·• .

•,
LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT
.:NOV· 0 9 2012
BIBLIOTHÈQUE DU PARLEMENT
1
- ~
Royal Canadian. GendarmÉirié·roy_ale .' .
Mounted Police du Canada · · _
~ : : . '
·.·"
--·Canada·
, .' . : ~ :
CONTACT INFORMATION
RCMP Canadian Firearms Program
Ottawa, Ontario K1 A OR2
1 800 731 4000 (toll free)
1 613 825 0315 (fax)
Web site: www.rcmp.gc.ca/cfp
Email: cfp-pcaf@rcmp-grc.gc.ca
Media Relations:
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
1 613 843 5999
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 2012
This publication may be reproduced for internai use only without permission provided the source is fully
acknowledged. However, multiple copy reproductions of this publication in who le or in part for pur poses of resale or
redistribution require prior written permission from the:
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Ottawa, Ontario, K1 A OR2
Catalogue No: PS96-2011
ISSN: 1714-177X
1
CONTENTS
Message from the Commissioner of Firearms ............................................................................... 2
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3
Purpose of Report ................................................................................................ .' .............. 3
Program Overview .............................................................................................................. 3
CFP Mission, Values and Priorities ...................................................................................... 4
CFP Strategie Priorities ........................................... , ....................... : .................................... 4
CFP Partnerships ................................................................................................................. 5
2011 Highlights ................................................................................................................................ 8
Compliance lncentives ........................................................................................................ 8
Canada Safety Cou neil Partnership ..................................................................................... 8
Shift in Firearms Licence Ratios .......................................................................................... 9
Proposed Changes to Firearms Legislation ......................................................................... 9
CFP Law Enforcement Services ..................................................................................................... 10
National Weapons Enforcement Support Team (NWEST) ................................................ 10
Canadian National Firearms Tracing Centre (CNFTC) ....................................................... 11
Specialized Firearms Support Services (SFSS) ................................................................... 11
Firearms Internet Investigations Support (FilS) Unit ........................................................ 13
Firearms Operations and Enforcement Support (FOES) ................................................... 13
Public Agents Firearms Regulations (PAFR) ...................................................................... 13
Canadian Firearms Information System (CFIS) ................................................................. 15
C a ~ a d i a n Police Information Centre (CPIC} ...................................................................... 15
Canadian Firearms Registry Online (CFR0) ....................................................................... 15
CFP Geographical Firearms Reports .................................................................................. 15
CFP Service to the Public ............................................................................................................... 16
Licensing of Firearm Users ................................................................................................ 16
Firearms Licence Renewals ............................................................................................... 17
Firearms Business Support ................................................................................................ 18
Chief Firearms Officers (CFO) ............................................................................................ 18
Firearm Registration ......................................................................................................... 19
Registrar of Firearms ......................................................................................................... l9
Firearms Assistance and Outreach to the Public .............................................................. 20
Outreach to Aboriginal Communities ............................................................................... 21
Keeping Canada Safe ................................................................................................ : .................... 22
Firearms Safety Training ................................................................................................... 22
Enhanced Screening of Firearms Licence Applicants ........................................................ 22
Firearms Licence Application Refusais .............................................................................. 23
Continuous Eligibility Screening of Firearms Licence Holders .......................................... 24
Firearms Licence Revocations ........................................................................................... 24
Firearms Prohibitions ........................................................................................................ 25
Firearms Registration Application Refusais and Certificate Revocations ......................... 26
Firearm-related Inspections .............................................................................................. 26
Range Safety and Use-of-Force Coordinator .................................................................... 27
1-800 Safety Une- Reporting Public Safety Concerns ..................................................... 27
Commit ment to the Future ........................................................................................................... 28
1
Message from the Commissioner of Firearms
1 am pleased to present the 2011 Commissioner of Firearms Report on behalf of the RCMP Canadian
Firearms Program (CFP).
The CFP is Canada's authority on firearms and, as such, plays a key role in the regulation of firearms and
in the enforcement of firearm laws in Canada. ln administering the Firearms Act, the CFP oversees
Canada's program of firearms safety training and, perhaps more importantly, carefully screens firearms
licence applicants and holders to ensure firearms are used safely and responsibly. Sharing in the RCMP's
commitment to A Safe and Secure Canada, the CFP a Iso consists of several firearms-focused groups who
support law enforcement investigations and the criminal justice system in addressing firearm crimes and
mis use.
This report details the CFP's efforts and successes in 2011 and illustrates how it delivered on its
commitment ~ o help make and keep Canada safe in relation to firearms.
Commissioner Bob Paulson
Commissioner of Firearms
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
The Commissioner of the RCMP is a Iso designated as the Commissioner of Firearms and, as su ch, has a dual
mandate with respect to firearms. As the Commissioner of the RCMP, he is responsible for enforcing the law, which
includes firearms law and combating gun crime. As the Commissioner of Firearms, he is responsible for
administering the Firearms Act, which includes licensing of individuals and businesses, firearms safety training and
registration of firearms.
2
Please note that a legislative change took place in 2012, removing the requirement to register non- [1
restricted firearms. This report reflects information for 2011, when this requirement was stiJl in effect. __ ~
INTRODUCTION
Purpose of Report
This report summarizes the activities of, and performance measures for, the RCMP Canadian Firearms
Program (CFP} for the calendar year 2011. As required by the Firearms Act, the Commissioner of
Firearms Report is submitted to the Minister of Public Safety for tabling in Parliament.
Program Overview
The CFP is represented by firearms experts across the country and comprises five groups:
• the Chief Firearms Officer Operations and Firearms Safety Training (CFOOFST} Di recto rate
• the Firearms Service Delivery (FSD} Directorate
• the Firearms lnvestigative and Enforcement Services Directorate (FIESD}
• the Firearms Management and Strategie Services (FMSS} Directorate, and
• the Information Technology Integration and Business lmprovement (ITIBI} section
The CFOOFST Directorate is responsible for the CFP's ten Chief Firearms Officers (CFO}, located within
each province, with Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Yukon being managed by the Manitoba, Alberta
and British Columbia CFOs, respectively. The CFOs are responsible for ali firearms licences and
authorizations within their jurisdictions.
The FSD Di recto rate has two components- the Canadian Firearms Registry, located in Ottawa, and the
Central Processing Site, which includes the national contact centre in Miramichi, New Brunswick.
The CFP's main law enforcement component, FIESD, is coordinated through an office in Mississauga,
Ontario. Other FIESD representatives are located in Ottawa or co-located with municipal and provincial
police services and RCMP contract divisions across the country.
Located in National Headquarters, FMSS provides policy advice, strategie planning, performance
measurement, outreach and other corporate functions, while ITIBI oversees the development and
administration of the CFP's automated systems, data bases, and websites and manages the CFP's
operational business requirements.
The Department of Justice in Ottawa, Edmonton and St. John's provides legal advice to the CFP.
3
CFP Mission, Values and Priorities
The mission of the RCMP Canadian Firearms Program is to enhance public safety by helping to reduce
the risk of death, injury and threat from firearms. The CFP provides Canadian and international law
enforcement organizations with operational support vital to the prevention and investigation offirearms
crime and misuse. lt a Iso continuously screens individual owners to confirm their eligibility to possess
firearms and promotes responsible ownership, use and storage offirearms. ln pursuit of its mission, the
CFP:
• respects the lawful ownership and use of firearms in Canada and supports firearms clients with
quality service, fair treatment and protection of confidential information;
• recognizes th at the involvement of firearm owners and users, the provinces, other federal
agencies, Aboriginal people, police organizations, safety instructors, verifiers, businesses and
public safety groups is essential for effective program delivery and achieving success;
• commits to ongoing improvement and innovation to achieve the highest levels of service,
compliance, efficiency and overall effectiveness; •
• informs and engages its clients and stakeholders in reviewing and developing policy and
regulations and in communicating critical information on program requirements and results;
• manages its resources prudently to provide good value for money, and clear and accu rate
reporting of program performance and resource management; and
• upholds the values and ethical standards of the Public Service of Canada and is committed to fair
staffing, employee development and a work environ ment that encourages involvement and
initiative.
CFP Strategie Priorities
Aligned with both the Government of Canada's and the RCMP's commitment to A Safe and Secure
Canada, the CFP's goal is to protect and enhance public safety. The CFP is committed to the following
RCMP strategie priorities:
• Serious and Organized Crime: Experienced CFP firearms investigators work collaboratively with
Canadian and international law enforcement partners to dismantle organized criminal groups
who traffic firearms, often relying on firearms-focused analytical data produced by the CFP. This
information helps disrupt organized crime by allowing investigators to observe illicit firearms
patterns within a community, in a particular region or across the country.
• National Security: The CFP is actively involved in addressing firearms-related smuggling and
cross-border issues, recognizing illegally obtained firearms as a potential tool for terrorists. Key
international commitments include information sharing with U;S. firearms enforcement,
contributions to Canada's efforts at the United Nations and work with INTERPOL to combat the
trafficking of illicit firearms.
• Youth: While individuals younger than 18 are not permitted to own firearms, they may obtain a
minor's firearm licence which allows them to possess non-restricted firearms for purposes such
as hunting and target shooting. The CFP promotes the safe handling, use and storage of firearms
for ali owners and users and provides firearms safety training and information for youth.
• Aboriginal Communities: Committed to engaging and supporting Aboriginal communities on
firearms-safety-related projects at national, regional and locallevels, the CFP enhances both
individual and community safety by providing firearms-safety education and training as weil as
verification, licensing and registration assistance. Through research and the pursuit of new safety
and training initiatives, the CFP continues to strengthen its partnership with Canada's Aboriginal
communities.
CFP Partnerships
The CFP works collaboratively and effectively with a variety of partner agencies.
Canadian law en forcement agencies
Working with and providing firearm-related services and information to domestic law enforcement
groups, the CFP helps investigators and prosecutors address the illegal movement and criminal use of
firearms. They can check to see if someone considered to be a security threat might have access to
firearms, help to prepare and execute search warrants, provide firearms tracing, identification and
disposai services and offer hands-on firearms training to law enforcement officiais.
-··· ''·
5
International law enforcement
The CFP works with international law enforcement agencies from the United States and other countries
to prevent the illegal movement of firearms ac ross borders and has established a quick and accu rate
electronic exchange of firearms trace information with the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms
and Explosives {ATF). The CFP also hosts or co-hosts an annual international firearms trafficking
conference and has representatives who can travel to other cou nt ries in order to provide expert
firearms-related training to other law enforcement groups when requested.
Public Safety Canada
The Minister of Public Safety has overall responsibility for the Canadian Firearms Program. The
Commissioner of Firearms reports to the Minister of Public Safety and relies on Canadian Firearms
Program staff to provide accu rate and up-to-date firearms-related po licy advice and information which
is then passed on to the Minister and other senior government officiais to assist them in carrying out
their responsibilities.
Canada Border Services Agency
The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) assesses and confirms Non-resident Firearms Declarations
(which serve as temporary licences and firearms registration certificates) for firearms being imported
into Canada, processes commercial firearm imports and inspects firearm shipments to confirm
admissibility. They collect any applicable fees and confirm the firearms' destinations, the purpose for
importation and the eligibility of the importer. CBSA a Iso ens ures firearms crossing the border are being
transported safely and in accordance with Canadian law.
Department of Foreign A/loirs and International Trade
The CFP works with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) to ensure
Canada's international commitments regarding firearms reflect the country's priorities as weil as its
capacity to implement them. DFAIT issues the permits required to export and import firearms.
Department of Justice
The Minister of Justice is responsible for the Criminal Code of Canada, including Part Ill (Firearms and
Other Weapons). Policy development on criminallaw related to firearms requires close cooperation
between the CFP and the Department of Justice. The Department of Justice also provides legal advice
and services to the CFP.
Aborigina/ A/loirs and Northern Development Canada
The CFP works with Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and advises Aboriginalland
daims negotiators on firearms legislation and related issues.
6
Provinces and Territories
Firearms licensing and authorizations in every province and territory are managed by CFOs, who are part
of the CFP. The provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia
have appointed their own CFOs under the Firearms Act and have entered into contribution agreements
for operational funding from the Government of Canada. The CFOs responsible for Newfoundland and
Labrador as weil as Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, the Yukon, the Northwest
Territories and Nunavut are appointed federally and are employees ofthe RCMP CFP.
Responsible for issuing firearms licences to businesses and individuals, CFOs must assess the risk
associated with possession of firearms by every one of the 1.9 million Canadian firearm licence holders.
The Firearms Act and associated regulations authorize CFOs to refuse to issue a licence orto revoke a
licence if a public-safety risk is identified. Within their jurisdictions, CFOs a Iso oversee the delivery of
safety training, approve shooting ranges and clubs, approve transfers and issue authorizations to
transport and carry restricted and prohibited firearms, and conduct inspections to ensure firearms are
being used, transported and stored safely.
Ali regions of Canada are further supported by police officers who work for the CFP Firearms
lnvestigative and Enforcement Services Directorate (FIESD) National Weapons Enforcement Support
Team (NWEST). These officers are members of, or seconded to, the RCMP and provide firearms
enforcement support and services to ali law enforcement groups who investigate firearms crimes and
mis use.
. .. _ ~ - - .. '
7
2011 HIGHLIGHTS
Compliance Incentives
ln 2011, the Minister of Public Safety announced the extension of firearms licensing compliance
incentives:
• A fee waiver for firearms licence renewals or upgrades from one type of licence to another;
• An amnesty that allows individuals who have expired firearms licences or possess unregistered non-
restricted firearms the opportunity to come into compliance without risk of prosecution, providing
they are attempting to come back into compliance; and
• The opportunity for eligible holders of expired Possession Only Licences (POL) to apply for a new
POL.
Canada Safety Council Partnership
2011 marked the third year the .CFP contributed to a Canada Safety Cou neil (CSC) public awareness
campaign about safety issues related to having firearms in the home, including safe storage and family
issues such as suicide. New Public Service Announcements (PSA) for television, radio and print media
were developed and distributed as were news releases to print and electronic.media.
Public Awareness Campaign: Firearm Safety in the Home
ln 2011, the following safety awareness campaign activities were completed:
New Public Service Announcements
The CSC, in consultation with the CFP, developed new Public Service Announcements (PSA) focusing on
firearms safety. The Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians provided two emergency physicians
as spokespersons. A PSA for radio and television was distributed to 516 contacts (195 TV stations and
321 radio stations) across Canada. New print PSAs were also developed and sent to print media along
with a news release.
News Media
A major news release featured quotes from campaign supporters, including an emergency physician
who appears in the new PSA. The release went to over 2,100 contacts in print, television and radio
news media, and was posted on the CSC's website.
Print Information
The CSC continued to distribute the posters and pamphlets developed in the campaign's second year.
Information on the Web
The esc featured the campaign online, and it continues to be available in the news release section of
the CSC's website.
Summary
This campaign phase achieved its objectives in expanding the reach of the campaign messaging. With
cooperation from the media and stakeholder organizations, the Canada Safety Council was able to
achieve broad exposure. With an effective awareness package now fully developed and committed
supporters actively involved, this campaign has the potential to maintain and increase its momentum in
future years, to keep firearm safety in the public eye.
8
Shift in Firearms Licence Ratios
While the total number of adult individual firearm licences [Possession Only licences (POL) as weil as
Possession and Acquisition licences (PAL)] in Canada remained fairly constant between 2005 and 2011,
there has been a noticeable shift in the ratio of POls and PAls. ln 2005, there were approximately 1.2
million POLs and 755,210 PALs. Conversely, in 2011, there were approximately 1.2 million PALs and
677,162 POLs. Because POLs were granted only to individuals who had firearms as of 2001, this licence
will eventually disappear.
- - ~ - - - ~ - - - ~ ~ - ~ - - ~ ~ ~ " - ~
Table 1: Total Cumulative Number of
POLs and PALs
-- -
Year POL PAL
2011 677,162 1,217,564
2010 695,299 1,144,970
2009 777,479 1,058,907
2008 889,425 962,890
2007 989,248 874,933
2006 1,091,994 797,329
2005 1,203,124 755,210
ln arder to be granted a PAL, a firearm licence which permits its holder to possess and acquire firearms
and acquire ammunition, applicants must first demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of firearms
safety. This means that the majority of current firearms licence holders in Canada have recently been
required to demonstrate the ir firearms safety knowledge and/or training.
Proposed Changes to Firearms Legislation
On October 25, 2011, the Minister of Public Safety introduced Bill C-19, An Act to amend the Criminal
Code and the Firearms Act, a Iso referred to as the Ending the Long-gun Registry Act. This bill was
drafted to ame nd the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act to rem ove the requirement to register non-
restricted firearms.
Please note that a legislative change took place in 2012, removing the requirement to
register non-restricted firearms. This report reflects information for 2011, when this
requirement was still in effect.
9
CFP LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES
The CFP supports the Commissioner of the RCMP's law enforcement mandate by helping front-line law
enforcement to investigate and prosecute persans involved in the illegal movement and criminal use of
firearms. The Firearms lnvestigative & Enforcement Services Directorate (FIESD) was established to
support this mandate.
National Weapons Enforcement Support Team (NWEST)
The CFP NWEST provides support, services and information to front-line police officers who combat the
illegal movement of firearms into and within Canada and the ir subsequent criminal use. Assistance
available 24/7 from NWEST includes:
• Firearms information, guidance and investigative advice
• Urgent hands-on firearms assistance
• Firearms identification and tracing
• Assistance with firearms seriai number recovery
• Development and execution of firearms-related search warrants
• Firearm seizures and exhibit organization
• Providing direction in determining firearm-related charges
• Firearms case law information and advice
• Firearm-related court preparation
• Affidavit preparation
• Expert witness services
• Firearm-related training and lectures
• Assistance with firearm amnesties and turn-in programs
• Destruction and disposai offirearms and ammunition
10
Canadian National Firearms Tracing Centre (CNFTC)
The origin and history of a firearm can be discovered through the tracing process. Since the firearm
itself is a critical piece of physical evidence in a gun crime, tracing the firearm to a source individual or
criminal organization can make the case for the Crown and open up new lêads to other criminal activity.
The CFP CNFTC provides this service to Canadian and international law enforcement agency
investigators. They are also able to exchange trace information electronically with U.S. investigators
which ena bles a quick and accu rate exchange of information. ln 2011, the CNFTC received and
processed 2,242 firearms tracing requests.
The group a Iso performed 1,000 indices checks on behalf of Canadian police agencies and Interpol in
2011. The CNFTC receives lists of stolen, missing, seized or crime firearms from these sources and
queries various Canadian firearms-related data bases, checking for any related information.
Specialized Firearms Support Services (SFSS)
CFP SFSS includes the Firearms Reference Table (FRT), a comprehensive and user-friendly computer-
based tool, developed and maintained by the CFP. With more than 141,000 firearms reference items, it
provides law enforcement users with a systematic and standardized method of identifying and
describing firearms, and improves accuracy in import-export controls and international communications
involving transnational firearms crime. lt also assists in firearms tracing, record keeping and
determining the class of a firearm, as outlined un der the applicable Criminal Code definitions. The FRT
data base is made available to ali police and regulatory agencies through a variety of technologies, and
the FRT group is recognized as the centre of expertise in the identification of firearms.
The 2011 FRT DVD was released in February/March 2011, with distribution including:
»- 3,926 Canadian-version DVDs
) 1,392 International-version DVDs
) 47 Corporate*-version DVDs
*The corporate version of the FRT is identica/ in bath data and functionality to the individual DVD, but the installation process
is different. ft is ideal for large police departments or government agencies thot run their own shared internai network and
have a large volume of users.
The following changes occurred in the distribution of the International version of the FRT DVD in
2011:
) 84 new international FRT clients from various countries
) 11 new countries added to international distribution list
) Interpol headquarters (Lyon) was updated in 2011 and supplied the FRT via the lnterpoi/FRT to
188 nations
11
1
i
:
i
1
The following countries receive international versions of the FRT with those in red added in 2011:
1
Argent ina Co lombia Jamaica St Lucia
Australia Costa Rica Kosovo Serbia and Montenegro
Austria Croatia Lesotho Spain
Bahamas France Malaysia Sweden
Bahrain Germ any Mexico Switzerland
Bangladesh Guatemala Netherlands Taiwan
Barbados Guinea New Zealand Thailand
Belgium Hungary Norway Trinidad and Tobago
Brazil lndia Oman Turkey
Canada lreland Pakistan United Arab Emirates
Cayman Islands Israel Peru United Kingdom
Chi le ltaly Philippines United States
ln August 2011, a Web version of the FRT was made available to clients through a secure Internet environment.
This version is updated daily and therefore gives users access to the most current firearm records and images. tt
also gives them access to the FRTfrom any Internet connection. By the end of 2011, 539 clients had registered
for this service.
Another part of SFSS is the Mobile Service Delivery Vehicle (MSDV) program. Here, trained RCMP
firearms personnel, equipped with specially outfitted vehicles, stationed or travelling across the country,
provide various firearms-focused services to law enforcement groups. When paired with the Mobile
Ammunition Combustion System (MACS), MSDV services include on-site firearms and ammunition
identification, examination, test-firing, destruction and disposai.
Summary of SFSS 2011 Firearms Support and Training:
• Daily support provided to federal, provincial and municipal police, specialized Guns and Gangs units as
weil as government agencies such as CBSA and DFAIT.
• Support to a provincial police service in April 2011 to assist with the identification and class verification
of 187 firearms for court.
• Assisted NWEST and municipal police services with the identification of military weapons.
• ln January 2011, three sessions of Firearm Verification training were provided:
1. CFO office, including Firearm Officers
2. Large municipal police force Guns and Gangs unit
3. Businesses/Museums in a Canadian metropolitan area
• Training provided to specialized provincial weapons enforcement unit.
• Three sessions of the Canadian Firearms Safety Course were offered to participants from the RCMP and
other government groups.
• Provided firearm identification training in Trinidad and Tobago.
• Delivered FRT presentation at the CFP-hosted International Firearms Trafficking School.
• Released two online firearm training courses- Firearm Verification and Firearm Verification for Public
Agents 2.0.
12
Firearms Internet Investigations Support (FilS) Unit
The Firearms Internet Investigations Support (FilS) Unit is a full open-source investigative unit providing
a range of Internet support services, both in the firearm applicant screening process and directly to
front-fine police officers. CFP FilS gathers information from a variety of sites and, when potentially
cri minai activities involving firearms are detected, the information is forwarded to the police of
jurisdiction for further investigation.
ln 2011 the CFP FilS unit screened 3,147 restricted firearms licence applicants, 666 more than in 2010. 1
They a Iso forwarded 42 follow-up reports, regarding high-risk applicants, to Chief Firearm Officers.
This unit also responded to 47 direct requests for supplementary information on individuals, firearms
businesses or organizations, up from 40 in 2010. 1
FilS also contributed to 21 investigations by providing information fou nd through various open source
1
avenues including blogs, forums, social networking and other publicly accessible online sites. This is a n ~
increase from 2010, when the group contributed to 13 investigations.
- •-- ~ ~ - ~ - ---------- -
Firearms Operations and Enforcement Support (FOES)
The CFP FOES unit receives and analyzes information on Canadian firearms trends and patterns,
suspected criminals and smuggling routes. They th en provide this information to law enforcement
agencies to help combat illicit firearms and the impact these firearms have on public and police officer
safety. FOES can provide law enforcement part ners with an operational overview of firearms within
their region or across Canada in arder to assist with investigations and prosecutions.
NWEST, CNFTC and FOES are also integral components of the lnvestment to Combat the Criminal Use of
Firearms, as described in the RCMP Departmental Performance Report.
Public Agents Firearms Regulations (PAFR)
The Public Agents Firearms Regulations, Jn effect since 2008, obligate certain public sector agencies,
including police forces, to report aff agency (owned by the agency) and protected (seized, turned in or
found by police) firearms in their possession.
This firearm-reporting requirement supports Canada's commitment to combat the trafficking of illicit
firearms as it creates a comprehensive, centralized and accessible data base containing firearm
information from across the country. PAFR data can be used to assist in investigations and has
particular relevance in multi-jurisdictional cases as it helps monitor the location, movement and
distribution of illicit firearms across Canada. This centralized and accessible firearms database makes it
easier for law enforcement officers to identify what types of firearms are being seized nationally and in
their jurisdiction, and determine where these firearms may have originated.
13
Table 2: Canadian Public Service Agencies*
in Possession of Firearms- 2011
AgencyType Number
Court 121
Federal Agency 242
Municipal Agency 46
Police Academy 6
Police Agency/Detachments 1,020
Provincial Agency 251
Total 1,686
• The numbers represent lndwldua/ reportlng agenc/es m possess1on of agency and/or
protected firearms. In some this can be an entire police force, white in other
it may representa single detachment of a larger police force, such as the RCMP.
Table 3: Firearms Seized by Public Service Agencies (Location) - 2011
Province/Territory Number of Firearms
Newfoundland and Labrador 368
Prince Edward Island 4
Nova Scotia 1,616
New Brunswick 1,168
Que bec 8,561
Ontario 9,643
Manitoba 1,736
Saskatchewan 886
Alberta 3,611
British Columbia 5,807
Yukon 120
Northwest Territories 91
Nunavut 116
Total 33,727
These numbers represent on/y information reported to the CFP and do not necessarily reflect ALL
firearms seized in canada
Table 4: Firearms Seized by Public Service Agencies (Ciass of Firearm)- 2011
Class Number of Firearms
Non-Restricted 27,655
Restricted 4,293
Prohibited 1,767
Unknown 12
Total 33,727
These numbers represent on/y mformation reported to the CFP and do not necessarily reflect ALL
firearms seized in canada
14
Canadian Firearms Information System (CFIS)
Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)
Canadian Firearms Registry Online (CFRO)
The Canadian Firearms Information System contains current firearms licence-holder data. Licensed
individuals and businesses are continuous-eligibility screened and, if a licence holder is the subject of a
Canadian Police Information Centre incident report anywhere in Canada, a Firearms lnterest Police (FIP)
report is automatically generated and sent to the CFP for further review. CFIS a Iso contains descriptions
and details of the 7.8 million firearms registered in Canada. Whenever a firearm is reported lost, stolen
or recovered in CPIC, a CPIC "event" is automatically generated and sent to the Canadian Firearms
Registry for review.
A subset ofthe data contained in CFIS comprises the Canadian Firearms Registry Online, which law
enforcement officers can query via CPIC. CFRO information helps police trace recovered firearms or
anticipate the presence of firearms at a location prior to attendance. Also, if a firearms licence is
revoked and police are deployed to recover the firearm(s), they can query CFRO to determine the
number of firearms associated to the individual, their descriptions and their seriai numbers.
ln 2011, Canadian law enforcement agencies queried the Canadian Firearms Registry Online an average
of 17,778 times per day.
Chart 1: An nuai Canadian Firearms Registry Online (CFRO) Queries
G.OOO.OOO
$/100.000
.ii
! ~ / 1 0 0 . 0 0 0
~
131)001)00
2/100.000
1.000.000
0
CFP Geographical Firearms Reports
6,489.()92.
The CFP has developed the ability to provide police services with jurisdiction-specific firearms-related
statistical information, upon request. By combining data from the Canadian Firearms Information
System, Statistics Canada and other sources, the CFP can prepare reports with current and accurate
firearms data relevant to specifie geographical a reas. This factual and timely firearms information can
help police address and counter gun violence, combat the illegal movement of firearms in their
jurisdiction and focus their investigative efforts and planning in relation to firearms crime.
15
CFP SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC
Licensing of Firearm Users
ln general, ali individuals and businesses that possess or use firearms must be licensed. Similarly, ali
individu ais or businesses who acquire firearms or ammunition must be licensed. There are four types of
firearms licences available:
1. Possession Only Licence (POL)
2. Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL)
3. Minor's Licence
4. Business Licence
-. '
;
5: by TyP,e and (as of l?eèe'mber 31, 2011)
.c
.,
Province/Territory Possession and Acquisition Possession Only Licence Minor's Licence Total Licences
Licence
Newfoundland and Labrador 45,787 27,768 208 73,763
Prince Edward Island 3,119 3,363 16 6,498
Nova Scotia 33,653 41,113 1,133 75,899
New Brunswick 32,724 40,932 143 73,799
Quebec 327,288 170,918 19 498,225
Ontario 330,506 194,307 3,963 528,776
Manitoba 54,360 27,279 325 81,964
Saskatchewan 61,434 31,044 110 92,588
Alberta 164,259 62,283 1,627 228,169
British Columbia 151,579 76,475 455 228,509
Yukon 5,291 1,088 42 6,421
Northwest Territories 4,620 541 44 5,205
Nunavut 2,942 51 6 2,999
TOTAL 1,217,562 677,162 8,091 1,902,815
Table 6: Number of Firearms Licences lssued by Type
(lncluding Renewals)
Licence Type Total Issued in 2011
Possession and Acquisition Licence 267,580
(New and Renewals)
Possession Only Licence 70,140
(Renewals Only)
Minor's Licence 3,925
Total Issued to Individuals 341,645
Total Issued to Businesses 1,993
Total 343,638
16
As of December 31, 2011, there were 4,390 firearms businesses, not including carriers and museums,
in .canada, licensed under the Firearms Act. Of these, 2,410 are licensed to sell ammunition only.
ln 2011, the average processing time for a standard firearms licence application (new or renewal) in
which ali requested information was provided and no follow up was required was 25 days.
Because of the need for reference checks, a deeper review of an applicant's background, and a
mandatory 28-day waiting period for ali new Possession and Acquisition Licences (PAL), the average
processing time for a new PAL was 40 days.
Firearms Licence Renewals
As stated in the Firearms Act, firearms licence holders are responsible for renewing the ir licences prior
to expiry. The CFP facilitates this by sending out partially populated renewal application forms
approximately 90 days prior to the expiry of the current licence. Licence holders are legally required to
advise the CFP of any address changes. This also helps ensure they receive these renewal reminders and
pre-populated application forms.
Possession Only Licences (POL) are generally available only as renewals. However, the "New POL"
compliance incentive, in effect until May 16, 2013, offers individuals with expired POLs the opportunity
to apply for a new POL, providing they meet certain requirements. This licence is available only to
holders of expired POLs and will not affect the trend toward the eventual disappearance of this licence.
ln 2011, a total of 230,767 licences (POL and PAL) for individuals in possession of firearms required
renewal. Chart 2 shows the year-on-year trend toward a greater portion of licencees renewing their
licences.
300,000
250,000
200,000
150,000
100,000
50,000
0
Chart 2: Firearms Licence Renewals (POL and PAL)
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
17
• Did not renew
•Renewed
Other advantages to renewing a licence before it expires include:
1. Renewal application forms are shorter and more streamlined than licence application forms;
2. Avoiding the risk of having a registration certificate revoked or losing grandfathered privileges to
possess prohibited firearms; and
3. Avoiding the risk of penalties for being in unlawful possession of a firearm.
Firearms Business Support
Organizations and businesses that manufacture, sell, possess, handle, display or store firearms or
ammunition must have a firearms business licence. Employees who ha nd le firearms for these
businesses must also have firearms licences, and ali firearms in a business inventory must be registered.
Businesses must submit to periodic inspections by a CFP Firearms Officer who confirms the safe and
lawful business practices and storage of firearms.
The CFP offers businesses the option of performing firearm registration and transfers through the
Program's web-based services. An Internet transfer of a firearm from a business to an individual can be
processed in a few minutes.
Standards set out in the Firearms Act seek to ens ure the safety of members, visitors and the general
public in relation to shooting clubs and ranges. CFP-published range guidelines and periodic CFP
Firearms Officer inspections promote firearm and participant safety at these locations.
Chief Firearms Officers (CFO)
The re is a Chief Firearms Officer for each province and territory, responsible for the administration and
delivery of key corn ponents of the Firearms Act:
• licensing individuals and businesses
• approving transfers of restricted and prohibited firearms
• approving shooting clubs and shooting ranges
• approving gun shows
• issuing Authorizations to Carry
• issuing Authorizations to Transport
• designating Firearms Officers
• designating firearms safety inspectors and
• designating instructors for firearms safety courses
This includes determining an applicant's eligibility to obtain or keep a firearms licence. The CFO can
issue, refuse to issue, renew or revoke a licence or authorization to transport, carry, transfer or sponsor,
or set specifie conditions on these documents.
18
Firearm Registration 1 Registrar of Firearms
The Registrar of Firearms is responsible for the administration and delivery of other key components of
the Firearms Act. The CFP Registrar is responsible for the following:
• issuing, refusing to issue or revoking firearm registration certificates for businesses and individuals
• issuing, refusing to issue or revoking carrier licences
• administering the Public Agents Firearms Regulations
• maintaining Canadian Firearms Registry data to ensure its quality and availability for law
enforcement
• maintaining the Firearms Verifiers' Network
As of December 31, 2011, the Firearms Act required that ali non-restricted, restricted and prohibited
firearms in Canada be registered. The registration èertificate number links each firearm to its licensed
owner in the CFP's national data base, the Canadian Firearms Information System. As with firearms
licences, a subset of this information, contained in the Canadian Firearms Registry Online, can then be
accessed by law enforcement agencies via CPIC.
Table 7: Firearms Registered to lndividuals and Businesses (2010 and 2011)
Firearm Class 2010 2011 Difference
Non-restricted 6,943,621 7,133,143 189,522
Restricted 501,079 531,735 30,656
Prohibited 201,999 197,024 -4,975
Total 7,646,699 7,861,902 215,203
Registration applicants must be at least 18 years old and have a firearms licence allowing them to
possess th at class or category of firearm. The re is no fee for registering a firearm and registration
certificates have no expiry date. The only ti me a registration certificate needs to be replaced, other than
when the firearm is transferred to a new owner, is when the firearm is modified in a way that changes
its class.
Before a firearm can be registered for the first time, it must be verified. Verification is the process used
to confirm the class of a firearm.
Ali firearms can be categorized into one of three classes:
• Non-restricted firearms are typically shotguns and rifles
• Restricted firearms are predominantly handguns
• Prohibited firearms*are mostly assault rifles, particular types of handguns and fully automatic
firearms
*Prohibited firearms cannot be newly imported into Canada by individuals. Only individuals "grandfathered" to have
prohibited firearms are allowed to possess them.
19
When a firearm is transferred to a new owner, the record must be changed to reflect both the de-
registration from the original owner and the re-registration to the new owner. This transfer process can
often be completed quickly by telephone.
Table 8: Firearm Registrations (individual and business) by Region - 2011
Non-restricted Restricted Prohibited
Province/Territory firearms firearms firearms Total
Newfoundland and Labrador
207,108 4,250 1,556 212,914
22,111 1,737 793 24,641
Prince Edward Island
Nova Scotia
286,268 16,468 7,114 309,850
New Brunswick
274,255 12,136 5,110 291,501
Quebec
1,618,935 58,579 32,792 1,710,306
Ontario
2,110,244 190,118 82,121 2,382,483
Manitoba
347,659 19,318 5,926 372/903
Saskatchewan
415,460 27,495 8,203 451,158
Alberta
930,519 97,850 24,584 1,052,953
British Columbia
838,878 100,013 27,865 966,756
Yukon
24,452 1,883 395 26,730
Northwest Territories
19,292 1,103 328 20,723
Nunavut
12,626 170 39 12,835
Other
25,336 615 198 26,149
Total
7,133,143 531,735 197,024 7,861,902
Firearms Assistance and Outreach to the Public
The CFP is committed to communicating with the public and distributing firearms safety information
through a variety of media. The goal is to improve public safety by expanding awareness of and
compliance with safe use, handling and storage offirearms.
CFP Firearms Management & Strategie Services (FMSS) outreach activities a Iso inform the public on how
the CFP works with and assists front-li ne police and other law enforcement agencies in gathering and
processing evidence and investigating and prosecuting people and organizations involved in the illegal
movement, unlawful possession and criminal use of firearms. ln 2011, the CFP FMSS maintained the
Program's commitment to partnerships with various Canadian law enforcement organizations by
distributing enforcement-focused firearms-related information in bulletin, brochure, ca rd and fact-sheet
formats. To enhance service to police, the CFP a Iso has toll-free telephone lines and e-mail addresses
designated for police-only assistance.
The CFP website is continually updated by FMSS to provide acc.urate and current information regarding
firearms safety, policies and client-service initiatives to a wide and varied audience. ln 2011, the CFP
website received 4,235,369 "unique page views"- individual page viewings, not including multiple
viewings within the same session.
20
The public, when seeking firearms-related information or assistance, can contact the CFP cali centre
using the toll-free number (1-800-731-4000) or via e-mail (cfp-pcaf@rcmp-grc.gc.ca).
ln 2011, the CFP cali centre received 977,005 telephone i n q u i r i ~ s and approximately 8,500 e-mail
inquiries, including firearms application status checks and requests for information and forms.
CFP representatives also attended hunting, outdoor and gun shows across the country, distributing
firearms-safety mate rials and responding ta direct in-persan requests for firearms information.
Outreach to Aboriginal Communities
The CFP provides firearms services ta Aboriginal people and their communities and is committed ta
continually improving the quality and variety of these services. ln an effort ta best meet these needs,
the CFP FMSS has conducted research studies and helped ta develop service-delivery programs.
ln the months of January, February and March 2011, as weil as during October, November and
December 2011, the CFP FMSS supported safety training within northern Ontario Aboriginal
communities. Du ring these periods, 287 individuals successfully completed firearms safety-training
certification. As part of these safety-training out rea ch initiatives, the CFP a Iso helped with applications,
registrations, verifications and general firearms information provision.
The goal of these efforts is ta increase public safety in Aboriginal communities by increasing safety
awareness among th ose who have access ta firearms.
21
KEEPING CANADA SAFE
Firearms Safety Training
As outlined in the Firearms Act, to be licensed to use or possess firearms in Canada, individuals must
demonstrate awareness of the principles relating to safe handling and use of firearms. The Canadian
Firearms Safety Course (CFSC) and the Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course (CRFSC) are
fundamental firearms-education and safety-training components ofthe CFP. Developed in partnership
with the provinces and territories, as weil as organizations with an ongoing interest in hunter education
and firearms safety, these courses provide instruction on the safe handling, use, transportation and
storage of both restricted and non-restricted firearms.
The Firearms Act states th at individuals who want to acquire non-restricted firearms must pass the CFSC
test, wh ile individuals wanting to acquire restricted firearms must pass both the CFSC and the CRFSC
tests. ln 2011, there were 86,740 CFSC graduates and 26,509 CRFSC graduates.
Table 9: Firearms Safety Training
Year Canadian Firearm Safety Course Canadian Restricted Firearm Safety Course
2007
72,421 15,382
2008
83,225 20,149
2009
83,287 ~ 2 , 7 7 3
2010
84,622 23,246
2011 86,740 26,509
The RCMP CFP is responsible for the continued development, implementation, evaluation and revision
of national firearms-safety standards, the CFSC and the CRFSC. Each CFO is responsible for the delivery
of the courses within the ir jurisdiction.
Enhanced Screening of Firearms Licence Applicants
The CFP employs an in-depth licence applicant screening process to redu ce the possibility that
individuals who pose a public safety risk acquire or have access to firearms. Ali first-time firearms
licence applicants undergo thorough security screening, including interviews of the applicants and their
references, as weil as Internet checks.
ln 2011, the CFP performed enhanced security screening on 40,141 firearms licence
applicants and interviewed 120,424 applicants or their references.
22
Firearms Licence Application Refusais
Chief Firearms Officers play a key role in authorizing an individual to acquire a firearms licence. Under
the Firearms Act, CFOs are authorized to refuse an application for a licence, based on their assessment
of the individual's risk to public safety.
ln 2011, there were 520 firearms licence applications refused, for a variety of reasons. (This total does
not include the nu merous applications which are withdrawn by applicants subsequent to questioning
but prior to a potential application refusai by a CFO.)
Table 10: Number of Firearms Licence Application Refusais
Year Refusais
2007 440
2008 462
2009 515
2010 570
2011 520
Total 2507
Table 11: Reasons for Firearms Licence Application Refusais (2011)
Rea son Refusais*
Court-Ordered Prohibition 1 Probation 237
Domestic Violence 34
Drug Offences 32
Mental Health 92
POL Ineligible 10
Potential Risk to Others 164
Potential Risk to Self 141
Provided False Information 42
Unsafe Firearm Use and Storage 17
Violent 68
*A firearms licence application refusai can be influenced by more than one factor, therefore
the sum of refusai rea sons will exceed the annual total of licence applications refused.
23
Continuous Eligibility Screening of Firearms Licence Holders
Ali firearms licences are recorded in the Canadian Firearms Information System, which automatically
checks with the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) daily to determine if a licence holder has
been the subject of a CPIC incident report anywhere in Canada. Any match generates a Firearms
lnterest Police (FIP) report which is automatically forwarded to the relevant Chief Firearms Officer for
follow-up. Sorne of these reports are "excluded", which means they require no further action, but sorne
prompt a review of the individual's firearms licence and may result in its revocation and the seizure of
any firearms.
Table 12: Number of FIP Events by Province (2011)
Province/Territory
Confirmed Excluded Total
Newfoundland and labrador
808 1,024 1,832
Prince Edward Island
96 208 304
Nova Scotia
1,341 2,472 3,813
New Brunswick
1,388 2,748 4,136
Quebec
11,239 17,427 28,666
Ontario
18,903 25,336 44,239
Manitoba
2,880 4,272 7,152
Saskatchewan
2,145 2,446 4,591
Alberta
4,744 3,920 8,664
British Columbia
5,537 8,874 14,411
Yukon
343 207 550
Northwest Territories
122 80 202
Nunavut
65 4 69
Total
49,611 69,018 118,629
Firearms Licence Revocations
Under the Firearms Act, CFOs are authorized to revoke a firearms licence, based on their assessment of
the licence holder's risk to public safety.
ln 2011, the re were 2,365 firearms licences revoked. This number is increasing year over year, possibly
as a result of greater awareness regarding criminal offences which require firearm prohibitions and
licence revocations.
Table 13: Number of Firearms Licence Revocations
Year Revocations
2007 1748
2008 1833
2009 2 085
2010 2 231
2011 2365
Total 10,262
24
Table 14: Reasons for Firearms licence Revocations (2011)
Rea son Revocations*
Court-Ordered Prohibition 1 Probation 1,758
Domestic Violence 55
Drug Offences 45
Mental Health 214
POL Ineligible 63
Potential Risk to Others 390
Potential Risk to Self 386
Provided False Information 28
Unsafe Firearm Use and Storage 59
Violent 91
*A firearms licence revocation can be influenced by more than one factor, therefore the
su rn of revocation rea sons will exceed the annual total of firearms licences revoked.
Firearms licence application refusais and firearms licence revocations are recorded in the CFP's national
Canadian Firearms Information System database. lndividuals who have an application refused or a licence
revoked, therefore, cannot evade this decision by moving from one jurisdiction to another.
' Firearms Prohibitions
Courts must notify Chief Firearms Officers of ali firearms prohibition orders in their jurisdiction.
Firearms-licence applicant screening includes checking if an applicant is the subject of a prohibition
order which wou Id then lead to the refusai of a firearms licence application.
If an individual who holds a firearms licence is the subject of a prohibition order, their licence is revoked
and they are instructed by the court to tu rn in the licence and dispose of ali firearms. When the Chief
Firearms Officer is notified by the court, the individual's firearms licence is administratively revoked.
ln these cases, the CFP Registrar of Firearms administratively revokes the associated registration
certificates and provides the subject with instructions on how to dispose of the firearms. The Registrar
a Iso refuses any pending applications to register firearms, advises police of the revocation and follows
up on the disposition of firearms in support of law enforcement.
Prohibition orders are recorded in the Canadian Police Information Centre Persans File and form part of
the background and continuous-eligibility checks forfirearms licences. An applicant with a Prohibition
Order would not receive a firearms licence. Information from municipal, provincial and federal courts
also helps to determine whether an individual is a potential threat to public safety. A match against a
court order may result in the Chief Firearms Officer conducting an investigation which could lead to a
or a change in licence conditions.
25
Chart 3: Firearms Prohibitions (Cumulative) (2007-2011)
l 1 1 1 1 1 1
ion
318,79
1 1 1 1
2010
301,048
1 1 1 1
2009 279, 04
1 1 1 1
2008 254,036
1 1 1 1
2007 208,851
0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 350,000
Firearms Registration Application Refusalls and Certificate Revocations
The CFP Registrar of Firearms revokes registration certificates and, if applicable, refuses firearm
registration applications whenever a firearm owner's licence is revoked for public safety reasons. The
Registrar a Iso refuses firearms registration applications when the firearm owner's licence is revoked as a
result of a court-issued firearms prohibition order. Other reasons for registration certificate revocations
or registration application refusais include expired firearms licences, individuals not having adequate
licence privileges for a certain class of firearms or individuals failing to provide sufficient information to
meet registration requirements.
ln 2011, there were 181 firearm registration applications refused and 89,805 firearm registration
certificates revoked.
Following the revocation of registration certificates and the refusai of registration applications, the
Registrar monitors the disposition of the firearms and, if necessary, refers the matter to local law
enforcement agencies for further action.
Table 15: Number of Registration Refusais and Revocations
Year Applications Refused Certificates Revoked Total
2007 618 253 107 253 725
2008 747 191 208 191955
2009 407 195 543 195 950
2010 311 163 909 164 220
2011 181 89 805 89,986
Total 2 264 893 572 895 836
Firearm-related Inspections
Chief Firearms Officers are responsible for approving and performing inspections of shooting clubs and
ranges within their jurisdictions to ensure safe operation and compliance with the Firearms Act. For
community safety, they are a Iso authorized to inspect firearms businesses and individuals who collect
firearms to ensure safe storage and handling requirements are met.
26
Range Safety and Use-of-Force Coordinator
The Range Safety and Use-of-Force Coordinator develops and implements initiatives to support the
continuous improvement of Canadian shooting ranges. They develop and implement range safety
measures and review range safety inspection reports to improve guidelines, procedures and forms used
by firearms officers for shooting range inspections. They also review range applications, conduct quality
control checks, provide feedback on inspection reports and request or conduct follow-up inspections as
required.
1-800 Safety Line - Reporting Public Safety Concerns
The CFP offers a toll-free line (1-800-731-4000) and urges those with non-emergency firearm-related
public safety concerns to cali and report them. The CFP encourages people to cali if they believe a
persan who owns firearms could be a da.nger to themselves orto others, or if they know of any valid
reason why a persan who has a firearms licence or has applied for one should not have such a licence.
These reports about potential threats to public safety are routed to Chief Firearms Officers who respond
by ta king appropriate action.
27
COMMITMENT TO THE FUTURE
The CFP is Canada's centre for firearms expertise, committed to keeping our country safe from firearms
crime and misuse.
ln 2011, the RCMP Canadian Firearms Program maintained its dedication to enhancing public safety in
Canadian communities by providing police and other law enforcement partners with firearms-focused
assistance and information vital to the prevention, investigation and prosecution of firearms crime.
When investigators need help tracing or identifying a firearm, preparing or executing a search warrant
involving firearms or organizing firearm exhibits for court- they can rely on the knowledge and
experience of CFP firearm experts.
The CFP also continued to promote and regulate responsible ownership, safe use and secure storage of
firearms in order to redu ce the risk of firearms-related death and injury. This is achieved through
mandatory firearms safety training, screening of licence applicants, inspections, and monitoring of
restricted and prohibited firearms.
The Canadian Firearms Program is Canada's authority on firearms.
28
Gendarmerie royale ,Royal Canadian
du Canada Mounted Police
?



l!lJj IMIMIJ.'S & rm l!.lA
001 lm tlilJ CSfNM\I!Y!\
Canada
COORDONNÉES
Programme canadien des armes à feu de la GRC
Ottawa (Ontario) K1A OR2
1 800 731 4000 (sans frais)
1 613 825 0315 (télécopieur)
Site Web : www.grc.gc.ca/pcaf
Courriel : pcaf-cfp@rcmp-grc.gc.ca
Relations avec les médias:
Gendarmerie royale du Canada
1 613 843 5999
©Sa Majesté la Reine du Chef du Canada, représentée par la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, 2012
Cette publication peut être reproduite sans autorisation pour usage personnel ou interne seulement dans la
mesure où la source est indiquée en entier. Toutefois, la reproduction de cette publication en tout ou en partie
à des fins commerciales ou de redistribution nécessite l'obtention au préalable d'une autorisation de :
la Gendarmerie royale du Canada,
Ottawa (Ontario) K1 A OR2
N°de catalogue: PS96-2011
ISSN: 1714-177X
1
TABLE DES MATIÈRES
Mot du commissaire aux armes à feu ............................................................................................ 2
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3
Objet du rapport ................................................................................................................. 3
Aperçu du PCAF ................................................................................................................... 3
Mission, valeurs et priorités du PCAF ................................................................................. 4
Priorités stratégiques du PCAF ............................................................................................ 4
Partenaires du PCAF ............................................................................................................ 5
Points saillants en 2011 .......................... ......................................................................................... 9
Mesures d'incitation à la conformité .................................................................................. 9
Partenariat avec le Conseil canadien de la sécurité .......................................................... 9
Changement dans les rapports entre catégories de permis d'armes à feu ...................... 10
Modifications législatives envisagées ............................................................................... 10
Services de soutien à l'application de la loi du PCAF ................................................................... 11
Équipe nationale de soutien à l'application de la Loi sur les armes à feu (ENSALA) ........ 11
Centre national de dépistage des armes à feu (CNDAF) ................................................... 12
Services spécialisés de soutien en matière d'armes à feu (SSSAF) ................................... 12
Unité de soutien aux enquêtes sur Internet en matière d'armes à feu (SEIAF) ............... 14
Support aux enquêtes et aux opérations en matière d'armes à feu (SEOMAF) ............... 14
Règlement sur les armes à feu des agents publics (RAFAP) ............................................. 14
Système canadien d'information relative aux armes à feu (SCIRAF) ...................... : ......... 16
Centre d'information de la police canadienne (CIPC) ....................................................... 16
Registre canadien des armes à feu en direct (RCAFED) .................................................... 16
Rapports par secteur géographique du PCAF ................................................................... 16
Services offerts au public par le PCAF .......................................................................................... 17
Délivrance de permis d'armes à feu ................................................................................. 17
Renouvellement des permis d'armes à feu ...................................................................... 18
Soutien aux entreprises d'armes à feu ............................................................................. 19
Contrôleurs des armes à feu (CAF) ................................................................................... 19
Enregistrement des armes à feu ....................................................................................... 20
Directeur de l'enregistrement des armes à feu ................................................................ 20
Aider et informer le public ................................................................................................ 21
Sensibiliser les collectivités autochtones .......................................................................... 22
Assurer la sécurité du Canada ....................................................................................................... 23
Formation sur le maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu ................................................ 23
Vérification approfondie des demandeurs de permis d'armes à feu ............................... 23
Demandes de permis d'arme à feu refusées .................................................................... 24
Vérification continue de l'admissibilité des titulaires de permis d'armes à feu ............... 25
Révocations de permis d'armes à feu ............................................................................... 25
Interdictions visant les armes à feu ............................................................. ' ..................... 26
Refus de demandes d'enregistrement d'armes à feu et révocations de certificats ......... 27
Inspections relatives aux armes à feu ............................................................................... 27
Coordonnateur- Sécurité des champs de tir et recours à la force .................................. 27
Service 1-800- Signaler une préoccupation en matière de sécurité publique ................ 28
Engagement pour l'avenir ............................................................................................................. 29
1
Mot du commissaire aux armes à feu .
Je suis heureux de vous présenter le Rapport de 2011 du commissaire aux armes à feu au nom du
Programme canadien des armes à feu {PCAF).
Le PCAF est l'autorité au Canada en matière d'armes à feu et, à ce titre, il joue un rôle fondamental dans
la réglementation touchant les armes à feu et dans l'application des lois sur les armes à feu au Canada.
En application de la Loi sur les armes à feu, le PCAF supervise le programme canadien de sécurité dans le
maniement des armes à feu et, qui plus est, vérifie soigneusement les antécédents des demandeurs et
des titulaires de permis d'armes à feu pour que celles-ci soient utilisées de manière responsable et
sécuritaire. Le PCAF contribue aussi à l'engagement qu'a pris la GRC d'assurer un Canada sécuritaire et
sécurisé. En effet, le PCAF compte plusieurs groupes spécialisés dans les armes à feu qui appuient les
enquêtes relatives à l'application de la loi et le système de justice pénale en s'attaquant aux crimes
commis avec des armes à feu et à la mauvaise utilisation de celles-ci.
Le présent rapport rend compte du travail accompli par le PCAF et de ses réussites en 2011, et il dépeint
la manière qont le Programme a do.nné suite à son engagement d'assurer la sécurité du Canada en ce
qui touche les armes à feu.
Commissaire Bob Paulson
Commissaire aux armes à feu
Gendarmerie royale du Canada
Le commissaire de la GRC est aussi commissaire aux armes à feu et, à ce titre, il est investi d'un double mandat
relativement aux armes à feu. D'une part, en tant que commissaire de la GRC, il a la responsabilité d'appliquer la loi, ce
qui comprend la législation sur les armes à feu et la lutte contre les crimes perpétrés avec une arme à feu. D'autre part,
en tant que commissaire aux armes à feu, il est chargé d'appliquer la Loi sur les armes à feu, ce qui comprend la
délivrance de permis d'armes à feu aux particuliers et aux entreprises, la formation sur le maniement sécuritaire des
armes à feu ainsi que l'enregistrement des armes à feu.
2
Veuillez noter que des modifications législatives ont été apportées en 2012, abolissant l'exigence :J
d'enregistrer les armes à feu sans restriction. Le présent rapport contient des renseignements portant sur !
l'année 2011, alors que cette exigence était toujours en vigueur. :
1
)
-.1-------- -- -- --- ---- --- - -----
INTRODUCTION
Objet du rapport
Le présent rapport résume les activités et les mesures de rendement du Programme canadien des armes
à feu (PCAF) de la GRC pour l'année civile 2011. Comme l'exige la Loi s u ~ les armes à feu, le rapport du
commissaire aux armes à feu est présenté au ministre de la Sécurité publique en vue de son dépôt au
Parlement.
Aperçu du PCAF
Le PCAF est représenté par des spécialistes des armes à feu partout au pays. Il se divise en cinq groupes :
• La Direction des opérations des contrôleurs des armes à feu (CAF) et de la formation au
maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu
• La Direction de la prestation de services en matière d'armes à feu
• La Direction des services d'enquête et d'application de la loi en matière d'armes à feu (DSEALAF)
• La Direction des services de gestion et de stratégie des armes à feu (SGSAF)
• La Section de l'amélioration de l'intégration et des opérations de la Tl (AIOTI)
Les dix contrôleurs des armes à feu du PCAF, dont les bureaux sont situés dans chaque province,
relèvent de la Direction des opérations des CAF et de la formation au maniement sécuritaire des armes à
feu. Les CAF du Manitoba, de l'Alberta et de la Colombie-Britannique gèrent l'exécution du Programme
au Nunavut, dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et au Yukon respectivement. Les CAF sont responsables
de tous les permis et de toutes les autorisations touchant les armes à feu qui relèvent de leur
compétence.
La Direction de la prestation de services en matière d'armes à feu possède deux composantes: le
Registre canadien des armes à feu, situé à Ottawa, et le Bureau central de traitement, qui comprend un
centre d'appels national à Miramichi, au Nouveau-Brunswick.
La DSEALAF est la principale composante du PCAF chargée de l'application de la loi, dont la coordination
est assurée par un bureau à Mississauga, en Ontario. D'autres représentants de la DSEALAF travaillent à
Ottawa ou partagent les bureaux des services de police municipaux ou provinciaux, ou ceux de divisions
à contrat de la GRC partout au pays.
Situés à la Direction générale, les SGSAF s'acquittent de fonctions de conseil stratégique, de planification
stratégique, de mesure du rendement, et de sensibilisation ainsi que de fonctions organisationnelles,
tandis que la Section de l'amélioration de l'intégration et des opérations de la Tl supervise l'élaboration
et l'administration des systèmes automatisés, des bases de données et des sites Web du PCAF, et gère
les besoins opérationnels du PCAF.
Les bureaux du ministère de la Justice à Ottawa, à Edmonton et à St. John's fournissent des avis
juridiques au PCAF.
Mission, valeurs et priorités du PCAF
Le Programme canadien des armes à feu (PCAF) de la GRC a pour mission d'améliorer la sécurité
publique en aidant à réduire les risques de mort et de blessure par balle et la menace que posent les
armes à feu. Il fournit aux organismes d'application de la loi au Canada et à l'échelle internationale un
soutien opérationnel crucial pour la prévention des crimes perpétrés avec des armes à feu et la
prévention de la mauvaise utilisation des armes et pour les enquêtes connexes. Il effectue également
des vérifications continues à l'égard des propriétaires d'armes à feu pour s'assurer qu'ils remplissent les
conditions requises pour pouvoir posséder des armes à feu et il promeut la possession, l'utilisation et
l'entreposage responsables des armes à feu. Dans le cadre de sa mission, le PCAF :
• respecte la possession et l'utilisation légitimes des armes à feu au Canada et appuie les utilisateurs
d'armes à feu en assurant un service de qualité ainsi qu'un traitement équitable et la protection
des renseignements confidentiels;
• reconnaît que la participation des provinces, d'organismes fédéraux, des Autochtones, des
organisations policières, des propriétaires et utilisateurs d'armes à feu, des instructeurs en
matière de sécurité, des vérificateurs, des entreprises et des groupes responsables de la sécurité
publique est essentielle à l'exécution efficace du Programme et au succès de celui-ci;
• s'engage à réaliser des améliorations et à promouvoir l'innovation de façon continue afin
d'atteindre le niveau optimal en matière de service, de conformité, d'efficacité et de rendement
global;
• renseigne ses clients et les intervenants et les encourage à participer à l'examen et à l'élaboration
de politiques et de règlements ainsi qu'à la communication de renseignements cruciaux relatifs
aux exigences du Programme et à ses résultats;
• gère ses ressources de manière réfléchie pour optimiser celles-ci et présente des rapports clairs et
précis sur le rendement et la gestion des ressources du Programme;
• respecte les valeurs et les normes éthiques de la fonction publique du Canada et tient résolument
à ce que la dotation en personnel soit équitable et à offrir au personnel des occasions de
perfectionnement ainsi qu'un milieu de travail qui favorise la participation et l'esprit d'initiative.
Priorités stratégiques du PCAF
En conformité avec l'engagement du gouvernement du Canada et de la GRC d'assurer un Canada
sécuritaire et sécurisé, le PCAF a pour mission de protéger et d'accroître la sécurité publique. Le PCAF est
déterminé à réaliser les priorités stratégiques de la GRC suivantes :
• Crimes graves et crime organisé : Des enquêteurs experts du PCAF collaborent avec des
partenaires dans le domaine de l'application de la loi au Canada et à l'échelle internationale dans
le but de démanteler les groupes du crime organisé qui se livrent au trafic des armes à feu. Pour
ce faire, les enquêteurs se servent souvent de données analytiques sur les armes à feu produites
par le PCAF. Ces renseignements aident à perturber les activités du crime organisé en permettant
4
aux enquêteurs d'observer les tendances de la criminalité liée aux armes à feu illégales dans une
collectivité, une région ou partout au pays.
• Sécurité nationale : Étant donné que les armes à feu obtenues illégalement sont un outil
éventuel pour les terroristes, le PCAF participe activement à la lutte contre la contrebande des
armes à feu et aux interventions visant d'autres problèmes transfrontaliers liés aux armes à feu.
En ce qui a trait aux principaux engagements internationaux, le PCAF échange des
renseignements avec les organismes américains d'application de la loi sur les armes à feu,
contribue aux efforts que le Canada déploie aux Nations Unies et collabore avec INTERPOL dans
le but de lutter contre le trafic d'armes à feu.
• Jeunes : Bien qu'ils ne puissent acquérir des armes à feu, les jeunes de moins de 18 ans peuvent
se procurer un permis pour mineur, qui leur donne le droit de posséder des armes à feu sans
restriction pour des activités comme la chasse et le tir à la cible. le PCAF incite tous les
propriétaires et utilisateurs d'armes à feu à manier, à utiliser et à entreposer leurs armes à feu de
manière sécuritaire, et il offre aux jeunes des cours sur le maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu
et de l'information sur le sujet.
• Collectivités autochtones : Encourageant les collectivités autochtones à participer à des projets
nationaux, régionaux ou locaux liés au maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu et les aidant à cet
égard, le PCAF améliore la sécurité personnelle et communautaire en offrant de l'information et
de la formation sur la sécurité ainsi que de l'aide aux collectivités pour la vérification et
l'enregistrement des armes à feu et la délivrance des permis. En faisant de la recherche et en
poursuivant de nouvelles initiatives en matière de sécurité et de formation, le PCAF renforce les
partenariats qu'il a établis avec les collectivités autochtones du Canada.
Partenaires du PCAF
le PCAF collabore de manière efficace avec divers organismes partenaires.
Organismes canadiens d'application de la loi
Travaillant avec des organismes d'application de la loi au pays à qui il offre de l'information et des
services liés aux armes à feu, le PCAF aide les enquêteurs et les procureurs à s'attaquer à la circulation
illégale des armes à feu et à l'utilisation de celles-ci à des fins criminelles. le PCAF peut vérifier si une
personne considérée comme constituant une menace sur le plan de la sécurité est susceptible d'avoir
accès à des armes à feu. Il peut aussi contribuer à l'établissement et à l'exécution des mandats de
perquisition, fournir des services de dépistage, d'identification et d'élimination d'armes à feu ainsi
qu'offrir aux autorités en matière d'application de la loi une formation pratique sur les armes à feu.
5
.' j • ~ •
) i
Organismes internationaux d'application de la loi
Le PCAF collabore avec des organismes d'application de la loi des États-Unis et d'autres pays dans le but
de prévenir la circulation transfrontalière illégale des armes à feu et il a établi un mode d'échange
électronique rapide et précis de renseignements aux fins du dépistage avec le Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) des États-Unis. De plus, le PCAF organise ou coorganise une·
conférence internationale annuelle sur le trafic d'armes à feu, et certains de ses représentants peuvent
se rendre sur demande dans d'autres pays afin d'offrir de la formation spécialisée sur les armes à feu à
des organismes d'application de la loi.
Sécurité publique Canada
Le ministre de la Sécurité publique assume la responsabilité générale du Programme canadien des
armes à feu. Le commissaire aux armes à feu relève du ministre de la Sécurité publique et compte sur le
personnel du Programme pour obtenir des conseils stratégiques et des renseignements exacts et à jour
sur les armes à feu. Ces conseils et renseignements sont ensuite transmis au ministre et à d'autres hauts
fonctionnaires pour les aider dans l'exercice de leurs responsabilités.
Agence des services frontaliers du Canada
L'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada (ASFC) évalue et atteste les déclarations des non-résidents
(qui servent de permis temporaire et de certificat d'enregistrement) pour les armes à feu importées au
Canada. L' ASFC traite aussi les importations commerciales d'armes à feu et inspecte les expéditions
d'armes à feu pour confirmer leur admissibilité. Elle perçoit également les droits exigibles et elle
confirme la destination des armes à feu et la raison de leur importation ainsi que l'admissibilité de
l'importateur. En outre, l' ASFC veille à ce que les armes à feu importées au Canada soient transportées
de manière sécuritaire et en conformité avec les lois du Canada.
6
Ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Commerce international
Le PCAF collabore avec le ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Commerce international {MAECI) pour
veiller à ce que les engagements internationaux du Canada portant sur les armes à feu soient conformes
aux priorités du Canada et que le pays soit en mesure de les mettre en œuvre. Le MAECI délivre les
licences requises pour exporter et importer des armes à feu.
Ministère de la Justice
Le ministre de la Justice est responsable de l'application du Code criminel du Canada, y compris de la
partie Ill (Armes à feu et autres armes). L'élaboration de politiques sur le droit pénal traitant d'armes à
feu exige une étroite collaboration entre le PCAF et le ministère de la Justice. Le ministère de la Justice
fournit également des conseils juridiques et des services au PCAF.
Affaires autochtones et Développement du Nord Canada
Le PCAF collabore avec Affaires autochtones et Développement du Nord Canada et donne aux
négociateurs chargés des revendications territoriales autochtones des avis sur des questions concernant
les dispositions législatives sur les armes à feu et sur des questions connexes.
Provinces et territoires
Dans chaque province et territoire, la délivrance des permis d'armes à feu et des autorisations d'en
posséder est administrée par les contrôleurs des armes à feu (CAF), qui font partie du PCAF. Les
provinces de l'Ontario, du Québec, du Nouveau-Brunswick, de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et de la
Nouvelle-Écosse ont nommé leur propre CAF en vertu de la Loi sur les armes à feu et ont conclu des
accords de contribution avec le gouvernement du Canada pour financer leurs activités. Les CAF
responsables de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, du Manitoba, de la Saskatchewan, de l'Alberta, de la
Colombie-Britannique, du Yukon, des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et du Nunavut sont nommés par le
gouvernement fédéral et sont des employés de la GRC (PCAF).
Ayant la responsabilité de délivrer des permis d'armes à feu aux entreprises et aux particuliers, les CAF
doivent évaluer le risque lié à la possession d'une arme à feu que pose chacun des titulaires d'un permis
d'armes à feu au Canada, qui sont au nombre de 1,9 million. La Loi sur les armes à feu et ses règlements
d'application confèrent aux CAF le pouvoir soit de refuser de délivrer un permis, soit de révoquer un
permis s'il y a un risque connu pour la sécurité publique. Au sein de leur administration, les CAF
supervisent également la formation sur la sécurité, ils voient à l'agrément des clubs et champs de tir, ils
approuvent les cessions et délivrent des autorisations de transport et de port d'armes à feu à
autorisation restreinte et d'armes prohibées, et ils procèdent à des inspections pour s'assurer que les
armes à feu sont utilisées, transportées et entreposées de façon sécuritaire.
Toutes les régions du Canada sont en outre appuyées par des policiers qui travaillent pour l'Équipe
nationale de soutien à l'application de la loi sur les armes à feu (ENSALA) de la Direction des services
7
d'enquête et d'application de la loi en matière d'armes à feu (DSEALAF) du PCAF. Ces policiers sont des
membres de la GRC ou des policiers détachés auprès de la GRC et ils s'emploient à assurer du soutien et
des services en matière d'application de la loi à tous les organismes d'application de la loi qui mènent
des enquêtes sur des crimes commis avec des armes à feu et sur la mauvaise utilisation de celles-ci.
8
POINTS SAILLANTS EN 2011
Mesures d'incitation à la conformité
En 2011, le ministre de la Sécurité publique a annoncé la prolongation de la période d'application des
mesures d'incitation à la conformité à la législation relative aux armes à feu :
• Dispense des droits de renouvellement des permis d'armes à feu ou de reclassement de permis.
• Amnistie permettant aux titulaires de permis d'armes à feu expirés ou aux propriétaires d'armes à
feu sans restriction non enregistrées de se conformer à la loi sans risques de poursuite, à la
condition qu'ils prennent des mesures pour se conformer à la législation relative aux armes à feu.
• Occasion pour les titulaires admissibles d'un permis de possession seulement (PPS) expiré de
demander un nouveau PPS.
Partenariat avec le Conseil canadien de la sécurité
L'année 2011 a marqué la troisième année de contribution du PCAF à la campagne de sensibilisation du
public du Conseil canadien de la sécurité (CCS) aux questions de sécurité liées à la présence d'armes à
feu à la maison, y compris l'entreposage sécuritaire des armes à feu et les problèmes familiaux telle
suicide. De nouveaux messages d'intérêt public ont été élaborés, puis diffusés à la télévision, à la radio
et dans la presse écrite, et des communiqués de presse ont été diffusés dans la presse écrite et dans les
médias électroniques.
Campagne de sensibilisation du public :Armes à jeu et sécurité à la maison
En 2011, les activités suivantes ont été réalisées dans le cadre de la campagne de sensibilisation du public à la sécurité en
matière d'armes à feu :
Nouveaux messages d'intérêt public
Le CCS, en collaboration avec le PCAF, a élaboré de nouveaux messages d'intérêt public sur la sécurité en matière d'armes
à feu. L'Association canadienne des médecins d'urgence a offert les services de deux médecins d'urgence à titre de
porte-parole. Un message d'intérêt public pour diffusion à la radio et à la télévision a été distribué à 516 stations
(195 stations de télévision et 321 stations de radio) partout au Canada. De nouveaux messages d'intérêt public imprimés
et des communiqués de presse ont aussi été envoyés à la presse écrite.
Médias d'information
Un communiqué de presse important reprenait des citations de gens soutenant la campagne, y compris les propos d'un
médecin d'urgence jouant un rôle dans le nouveau message d'intérêt public. Le communiqué de presse a été envoyé à
plus de 2 100 stations de radio, stations de télévision et médias imprimés et il a été affiché sur le site Web du CCS.
Information sur support papier
Le ces a continué de distribuer des affiches et des dépliants élaborés au cours de la deuxième année de la campagne.
Information dans le Web
Le ces a présenté la campagne en ligne, et son contenu se trouve toujours dans la section sur les communiqués de presse
du site Web du CCS.
Résumé
Au cours de cette phase de la campagne, les objectifs fixés ont été réalisés pour ce qui est d'élargir la portée du message
de la campagne. Avec la collaboration des médias et d'intervenants organisationnels, le ces a été en mesure de diffuser
son message plus largement. Grâce à l'élaboration maintenant complète d'un jeu de documents de sensibilisation
efficaces et à la participation active de gens engagés, la campagne est susceptible de poursuivre sur sa lancée, voire de
prendre de l'ampleur, dans les années futures pour que le public garde présente à l'esprit la question de la sécurité
relative aux armes à feu.
9
Changement dans les rapports entre catégories de permis d'armes à feu
Si le nombre total de permis d'armes à feu délivrés à des adultes au Canada (permis de possession
seulement ainsi que permis de possession et d'acquisition) est demeuré plutôt constant entre 2005 et
· 2011, le rapport entre les permis de possession seulement (PPS) et les permis de possession et
d'acquisition (PPA) a changé de façon appréciable. En 2005, on comptait environ 1,2 million de PPS pour
755 210 PPA. Or, en 2011, il existait environ 1,2 million de PPA pour 677 162 PPS. Comme les PPS
n'étaient délivrés qu'aux personnes qui possédaient une arme à feu à compter de 2001, ce type de
permis est appelé à disparaître .
..----------------------. --
Tableau 1 : Nombre total cumulé de PPS et
de PPA
-------------
Année PPS PPA
2011 677 162 1217 564
2010 695 299 1144 970
2009 777 479 1 058 907
2008 889 425 962 890
2007 989 248 874 933
2006 1 091 994 797 329
2005 1203124 755 210
Pour pouvoir obtenir un PPA, c'est-à-dire un permis d'armes à feu qui donne au titulaire le droit de
posséder et d'acheter des armes à feu et d'acheter des munitions, le demandeur doit d'abord
démontrer qu'il connaît bien le maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu. Ainsi, la majorité des titulaires
actuels d'un permis d'armes à feu au Canada ont été tenus récemment de démontrer leur connaissance
du maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu ou de prouver qu'ils avaient suivi de la formation sur le sujet.
Modifications législatives envisagées
Le 25 octobre 2011, le ministre de la Sécurité publique a déposé le projet de loi C-19, Loi modifiant le
Code criminel et la Loi sur les armes à feu, aussi connue sous le nom de Loi sur l'abolition du registre des
. armes d'épaule. Le projet de loi a été rédigé dans le but de modifier le Code criminel et la Loi sur les
armes à feu afin d'y supprimer l'exigence relative à l'enregistrement des armes à feu sans restriction.
Veuillez noter que des modifications législatives ont été apportées en 2012, abolissant l'exigence
d'enregistrer les armes à feu sans restriction. Le présent rapport contient des renseignements portant sur
l'année 2011, alors que cette exigence était toujours en vigueur.
10
SERVICES DE SOUTIEN À L'APPLICATION DE LA LOI DU PCAF
Le PCAF appuie le mandat d'application de la loi du commissaire de la GRC en aidant les organismes
d'application de la loi de première ligne à enquêter sur les personnes impliquées dans la circulation
illégale des armes à feu ou qui en font une mauvaise utilisation, et à les poursuivre en justice. La
Direction des services d'enquête et d'application de la loi en matière d'armes à feu (DSEALAF) a été mise
sur pied pour faciliter la réalisation de ce mandat.
Équipe nationale de soutien à l'application de la Loi sur les armes à feu (EN SALA)
L'ENSALA du PCAF fournit soutien, services et information aux policiers de la première ligne luttant
contre la circulation illégale d'armes à feu à destination du Canada et à l'intérieur du Canada et contre
leur usage criminel par la suite. L'assistance qu'apporte I'ENSALA, offerte en tout temps, comporte ce
qui suit:
• information et orientation sur les armes à feu, et conseils dans le domaine des enquêtes sur les
armes à feu;
• aide pratique en matière d'armes à feu en situation d'urgence;
• identification et dépistage des armes à feu;
• aide pour la récupération du numéro de série des armes à feu;
• préparation et exécution de mandats de perquisition concernant des armes à feu;
• saisies d'armes à feu et organisation de la preuve;
• lignes directrices pour la détermination des accusations relatives aux armes à feu;
• information et conseils sur la jurisprudence en matière d'armes à feu;
• préparation à la comparution en matière d'armes à feu;
• préparation d'affidavits;
• services de témoins experts sur les armes à feu;
• formation et exposés sur les armes à feu;
• assistance en rapport avec les programmes d'amnistie et de remise d'armes à feu;
• destruction et élimination d'armes à feu et de munitions.
11
Centre national de dépistage des armes à feu (CNDAF)
Le processus de dépistage peut révéler la provenance et l'historique d'une arme à feu. Comme l'arme à
feu représente un élément crucial de la preuve matérielle d'un crime perpétré avec une arme à feu,
établir un lien entre l'arme à feu et l'individu ou l'organisation criminelle qui la possède peut permettre
au Ministère public de faire valoir son argument et ouvrir de nouvelles pistes menant à d'autres activités
criminelles. Le CNDAF du PCAF offre ce service de dépistage aux enquêteurs des organismes
d'application de la loi au Canada et à l'étranger. Le CNDAF est en outre capable de mettre en commun
électroniquement des renseignements en matière de dépistage avec les enquêteurs des États-Unis, ce
qui assure un échange de renseignements rapide et précis. En 2011, le CNDAF a reçu et traité 2 242
demandes de dépistage d'armes à feu.
Le CNDAF a aussi réalisé 1 000 vérifications des sources locales pour le compte de services de police
canadiens et d'Interpol en 2011. Il reçoit des listes d'armes à feu volées, disparues, saisies ou de telles
armes à feu utilisées pour commettre un crime et interroge diverses bases de données canadiennes sur
les armes à feu, vérifiant tout renseignement sur les armes en question.
Services spécialisés de soutien en matière d'armes à feu (SSSAF)
Les SSSAF comprennent le Tableau de référence des armes à feu (TRAF), un outil informatisé complet et
convivial mis sur pied et tenu à jour par le PCAF. Avec plus de 141 000 articles de référence sur les armes
à feu, le TRAF fournit aux utilisateurs œuvrant dans le domaine de l'application de la loi une méthode
systématique et normalisée pour identifier et décrire des armes à feu. Le TRAF améliore la précision des
contrôles à l'importation et à l'exportation ainsi que les communications internationales concernant les
crimes faisant intervenir des armes à feu qui ont des ramifications dans plus d'un pays. Il contribue aussi
au dépistage des armes à feu, à la tenue des dossiers et à la détermination de la classe d'une arme à feu
en fonction des définitions applicables du Code criminel. La base de données du TRAF est mise à la
disposition de tous les corps policiers et organismes de réglementation par le biais d'un large éventail de
technologies, et le groupe du TRAF est reconnu comme le centre d'expertise en matière d'identification
des armes à feu.
La version 2011 du TRAF sur DVD a été diffusée en février/mars 2011 et a été distribuée comme suit :
~ 3 926 exemplaires de la version canadienne sur DVD
~ 1 392 exemplaires de la version internationale sur DVD
~ 47 exemplaires de la version destinée aux organisations* sur DVD
*La version du TRAF destinée aux organisations renferme les mêmes données et comporte les mêmes fonctionnalités que la version destinée aux
particuliers, mais Je processus d'installation du DVD diffère. La version destinée oux orgonisotions est idéale pour les organismes gouvernementaux et les
services de police de grande toi/le qui exploitent leur propre réseou interne commun et comptent un grand nombre d'utilisateurs.
Les changements suivants sont survenus dans la distribution de la version internationale du TRAF sur DVD en 2011 :
~ 84 nouveaux clients de divers pays pour la version internationàle du TRAF
~ 11 nouveaux pays ajoutés à la liste de distribution de la version internationale
~ Le Secrétariat général d'INTERPOL à Lyon a reçu des données à jour en 2011 et a offert à 188 pays la possibilité de
consulter le TRAF grâce au Tableau de référence INTERPOL des armes à feu {TRIAF}.
12
Les pays suivants reçoivent la version internationale du TRAF, et ceux qui sont écrits en rouge se sont
ajoutés à la liste de distribution en 2011 :
Argentine Colombie Jamaïque Sainte-lucie
Australie Costa Rica Kosovo Serbie et Monténégro
Autriche Croatie lesotho Espagne
Bahamas France Malaisie Suède
Bahrein Allemagne Mexique Suisse
Bangladesh Guatemala Pays-Bas Taïwan
Barbade Guinée Nouvelle-Zélande Tha'•lande
Belgique Hongrie Norvège Trinité-et-Tobago
Brésil Inde Oman Turquie
Canada Irlande Pakistan Émirats arabes unis
Îles Caïmans Israël Pérou Royaume-Uni
Chili Italie Philippines États-Unis
En août 2011, une version du TRAF sur le Web a été offerte aux clients dans un environnement Internet sécurisé. La
version est mise à jour quotidiennement et permet donc aux utilisateurs d'avoir accès aux images d'armes à feu et aux
dossiers les plus récents. Grâce à cette version, les utilisateurs ont également accès au TRAF à partir d'une connexion
Internet. D'ici la fin de 2011, 539 clients se seront inscrits à ce service.
~ ~
Le programme de l'Unité mobile de service (UMS) est un autre volet des SSSAF. L'UMS est composée
d'experts en armes à feu de la GRC qui, au moyen de véhicules spéciaux, stationnaires ou se déplaçant
aux quatre coins du pays, fournissent des services liés aux armes à feu aux divers groupes d'application
de la loi. Lorsqu'elle est jumelée au Système mobile d'incinération de munitions, I'UMS peut offrir sur
place des services d'identification d'armes à feu et de munitions, d'examen d'armes et de munitions, de
tirs d'essai ainsi que des services de destruction et d'élimination.
Résumé des activités de formation et de soutien en matière d'armes à feu offertes par les SSSAF en 2011 :
• Soutien quotidien apporté à des services de police municipaux, provinciaux et fédéraux, à des unités spécialisées dans
les armes à feu et les gangs, ainsi qu'à des organismes gouvernementaux tels que l' ASFC et le MAECI.
• Soutien apporté à un service de police provincial en avril 2011 pour identifier 187 armes à feu et en vérifier la classe
pour les tribunaux.
• Aide apportée à I'ENSALA et à des services de police municipaux pour identifier des armes de type militaire.
• En janvier 2011, trois séances de formation sur la vérification des armes à feu ont été données. Y ont participé :
1. Le bureau du contrôleur des armes à feu, y compris des préposés aux armes à feu
2. Une unité spécialisée dans les armes à feu et les gangs d'un service de police municipal de grande taille
3. Des entreprises et des musées dans une région métropolitaine du Canada
• Formation offerte à une unité provinciale spécialisée dans l'application de la Loi sur les armes à feu
• Prestation de trois séances du Cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu à des participants de la
GRC et à d'autres groupes gouvernementaux
• Formation sur l'identification des armes à feu donnée à Trinité-et-Tobago
• Présentation sur le TRAF dans le cadre de l'école internationale sur le trafic des armes organisée par le PCAF
• Diffusion de deux cours de formation en ligne sur les armes à feu : Vérification des armes à feu et Identification des
armes à feu pour agents publics (v.2.0}.
13
1
!
1
]
Unité de soutien aux enquêtes sur Internet en matière d'armes à feu
L'Unité de soutien aux enquêtes sur Internet en matière d'armes à feu (SEIAF) est une unité d'enquête
dans des sources ouvertes qui fournit toute une gamme de services de soutien Internet, notamment
dans le cadre d'enquêtes sur les demandeurs de permis d'armes à feu et aux policiers de première ligne.
Le SEIAF du PCAF recueille des renseignements sur une multitude de sites Web et, lorsque de possibles
activités criminelles faisant intervenir des armes à feu sont relevées, les renseignements pertinents sont
transmis au corps de police compétent afin que ce dernier procède aux enquêtes de rigueur.
En 2011, le SEIAF du PCAF a procédé à 3 147 enquêtes sur des demandeurs de permis d'armes à feu à
autorisation restreinte, soit 666 de plus qu'en 2010. Le SEIAF a aussi fait parvenir aux contrôleurs des
armes à feu 42 rapports de suivi sur des demandeurs présentant un risque élevé.
Le SEIAF a également répondu à 47 demandes directes de renseignements supplémentaires sur des
particuliers, des entreprises d'armes à feu ou des organisations, alors qu'elle avait répondu à 40 demandes
de cette nature en 2010.
Le SEIAF a aussi participé à 21 enquêtes en fournissant des renseignements trouvés sur des sites à source
ouverte dont des blogues, des forums, des réseaux sociaux et d'autres sites Web publics. Il s'agit là d'une
augmentation par rapport à l'année 2010, où l'unité avait contribué à 13 enquêtes.
Support aux enquêtes et aux opérations en matière d'armes à feu (SEOMAF)
L'unité SEOMAF du PCAF reçoit et analyse des renseignements sur les tendances observées au Canada
en rapport avec les armes à feu ainsi que sur les criminels présumés et les itinéraires empruntés par les
contrebandiers. L'unité transmet ensuite ces renseignements aux organismes d'application de la loi pour
les aider à lutter contre les armes à feu illicites et à réduire les risques que posent ces armes pour la
sécurité du public et des policiers. Elle peut aussi fournir à ses partenaires d'application de la loi un
. aperçu opérationnel des armes à feu présentes dans leur région ou à l'échelle du Canada pour les
épauler dans leurs enquêtes et dans les poursuites qu'ils intentent.
L'ENSALA, le CNDAF et le SEOMAF font aussi partie intégrante de l'initiative Investissements dans la
lutte contre l'utilisation d'armes à feu à des fins criminelles, laquelle est présentée dans le Rapport
ministériel sur le rendement de la GRC.
Règlement sur les armes à feu des agents publics
Le Règlement sur les armes à feu des agents publics, en vigueur depuis 2008, exige de certains
organismes du secteur public, y compris les services de police, qu'ils déclarent toutes les armes à feu
«de service »(appartenant à l'organisation) et« protégées» (saisies, trouvées ou qui lui ont été
remises).
Cette exigence concourt à l'engagement gu' a pris le Canada de lutter contre le trafic d'armes à feu
illicites, en prévoyant la création d'une base de données complète, centralisée et accessible contenant
des renseignements sur les armes à feu détenues partout au Canada. Les données peuvent être utilisées
14
pour faire avancer des enquêtes. Elles sont particulièrement importantes pour les crimes touchant plus
d'une administration, car elles contribuent à contrôler l'emplacement, le transport et la distribution des
armes à feu illicites au Canada. La base de données centralisée et accessible des armes à feu simplifie le
travail des agents d'application de la loi chargés de déterminer quels types d'armes à feu sont saisis au
pays et dans leur administration et d'établir la provenance probable de ces armes à feu.
Tableau 2 : Les agents publics canadiens* en possession d'armes à feu en 2011
Type d'organisme Nombre
Tribunal 121
Organisme fédéral 242
Organisme municipal 46
École de police 6
Service/détachement de police 1020
Organisme provincial 251
Total 1686
*Ces chiffres représentent les organismes en possession d'armes à feu protégées ou
d'd'armes à feu de service qui ont produit une déclaration à titre individuel. Dans
certains cas, il peut s'agir d'un service de police entier mais, dans d'autres cas, ce peut être
un détachement d'un service de police de grande envergure, comme la GRC
Tableau 3 : Armes à feu saisies par des agents publics (par lieu) en 2011
Province/Territoire Nombre d'armes à feu
Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador 368
Île-du-Prince-Édouard 4
Nouvelle-Écosse 1616
Nouveau-Brunswick 1168
Québec 8 561
Ontario 9 643
Manitoba 1736
Saskatchewan 886
Alberta 3 611
Colombie-Britannique 5 807
Yukon 120
Territoires du Nord-Ouest 91
Nunavut 116
Total 33727
' '

Ces chiffres representent umquement commumquee au PCAF et n mdtquent pas
nécessairement le nombre TOTAL d'armes à feu saisies au Canada.
Tableau 4 :Armes à feu saisies par des organismes d'application de la loi (par
classe d'armes) en 2011
Classe Nombre d'armes à feu
Armes à feu sans restriction 27 655
Armes à feu à autorisation restreinte 4 293
Armes à feu prohibées 1767
Armes à feu inconnues 12
Total 33 727
' '
Ces chiffres representent umquement commumquee au PCAF et n1ndtquent pas
nécessairement le nombre TOTAL d'armes à feu saisies au Canada.
15
Système canadien d'information relative aux armes à feu (SCIRAF)
Centre d'information de la police canadienne (CIPC)
Registre canadien des armes à feu en direct (RCAFED)
Le Système canadien d'!nformation relative aux armes à feu contient des données sur les titulaires
actuels de permis d'armes à feu. Les personnes et les entreprises titulaires de tels permis font l'objet de
vérifications continues et, si un titulaire de permis est visé par un rapport d'incident du Centre
d'information de la police canadienne n'importe où au Canada, un rapport appelé Personnes d'intérêt
relativement aux armes à feu (PIAF) est automatiquement créé et transmis au PCAF aux fins d'un
examen plus approfondi. Le SCIRAF êontient aussi des descriptions et des précisions sur les 7,8 millions
d'armes à feu enregistrées au Canada. Chaque fois qu'une arme à feu est signalée au CIPC comme ayant
été perdue, volée ou retrouvée, un « événement » du CIPC est automatiquement généré et envoyé au
Registre canadien des armes à feu pour examen.
Un sous-ensemble des données contenues dans le SCIRAF constitue le Registre canadien des armes à feu
en direct. Les agents d'application de la loi peuvent lancer des recherches dans le RCAFED par le
truchement du CIPC. L'information du RCAFED aide la police à trouver la provenance d'armes à feu ou à
s'informer de la présence d'armes à feu dans un lieu avant de s'y rendre. De plus, si un permis d'armes à
feu est révoqué et que la police intervient pour récupérer une ou plusieurs armes à feu, le service de
police concerné peut effectuer une recherche dans le RCAFED pour connaître le nombre d'armes à feu
associées à la personne en cause, leur description et leur numéro de série.
En 2011, les organismes canadiens d'application de la loi ont effectué, en moyenne, 17 778 recherches
par jour dans le Registre canadien des armes à feu en direct.
Graphique 1 : Nombre annuel de recherches dans le Registre canadien des armes à feu en direct (RCAFED)
7000000
c.oooooo
• SOO(l 000
i
~ •1001) 000
i
~ iOOOOOO
2000 000
l 000 000
2007 2008
Rapports par secteur géographique du PCAF
2009
........
2010 21)11
Le PCAF est capable de fournir sur demande aux se rvices de police des données statistiques relatives
aux armes à feu pour leur territoire. En regroupant les données du Système canadien d'information
relative aux armes à feu, de Statistique Canada et d'autres sources, le PCAF peut établir des rapports qui
renferment des données actuelles et précises sur les armes à feu par secteur géographique. Ces
renseignements factuels et présentés en temps voulu peuvent aider les policiers à s'attaquer à la
violence liée aux armes à feu, à lutter contre la circulation illégale des armes à feu sur leur territoire et à
concentrer leurs efforts d'enquête et de planification pour ce qui est des crimes perpétrés par arme à
feu.
16
1
SERVICES OFFERTS AU PUBLIC PAR LE PCAF
Délivrance de permis d'armes à feu
De façon générale, toutes les personnes et toutes les entreprises qui possèdent ou qui utilisent des
armes à feu doivent être titulaires d'un permis. De même, toute personne ou entreprise qui fait
l'acquisition d'armes à feu ou de munitions doit détenir un permis. Il existe quatre types de permis
d'armes à feu :
1. Permis de possession seulement (PPS)
2. Permis de possession et d'acquisition (PPA)
3. Permis pour mineur
4. Permis pour entreprise
Tableau 5 : Permis d'armes à feu par type et par province ou territoire (en date du 31 décembre 2011)
Province/Territoire Permis de possession et Permis de possession Permis pour mineur Nombre total
d'acquisition seulement de permis
Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador 45 787 27 768 208 73 763
Ile-du-Prince-Edouard 3 119 3 363 16 6 498
Nouvelle-Ecosse 33 653 41113 1133 75 899
Nouveau-Brunswick 32 724 40932 143 73 799
Québec 327 288 170 918 19 498 225
Ontario 330 506 194 307 3 963 528 776
Manitoba 54 360 27 279 325 81964
Saskatchewan 61434 31044 110 92 588
Alberta 164 259 62 283 1627 228 169
Colombie-Britannique 151 579 76475 455 228 509
Yukon 5 291 1088 42 6 421
Territoires du Nord-ouest 4 620 541 44 5 205
Nunavut 2 942 51 6 2 999
TOTAL 1217 562 677162 8091 1902 815
Tableau 6 : Nombre de permis d'armes à feu délivrés par type de
permis (y compris les renouvellements)
Type de permis d'armes à feu Nombre total de permis
délivrés en 2011
Permis de possession et d'acquisition 267 580
_{Nouveaux et renouvellements)
Permis de possession seulement 70140
(Renouvellements seulement)
Permis pour mineur 3 925
Nombre total de permis délivrés à des 341645
personnes
Nombre total de permis délivrés à des 1993
entreprises
Total 343 638
17
du 31 4 39-0 d'armes à feu titulaires de permis
j délivrés aux termes de la Loi sur les armes à feu, à l'exclusion des transporteurs et des musées. Parmi
: ces entreprises, 2 410 étaient titulaires d'un permis de vente de munitions seulement.
En 2011, le temps moyen de traitement d'une demande de permis d'arme à feu ordinaire (nouvelle
demande ou renouvellement du permis) pour laquelle toute l'information demandée était fournie et
aucun suivi n'était nécessaire était de 25 jours.
En 2011, le temps moyen de traitement d'une demande pour tout nouveau PPA était de 40 jours, en
raison de la nécessité de la vérification des références, d'un examen plus poussé des antécédents du
demandeur et de la période d'attente obligatoire de 28 jours pour tous les nouveaux PPA.

Renouvellement des permis d'armes à feu
Comme l'indique la Loi sur les armes à feu, les titulaires de permis d'armes à feu ont la responsabilité de
renouveler leur permis avant son expiration. Le PCAF facilite le processus de renouvellement en
envoyant des formulaires de demande de renouvellement partiellement remplis environ 90 jours avant
la date d'échéance des permis en vigueur. Les titulaires de permis sont tenus selon la loi d'informer le
PCAF de tout changement d'adresse. Ils sont ainsi certains de recevoir les avis de renouvellement et les
formulaires de demande de renouvellement partiellement remplis.
Les permis de possession seulement (PPS) ne sont généralement offerts que par renouvellement.
Toutefois, la mesure d'incitation à la conformité prévoyant la délivrance d'un nouveau PPS, qui est en
vigueur jusqu'au 16 mai 2013, offre aux personnes qui détiennent un PPS échu l'occasion de demander
un nouveau PPS pour autant qu'elles remplissent certaines conditions. Ce permis n'est délivré qu'aux
titulaires d'un PPS échu, et la mesure d'incitation à la conformité n'inversera pas la tendance actuelle, à
savoir la disparition de ce type de permis à plus ou moins longue échéance.
En 2011, un total de 230 767 permis (PPS et PPA) détenus par des propriétaires d'armes à feu devaient
être renouvelés. Le graphique 2 illustre la tendance d'année en année suivant laquelle un plus grand
nombre de titulaires de permis renouvellent leur permis.
Graphique 2 : Renouvellement de permis d'armes à feu (PPS et PPA)
350000 -r---------------
300000
250000
200000
150000
100000
50000
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
• Non renouvelé
•Renouvelé
Parmi les autres avantages rattachés au renouvellement du permis d'armes à feu avant son échéance
figurent ceux-ci :
1. le formulaire de demande de renouvellement est plus court et plus simple que le formulaire de
demande de permis d'armes à feu;
2. le renouvellement permet d'éviter de courir le risque que son certificat d'enregistrement ne soit
révoqué ou de perdre les droits acquis de possession d'armes à feu prohibées;
3. le renouvellement permet d'éviter le risque de se voir infliger une amende pour possession illégale
d'une arme à feu
Soutien aux entreprises d'armes à feu
Les organisations et les entreprises qui fabriquent, vendent, possèdent, manient, exposent ou
entreposent des armes à feu ou des munitions doivent détenir un permis d'entreprise d'armes à feu.
Aussi, les employés de ces entreprises qui manient des armes à feu dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions
doivent être titulaires d'un permis d'armes à feu. Par ailleurs, toutes les armes à feu qu'une entreprise a
en stock doivent être enregistrées.
Les entreprises doivent se soumettre à des inspections périodiques menées par un préposé aux armes à
feu du PCAF visant à vérifier la conformité à la loi des mesures prises par l'entreprise en matière de
sécurité et d'entreposage des armes à feu.
Le PCAF offre aux entreprises l'option d'enregistrer et de céder leurs armes à feu par l'intermédiaire de
ses services en ligne. La cession électronique d'une arme à feu à un particulier est traitée en quelques
minutes.
Les normes énoncées dans la Loi sur les armes à feu qui doivent être respectées par les clubs de tir et les
champs de tir visent à assurer la sécurité de leurs membres, des visiteurs et du grand public. Les lignes
directrices relatives aux champs de tir publiées par le PCAF et les inspections périodiques réalisées par
les préposés aux armes à feu du PCAF font la promotion de la sécurité des participants et de l'utilisation
sécuritaire des armes à feu en ces lieux.
Contrôleurs des armes à feu (CAF)
On trouve dans chaqué province et territoire un contrôleur des armes à feu qui est responsable de la
mise en œuvre des principales dispositions de la Loi sur les armes à feu, soit :
• délivrer des permis aux particuliers et aux entreprises;
• approuver les cessions d'armes à feu à autorisation restreinte et d'armes à feu prohibées;
• agréer les clubs de tir et les champs de tir;
• approuver les expositions d'armes à feu;
• accorder des autorisations de port d'armes à feu;
• accorder des autorisations de transport d'armes à feu;
• nommer des préposés aux armes à feu;
• nommer des inspecteurs de la sécurité des armes à feu;
• nommer des moniteurs chargés du Cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu.
19
De plus, les CAF doivent déterminer si un demandeur remplit toutes les conditions nécessaires pour
obtenir ou conserver un permis d'armes à feu. Ils peuvent décider de délivrer ou non un permis ou une
autorisation de transport, de port, de cession ou d'agrément, de renouveler ces documents, de les
révoquer ou d'établir des conditions particulières dans ces documents.
Enregistrement des armes à feu/Directeur de l'enregistrement des armes à feu
Le directeur de l'enregistrement des armes à feu est responsable de l'administration et de l'application
des principales dispositions de la Loi sur les armes à feu. Il est chargé de :
• délivrer ou refuser de délivrer des certificats d'enregistrement aux entreprises et aux particuliers, ou
de les révoquer;
• délivrer, refuser de délivrer ou révoquer des permis de transporteur;
• mettre en application le Règlement sur les armes à feu des agents publics;
• tenir à jour les données du Registre canadien des armes à feu pour en assurer la qualité et la
disponibilité pour les responsables de l'application de la loi;
• mettre à jour le Réseau national des vérificateurs.
Au 31 décembre 2011, la Loi sur les armes à feu exigeait l'enregistrement au Canada de toutes les armes
à feu sans restriction, à autorisation restreinte et prohibées. Le numéro du certificat d'enregistrement
établit un lien entre l'arme à feu et son propriétaire titulaire d'un permis dans la base de données
nationale du PCAF, le Système canadien d'information relative aux armes à feu. Comme c'est le cas pour
les permis d'armes à feu, il est possible pour les organismes d'exécution de la loi d'accéder à un sous-
ensemble de données contenues dans le Registre canadien des armes à feu en direct par l'intermédiaire
du Centre d'information de la police canadienne.
.. ? .: Armes à feu enregistrées à_u nom ou d'un particulierJ2010 et2011)
Classe d'arme à feu 2010 2011 Ecart
Sans restriction 6 943 621 7 133 143 189 522
A autorisation restreinte 501 079 531 735 30 656
Prohibée 201 999 197 024 -4975
Total 7 646 699 7 861902 215 203
'
Pour présenter une demande d'enregistrement, une personne doit avoir au moins 18 ans et détenir un
permis d'armes à feu l'autorisant à posséder une arme à feu de la classe en question. L'enregistrement
d'une arme à feu est gratuit, et le certificat d'enregistrement n'a pas de date d'expiration. Le seul
moment où un certificat d'enregistrement doit être remplacé, autre que celui où une arme à feu est
cédée à un nouveau propriétaire, c'est lorsque l'arme à feu subit des modifications qui entraînent un
changement à sa classification.
Une arme à feu doit être vérifiée avant d'être enregistrée la première fois. La vérification est le
processus par lequel la classe à laquelle appartient une arme à feu est confirmée.
Toutes les armes à feu peuvent être réparties dans l'une des trois classes suivantes :
• Armes à feu sans restriction :la plupart des fusils de chasse et des carabines
• Armes à feu à autorisation restreinte :surtout des armes de poing
• Armes à feu prohibées*: la plupart des fusils d'assaut, des types particuliers d'armes de poing et des
armes à feu entièrement automatiques
*Les armes à feu prohibées ne peuvent pas être nouvellement importées au Canada par des particuliers. Seuls les particuliers
« bénéficiant de droits acquis » sont autorisés à posséder ces armes à feu.
20
Lorsqu'une arme à feu est cédée à un nouveau propriétaire, le dossier doit être modifié de façon à
illustrer la radiation du propriétaire original et l'enregistrement au nom du nouveau propriétaire. Ce
processus de cession peut souvent être réalisé rapidement par téléphone.
Tableau 8: Enregistrements d'armes à feu (particuliers et entreprises) par région en 2011
Armes à feu à
Armes à feu sans autorisation Armes à feu
Province/Territoire restriction restreinte prohibées Total
Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador
207 108 4 250 1 556 212914
Île-du-Prince-Édouard
22111 1 737 793 24641
Nouvelle-Écosse
286 268 16 468 7114 309850
Nouveau-Brunswick
274 255 12 136 5 110 291501
Québec
1 618 935 58 579 32 792 1710 306
Ontario
2 110 244 190 118 82 121 2 382483
Manitoba
347 659 19 318 5 926 372903
Saskatchewan
415 460 27495 8 203 451158
Alberta
930 519 97 850 24 584 1052 953
Colombie-Britanniaue
838 878 100 013 27 865 966 756
Yukon
24452 1883 395 26730
Territoires du Nord-Ouest
19 292 1103 328 20723
Nunavut
12 626 170 39 12835
Autre
25 336 615 198 26149
Total
7133143 531735 197 024 7 861902
Aider et informer le public
Le PCAF a à cœur de communiquer avec le public et de diffuser de l'information sur la sécurité et les
armes à feu par divers médias. L'objectif est d'améliorer la sécurité du public en misant sur une
sensibilisation accrue et sur une plus grande conformité dans l'utilisation, le maniement et
l'entreposage sécuritaires des armes à feu.
Les activités d'information menées par la Direction des services de gestion et de stratégie des armes à
feu (SGSAF) du PCAF renseignent le public sur la façon dont le Programme collabore avec les services de
police de première ligne et d'autres organismes d'application de la loi et les aident à recueillir et à traiter
des éléments de preuve, à mener des enquêtes et à poursuivre les personnes et les organisations
impliquées dans le trafic et la possession illégale d'armes à feu et l'utilisation d'armes à feu à des fins
criminelles. En 2011, les SGSAF ont continué de donner suite à l'engagement du Programme d'établir
des partenariats avec divers organismes d'exécution de la loi canadiens en diffusant de l'information sur
les armes à feu axée sur l'application de la loi dans des bulletins, des brochures, des cartes et des fiches
de renseignements. Pour améliorer les services à la police, le PCAF offre aussi des numéros de téléphone
sans frais et des adresses électroniques réservés à la police.
Le site Web du PCAF est régulièrement mis à jour par les SGSAF afin de fournir à un public vaste et varié
de l'information exacte et à jour sur le maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu, les politiques et les
initiatives axées sur le service à la clientèle. En 2011, il y a eu 4 235 369 visualisations de pages dans le
site Web du PCAF, ce qui ne comprend pas les visualisations multiples au cours d'une même session.
21
Les citoyens qui veulent obtenir de l'aide ou de l'information au sujet des armes à feu peuvent
communiquer avec le personnel du centre d'appels du PCAF au numéro sans frais 1-800-731-4000 ou
par courriel à l'adresse pcaf-cfp@rcmp-grc.gc.ca.
En 2011, le centre d'appels du PCAF a reçu 977 005 demandes de renseignements par téléphone et
environ 8 500 demandes de renseignements par courriel, y compris des demandes de vérification de
l'état d'une demande de permis, des demandes d'information et des demandes de formulaires.
De plus, des représentants du PCAF ont assisté à des salons de chasse et de plein air ainsi qu'à des
expositions d'armes à feu à la grandeur du pays pour distribuer des documents sur le maniement
sécuritaire des armes à feu et pour répondre en personne à des demandes d'information sur les armes à
feu.
Sensibiliser les collectivités autochtones
Le PCAF offre des services relatifs aux armes à feu aux Autochtones et à leurs collectivités. Il s'emploie à
rehausser continuellement la qualité et la gamme des services offerts. Pour tenter de mieux répondre à
ces besoins, les SGSAF du PCAF ont effectué des études et ont aidé à mettre sur pied des programmes
de prestation de services.
Au cours des mois de janvier, février et mars 2011, ainsi qu'en octobre, novembre et décembre 2011, les
SGSAF ont appuyé la formation sur la sécurité offerte dans les collectivités autochtones du Nord de
l'Ontario. Au cours de ces mois, 287 personnes ont obtenu la certification de maniement sécuritaire des
armes à feu. Dans le cadre de ces initiatives d'information et de formation sur la sécurité, le PCAF a
également apporté son concours pour ce qui des demandes de permis d'armes à feu et des demandes
d'enregistrement, des vérifications et de la prestation de renseignements généraux sur les armes à feu.
Ces activités ont pour but d'accroître la sécurité publique dans les collectivités autochtones en
sensibilisant davantage les membres qui ont accès à des armes à feu.
22
ASSURER LA SÉCURITÉ DU CANADA
Formation sur le maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu
Comme le stipule la Loi sur les armes à feu, toute personne qui veut obtenir un permis en vue d'utiliser
ou de posséder des armes à feu au Canada doit démontrer qu'elle connaît les principes du maniement
et de l'utilisation sécuritaires des armes à feu. Le Cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement des
armes à feu (CCSMAF) et le Cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu à
autorisation restreinte (CCSMAFAR) sont des éléments essentiels de sensibilisation aux armes à feu et
de formation sur la sécurité du PCAF. Élaborés en collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires et
des organisations qui manifestent un intérêt continu à l'égard de l'éducation des chasseurs et de
l'utilisation sécuritaire des armes à feu, ces cours offrent de la formation sur le maniement, l'utilisation,
le transport et l'entreposage sécuritaires des armes à feu à autorisation restreinte et sans restriction.
La Loi sur les armes à feu stipule que toute personne qui souhaite acquérir des armes à feu sans
restriction doit réussir le CCSMAF, alors que celle qui veut acquérir des armes à feu à autorisation
restreinte doit réussir à la fois le CCSMAF et le CCSMAFAR. En 2011, 86 740 personnes ont réussi le
CCSMAF et 26 509 personnes ont réussi le CCSMAFAR.
Tableau 9: Formation sur le maniement sécuritaire des armes à feu
Année Cours canadien de sécurité dans Cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement
le maniement des armes à feu des armes à feu à autorisation restreinte
2007
72 421 15 382
2008
83 225 20149
2009
83 287 22 773
2010
84 622 23 246
2011 86 740 26509
Le PCAF de la GRC est responsable de l'élaboration, de la mise en œuvre, de l'évaluation et de la révision
des normes nationales de sécurité applicables aux armes à feu ainsi que du CCSMAF et du CCSMAFAR.
Chaque contrôleur des armes à feu est responsable de la prestation des cours dans son administration.
Vérification approfondie des demandeurs de permis d'armes à feu
Le PCAF met en application un processus de vérification accrue des demandeurs de permis d'armes à
feu afin d'éviter que les particuliers qui présentent un risque pour la sécurité publique n'acquièrent des
armes à feu ou n'y aient accès. Toute personne qui présente une première demande de permis d'armes
à feu doit faire l'objet d'un processus de vérification approfondie, qui comporte notamment des
entrevues avec le demandeur et ses répondants ainsi que des vérifications dans Internet.
En 2011, le PCAF a procédé à une vérification approfondie de la sécurité pour 40 141 demandeurs
de permis d'armes à feu et il a réalisé 120 424 entrevues (demandeurs et répondants).
23
Demandes de permis d'armes à feu refusées
Les contrôleurs des armes à feu (CAF) jouent un rôle essentiel au cours du processus visant à autoriser
des particuliers à acquérir un permis d'armes à feu. Le CAF est autorisé, en vertu de la Loi sur les armes à
feu, à rejeter une demande de permis sur la foi de son évaluation du risque que le particulier représente
pour la sécurité publique.
En 2011, 520 demandes de permis d'armes à feu ont été rejetées pour diverses raisons. (Ce chiffre ne
comprend pas les nombreuses demandes que retirent certaines personnes après que des questions leur
ont été posées, mais avant que la demande ne soit éventuellement refusée par le CAF.)
Tableau 10 : Nombre de demandes de permis d'armes à feu refusées
Année Demandes refusées
2007 440
2008 462
2009 515
2010 570
2011 520
Total 2507
Tableau 11: Motifs de refus des demandes de permis d'armes à feu
(2011)
Motifs Demandes refusées*
Ordonnance d1nterdiction ou probation 237
Violence conjugale 34
Infractions relatives à la drogue 32
Santé mentale 92
Inadmissible au PPS 10
Risque potentiel pour autrui 164
Risque potentiel pour soi 141
Fausse déclaration 42
Utilisation et entreposage non sécuritaires d'armes à feu 17
Violence 68
*Le refus d'une demande de permis d'armes à feu peut être fondé sur plus d'un facteur,
c'est pourquoi la somme des motifs de refus dépasse le total annuel de demandes de
permis refusées.
24
Vérification continue de l'admissibilité des titulaires de permis d'armes à feu
Tous les titulaires de permis,d'armes à feu sont inscrits dans le Système canadien d'information relative
aux armes à feu, lequel effectue chaque jour des vérifications automatiques dans le Cl PC afin de savoir si
un titulaire de permis a fait l'objet d'un rapport d'incident au CIPC. Toutes les correspondances
produisent un rapport intitulé« Personnes d'intérêt- Armes à feu (PIAF)» qui est automatiquement
envoyé au CAF compétent pour qu'il assure le suivi. Certains de ces rapports sont« exclus »,ce qui
signifie qu'ils ne requièrent aucune autre mesure, mais d'autres donnent lieu à un examen du permis
d'armes à feu de la personne concernée et peuvent entraîner sa révocation et la saisie des armes à feu.
Tableau 12 : Nombre d'incidents PIAF par province (2011}
Province/Territoire
Confirmés Exclus Total
Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador 808 1 024 1832
Île-du-Prince-Édouard 96 208 304
Nouvelle-Écosse
1 341 2472 3 813
Nouveau-Brunswick
1 388 2748 4136
Québec
11239 17427 28 666
Ontario
18 903 25 336 44 239
Manitoba
2 880 4272 7 152
Saskatchewan
2 145 2 446 4 591
Alberta
4 744 3 920 8664
Colombie-Britannique
5 537 8 874 14411
Yukon
343 207 550
Territoires du Nord-Ouest
122 80 202
Nunavut
65 4 69
Total
49611 69018 118 629
Révocations de permis d'armes à feu
Les CAF sont autorisés, en vertu de la Loi sur les armes à feu, à révoquer un permis d'armes à feu, sur la
foi de leur évaluation du risque que le particulier représente pour la sécurité publique.
En 2011, 2 365 permis d'armes à feu ont été révoqués. Ce chiffre augmente d'année en année, peut-être
en raison d'une sensibilisation accrue aux actes criminels qui entraînent une interdiction de posséder
une arme à feu et la révocation du permis
Tableau 13 : Nombre de révocations de permis
d'armes à feu
Année Révocations
2007 1748
2008 1 833
2009 2 085
2010 2 231
2011 2365
Total 10262
25
Tableau 14: Motifs de révocation de permis d'armes à feu (2011}
Motifs Révocations*
Ordonnance d'interdiction ou probation 1 758
Violence conjugale 55
Infractions relatives à la drogue 45
Santé mentale 214
Inadmissible au PPS 63
Risque potentiel pour autrui 390
Risque potentiel pour soi 386
Fausse déclaration 28
Utilisation et entreposage non sécuritaires d'armes à feu 59
Violence 91
*Les révocations de permis d'armes à feu peuvent être fondées sur plus d'un facteur, c'est pourquoi
la somme des motifs de révocation dépasse le total annuel des révocations de permis d'armes à feu.
Les refus de demandes de permis d'armes à feu et les révocations de permis sont consignés dans le
Système canadien d'information relative aux armes à feu du PCAF. Les particuliers dont la demande de
permis est refusée ou dont le permis est révoqué ne peuvent donc pas se soustraire à cette décision en
déménageant dans une autre province ou un autre territoire.
Interdictions visant les armes à feu
Les tribunaux doivent informer les contrôleurs des armes à feu de toutes les ordonnances d'interdiction
visant les armes à feu qui sont rendues au sein de leur administration. Les demandeurs de permis
d'armes à feu font l'objet d'une vérification afin de déterminer s'ils sont visés par une ordonnance
d'interdiction et, si c'est le cas, le permis d'armes à feu leur est refusé.
Si le titulaire d'un permis d'armes à feu est visé par une ordonnance d'interdiction, son permis est
révoqué et le tribunal lui ordonne de remettre son permis et de se départir de toutes ses armes à feu.
Une fois informé par le tribunal, le contrôleur des armes à feu révoquera le permis par voie
administrative.
Dans ces cas, le directeur de l'enregistrement du PCAF révoque par voie administrative les certificats
d'enregistrement connexes et donne au particulier en question des instructions sur la façon de se
départir des armes à feu. Le directeur refuse également toutes les demandes d'enregistrement d'armes
à feu en attente d'approbation, informe les services de police de la révocation, et assure le suivi de
l'aliénation des armes à feu en faveur de l'application de la loi.
Les ordonnances d'interdiction sont versées au dossier des personnes concernées du CIPC, et l'on en
tient compte lors de la vérification des antécédents et de la vérification continue de l'admissibilité.
Aucun permis ne sera délivré à une personne visée par une ordonnance d'interdiction. Les
renseignements obtenus des tribunaux municipaux, provinciaux et fédéraux aident également à
déterminer si un particulier peut représenter une menace pour la sécurité publique. À la suite de la
découverte d'une telle ordonnance, le contrôleur des armes à feu peut effectuer une enquête pouvant
mener à la révocation d'un permis ou à la modification des conditions du permis.
26
Graphique 3 : Interdictions visant les armes à feu (cumulatives) (2007-2011}
2011
3 1 8 7 ~ 9
2010
301048
2009
27 104
2008
254036
2007
20885
50000 100000 150000 200000 250000 300000 350000
Refus de demandes d'enregistrement d'armes à feu et révocations de certificats
Lorsque le permis d'un propriétaire d'armes à feu est révoqué pour des raisons de sécurité publique, le
directeur de l'enregistrement des armes à feu du PCAF révoque les certificats d'enregistrement
connexes et, s'il y a lieu, refuse les demandes d'enregistrement d'armes à feu. Le directeur refuse
également les demandes d'enregistrement d'armes à feu lorsque le permis d'un propriétaire d'armes à
feu est révoqué à la suite de la délivrance d'une ordonnance d'interdiction de posséder des armes à feu.
Les autres motifs de révocation d'un certificat d'enregistrement et de refus d'une demande
d'enregistrement comprennent l'expiration du permis d'armes à feu, le fait que les privilèges associés au
permis sont inappropriés pour une certaine classe d'armes à feu et l'omission de renseignements
suffisants pour respecter les exigences en matière d'enregistrement.
En 2011, 181 demandes d'enregistrement d'armes à feu ont été rejetées et 89 805 certificats
d'enregistrement d'armes à feu ont été révoqués.
À la suite de la révocation d'un certificat d'enregistrement et du rejet d'une demande d'enregistrement,
le directeur de l'enregistrement surveille l'aliénation des armes à feu et, s'il y a lieu, renvoie l'affaire aux
organismes locaux d'application de la loi pour que des mesures soient prises.
Refus de demandes
Inspections relatives aux armes à feu
Il incombe au contrôleur des armes à feu d'inspecter et d'agréer les clubs de tir et les champs de tir qui
se trouvent dans son administration afin de s'assurer que les entreprises sont gérées de manière
sécuritaire et conformément à la Loi sur les armes à feu. Afin de contribuer à la sécurité de la
collectivité, le CAF est également autorisé à effectuer des inspections dans les entreprises d'armes à feu
et chez les particuliers qui collectionnent des armes à feu afin de s'assurer que les exigences en matière
d'entreposage et de maniement sécuritaires sont respectées.
27
Coordonnateur - Sécurité des champs de tir et recours à la force
Le coordonnateur, Sécurité des champs de tir et recours à la force, est chargé d'élaborer et de mettre en
œuvre des initiatives visant à appuyer l'amélioration continue des champs de tir au Canada. Il élabore et
met en œuvre des mesures de sécurité visant les champs de tir, et examine les rapports d'inspection
relatifs à la sécurité des champs de tir pour améliorer les lignes directrices, les procédures et les
formulaires utilisés par les préposés aux armes à feu lors des inspections des champs de tir. Aussi, il
examine les demandes présentées par les champs de tir, mène des vérifications de contrôle de la
qualité, formule des commentaires sur les rapports d'inspection et demande que des inspections de
suivi soient effectuées s'il y a lieu, ou les effectuent lui-même.
Service 1-800 - Signaler une préoccupation en matière de sécurité publique
Le PCAF offre une ligne téléphonique sans frais (1-800-731-4000) et conseille fortement à toute
personne ayant une préoccupation non urgente en matière de sécurité publique liée aux armes à feu de
lui en faire part. Le PCAF encourage toute personne à lui signaler l'existence d'un propriétaire d'armes à
feu qui pourrait représenter un danger pour lui ou pour autrui, ou de lui indiquer toute raison valable de
croire qu'un particulier titulaire d'un permis d'armes à feu, ou qui en a fait la demande, ne devrait pas
détenir un tel permis.
Les rapports de menaces potentielles pour la sécurité publique sont acheminés aux contrôleurs des
armes à feu, qui prennent les mesures appropriées.
28
ENGAGEMENT POUR L'AVENIR
Le Programme canadien des armes à feu (PCAF) constitue le centre d'expertise du Canada en matière
d'armes à feu. 11 s'emploie à protéger les Canadiens et les Canadiennes contre les crimes commis avec
des armes à feu et leur mauvaise utilisation.
En 2011, le PCAF de la GRC a continué de se consacrer au renforcement de la sécurité publique dans les
collectivités canadiennes en offrant à la police et aux autres partenaires d'application de la loi une aide
axée sur les armes à feu ainsi que des renseignements fondamentaux pour la prévention des crimes
perpétrés avec arme à feu, les enquêtes sur ceux-ci et les poursuites qui s'ensuivent. Lorsque les
enquêteurs ont besoin d'aide pour trouver la provenance d'une arme à feu ou l'identifier, pour établir
ou exécuter un mandat de perquisition mettant en cause unè arme à feu ou pour organiser les éléments
de preuve liés aux armes à feu à l'intention des tribunaux, ils peuvent compter sur le savoir et
l'expérience des experts en armes à feu du PCAF.
En outre, le PCAF continue de promouvoir et de réglementer la possession responsable des armes à feu
ainsi que leur utilisation et leur entreposage sécuritaires pour réduire les risques de mort et de blessures
liés aux armes à feu. À cette fin, le PCAF offre de la formation obligatoire sur le maniement sécuritaire
des armes à feu, procède à des vérifications quant aux demandeurs de permis d'armes à feu, réalise des
inspections et exerce une surveillance à l'égard des armes à autorisation restreinte et des armes
prohibées.
Le Programme canadien des armes à feu est l'autorité en matière d'armes à feu au Canada.
29

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful