
the Knights trailing 20-17. SHP preceded to
win the final five points to take the set.
“Merten going down didn’t help (Menlo),”
Hardy said.
In Game 3, the Gators simply blitzed the
Knights. Menlo held an early 3-1 lead before
SHP ripped off 12 straight points to take a
commanding 13-3 advantage. Smith and
Shannon were virtually unstoppable for the
Gators, combining for seven of the 12 points.
The Gators then ended with a flourish, win-
ning the final five points to end the Knights’
season.
“[Volleyball] is such a mental game,” Hardy
said. “Momentum goes back and forth so
quickly. If you can hold on to it for a few
points, you’re in good shape.”
Continued from page 11
GATORS
stiffer competition in the rugged AL East than
Verlander did in the AL Central.
“I guess it’s a blessing and a curse at the
same time,” Price said. “There’s not an easy
out in the lineups every game. It feels like a
postseason game.”
Weaver came in third with 70 points, but was
listed second on a pair of ballots. The right-
hander threw a no-hitter and had a 2.81 ERA in
his first 20-win season but missed time with
injuries and totaled only 188 2-3 innings for
the Los Angeles Angels.
The top pick in the 2007 amateur draft out of
Vanderbilt, Price reached the majors the fol-
lowing year and has made three straight All-
Star teams.
Despite going 19-6 with a 2.72 ERA in
2010, he finished a distant second in Cy Young
voting to Felix Hernandez, who won only 13
games for last-place Seattle but dominated
most other statistical categories that year.
Verlander was trying to become the first AL
pitcher to win back-to-back Cy Youngs since
Boston’s Pedro Martinez in 1999 and 2000.
San Francisco right-hander Tim Lincecum did
it in the National League in 2008-09.
Dickey garnered 27 of 32 first-place votes
and easily outdistanced 2011 winner Clayton
Kershaw of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Gio
Gonzalez of Washington finished third.
Dickey joined Dwight Gooden (1985) and
three-time winner Tom Seaver as the only Mets
pitchers to win the award. The right-hander
was the club’s first 20-game winner since
Frank Viola in 1990. And perhaps most
impressive, Dickey did it during a season when
the fourth-place Mets finished 74-88.
“It just feels good all over,” he said.
Price and Dickey are both from Tennessee,
making them the fourth pair of Cy Young win-
ners to be born in the same state, according to
STATS.
The two MVP awards will be announced
Thursday. Verlander’s teammate, Triple Crown
winner Miguel Cabrera, is a leading contender
in the American League.
Continued from page 11
AWARDS
A’s manager Melvin will
welcome back Bartolo Colon
OAKLAND — Bartolo Colon will be wel-
comed back to the Oakland Athletics with no
hard feelings — at least by newly crowned AL
Manager of the Year Bob Melvin.
Melvin said Wednesday he is “thrilled” the
right-hander will return to the club next year after
his 2012 season ended with a 50-game suspen-
sion Aug. 22 for testing positive for testosterone.
Colon received a $3 million, one-year contract
Nov. 3, though he still has five games remaining
on his suspension when the 2013 season starts.
While the new deal includes incentives for starts
and innings, he also has potential bonuses for
relief appearances — though Melvin said Colon
would prepare as a starter and will be
“embraced” by the reigning AL West champions.
“He’s gone through his penalty,” Melvin said.
“It’s one thing if it’s a guy who might be a little
bit of a bad guy, but his is a true gentleman, a
great guy who just made a mistake. He’ll be
embraced back here again. He was very impor-
tant for us. Guys like that can kind of get lost in
the shuffle when they’re not here and you get to
the postseason, but he was a key guy for us, he
really was.”
The former Cy Young winner went 10-9 with a
3.43 ERA in 24 starts for Oakland last season, his
15th in the majors.
A’s general manager Billy Beane said finding a
veteran pitcher to be part of a young rotation —
and for the financial value — Colon was the per-
fect fit.
Melvin said he last spoke to Colon about three
weeks after the suspension began, and they will
talk again before the start of spring training in
February.
“I don’t need to talk to Bart. I will call him at
some point in time,” Melvin said. “I got very
close to him, and we had a nice conversation and
he was very remorseful when all that went down.
I think in the back of his mind he was hoping this
situation would arise for him again, and it did.”
A’s brief
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mix Diskerud gave the U.S. soccer a team a
thrilling end to 2012.
Playing just his third game for the Americans,
the 22-year-old midfielder scored his first inter-
national goal on a 20-yard shot 2:50 into four
minutes of injury time, giving the United States
a 2-2 tie against Russia on Wednesday in an
exhibition game at Krasnodar.
Michael Bradley, who scored in the 76th
minute, sent a long ball into the penalty area
toward Terrence Boyd. Defender Sergei
Ignashevich tied to clear the ball but his header
went on one hop to Diskerud. His right-footed
shot took a bounce and spin in off the left hand
of goalkeeper Vladimir Gabulov.
“It was a long ball and I was hoping with all
my heart that it would come back to me and it
did,” Diskerud said. “I got a nice strike.”
Diskerud’s whose mother is from Arizona and
whose father is from Norway, was a member of
the American under-23 team that failed to quali-
fy for the London Olympics.
“We can compete with very good teams in the
world,” U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann said. “The
way our team fought back twice after being
down a goal was great. It showed a lot of per-
sonality. It showed a lot of character. This is a
young team, and a team that is growing.”
Fedor Smolov, making his Russian national
team debut, gave the hosts the lead in the ninth
minute following a giveaway by Danny
Williams, who mis-hit the ball trying for a quick
free kick in his own half.
Bradley tied it on a 19-yard volley, his 11th
international goal. Maurice Edu passed to Juan
Agudelo in the penalty area, and Agudelo head-
ed the ball back to an open Bradley for a right-
footed shot that clanked in off the post to
Gabulov’s right.
“I caught it perfect,” Bradley said.
Roman Shirokov put Russia back ahead 2-1
when he converted a penalty kick in the 84th
minute after a foul by Clarence Goodson, who
pushed over Artem Dzyuba in front of goalkeep-
er Tim Howard following a free kick.
“I think we came in at halftime frustrated with
ourselves,” Bradley said. “We were too casual
from the start and good teams make you pay.
Maybe we were a little lucky after the first 15
minutes that it was only 1-0.”
The 27th-ranked United States, missing regu-
lars Clint Dempsey, Landon Donovan and Steve
Cherundolo, are preparing for the final round of
qualifying next year for the 2014 World Cup.
They finished the year at 9-2-3 with a .750 win-
ning percentage that tied their best in the modern
era, set in 2005. The U.S. had two big firsts,
beating Italy and winning at Mexico City, and its
only defeats came in an exhibition against Brazil
and a World Cup qualifier at Jamaica.
“We only had two losses, a bunch of wins,
some really tough-fought draws and we topped
the group,” Howard said of the Americans’ finish
in the semifinals of World Cup qualifying. “It
was a really fantastic year. It’s not something to
be ashamed of. It’s a really good, positive year
for this group.”
The ninth-ranked Russians are 4-0-2 since for-
mer England coach Fabio Capello took over last
summer.
Howard had six saves, including two nifty
stops in succession in the 66th when he batted
away an open shot by Renat Yanbaev and then
parried Vasily Berezutskiy’s shot over the cross-
bar.
Jozy Altidore started at forward for the U.S.
after he was dropped from the roster for last
month’s qualifiers following poor performances
against Jamaica in September.
“Jozy Altidore today was a handful,”
Klinsmann said. “He gets a big, big compliment
for his performance.”
Timmy Chandler started at right back. He had
not played for the Americans since last
November, uncertain whether he wanted to com-
mit to the U.S. program, and would not be tied
to the program until he plays in a competitive
match such a qualifier.
“I think the team has grown a lot in a lot of
ways,”Altidore said. “We’ve had a lot of ups and
downs, but I think we’re finding our identity
again and that’s important going into the nature
of the final qualifying round. It’s going to be
tough, but we’ve grown a lot.”
NOTES: U.S. captain Carlos Bocanegra left
in the 18th minute with a strained left hamstring.
He was replaced by Clarence Goodson, who
paired with Geoff Cameron in central defense.
Bocanegra’s 110th career game moved him into
a sixth-place tie on the U.S. list with Paul
Caligiuri, who had 110 appearances from 1984-
98. ... The starting lineup marked the first time
since June 19, 2011, the U.S. team had no
starters from MLS clubs. The previous game
was a 2-0 victory over Jamaica in the CONCA-
CAF Gold Cup. ... Josh Gatt, a speedy 21-year-
old midfielder, started in his national team debut
and was replaced by Agudelo in the 63rd.
Diskerud goal gives
US 2-2 tie at Russia
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Jeremy Affeldt want-
ed some job security — and the reliable reliev-
er got it.
The left-hander and the World Series cham-
pion San Francisco Giants completed an $18
million, three-year contract Wednesday.
Bobby Evans, the team’s vice president of
baseball operations, said the deal had been
finalized to keep Affeldt in the Bay Area.
“We are so happy to be back with our San
Francisco family,” Affeldt said.
Affeldt, who returned home to Washington
State from San Francisco after taking his phys-
ical Tuesday, realizes few relievers can say
they will have spent seven years with the same
team. The 33-year-old Affeldt went 1-2 with a
2.70 ERA in 67 appearances covering 63 1-3
innings this season for the Giants.
“It’s an awesome opportunity to stay in that
city for a few more years,” he said. “This is
what I was looking for — not one year, not one
year with an option. When you can get a mul-
tiyear deal in one city and give your family
some stability, it’s a good thing.”
When the season ended, he publicly said he
wanted to stay but would not accept a one-year
deal because he wanted to provide some sta-
bility for his family — he has a wife and three
young sons. Affeldt also was a key member of
the bullpen during the club’s 2010 run to the
franchise’s first championship since 1954.
“I’m glad it got done,” manager Bruce
Bochy said. “He is such a key swing guy who
can be used in the sixth inning on. That was an
important sign for us. I’m excited to have the
crazy left-hander back. He’s getting better
with age, his stuff, his command. He is a more
complete pitcher now than when we got him.
He’s doing what you want your players to do:
keep getting better.”
General manager Brian Sabean called re-
signing Affeldt one of his top offseason prior-
ities. Affeldt lives on the West Coast in his
hometown of Spokane, Wash., so re-signing
with the Giants was appealing from that stand-
point as well.
“It’s great to retain such a big piece to our
bullpen puzzle,” Sabean said.
He has spent the past four of his 11 major
league seasons with San Francisco, going 10-
9 with a 2.73 ERA in 237 1-3 innings and 184
outings.
Affeldt dealt with two bizarre, non-baseball
injuries the past two seasons.
In late April, he sprained his right knee and
went on the disabled list after he reached out to
catch his son, Walker, as the 60-pound 4-year-
old jumped off the couch to hug his arriving
father.
On Sept. 8, 2011, the pitcher sliced his non-
throwing hand nearly to the artery while sepa-
rating frozen hamburgers during an outdoor
barbecue with his family on an off-day. The
paring knife he was using pushed through a
hamburger patty and deep into his hand.
Affeldt came within a millimeter of an artery
and underwent surgery about eight hours after
the injury to repair nerve damage in his pinkie.
“Those are fluke injuries,” Bochy said.
“These guys have to live their lives. We let
these guys live their normal lives — that’s the
way it should be. We’re all occasionally going
to have them, and he has a knack for the good
ones.”
Affeldt, Giants
complete deal
16
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
An Authenti c
CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE
HAPPY THANKSGIVING WEEKEND
Sold Out
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
period, with the only miss being a shot from
goaltender Will Runkel, whose length-of-the-
pool shot hit the crossbar as the period ended.
Bret Hinrichs got SHP on the scoreboard
with a 5-meter penalty shot at the 5:07 mark
of the first period. He added a second on a
one-timer off an assist from Enright for a 2-0
lead. Enright’s first goal made it 3-nil Gators
and Hinrichs completed a first-period hat trick
to give SHP a 4-0 lead after seven minutes.
Conner Will added a pair of power-play
goals to start the second period and Enright’s
second goal of the night gave the Gators a 7-0
lead at the half.
Five different players scored in the third
period as the Gators upped their lead in the
third. But a chance at a second straight shutout
went by the boards when Soquel’s Kala
Buthman finally slipped a shot past Runkel,
who finished the match with 10 saves.
Goals from Finn Banks, Michael Schurr and
Grant Hardly rounded out the scoring for SHP.
The only question remaining for the Gators
in determining where this team ranks among
the all-time teams at Sacred Heart Prep.
Kreutzkamp said he’ll wait to answer the
question until after Saturday’s championship
match, but right now, this team is on the short
list of all time Gators’ greats.
“To go through the schedule we’ve gone
through, playing the best teams in the nation,
and have only four losses, it’s going to be hard
not to say [this is the best team I’ve had]."
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
SacredHeart Prep’s Bret Hinrichs fires home a goal during the Gators’ 15-3 win over Soquel
in the CCS Division II playoffs.
Continued from page 11
POLO
played on the field. Officially listed as an out-
fielder/first baseman, she can play just about
anywhere. She was a catcher for the Knights
her freshman year, even though she had never
played the position before. While the Cal Poly-
SLO coaching staff hasn’t told Tyler where she
will be playing, she’s guessing it will be some-
where in the outfield, considering the
Mustangs already have a first baseman.
Regardless of where she plays, she said she
will be ready for the challenge. As such, she is
not about to take it easy now that she has a
scholarship in hand.
“Obviously [signing the Letter of Intent] was
a huge relief. But I’m still working hard, I’m
still trying get my grades better (she currently
has a 3.85 GPA). It’s definitely a relief, but it’s
no excuse to slack off.”
While she has had a stellar high school
career, she really got noticed by the Cal Poly
staff for her play with her club team, the San
Jose Sting — one of the top softball clubs in
the Bay Area. The Stings’ various rosters are
dotted with who’s who of the South Bay soft-
ball world and a few of its alumni are already
playing at Cal Poly.
Because of the caliber of players on the
Sting, she knows what it takes to get to the
next level.
“I was always the baby, playing up (an age
group). I was trying to live up to them. They
were going places and now I’m going places.
It’s so surreal,” Tyler said. “I was always trying
to keep up with these girls. They were the best
girls ever, who didn’t slack off even though
they already had scholarships. The (Sting)
teams I played definitely had a love of the
game. There was never a doubt in my decision
to play college softball.”
***
Tyler isn’t the only local athlete officially
committing to college athletic programs.
Aragon’s Samantha Bowman, a coxswain for
the Nor Cal Crew out of Redwood City,
signed a Letter of Intent to row at Duke
University in North Carolina.
“This is just like a dream come true,”
Bowman said. “It’s just a shock.”
Bowman started rowing as a freshman and
said Duke showed interest last spring. She took
an official visit to the campus in September
and gave the Blue Devils an oral commitment
at that time. Wednesday, she made it official.
“It’s a great sport. Once you get involved, it
sucks you in. It’s hard to get out. It’s a great
bubble,” Bowman said.
***
In other signing news, Matt Krook, a senior
at St. Ignatius High in San Francisco and a
member of those juggernaut Hillsborough
Little League All-Star teams that ran
roughshod through District 52 play and to divi-
sional and sectional play in the early- to mid-
2000s, signed a National Letter of Intent to
play baseball at University of Oregon. Krook
batted .404 and posted an ERA of 2.75 in 10
appearances for the Irish last season, helping
them to a 23-8-1 record in 2012.
***
The Cañada College women’s golf team fin-
ished in third place at the California
Community College Women’s Golf
Championship at Temecula Creek Inn Resort.
The Colts shot a score of 673. Irvine Valley
took the title with a score of 628 with Glendale
finishing second with a score of 660. Shannon
Wong led the Colts with a two-day total of
166, good for 14th place. Sarah Rotter tied for
17th place with a 169. Annika Nousiainen fired
a 172, Mehreen Raheel had a 174, Hannah
Murray finished with a 181 and Michelle
Wong was at 206.
***
In Nov. 13 edition of the Daily Journal, the
CCS roundup article incorrectly reported the
finish for Mills cross country runner Grant
Murphy. His time of 16:05 was good for third
place in the Division III race, which qualifies
him for the state meet next weekend.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-5200
ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
SPORTS 17
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. $ao Nateo 0r|ve, $te 3 º $ao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 5 0 1.000 —
Brooklyn 4 2 .667 1 1/2
Boston 5 3 .625 1 1/2
Philadelphia 4 4 .500 2 1/2
Toronto 2 6 .250 4 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 6 3 .667 —
Charlotte 4 3 .571 1
Atlanta 3 4 .429 2
Orlando 2 5 .286 3
Washington 0 7 .000 5
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 5 2 .714 —
Chicago 5 3 .625 1/2
Indiana 3 6 .333 3
Cleveland 2 6 .250 3 1/2
Detroit 1 8 .111 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 7 1 .875 —
Memphis 6 1 .857 1/2
Dallas 5 4 .556 2 1/2
Houston 4 4 .500 3
New Orleans 3 3 .500 3
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 6 3 .667 —
Minnesota 5 3 .625 1/2
Denver 4 4 .500 1 1/2
Utah 4 5 .444 2
Portland 3 5 .375 2 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 6 2 .750 —
Golden State 4 4 .500 2
Phoenix 4 5 .444 2 1/2
L.A. Lakers 3 5 .375 3
Sacramento 2 6 .250 4

Wednesday’sGames
Detroit 94, Philadelphia 76
Boston 98, Utah 93
Houston 100, New Orleans 96
Charlotte 89, Minnesota 87
Memphis 107, Oklahoma City 97
Milwaukee 99, Indiana 85
Dallas 107,Washington 101
Chicago 112, Phoenix 106, OT
Golden State 92, Atlanta 88
L.A. Clippers 107, Miami 100
Thursday’sGames
Boston at Brooklyn, 5 p.m.
New York at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Miami at Denver, 7:30 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Utah at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Orlando at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Golden State at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
New York at Memphis, 6:30 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 6 3 0 .667 299 201
Miami 4 5 0 .444 173 186
N.Y. Jets 3 6 0 .333 175 228
Buffalo 3 6 0 .333 211 285
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 8 1 0 .889 250 143
Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 186 201
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 219 311
Jacksonville 1 8 0 .111 127 246
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 7 2 0 .778 254 196
Pittsburgh 5 3 0 .625 191 164
Cincinnati 4 5 0 .444 220 231
Cleveland 2 7 0 .222 169 211
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 6 3 0 .667 271 189
San Diego 4 5 0 .444 209 191
Oakland 3 6 0 .333 191 284
Kansas City 1 7 0 .125 133 240
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 267 216
Dallas 4 5 0 .444 188 204
Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 156 221
Washington 3 6 0 .333 226 248
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 8 1 0 .889 247 174
Tampa Bay 5 4 0 .556 260 209
New Orleans 4 5 0 .444 249 256
Carolina 2 7 0 .222 163 216
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 7 2 0 .778 242 133
Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 239 187
Minnesota 6 4 0 .600 238 221
Detroit 4 5 0 .444 216 222
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 6 2 1 .722 213 127
Seattle 6 4 0 .600 198 161
Arizona 4 5 0 .444 144 173
St. Louis 3 5 1 .389 161 210
Monday’sGame
Pittsburgh 16, Kansas City 13, OT
Thursday, Nov. 15
Miami at Buffalo, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 18
Cleveland at Dallas, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 10 a.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 1:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 1:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, N.Y. Giants, Seattle,Tennessee
Monday, Nov. 19
Chicago at San Francisco, 5:30 p.m.
NFL STANDINGS
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX—Agreed to terms with C
David Ross on a two-year contract.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS—Claimed LHP Scott Maine
off waivers from Toronto.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with
C Blake Lalli on a minor league contract.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms
with LHP Jeremy Affeldt on a three-year con-
tract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Announced first
base coach Trent Jewett with be the third base
coach for the 2013 season. Named Tony Tarasco
first base coach and Gary Thurman minor
league outfield/baserunning coordinator.
NFL
NFL—Fined Houston LB Tim Dobbins $30,000
for a helmet-to-helmet hit to Chicago QB Jay
Cutler.
CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed G Jeremy
Bridges. Placed DE Thomas Keiser on injured re-
serve.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed TE DeMarco
Cosby to the practice squad.
NEWYORK JETS—Signed RB Kahlil Bell.
OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed LB Omar Gaither.
Placed LB Travis Goethel on injured reserve.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released WR Phil Bates
from the practice squad. Placed WR Lavasier Tu-
inei to the practice squad.
CCS PAIRINGS
GIRLS’ WATER POLO
Semifinals
Division I
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (15-10) vs. No. 2 Leland
(22-5) at Gunn High, 7 p.m.
BOYS’ WATER POLO
Semifinals
Division II
No. 4 Soquel (22-5) vs. No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep
(23-4) at Serra High, 5:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
FOOTBALL
Open Division
No. 5 Serra (8-2) at No. 4 Palo Alto (8-2), 7 p.m.
No. 8 Terra Nova (6-4) vs. No. 1 Bellarmine (9-1)
at San Jose City College, 7 p.m.
Division I
No. 5 Sequoia (8-2) at No. 4 Menlo-Atherton (6-
4), 7 p.m.
Division II
No. 6 South City (7-3) at No. 2 Wilcox (7-3), 7 p.m.
No. 5 Aragon (7-3) at No. 4 Leland (6-4), 7 p.m.
Division IV
No. 5 Monte Vista-Christian (8-2) vs. No. 4 Menlo
School (8-2) at Sequoia High, 7 p.m.
No. 8 Capuchino (6-4) at No. 1 Seaside (10-0), 7
p.m.
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
Division III
No. 6 Burlingame (5-5) at Valley Christian (4-6),
7 p.m
Division IV
No. 7 Pacific Grove (7-3) at No. 2 Sacred Heart
Prep (9-1), 1 p.m.
vs.Miami
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/9
@Rams
10 a.m.
FOX
12/2
vs.Bears
5:00p.m.
ESPN
11/19
@Saints
1:20p.m.
FOX
11/25
vs.Patriots
8:20p.m.
NBC
12/16
@Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/9
vs.Broncos
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
12/6
vs.Browns
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/2
vs.Chiefs
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/16
@Panthers
1p.m.
CBS
11/4
vs.Saints
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/18
@Bengals
10a.m.
CBS
11/25
@Thunder
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/18
@Dallas
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/5
@ Wolves
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/16
vs.Cavs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/7
vs.Hawks
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/14
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oregon State’s quarterback shuffle is
emblematic of what has been happen-
ing around the Pac-12 all season.
Injuries and inconsistency have dogged
many teams in a league that has always
been known for its strong quarterbacks.
The No. 15 Beavers started out the
season with Sean Mannion under cen-
ter. Because of injury they went to
Cody Vaz. Then it was back briefly to
Mannion. This week it’s undetermined.
Other Pac-12 teams that have
switched quarterbacks include No. 14
Stanford, which started with Josh
Nunes but swapped him for dual threat
Kevin Hogan, and beleaguered
Colorado, which started the season
with Kansas transfer Jordan Webb but
is now looking toward Connor Wood
and Nick Hirschman.
Washington State has gone back and
forth between Jeff Tuel and Connor
Halliday.
Injuries are also an issue. Cal senior
Zach Maynard is nursing a sprained left
knee. Arizona quarterback Matt Scott
missed a game with a concussion and
might not be back in time to face Utah
on Saturday. They Utes are expected to
start true freshman Travis Wilson, who
unseated Jon Hays.
This week, as Oregon State (7-2, 5-
2) prepares to host California (3-8, 2-
6), the starting quarterback is still up in
the air — on both sides.
The Beavers’ situation is certainly
unique.
Mannion took over the Beavers as a
redshirt freshman last season when the
team finished just 3-9 overall. He got
off to a strong start this year, leading
Oregon State to four straight wins
while throwing for an average of 339
yards a game.
But Mannion’s fortunes took a turn
when he injured his left knee on a hand-
off during a game against Washington
State. Two days later, the Beavers
announced he needed surgery and the
timeline for his return was uncertain.
So Oregon State turned to Cody Vaz,
who had not started since high school
but coolly led the Beavers in victories
over BYU and Utah, helping the team
to its best start since 1907.
Mannion made an unexpectedly
quick recovery and returned to start the
next week at Washington. He strug-
gled, however, throwing four intercep-
tions in the Beavers’ first loss of the
season. So Oregon State turned back to
Vaz, who helped the team to a victory
against Arizona State.
Vaz started last week in a 27-23 loss
to Stanford, but he injured his left ankle
during the waning moments. Mannion
was taking snaps in practice earlier this
week while the Beavers waited to see if
Vaz would be cleared.
Oregon State is lucky. Since Vaz had
a few quality starts, the Beavers know
what they’re getting with either quarter-
back.
“With either guy, we just decide
what’s going to be best to do against the
upcoming team. They’re both passers
first, the both manage the offense and I
think they’re both good players,” coach
Mike Riley said. “They don’t really
bring something different than the
other guy, nor do we have to tone some
things down in regard to either guy.
That’s the beauty of the thing, they both
— in spring practice and fall camp —
basically shared the turns for two years.
We just run our offense.”
Injuries and inconsistency
dog Pac-12 quarterbacks
18
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
6 5 0 - 4 7 7 - 6 9 2 0 | 3 2 0 N . S a n M a t e o D r . S u i t e 2 , S a n M a t e o
D r . S a mi r N a n j a p a D D S
Dr. Nanjapa received his dental de-
gree from MAHE, India (1997) and a
Masters in Dental Biomaterials at the
University of Alabama at Birmingham
in 1999.
He moved to Chicago to pursue a
dental postgraduate program in Full
Mouth Restoration and in 2003 re-
ceived both a DDS license and Certifi-
cate in Advanced Prosthodontics.
Dr. Nanjapa began private practice
while maintaining a teaching position
as Assistant Clinical Professor at
College of Dentistry, Chicago.
In 2007 he moved to San Francisco for
private practice and a continued
academic role teaching at UC San
Francisco Dental School. His San
Mateo practice opened in 2011.
“I had not been to the dentist in 20 years! For good reason,
they are scary! However, I finally bit the bullet and through a
friend found Dr Nanjapa. Wow... “ - Julie H.
“He does a great teeth cleaning, is very attentive and not once
got impatient amid all my questions...” - Vince E.
“I highly, highly recommend him.” - C.B.
“He did a super job. I love his gentle touch” - Hardial A.
5/5 Stars on ratemds.com
5/5 Stars on healthgrades.com
REVI EWS:
By Ibrahim Barzak and Josef Federman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip — Israel carried
out a blistering offensive of more than 20
airstrikes in the Gaza Strip on Wednesday,
assassinating Hamas’ military commander and
targeting the armed group’s training facilities
and rocket launchers in Israel’s most intense
attack on the territory in nearly four years.
Israel said the airstrikes, launched in
response to days of rocket fire out of Hamas-
ruled Gaza, were the beginning of a broader
operation against the Islamic militants code-
named “Pillar of Defense.” Israeli defense offi-
cials said a ground operation was a strong pos-
sibility in the coming days though they
stressed no decisions had been made and much
would depend on Hamas’ reaction. There were
no immediate signs of extraordinary troop
deployments along the border.
The attack came at a time when Israel seems
to be under fire from all directions. Relations
have been deteriorating with Egypt’s new
Islamist government, Egypt’s lawless Sinai
desert has become a staging ground for mili-
tant attacks on Israel, and the Syrian civil war
has begun to spill over Israel’s northern bor-
der. Earlier this week, Israel fired back at Syria
— for the first time in nearly 40 years — after
stray mortar fire landed in the Israeli-con-
trolled Golan Heights.
With at least 10 Palestinians dead, including
two young children, Wednesday’s offensive
was certain to set off a new round of heavy
fighting with Gaza militants, who have built
up a formidable arsenal of rockets and mis-
siles.
It also threatened to upset Israel’s relations
with neighboring Egypt and shake up the cam-
paign for Israeli elections in January. In a pre-
liminary response, Egypt recalled its ambassa-
dor to Israel in protest.
In a nationwide address, Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel could no
longer stand repeated attacks on its southern
towns. Days of rocket fire have heavily dis-
rupted life for some 1 million people in the
region, canceling school and forcing residents
to remain indoors.
“If there is a need, the military is pre-
pared to expand the operation. We will
continue to do everything to protect our
citizens,” Netanyahu declared.
The Israeli military said it was ready, if nec-
essary, to send ground troops into Gaza. The
defense officials who said a ground operation
was likely in the coming days spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because they were dis-
cussing sensitive military plans.
“We are at the beginning of the event, and
not the end,” Defense Minister Ehud Barak
said, in a joint appearance with the prime min-
ister. “In the long run I believe the operation
will help strengthen the power of deterrence
and to return quiet to the south.”
Israeli assassinates Hamas military chief
Ahmed Jabari, the Hamas military chief, is
the latest of a number of Hamas leaders
killed by Israel in airstrikes over the past
decade.
• July 2002: An Israeli warplane drops a
bomb on the home of Salah Shehadeh,
the head of the Hamas military wing,
killing him and 14 others, including
women and children.
• March 2004: An Israeli missile strike kills
Sheik Ahmed Yassin, the Hamas spiritual
leader, near a Gaza City mosque. Yassin,
paralyzed in a childhood accident, was
among the founders of Hamas founders
in 1987, a few days after the outbreak of
the first Palestinian uprising. Hamas is the
Palestinian offshoot of the region-wide
Muslim Brotherhood.
• April 2004: Israel kills Gaza’s Hamas leader
Abdel Aziz Rantisi in a missile strike on his
car. Two of Rantisi’s bodyguards are also
killed.
• January 2009: An Israeli warplane drops
a bomb on the home of Nizar Rayyan, a
senior Hamas figure, killing him and 18
others.The attack comes several days after
Israel launches a three-week military
offensive, against Hamas in Gaza.
• January 2009, an Israeli airstrike during
the offensive kills Said Siam, the interior
minister in Gaza’s Hamas government. A
missile hits the home of Siam’s brother and
also kills two other senior Hamas
members.
Israel’s history of
killing Hamas leaders
REUTERS
A Palestinian man carries a wounded girl into a hospital after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City.
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
By Cedar Burnett
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Something small is afoot. Backyard cottages
— from 800-square-foot bungalows to
Lilliputian studio cabins — are springing up
behind houses in many cities, some of which
have changed zoning laws to accommodate
them.
Often, the cottages are built for aging parents
or grown children. Sometimes, they’re rented
out for extra income, or are used as studios or
offices.
“Backyard cottages increase density in a nice
way,” says Bruce Parker, principal of the Seattle-
based design collective Microhouse. “They use
existing infrastructure and ... they’re inherently
sustainable. A cottage is the antithesis of a big
house on a tiny lot.”
Seattle updated its zoning laws in 2009 to
allow for “accessory dwelling units” on single-
family lots of at least 4,000 square feet. (Permits
are needed depending on the size of the cottage
and whether it has plumbing and electricity.)
While Parker had been designing small homes
for several years, the microhouse law inspired
him to focus on backyard dwellings. Soon, he
was teaching classes on backyard cottages with
the Seattle firm NCompass Construction.
About 90 percent of his students, he said,
wanted to build a cottage for their parents.
“Rather than paying thousands of dollars a
month for assisted living, you can have your par-
ents with you and they can help with the kids —
but everyone gets their own space,” says Parker.
Often, it’s the parents who pay to build the
cottages. “It’s an investment for their comfort
and a way to improve their children’s property,”
says Parker. “One pragmatic woman told me she
hoped her great-granddaughter would use it for
college housing after she was gone.”
In Portland, Ore., which changed zoning rules
in 2010 to allow for backyard cottages, Jasmine
Deatherage and her mother, Diane Hoglund,
looked for a house with a large yard specifically
with this living arrangement in mind.
“We really wanted to live together,” says
Deatherage. “I have a 2-year-old and my mom
will be taking on some of the childcare. It’s a
special time to live together.”
Need more space? Put up a cottage out back
Often, cottages are built for aging parents or grown children. Sometimes, they’re rented out
for extra income, or are used as studios or offices.
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fall planting is in full swing. As you nestle tulips, daffodils,
hyacinths and crocuses into the soil, don’t neglect to also plant
some minor bulbs — “minor” only because they aren’t well
known, not because they lack quality.
Many of these bulbs are so minor as to even lack common
names. But botanical names are not all that cumbersome. After
all “crocus,” “hyacinth” and “narcissus” are botanical names.
Some names of minor bulbs are even fun to say: Puschkinia,
for example, rolls smoothly off the tongue once you sound it
out and, for me, conjures up an image of a friendly, stuffed
clown doll.
BLUE AND BLUISH
Puschkinia in very early spring sends up strappy leaves and
6-inch flower stalks, atop which sit clusters of white flowers
striped with shadings of grayish blue. It’s the perfect bulb to
tuck into a partially shaded rock garden or under trees and
shrubs.
Plant puschkinia this year and the planting will become
increasingly beautiful over the years as the bulb naturalizes,
increasing its numbers by self-seeding.
Another early bloomer that should become better known is
chionodoxa. Again, the first step is to slowly sound out the
name. Then plant it and wait a few months for the rich blue
flowers, small but in great numbers, as many as a dozen per
stem.
Two other dainty blue flowers for early and mid-spring are,
respectively, squill and muscari. (See? Not all minor bulbs
have botanical or unfamiliar names.)
Muscari, especially, naturalizes readily to the extent that
patches of lawn given over to it look in mid-spring like a piece
of blue sky has dropped on the ground.
ROUNDING OUT THE SPECTRUM
The minor bulb palette is not restricted to blues and whites:
Allium sphaerocephalon, sometimes known as round-headed
leek, is a beauty displaying “Tootsie roll pops” of reddish pur-
Minor bulbs should get more attention
See BULBS, Page 20
SUBURBAN LIVING 20
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SHOWROOM HOURS:
Wednesday – Saturday 12:00 noon – 5:30 PM
All other times by appointment
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
(Between Brittan & Holly)
652-388-8836
Making Peninsula homes more beautiful since 1996
www.cinnabarhome.com
FREE DESIGN SERVICE WITH PURCHASE
•Home furnishings & accessories
•Drapery & window treatments, blinds & shades
•Free in-home consultation with purchase
• Gifts • Interior Design
Trustee Henry Sanchez absent, moved the
proposal forward.
“I can’t believe we’re begging you to
improve these schools,” El Crystal Principal
Skip Johnson said when it appeared the board
would be deadlocked with a split vote.
Despite voting for the magnet proposal,
board President Skip Henderson still had
questions about the possible negative impact it
may cause throughout the district.
“We’re in deep doo-doo when it comes to
finances,” said Henderson.
Adding another program into the mix when
there are other problems isn’t prudent. He also
had concerns that the new program would
draw students from other San Bruno schools
causing a lower enrollment. Such a change
could make other schools more vulnerable to
closure – a conversation that will most likely
be rekindled given the district’s budget chal-
lenges.
Johnson, along with members in the audi-
ence, pledged to raise the funds needed to get
the program started. If the money isn’t raised,
Johnson told Henderson they would have to
pull the plug. Advocates pointed to grant and
donor possibilities if the program is given the
go-ahead. Securing that money, supporters
argued, would give the district more money to
spend on other district schools.
Martinez’s concerns were not about the pro-
gram but more about the possible benefit and
access to all students. He also had questions
about governance that he wanted worked out
before approval.
Trustees Jim Prescott and Jennifer Blanco
both favored the proposal, crediting staff and
the community for coming together to bring
forward a creative solution that could draw
positive change to the district.
Unlike most magnet schools, the El Crystal
proposal includes keeping the current bound-
aries and allowing students from throughout
the district to also enroll as space permits. The
school would convert its media center to be
formally named the Danford Center for
Innovation. The name will honor the Danford
Foundation which has donated more than
$200,000 to both El Crystal and Parkside to
support the implementation of technology.
The center would serve as space for continued
teacher professional development and as a
student technology activity center, according
to the proposal included in the staff report.
The plan also calls for the creation of a sub-
committee including school, district and com-
munity representatives to create an action plan
that includes designing curriculum, consider-
ing enrollment possibilities, making presenta-
tions to the larger school community, working
with a volunteer architect to redesign the
media center and seeking outside funding.
Budget and school closure remain serious
issues for the district.
The San Bruno Park Elementary School
Board of Trustees hoped to curb the deficit
with Measure G, a five-year, $199 annual par-
cel tax that failed on the Nov. 6 ballot. An
updated current budget now shows an expect-
ed $3.26 million deficit, according to a report
by the Fiscal Sustainability Task Force. The
presentation, which was supposed to be heard
last night, calls for a $980,000 transfer from a
special savings account and for more than
$500,000 in either cuts or increased revenue.
The conversation about the budget, along
with a number of other agendized items,
weren’t heard Wednesday. Instead, the meet-
ing was ended at 10 p.m. and the conversation
was moved to a special meeting to be held
Thursday, Nov. 29.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
ple in late spring. You might recognize from
the botanical name that this bulb is in the
onion family and, except for its color, it does
indeed resemble chives in bloom. Like chives,
it likes lots of sun.
Let’s return to blues and whites, this time to
some bulbs that are somewhat familiar but
which you might forget: snowdrops, dwarf
irises and Spanish bluebells.
As implied by their name, the nodding,
white flowers of snowdrops do appear very
early, providing flowers in winter — a very
welcome sight.
Dwarf irises, appearing a bit later, are dain-
ty cousins of Siberian irises, growing only a
few inches tall and with intensely blue flowers
— a particularly charming sight when their
dark blue petals catch hold of a few flakes of
newly fallen snow.
Spanish bluebells are giants among these
minor bulbs, growing over a foot high. The
bell-like flowers come in a range of colors,
including shades of blue, but also pink and
white.
Continued from page 19
BULBS
SUBURBAN LIVING 21
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes º Mu|ti-Fami|y º Mixed-Use º Commercia|
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Reñnance / Cash Out
Investors We|come º Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
As much as I love the cool, crisp weather
that accompanies fall, it doesn’t take long for
me to get fed up with some of the garden
chores that come with it.
Just as I finish raking the multitudes of
leaves and twigs that appear after each gust of
wind, more reappear from God knows where.
I try to remind myself that all these leaves are
a gift, and my compost will be all the richer
because of them. But after the freshly cleared
lawn gets covered with fallen leaves for the
umpteenth time, I start dreaming about firing
up the chain saw, imagining how I would
rather have a big pile of firewood than a big
pile of compost.
Fortunately, I always come to my senses.
Eventually the cleanup will come to an end,
but in the meantime there are plenty of other
jobs that need to be done this month.
Now is the time to take soil samples of any
garden areas that failed to perform well in the
past season. This is especially true of veg-
etable gardens, but it also holds true for flower
gardens, shrub borders and even lawns.
Your state or county agricultural extension
agency can do an analysis of your soil, often
for free. Most states provide online instruc-
tions on how to take soil samples, along with
an address you can send the samples to. Some
states even provide bags to mail the samples
in. (Not sure how to find your agency? Just
type your county’s name and “agricultural
extension” in an Internet search engine.)
A detailed analysis from your extension
agent will provide you with information need-
ed for soil amendments. Many amendments
can still be added now to give you a head start
on spring work.
Speaking of getting a jump on spring, now
is a good time to prepare seed beds for early
spring crops such as peas, spinach, arugula
and radishes. I add plenty of compost and
aged manure now so the beds will be ready
early. Often my soil is too wet to work in early
spring, but it’s fine to work now.
I still have root vegetables in my garden,
such as beets and carrots. I prefer to leave
them in the cool soil, where they will sit in a
suspended state of animation until I harvest
them. However, there are other roots from the
garden that will need to be dug and stored
soon. Dahlia tubers should be dug as soon as
the first hard frost blackens their leaves and
stems.
Once the foliage has been killed by frost. I
cut the plants down, leaving stems that are
about 6 inches above the soil. I gently dig
down and lift the tubers from the ground in
one clump and gently shake off any loose soil
but leave any soil that clings to the tubers.
I put the clumps on screens placed between
two saw horses and let them dry for a day or
two out in the garden before placing the
clumps (soil and all) into stackable plastic
milk crates. I store the crates in an area of my
basement that is far from the furnace where
temperatures stay between 40 and 50 degrees.
Cooler temperatures will keep the tubers
from drying out too much over the next few
months until it is time to replant them into the
garden next spring.
Taking care of soil and roots
After the first hard frost, it’s time to dig up your dahlia tubers.
DATEBOOK
22
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, NOV. 15
Connecting Ready Kids to Ready
Schools: Silicon Valley’s Campaign
for ThirdGrade Achievement. 8 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. San Mateo Marriott, 1770
S. Amphlett Blvd., San Mateo.There will
be speakers and breakout sessions for
discussion. For more information and
to register call 450-5512 visit
siliconvalleycf.org/content/calendar.
AARP Chapter 139 Meeting. 11 a.m.
Beresford Recreation Center 2720
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. 11
a.m. will be the social hour, the
meeting will be at noon. Meeting will
be followed by Tony Castle,Vaudeville
Entertainer. Free. For more information
call 345-5001.
Caminar SanMateo’sOpenHouse.4
p.m. to 6 p.m. Caminar, 2600 El Camino
Real, San Mateo. The nonprofit
celebrates the opening of its newly
consolidated Caminar San Mateo
office, meet the staff and learn about
its programs and services to help
individuals with serious mental illness
live independently. To RSVP call 372-
4080.
Energy Efficiency Workshops. 6:30
p.m. to 8 p.m. Westlake Community
Center, Merced Room, 145 Lake
Merced Blvd., Daly City. For more
information call 520-4869.
Lecture by Ray Kurzwell. 7 p.m.
Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way,
Palo Alto. Ray Kurzwell, inventor,
futurist and author of ‘How to Create
a Mind’ will deliver a lecture on
artificial intelligence. $12 for members,
$20 for non-members and $40
premium (includes a copy of his book
and premium seating). For more
information email
ggehue@commonwealthclub.org.
Pairing Wine with Food. 7 p.m. to 8
p.m. San Bruno Library, Downstairs
Community Room. 701 Angus Ave.
West, San Bruno. Wine pairing
program that will teach you how to
pair wine with your holiday menu. 21
and over. Limited to 30 people, pre-
registration is required. Free. to
pre-register or for more information
call 616-7078.
Preview Night: HowTo Succeed In
Business Without Really Trying. 7
p.m. Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.The
show is rated PG. $15 for adults and
$10 for students and seniors online.
$17 for adults and $10 for students
and seniors at the door. For more
information visit aragondrama.com.
Faith and Democracy: A Post-
Election Forum. 7 p.m. Peninsula
Temple Beth El, 1700 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Panelists will share
their insight and analysis about what’s
at stake for immigration, education,
criminal justice and growing income
disparities on the San Francisco
Peninsula. For more information call
341-7701.
‘Get Ready’ Basic Disaster
Preparedness Training. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Beresford Recreation Center at
2720 Alameda de las Pulgas San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
522-7960. To register visit
www.erecreg.
Waltz, Bachata, Salsa. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City, 7 p.m. to
8 p.m. International Standard Level II
Waltz, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. International
Standard Level I Waltz, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Bachata, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Salsa. For
more information call
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Dragon Productions Presents:
‘March.’ 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 535
Alma St., Palo Alto. $25 general, $20
seniors, $16 student. To purchase
tickets visit
www.dragonproductions.net. For
more information call 493-2006.
FRIDAY NOV. 16
Aida Opera Candies Reopening. 10
a.m. Aida Opera Candies, 1375
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Free
admission. For more information visit
aidacandies.com.
Senior Showcase Information Fair.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd. (at Hillsdale
Boulevard), Foster City. Learn about
senior services from more than 40
exhibitors at this free community
event. Free blood pressure check, free
document shredding. Ask pharmacists
your questions about medications.
Free goody bags for the first 250
guests. Sponsored by the Daily Journal
and the Health Plan of San Mateo.
Everyone welcome. Free admission.
For more information call 344-5200.
J. Stephen Morrison Lectures on
Global Health Policy and HIV/AIDS
Authority. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Skyline
College, Building 6, Room 6202, 3300
College Drive, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call 738-4346.
Open House/Adoption Event. Noon
to 7 p.m. Nine Lives Foundation, 3015
Rolison Road, Redwood City.The Nine
Lives Foundation is a nonprofit, no kill
cat shelter in Redwood City. Free
admission. For more information visit
ninelivesfoundation.org.
Invest Yourself with Guest Speaker
Bella Schneider. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Il
Fornaio, 327 Lorton Ave., Burlingame.
For more information contact
gallagherbren@gmail.com.
The Progressive International
MotorcycleShow. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. San
Mateo County Event Center, 2495
South Delaware St., San Mateo. $15 for
adults. $6 for children ages 6 to 11. To
purchase tickets or for more
information visit
www.motorcycleshows.com.
Hillsdale Shopping Center Presents
a Live Broadway Performance from
Disney’s The Lion King. 5:30 p.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 345-8222.
Burlingame High School Presents:
‘Wyrd Sisters.’ 7 p.m. Burlingame
High School Theater, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $12 for general admission
and $10 for students, seniors and
children. For more information or to
reserve tickets call 558-2854.
Pied Piper Players presents ‘The
Wizard of Oz.’ 7 p.m. Bayside
Performing Arts Center, 2025 Kehoe
Ave., San Mateo. $16 for adults, $11 for
children and seniors. For more
information visit
http://baysidetheater.com.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
Presents ‘The Dracula Kidds.’ 7 p.m.
Mustang Hall, Central Middle School,
828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. $12 in
advance and $14 at the door. This
mystery-farce follows students on
their spring vacation in the gloomy
old mansion on Blood Pudding Lane,
which is haunted by a werewolf’s
curse. For more information and to
order tickets visit
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Preview Night: HowTo Succeed In
Business Without Really Trying. 7
p.m. Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.The
show is rated PG. $15 for adults and
$10 for students and seniors online.
$17 for adults and $10 for students
and seniors at the door. For more
information visit aragondrama.com.
Salsa, Milonga. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. 7 p.m. to
8 p.m. For Beginners Only Salsa 2 Class.
$20 at 8 p.m. for Argentine Tango
Lesson and Milonga with live music.
$18 at 9 p.m. for Milonga with live
music. For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Peninsula Youth Theatre: Disney’s
Beauty and the Beast Jr. 7:30 p.m.
500 Castro St., Mountain View. For
more information and to order tickets
call 903-6000.
New Millennium Chamber
Orchestra Concert. 7:30 p.m. Trinity
Presbyterian Church, 1106 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Carlos.The Orchestra
will premier two new pieces of music,
Brothers and Tommy. Suggested
donation at the door, $10. Students,
free. For more information visit
nmchamberorchestra.org.
Holiday Concert. 8 p.m. Memorial
Church, Stanford University, 450 Serra
Mall, Stanford. $20 general admission.
For more information call 941-5291 or
visit peninsulasymphony.org.
Dragon Productions Presents:
‘March’. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 535
Alma St., Palo Alto. $25 general, $20
seniors, $16 student. To purchase
tickets visit
www.dragonproductions.net. For
more information call 493-2006.
Bad@ss Bassoonists and
Beethoven’s Seventh. 8 p.m. to 10
p.m. Cañada College, Main Theatre,
4200 Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City.
Tickets range from $20 to $25. $10 for
students. Free for children. For more
information visit
redwoodsymphony.org.
SATURDAY, NOV. 17
KQED’s Dr. Seuss’s ‘The Cat in the
Hat’ character meet and greet. 8:30
a.m. Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. There will be a meet
and greet, photos and more. Free. For
more information visit hillsdale.com.
Thanksgiving Fun Run. 9 a.m.,
Genentech, 1 DNA Way, So. San
Francisco. Runners, walkers, families
and kids are invited to participate in
the 39th Annual Thanksgiving Fun
Run along the beautiful Bay trail. Rain
or shine. $20, youth 13-17 $5, 12 and
under are free.To register and for more
information call 829-3800.
The Progressive International
Motorcycle Show. 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
San Mateo County Event Center, 2495
South Delaware St., San Mateo. $15 for
adults. $6 for children ages 6 to 11. To
purchase tickets or for more
information visit
www.motorcycleshows.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
$2.7 billion greater than forecast in the
2012-13 budget, partly because of over-
ly optimistic projections for how much
the state would get from the dissolution
of local redevelopment agencies that
Brown initiated. Taylor said the state
will see about $1.8 billion less than
expected.
On Wednesday, the governor said the
analyst’s report validated his administra-
tion’s work these past two years to
reduce spending, streamline departments
and make government more efficient.
“We’ve had cuts. We’ve had a lot of
cuts. And with Proposition 30 we have
some revenue. ... Together it puts the
state in a very solid position for a sus-
tainable balanced budget for years to
come,” Brown told reporters at appear-
ance at a UC Board of Regents meeting.
The governor said he would like to see
the state exercise fiscal discipline, pay
down our debts and build a rainy day
fund. “We’re not out of the woods yet,”
he said.
Republican Assemblyman Jim Nielsen
of Gerber said he believes Democrats
will repeal a state law eliminating auto-
matic cost-of-living increases and go on
a spending spree.
“Being encouraged by this low deficit
level and emboldened by the people
approving tax increases, I think that the
spenders are going to say, ‘Hey, we’ve
got the green light,”’ said the vice chair
of the Assembly budget committee. “So
the key will be what restraint Jerry
Brown can exert upon them.”
The analyst’s report projects a surplus
starting in 2014, thanks partly to
Brown’s tax initiative, the state’s eco-
nomic recovery and previous budget
cuts, but he cautioned that the forecast is
dependent upon a continuing steady eco-
nomic recovery and strict spending con-
trols by the governor and Legislature.
Brown, a Democrat, bet big this
November by asking voters to approve
Proposition 30, which raises the
statewide sales tax by a quarter cent and
boosts income taxes on the wealthy to
help solve the state’s ongoing deficit.
Voters, particularly minorities and those
between the ages of 18 and 29, agreed.
The tax hikes are expected to provide
an additional $6 billion a year for the
state and deliver on a campaign promise
Brown made two years ago to fix the
state’s perpetual budget deficits and to
raise taxes only if voters approved.
Proposition 30 raises the statewide
sales tax to 7.5 percent for four years
and income taxes rates to between 10.3
and 12.3 percent for seven years on
income over $250,000 a year. The credit
rating agencies Standard & Poor’s and
Moody’s signaled their approval of the
state’s financial picture after it passed.
Voters also approved more taxes under
Proposition 39, which closes a corporate
tax loophole and is projected to raise
about $1 billion a year.
The $91.3 billion budget lawmakers
approved last summer called for about
$6 billion in automatic cuts to K-12
schools and universities if the initiative
failed.
According to the state finance depart-
ment, tax revenues have largely been on
pace with the state’s budget projections.
Overall, revenues are $176 million
below forecast, but October revenues
came in $208 million above the month’s
forecast.
The finance department reported that
the state brought in an additional $1.4
billion from income and corporate taxes
that it had attributed to past years. But
Taylor warned that such practice could
be problematic and he urged the
Legislature to direct the administration
to use a simpler accounting method.
But the decline of Facebook’s stock
price has rubbed out some of the money
the state was hoping to receive. The ana-
lyst previously estimated the state would
generate $1.9 billion from taxes related
to the sale of Facebook’s stock but
reduced that amount by $626 million.
Facebook went public at $38 a share
but closed around $22 Wednesday.
The analyst’s office cautioned that its
budget outlook was based on conserva-
tive assumptions. Taylor said his staff
did not account for cost-of-living
increases or inflation in state programs.
The state has yet to address its pension
and retiree health care liability.
Continued from page 1
DEFICIT
under the federal health care reform law.
The governor’s office is expected to
forward the plan to the Obama adminis-
tration on Friday, the deadline for states
to notify the federal government about
whether they plan to establish health
care exchanges. The deadline for states
to submit an operational plan, as
California is doing, has been extended to
mid-December.
“We don’t need more time,” said Peter
Lee, the board’s executive director.
“We’ve been working feverishly over
the past year, we’re excited about going
forward, and that blueprint is a big
deal.”
The action by the California Health
Benefit Exchange board, which changed
its name last month to Covered
California, kicks off a sprint toward the
Jan. 1, 2014, deadline for states to have
health insurance exchanges up and run-
ning.
In 2010, California became the first
state to authorize a health insurance
exchange after passage of the federal
Affordable Care Act. It is expected to
offer affordable care to some 3 million
uninsured Californians, although Lee
said a realistic coverage figure by 2017
is closer to 2.3 million.
Another 1.2 million to 1.6 million
Californians are expected to be covered
under expanded Medicaid provisions.
Small-business owners who find it dif-
ficult to provide health coverage to their
employees also are a prime target of the
coming marketplace.
“This is a big moment for California
going forward,” Lee said, shortly before
the board unanimously approved the
blueprint and an application for more
than $700 million in federal grant
money. One of the five members of the
exchange board, Dr. Robert Ross, was
absent.
Some states may opt out, meaning the
federal government will step in and
operate their insurance marketplace,
while others will create an exchange in
conjunction with the federal govern-
ment.
Until open enrollment begins next
October, Covered California will hire
staff, set up the exchange, begin educat-
ing the public about how it will work
and select health plans to participate
from the 33 that have indicated they
intend to submit bids.
Diana Dooley, the board’s chair-
woman, said the state has made great
progress so far in creating a health care
marketplace, but said the upcoming year
will be fast-paced.
Board members noted that California
has more uninsured residents — roughly
7 million — than the entire population of
some states. One of the exchange’s key
challenges between now and the time
open enrollment begins is to explain to
Californians how they will be affected
by the reforms and how this new part of
state government will work.
California’s ethnic diversity also will
be a challenge in getting out the mes-
sage. The exchange’s marketing effort
will provide outreach material in 13 lan-
guages.
“It’s still a very heavy lift,” said
Dooley, who also is the secretary of the
state Health and Human Services
Agency.
She and Lee expressed relief that
President Barack Obama had been re-
elected, because Republicans had vowed
to repeal the health care overhaul if they
had won the White House. “At least
some of the uncertainty that we faced is
now behind us,” she said.
Covered California’s chief mission is
to expand coverage by providing low-
cost but affordable health care using fed-
eral tax subsidies and credits. The mar-
ketplace it is establishing will allow con-
sumers to compare plans and prices
online.
Under the federal law, consumers will
be required to have insurance or pay a
penalty, the so-called individual man-
date. By 2016, that penalty will be $695
a year per family member, or $347 for
dependents under age 18.
Continued from page 1
HEALTH
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- The probability of mak-
ing a breakthrough on a recent project is exception-
ally good. However, it’s smart to keep this matter
confdential.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you fnd yourself
in a position where you can help guide a friend
through an awkward maze, don’t wait to be asked, es-
pecially if you see your pal making avoidable mistakes.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- An opportunity
might arise that would enable you to be of assistance
to someone you could easily help. If you don’t do so,
sadly, chances are it’ll be for some selfsh reason.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Your powers of obser-
vation are especially keen, and you will easily spot
errors in others’ methods. Find an opening to correct
them without appearing to be a know-it-all.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you’ve got the
experience, it might be smart for you to assume the
principal role in a joint endeavor rather than leave
things up to your partner. Why take a chance on what
the other party might not know?
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- You could get a lot
more accomplished if you are willing to cooperate
with your colleagues. You’ll quickly discover that
they’ll pull for you when you pull for them.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Before doing any work
for another, get a frm commitment on what your
prospective employer is willing to pay. Chances are,
the bigger the reward, the better job you’ll do.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You’ll instinctively treat
everyone as an equal and, since most people hold you
in high esteem, they’ll take it as a huge compliment.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- This is a good day to
take on some tasks that you know you should have
attended to by now but have been neglecting. Once
they’re done, it’ll be a huge load off your back.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Try to set aside some time to
spend with someone you like but haven’t seen much
of lately. It’ll prove to be a happy event, but more
importantly, you could learn something quite valuable.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Some kind and generous
behavior you display to others could turn out to be of
tremendous personal beneft in the long run. It pays
to be a giver.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- The major reason why
your words carry more weight than usual is that they
will not only come straight from the heart but will
have a strong ring of sincerity as well.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
11-15-12
THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
2
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
1
1
-
1
5
-
1
2
ACROSS
1 Floor beam
6 Thick carpeting
10 Deposed
12 Nibbled at
14 Elegant fur
15 Parmesan cousin
16 Overshoe
18 “Da” or “ja”
19 Gorby’s realm
21 Deli loaves
23 U.K. network
24 Actress -- Mendes
26 Painter Salvador --
29 Debt memos
31 Ugh!
33 Lean over
35 Ali --
36 Gas-pump abbr.
37 A law -- itself
38 License plates
40 UPS units
42 Cave, perhaps
43 Land parcel
45 Survey
47 Vive le --!
50 Breeding ground
52 Cancels
54 Born frst
58 -- pig
59 Glamour
60 What red means
61 Where Damascus is
DOwN
1 Average guy
2 Not just mine
3 Belief
4 Moves a little
5 Faculty reward
6 Disturbed a sleeper
7 Smokehouse hanger
8 Not at home
9 Kind of pool
11 Society miss
12 Cloudy, in London
13 John -- Passos
17 Piece of jewelry
19 WWII sea menace (hyph.)
20 Diver’s gear
22 The “elephant boy”
23 Apron front
25 Man of ancient Rome
27 Tennis great Ivan --
28 Chip maker
30 Heroic tale
32 Frequent 007 foe
34 Oxford tutor
39 Lug around
41 Hexes
44 Santa --, Calif.
46 In a strange way
47 Dusting cloth
48 Unwelcome obligation
49 -- -- for keeps
51 Lillie or Arthur
53 Famous numero
55 Ger., Nor., etc.
56 -- Lanka
57 Hot drink
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNA’s
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimer’s or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSE MANAGER
Hillsborough
20 hours per week, $16 per
hour, perfect for a retired cou-
ple. Responsibility includes car-
ing for executive property duties
include housekeeping, schedul-
ing, oversight of contractors,
and supervising the upkeep of
the property. Must have excel-
lent communication skills, be
computer literate and have at-
tention for details. Background
check and references are re-
quired. Must live in the San Ma-
teo Burlingame area
To apply email your resume to
box5711@live.com
110 Employment
HOUSEKEEPING - RETIREMENT
COMMUNITY. Full time, understand,
write & speak English. Experience re-
quired, $10.hr + benefits. Apply at 201
Chadbourne Ave., Millbrae.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part-time + Seasonal
Start up to $13 Exp up to $20
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER
INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by regular mail to
800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
BROADWAY GRILL HIRING
BARTENDER. We are an upscale Amer-
ican wood fired grill restaurant looking for
the best people to grow with our very
successful concept. Flexible full schedul-
ing, top $$ potential & more!
BROADWAY GRILL BURLINGAME
1400 Broadway Burlingame, CA 94010
Apply in person Tues-Saturday between
3PM and 5PM.
Or e-mail resume to Jobs@BWGrill.com
RESTAURANT -
LOOKING FOR FT/PT American
breakfast cook at the Pantry
Restaurant, Call (650)345-4544
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252802
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Geotours and Travel, 2750 Me-
lendy Drive, #7, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Frank Cromosini & Donna
Rhoan, same address. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Frank Cromosini /
/s/ Donna Rhoan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/1/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252742
The following person is doing business
as: Dymaxicon, 502 Barbados Lane,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Hillary
Johnson, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Hillary Johnson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252479
The following person is doing business
as: Jye Lih Enterprises Co., 454 Hillcrest
Road, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Chang
Meng Chen Yen, aka Margaret Yen,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Chang Meng Chen Yen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252433
The following person is doing business
as: Perla’s Gourmet, 2864 Hosmer
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Perla Prieto, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Perla Prieto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252606
The following person is doing business
as: G & B Automotive, 113 Camaritas
Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: J. Gerardo Ramirez, same
address, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/2/2012.
/s/ J. Gerardo Ramirez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252844
The following person is doing business
as: Sirius Illumination, 2007 Woodside
Rd. Apt. 9, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cynthia Magg, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
10/11/2012
/s/ Cynthia Magg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/12, 11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/18/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252556
The following person is doing business
as: Paradise Flowers and Gifts, 3720
Florence St., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Rosa I. Funes, 636 Mar Ar-
thur Ave., Redwood City, CA 94063.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Rosa I. Funes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/01/12, 11/08/12, 11/15/12, 11/22/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253062
The following person is doing business
as: Betsy Viduya dba Custom Windows
& Things, 113 Indio Drive, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Elizabeth
A. Viduya, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/01/2012.
/s/ Elizabeth A. Viduya /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/12, 11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252907
The following person is doing business
as: Usual Place, 189 El Camino Real,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Min Fu Wu,
874 Washington St., San Francisco, CA
94108. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Min Fu Wu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/12, 11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253019
The following person is doing business
as: The Aromahhh Therapist, 1982 West
Bayshore Dr. #312, PALO ALTO, CA
94303 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Michelle Hernandez, same
address, and Kimberly Wong, 1440 6th
St., #12, ALAMEDA, CA 94501. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Kimberly Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/12, 11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253095
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Redwood Debris, 2) Redwood De-
bris Box 350 Lang Road, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Redwood Services, INC.,
CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
11/18/1996.
/s/ Gary Button /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/12, 11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253112
The following person is doing business
as: Mirinae Productions and Services, 67
41st Ave., Apt. 5, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: John Chang-Eun Cha, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/14/2007.
/s/ John Chang-Eun Cha /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253177
The following person is doing business
as: Car’s Auto Body Shop, 233 S. Maple
Ave #7, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Alina Claros, 682 Villo St. #4,
Daly City, CA 94014. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/1/12.
/s/ Alina Claros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253176
The following person is doing business
as: Best Specialty Products and Serv-
ices, 114 Somerset St., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94062 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Kathleen Pfister,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Kathleen Pfister /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
25 Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
CITY OF SAN BRUNO - NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Portable Generator
The City of San Bruno is accepting bids, subject to the specifi-
cations and conditions as stated in Bid No. E13-6410-01. Bid
Packet is available at http://www.sanbruno.ca.gov/finance_bid-
dingopp.html.
Bids must be submitted to San Bruno City Clerk’s Office, City
Hall, 567 El Camino Real, San Bruno 94066 by 3:00 p.m. No-
vember 21, 2012, at which time they will be publicly opened
and read.
Contact the Finance Department at 650-616-7034 to obtain a
copy of the bid documents or for more information.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
November 2, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, November 10 and
15, 2012.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253110
The following person is doing business
as: Buyvia, 63 Bovet Rd. Ste 311, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: NF8LF, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2012.
/s/ Norman Fong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
William J. McPartland
Case Number 122872
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Wiilliam J. McPartland.
A Petition for Probate has been filed by
Frank J. McPartland. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that
Frank J. McPartland. be appointed as
personal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: Decenber 14, 2012
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. Probate, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Petitioner:
Frank J. McPartland
167 Alhambra St.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94123
(415)771-0216
Dated: November 14, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 15, 22, 29, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV506826
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): OVIER MARISCAL SALCE-
DO, CARMEN RENDON IBARRA; and
DOES 1 through 30, inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): MIGUEL
ANGEL SANDOVAL
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
203 Public Notices
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo,
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Daniel D.Castillo, Esq.
Southwest Legal Group
(818)591-4300
22440 Clarendon St., Ste. 200
WOODLAND HILLS, CA 91367
Date: (Fecha) July 05, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: HG12644729
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): TY ALMO, ANNIE WHITE;
and DOES 1 TO 10
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): STATE
FARM GENERAL INS. CO.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
203 Public Notices
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
Alameda,
24405 Amador St.
Hayward, CA 94544
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Reese Law Group
Harlan M. Reese, 118226, Joseph M.
Pleasant, 179571, Max A. Higgins,
270334, Dana N. Meyers, 272640.
(858)550-0389
6725 Mesa Ridge Road, Ste. 240
SAN DIEGO, CA, 92121
Date: (Fecha) Aug. 22, 2011
Pat Sweeten, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 8, 15, 22, 29, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. SOLD!
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1 BAG of Hot Wheels and Matchbox
Cars, from the 70s, Appx 40, SOLD!
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, playgoer August pro-
gram, featuring Gloria Stuart, George
Sanders, Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20.,
San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE - Special Issue,
“Off to the Moon”, featuring Armstrong,
Aldrin, and Collins, and a special article
by Charles Lindburgh, $25., San Mateo,
(650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
298 Collectibles
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., SOLD!
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
LIONEL TRAIN Wall Clock with working
train $45 (650)589-8348
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures, SOLD!
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
2 MODEL ships in box $30
(650)589-8348
PLASTIC ARMY MAN SET - from the
70’s, set inludes tanks, soldiers, vehicles,
landscape, $75.obo, (650)589-8348
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
302 Antiques
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. SOLD!
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 SOLD!
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH & LOVE SEAT- Floral Design.
Great Condition, $350.00, SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LARGE DESK, with 3 drawers, 1 in
center. Oak color, $150 obo,
(650)348-5169
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
26
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Elegant trinket
6 Yam or taro
11 “Talk of the
Nation” airer
14 Not proximate
15 “The Princess
Bride” kidnapper
__ Montoya
16 Rivière contents
17 Negotiator’s
assets
20 Textbook
updates, e.g.:
Abbr.
21 Pricey screens
22 Nuts for soft
drinks
23 Stage signal
24 Synthesizer
pioneer
25 Utterly squashed
32 Come undone
33 Be just too sweet
34 Inkling
35 __ Lopez: chess
opening
36 Mickey D’s
breakfast item
39 In
40 Before, to the
Bard
42 “Actually, that’s
not true”
43 Reasons for
returns
45 Easily identifiable
teams, in casual
games
48 Shared currency
49 Really quiet, in
music
50 USS Missouri
nickname
52 Digital image unit
55 Through
58 1885 Van Gogh
painting (whose
subjects may
have appreciated
the ends of 17-,
25- and 45-
Across)
61 Angkor __:
Cambodian
temple
62 Die (out)
63 Trio with notable
beards
64 “Star Trek: DSN”
role
65 Below-average
Joe
66 Eternities
DOWN
1 Big screen pig
2 Third-generation
release of 2012
3 24-Down
containers
4 Part of ILO: Abbr.
5 Pacific-12
Conference
member
6 Windshield
application
7 Pac-12 member,
e.g.
8 Some troughs
9 It’s usually
broken before
use
10 “You da man!”
11 Author of “The
Sandman”
graphic novels
12 Respected Smurf
13 Muscovite, e.g.:
Abbr.
18 Think tank
product
19 Cheap sauce
23 Keep from going
higher
24 Subway
addition?
25 Club with the
motto “To Make
the Best Better”
26 Beset
27 Milan’s La __
28 Fully committed
29 Traveled down
the Grand Canal,
say
30 Has met before
31 JFK listings
32 College srs.’ tests
37 Soup with a bento
38 Named for a prez,
Philly public
square also known
as Love Park
41 Master card?
44 Golf hole’s edge
46 Uniformed forces
47 WWI German
vice admiral
50 USAF stealth
plane
51 “__ to do it!”
52 Trail
53 Brangelina, e.g.
54 Tic-tac-toe option
55 Quash
56 Element in
hemoglobin
57 Egyptian dangers
59 Dick
60 Philosopher Mo-__
By Julian Lim
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
11/15/12
11/15/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
BUFFET SERVER, stainless, cook &
serve same dish, $20 (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, Italian, in original box, clear
color, $12., (650)578-9208
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size bed pillow. Allergy-free ticking.
Gently cushions pain, stiffness. Almost
new. $20.00 (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., SOLD!
306 Housewares
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , elegant, durable. $25.,
(650)578-9208
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw, SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1” BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, SOLD!
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
308 Tools
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
310 Misc. For Sale
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case $75 OBO,
(650)345-7352
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
perfect condition ideal gift, SOLD!
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SMALL SIZE Kennel good for small size
dog or cat 23" long 14" wide and 141/2"
high $25 FIRM (650)871-7200
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEAMER TRUNK $65 OBO (650)345-
7352
310 Misc. For Sale
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TOILET - very good condition, white,
SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, SOLD!
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
SOLD!
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2 SAN Francisco Giants Jackets 1 is
made by (Starter) LG/XLG excellent con-
dition $99 for both (650)571-5790
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DESIGNER SHOES, Size 9 1/2 & 10,
many styles and colors, (650)580-3316
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
27 Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MEN’S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened package, XL, High Sierra, long
sleeves and legs, dark green plaid, great
gift, $12., (650)578-9208
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, excellent condition,
$30.all, San Bruno, (650)588-1946
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
CALLAWAY GOLF Clubs Hawkeye
Irons, Graphite Shafts, # 4 thru P/W
Excellent Condition $79 (650)365-1797
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole , SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - Proform XB 550S, local
pickup, $100., SOLD!
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, SOLD!
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS SALE!
Fri, Nov 23, 10 AM - 4 PM
Sat, Nov 24, 10 AM - 4 PM
Pro Dance Flooring
Large Wall Mirrors,
Sound & Lighting System,
Benches, Pub Tables,
Stools, Display Counters,
Large Metal Shelves,
Refrigerator & Microwave,
Kitchen & Janitorial
Supplies, Folding Tables &
CD players,
Office Equipment & Supplies
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!
Boogie Woogie Ballroom
551 Foster City Blvd, Ste. G
Foster City, CA 94404
650-627-4854
Find the IHOP,
Then Look Right
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., SOLD!
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
670 Auto Parts
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, $20.,
San Bruno, (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors Cleaning
Concrete
Construction Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
28
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
LOPEZ HANDYMAN
Bath & Kitchen
Remodels
Specializing in granite,
tile & flooring.
(650)219-4050
Handy Help
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean
(415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JM PAINTING &
PLUMBING
New Construction,
Remodel & Repair
(415)350-1908
Lic.# C36C33
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S
INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Business Services
PUT YOUR
BUSINESS INFO
ON THE
INTERNET
FREE
Link the phone number
in your classified ad
directly to online details
about your business
ZypPages.com
Barbara@ZypPages.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
29 Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
Health & Medical
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
ERRANDS WITH
CARE
Housecleaning,
Cooking,
Appointments, Errands
Call anytime
(650) 271-2505
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
MANUFACTURED
HOME COMMUNITY
For Ages 55+
Canada Cove,
Half Moon Bay
(650) 726-5503
www.theaccenthome.com
Walk to the Beach
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
&
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
LOCAL 30 Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
near Theatre Way.
The construction is blocking through traffic
on Middlefield Road and limiting parking and
access to the businesses located on Theatre
Way. All businesses are remaining open dur-
ing the project, including Arya, which opened
eight months ago.
“It’s a great promise of tomorrow,” said
Fera Hashemi, another manger at Arya. “In
the meantime, we’re here.”
She pointed to the construction blockade
that prevents vehicle traffic on Theatre Way on
weekdays.
“Look at it,” she said. “In the rain, my cus-
tomers can’t drop off people in front of the
restaurant.”
The city held its first meeting with the
impacted businesses last Thursday.
Hashemi left the meeting hopeful that there
would be collaboration with the city to
improve customer access to the shops and
restaurants during construction.
While Theatre Way is opened up for vehicle
traffic Friday evening through Sunday
evening, some suggested opening up Theatre
Way on weekday afternoons too.
Another idea Hashemi liked was setting up
valet parking on the east end of Theatre Way.
She suggested valet cars be parked in the
courthouse parking garage, which is free after
6 p.m.
After the meeting, Community
Development Director Bill Ekern said he was
open to the concerns of the business owners.
“Our commitment is to the businesses,” he
said.
He acknowledged that the construction
deters the already fickle customer base.
“It’s brutal for businesses,” he said. “I don’t
think we’re going to be able to solve every-
one’s problems. Parking is always difficult in
cities.”
But some of the solutions proposed by busi-
nesses are plausible, he said. And he is willing
to consider revising project logistics if it
would help them.
Many of the business owners feel the proj-
ect will be beneficial in the long run, but are
worried about making it in the short term, and
during the upcoming holiday season.
Portobello Grill owner Kamran Mahrou was
concerned about customer access, but was
hopeful after the meeting that the city will
help.
“We like to encourage people to come here,
everybody’s open,” he said. “We’re working
with the city to make it as easy as possible.”
While there are less parking spaces in the
Middlefield Road lot, there are 750 spaces in
the Jefferson garage under their building
shared with Century 20 Theatre, he said. And
there are more spaces in the courthouse park-
ing garage.
“We do need the support of the people dur-
ing construction,” he said.
Despite the potential shortfalls, Mahrou is
optimistic about of city’s downtown improve-
ment projects.
“Everything Redwood City is trying to do is
going to make the area exciting,” he said. “So
it will be good in the end.”
Pizza My Heart manager Bobbi Jo
Cannizzaro said she would like Theatre Way
to be open for her delivery drivers.
Pizza My Heart has seen an 8 percent
decrease in sales from the same time last year.
But the construction has not hurt her business,
which offers delivery, as much as the other
restaurants, she said.
She hopes the city will start construction
earlier in the morning and begin to open up
Theatre Way on weekday afternoons.
“We will all benefit if they actually do it,”
she said.
The first phase of relocating the under-
ground storm culvert will last up to eight
months, according to the city’s website. The
entire project is estimated to take more than
two years to complete.
The city is expected to hold another meeting
with businesses in the next few weeks.
For more information on the Redwood
Tower project visit www.redwoodcity.org/red-
woodtower.
Continued from page 1
BUSINESS
to allow the 7-Eleven to only operate on the
site for two years, the minimum city code
allows for. It could also vote not to terminate
the use regardless of the Planning
Commission’s recommendations that would
allow 7-Eleven to operate on the site for the
duration of its 10-year, just-signed lease or
even longer.
The old deli stood vacant so long that city
staff determined the market use had discontin-
ued for the site and that it should be reverted
back to residential.
But an interim legal counsel for the city
opined earlier this year that the market’s then
owners had no intention to “abandon” the
market use for the site despite it being mar-
keted for medical office uses.
In February, the public was invited to hear a
request for a zoning code amendment sought
by Portfolio Development Partners to keep the
market use on the site.
The public process ended abruptly after the
legal opinion, however, and residents were
then shocked to see a 7-Eleven would move
into the site.
The San Mateo Heights Neighborhood
Association then rallied support to protest the
7-Eleven, based on the potential for increased
crime, litter and traffic in the predominately
residential family-friendly neighborhood.
A building permit for minor interior
improvements for the market was approved on
Aug. 30 by city staff just two days after the
sale of the property was finalized from Isaac
Choy and Susan Lin to Portfolio Development
Partners.
“Once the determination was made that the
retail/market use was a continuation of a legal
non-conforming use, and all other relevant
Municipal Code requirements were met, there
was no discretion under which the city could
deny the building permit. The property was
purchased in 2012 by Portfolio Development
Partners LLC for $1.009 million, in anticipa-
tion of receiving this building permit and with
the intent of reopening a market on the prop-
erty,” according to a city staff report.
Deputy Mayor David Lim called for the
public hearings to consider whether to termi-
nate the market use for the property after
neighbors started expressing concerns on hav-
ing an all-night liquor store operate in the
area.
Stangelini’s operated on the site for nearly
70 years.
A source close to Portfolio said the compa-
ny would have no other option than to sue the
city if the council moves to terminate the use
and not allow the company to recoup its
investment.
The San Mateo City Council meets 7 p.m.,
tonight, City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo.
Continued from page 1
7-ELEVEN
31
Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
32 Thursday • Nov. 15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll808M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 11/30/12
WEBUY
$â0
OFF ANY
$â0
OFF ANY

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful