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MAJLIS PEPERIKSAAN MALAYSIA


(nrRlavsnN EXAMINATIoNS
coLTNCIL)

Instructions to candidates: DO NOT OPEN THIS QUESTION PAPER UNTIL YOU ARE TOLD TO DO SO.
There are forty-five questions in this test. For each question, choose the most appropriate answer. Indicate your answer on the separate answer sheet given. Read the instructions on the answer sheet carefully.
Att emp t a,ll
q u es
ti

on s.

This question paper consists of 16 printed pages. O Majlis Peperiksaan Malaysia 2009

MUET

SOOI3IE

*This question papff is CONFIDENTIAL until the test is over.

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Questions

to 7 are based on the following passage.

KualaLumpur:Atotalof35gpeoplehavebeenhangedsince 1970. Manyofthemtrafficked in drugs, some of them who practised black magic were involved in murders and a number committed fi rearms robberies. Malaysia is one of 76 countries in the world where the death penalty is still part of the law-and-order regime. The Bar Council said over the weekend that it would campaign for the death penalty to be abolished, arguing that the punishment was barbaric, inhuman and an insufficient deterrent. It also called for an immediate moratorium on all death sentences pending amendments to
the laws. The country's de facto law minister yesterday threw his support behind the move to do away with the death PenaltY. Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Datuk Seri Nazri Aziz said, "I am open to with the idea but as it's not an issue ofjust the minister taking a stand, it must be discussed the Attorney-General. I welcome this proposal. This is deflnitely something which should be looked into. For me, a life is a life. No one has the right to take someone else's life, even

t0

l5

if that person has taken another life."


However, Nazri said that it was not possible to impose a moratorium on death sentences' ..They cannot do that. Laws providing for such sentences still exist until we decide to do away with them. The death sentence has been part of our laws for a long time. It goes with the fabric of the whole systern. After discussions are held, hopefully the Attorney-General

20

will advise the Government." Any move to abolish the death penalty is likely to face stiff opposition from the Government and also those who believe that the rights of victims and the rights of the
community to live and work in safety and security. Should the death penalty be abolished? What is your comment? Some readers' 25 comments to the press are presented below to help you decide. Then you can also e-mail your comment to news@nst.com.my or SMS to 32728.

Table: Death Penalty

For

Against
a

o o o . o

Retribution: To show certain crimes will


not be tolerated

End cycle of violence: No place for retribution in civilised society

Deterrent: Potential criminals twice before breaking the law

will think

o
a

Not a deterrent Low value of human life


Technical and legal costs

Safe8: No chance to repeat crimes Cost: No further maintenance cost to the


state

o o

Justice: For the victims and their families

Unfairness to offenders

(Adapted from New Straits Times,March 21, 2006)

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People were hanged for practising black magic.

A B C 2 A B C 3 A B C 4

True False

Not stated

Malaysia has a high number of death penalty cases.


True
False

Not stated

The Attorney-General and the Bar Council decide whether the death penalty can be abolished.

True
False

Not stated

youngsters from turning to a life of table.

Mary Lim sent in the following comment: "Capital punishment should remain to prevent crime." Her view is similar to one of the points listed in the

A B C 5 A B C 6 A B C 7 A B C

True
False

Not stated

The Minister in the Prime Minister's Deparlment is against the death penalty. True
False

Not stated

According to the news report, it is easy to abolish the death penalty.


True False

Not stated

According to the table, readers are in favour of abolishing the death penalty.
True
False

Not stated

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Questions 8 to 14 are based on the.following passage.

Ethical Issues in Advertising

A variety of ethical criticisms have been levelled against adr,efiisins. Becau,.e the issues are complex, it is impossible in this chapter to treat each critrcism in great detail. The purpose of this discussion is merelyto introduce the basic issues. The following criticisms are iiiustrative rather than exhaustive. Advertising is lJntruthful and Deceptive. The majorin oi -imerican consumers think that advertising often is untruthful. As mentioned earlier in the regulatory discussion, deception occurs when an advefiisement iaiseir iepies-nts a product and consumers believe the false representation to be true. Is ad..'erislns deceptive according to this general definition? Some adr erlising is ceceotir e ihe existence of governmental regulation and industry self-regulation atteits tl tir:s i)ct.

10

it would be naive, however, to assume that most advenrsing is adverlising industry is not much different from other institutions

Je ce -J:i-,

il :

e. The liuraitsl.c

society. Lying, cheating, and outright fraud are universal. occumng ;t tne highest levels of govemment and in the most basic human relationships. \dr erti>ing is ncrt without sin, but neither does it hold a monopoly on it. Advertising is Manipulative. The criticism of manipulatir.n as:erts that adverlising has the power to influence people to beha"'e aqpicaiir. tri lr jo things they would not do if they were not exposed to adveftisin". Takei iL'r :i-i3 -\treme. this suggests that advertising is capable oFmoving people.tg3rltst lhe'r lln lree wills. In general, the contention that advertising manipulates is ..r;:h--,::l sttbstance. Undeniabiy, advertising does attempt to persuade consumers to pr.ii"'hase particular products and brands. But persuasion and manipulation are not the same thing. Persuasion is a legitimate form of human interaction that all indir iduals and institutions in society perform. Advertising is Offensive and in Bad Taste. Adr enising cntics contend that many advertisements are insulting to human intelli-eence. rulgar. and generally offensive to the tastes of many consumers. Severai sroun,is ertst ibr this criticism: (1) sexual explicitness or innuendo in ali forms oladrertisements. tlltelevisrcrt commercials that advertise unpleasant products (haemorrho id treatments. di arrhoea products, etc.) and (3) repetitious usage of the same advenisement.r, lJndeniably, much advertising is disgusting and oft'ensire. \et. the same can be said for all forms of mass media presentations. For erample. fiianv nef*ork television programmes verge on the idiotic, and theatre mor ies are otten fi1led u ith inordinate amounts of sex andviolence. This cer1ain11 is ntrt to e\cuse adrertising for its excesses, but a balanced view demands that cntical evaluations of advertrsins be conducted in a broader context of popular cuhure and other lbmrs of mas-s media
presentations.

15

20

25

30

35

(Adapted tiom Terence \. Sirinrp 19al Advertising, Promotion. anci Sl;pienieii t.ii .1s teti-; o.f
d,\ !ai'i: e t i t t ? C t)t t' ii : i i i' i | . i I i )n s. 4'h edition. Fort \\-cnh: The Dr. ien Press)
Int e gra
te
t

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The fact that there is a need for regulations proves that some advertising is untrue.

A B C 9 A B C
10

True
False

Not stated

The writer argues that advertising is manipulative. True


False

Not stated

Adver-tisements tend to be offensive because of the influence of popular culture.

A B C

True
False

Not stated
is not without sin, but neither does it hold a monopoly on it (lines 14 and 15). This

11 Advertising
means that

A B C
12

many advertising companies are not ethical adverlising is not the only industry that is untruthful and deceptive

it is difficult to control the advertising industry because there are

so many players

The writer is of the opinion that advertising

A B C
13

encourages people to behave unethically

influences people to interact with others


persuades people to buy particular products

The writer thinks that the criticism that advertising is offensive and in bad taste is

,A unfair B unproven C unbelievable


14
The writer develops his ideas through

A B C

analysis

description
argumentation

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Questions 15 to

2l

are based on the following passage.

There are ways of owning your own business without starting it yourself. One way is to buy an existing business. The purchaser of an existing business is seeking to bypass the sometimes time consuming and involved process of establishing and building a business. Ideally, the purchaser is hoping to be able to build fiom someone else's efforts. Another market entry strategy is to purchase a business prototype or a franchise. Franchising has experienced a boom in recent years as people with no business experience of their own contract to use someone else's prototype. However, while buying a business or a franchise can provide a certain shortcut to ownership, do not take any shortcuts in evaluating either business

opporfunity. 2
Franchising involves a contracfual relationship between a franchisor and a franchisee. The franchisor is the owner of a particular service or product. The franchisee is interested in offering the product or service in a particular market. The franchise is the exclusive right to offer that product or service in a particular market. In return for granting that particular business opporlunity for the local distribution, the franchisor receives a payment from the franchisee.

10

15

Take, for example, a typical fast-food franchise. In this case, the franchisee has contracted with the flanchisor to offer the food products of the franchisor in a particular market. The agreement will also require the franchisee to conform to quality standards. This type of agreement would be a business format franchise, 20 which is one of the more popular forms of franchises today. In this case, the franchising goes beyond a particular product and assumes a contractual, ongoing business relationship between the franchisor and the franchisee. In addition. the franchisor supplies the franchisee with many documents, which include a procedures 25 manual and a marketing plan. The franchisor can also provide assistance with the business development. The business format franchise is a more complex way of franchising in that it involves the sale of an overall way of doing business as opposed to the rights to distribute a product. Payments for the franchise opportunity can go up to hundreds of thousands of dollars. in addition to initial outlay, more funds are required to build up the franchise 30 operation. In view of the huge investment involved, a franchise opporn-rniry is a way of minimising risks. You are decreasing your risk in the particular business by buying the franchisor's know-how and their business methodology in setting up

your business.

35 The number of franchises is increasing dramatically throughout the u'orld. New opportunities and innovation in certain computer software, environmentalll' safe products and even bagel making have been emerging. In addition, some hard-fought battles to ease the imbalance of power between franchisors and franchrsees have had some effect. Also, some franchisees have been beefing up their encroachment policies to guarantee the franchisees more territorial protection. In the United States, 40 there have been more disclosures required by franchisors, such as complete details about past litigation against the franchisor, supplier rebates, computer systems, revenues, and training program;'nes.

(Adapted from Tim Burns, 1999. Break the Curve, Internationai Thomson Business Press)

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15 In paragraph

1, the

writer recommends

A B C
16

starting a new business

taking short cuts when starting

a business

evaluating the options to having your own business

The phrase either business opportunity (lines 9 and 10) refers to

A B C
17

buying an existing business or franchising


purchasing a business or building your own

franchising or establishing your own business

The following statements describe franchising except

A B C
18

the franchisee has to pay the franchisor the franchisor transfers ownership of the business to the franchisee the exclusive rights to offer a particular product or service is a franchise

The business format franchise is a more complex way

offranchising (lines 26 and 27) be cause

it involves

I il m

the overall operations of the business the local distribution of a particular food product
an ongoing relationship between the franchisor and franchisee

A IandII B I andIII C iIandIII


19 In paragraph 4, the main idea is that

A B C
20

setting up a franchise business is costly there are less risks involved in franchising

by franchising you are buying business know-how

The concluding paragraph is mainly about

A B C
21

the increase in protection of the franchisor and franchisee the success offranchisees in gaining territorial protection the dramatic increase in franchising oppornrnities

The purpose of this passage is to

A B C

compare the roles of franchisor and franchisee

explain how franchising works


promote franchising

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Questions 22 to 29 are based on the following passage.

IQ Study Prompts Debate on Family Dynamics

The new evidence that eldest children develop higher iQs than their siblings has intensified the debate over two of the most stubborn questions in sociai science: What are the family dynamics that enhance intelligence? Ar1d can they - and should
they
The new flndings, from a landmark study published recently. showed that eldest children had a slight but signiflcant edge in IQ - an average of three points over the closest sibling. And it found that the difference was not because of biological factors but the psychological interplay of parents and children.

be changed?
5

3 4

Predictably, the sfudy set off a swaffn of Internet commentaries from parents, social scientists and others, speculating about what in families could enrich one 10 child's intellectual environment more than others. However, researchers acknowledge that few of the family variables aflecting intelligence are well understood, and some argue that peer influences are eventually more significant. Studies suggest that two elements are important during childhood: the perceived role a child has in the family: and the apparent benefit a child receives 15 when he or she tutors someone else, like a younger siblin-e.

Well before entering the high school, children w-ho gror,r'up u'ith siblings get tagged with labels: The screw-up of the family, the airhead. the whiner. And then there is the serious one, little Mr. or Ms. Responsible, who most often is the eldest,
psychologists have

found.

20

sneaks out," said

"In our family we had the straight one, the oldest, followed by the one who Feris, a former teacher who lives near Baltimore. "I was the

one who sneaked out, who had a lot more fun in high school, and who went to art

school."

7 8 9

Studies suggest that other family members tend to consider the eldest the most conscientious of the siblings, more likely to achieve academically. At least for some firstborns, the role may be self-fulfilling.

25

"I don't know about our IQs but, yes,


Ferris said of her older sister.

she was the more studious one," Elisabeth

Robert Zajonc, a psychologist at Stanford Universiry has argued that in fact having a younger sibling or two diminishes the overall intellectual environment for eldest children - who otherwise would be benefitting from the rich vocabulary and undivided attention of parents. This helps explain why, under the age of 12. -voung siblings actually outshine older ones on IQ tests.
Something else is at

30

10

role for eldest siblings

11

"Explaining something to a younger sibling solidifies your knowledge and allows you to grow more extensively," he said. Parents who recognise the diff'erent niches that their children fill can enhance the family's intellectual environment by exploiting each child's expertise, researchers 40 says. "Given the evidence we have on this, i would as a parent encourage late-born siblings to take on teaching roles, with other siblings or other children," said Paul Trapnell, a psychologist at the University of Winnipeg.

work. Dr. Zajonc found evidence that tutoring - benefrts the teacher more than it does the

natural

35

sfudents.

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12 13

How best to react to the diverse opinions?

14 15

16

"When parents ask me what to do about this, I always say the same thing: nothing," said Frank J. Sulloway, a psychologist at the Institute of Personality and Social Research at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of an editorial in the journal Science that accompanied one of the reports. Another report on the study was published in the journal Intelligence. "Younger siblings are more likely to take chances," Dr. Sulloway added, and to challenge the status quo in creative ways. Jackie Orsi, 53, of Morrow, Ohio, grew up the youngest of four, five years behind her nearest sibling, and said she discovered in high school that she scored the highest on IQ tests. She remembers the sister closest to her bringing home books from elementary school to read to her. "The oldest three held me, cherished me, ragged me, taught me, and gave me an acute view of life," she wrote in an e-mail message. She added, "I spent my high school years absorbing their books. What a gift. I got a boost from being lastborn."

45

50

55

(Adapted from New Sunday Times, July 8, 2007)

22

The landmark study (line 5) found that the eldest child is more intelligent because

of

A B C
23

biological andpsychological factors biological factors family dynamics

In paragraphs 5 and 6, the writer makes the point that

A B C
may

siblings have distinct characteristics

it is common for families to label their children


the eldest child is the most serious and responsible that role may be self-fuffilling (paragraphT) means that the eldest

24 At leastfor somefirstborns,

A B C

find it natural to be a leader among his siblings try very hard to be the best in everything
end up being what is expected of him

25 I donl know about our IQt ...


the comment?

(paragraph

8). Which of the following statements can replace

A B C

I may not be as intelligent.

I am not sure who is smarter. I don't believe in lQ measurement.

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l0

26

Something else is at work (line 35). This refers to the eldest

A B C
27

being outshone by younger siblings receiving less attention fromparents benefitting from tutoring younger siblings

Inparagraph 11, Paul Trapnell advocates that

A B C
28

parents play arole in the child's intellectual development parents give more encoumgement to the late-born siblings parents learn from the latest research findings in psychology

Which of the following sentences best reflects Dr. Sulloway's view?

A B C
29 It

Let children learn to be creative.


Be relaxed about children's behaviour.

Don't get upset about sibling differences.

canbe concluded from Jackie Orsi's and Dr. Zajonc's observations that

A B C

sibling interaction fosters bonding tutoring benefits the older and younger siblings siblings reading together enhances IQ development

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11

Questions 30 to 37 are bqsed on the following passage.

Taking Our Time Off Andrew Sims has a no-fly rule. As an international development expert and policy director for London's New Economics Foundation, he spends his days thinking globally. But when he travels on holiday, it's always closer to home; several years ago he decided never again to take a vacation by air. "The decision was partly driven by a concern for the environment," says Sims, 5 "but it's also driven by a desire not to overlook what's on your doorstep, and travel in more leisure ways." Now, instead of hopping on a cheap flight to Spain or the Cote d'Azuar, Sims and his family board a sleeper train from London to the west coast of Scotland. They spend unstrucfured days amid the lochs and islands, hiking, cooking or just 10 dreaming. The journey itself-made partly on a single track, which curves so that the back of the train is visible from the front-is a key part of the trip. No matter that it takes three times longer than flying; for Sims and his family enjoying breakfast in bed while chugging past some of the world's most beautiful scenery is the end, not the means to get there. 15 Sims is at the vanguard of a popular new way to travel: in the slow lane. As work life becomes increasingly hectic, holidays are occupying a more important place in our lives; when we take a break, we want to truly step off the treadmilleven as (or maybe because) we cling to our latest and most sophisticated handsets. Just as the slow-food movement encouraged diners to savour meals and the way 20 they are produced, the trend towards slow travel promotes a more thoughtful style of vacationing. It refers not only to leisurely and environmentally friendly modes of transport-train, boat, bike or foot-but also to the nature of the trips: smaller in scope and more off-the-beaten-path-a custom-crafted trek through niche sites rather than a top 10 group tour. It generally entails quieter, more intimate 25 accommodations-homey boutique hotels or upscale apartment swaps-and often requires taking more (gasp!) vacation days. With time shares and second-home ownership on the rise, many travellers are taking off for longer periods of time, enabled by the technology that allows them to connect to the offrce even as they
paddle around the

Arctic.

30

More and more people are living for vacation. They are using up every single allotted day off, and bargaining with their employers for more time to savour their travels. Gone are the days when holidays were a discrete, predictable part of the year; today they are more typically considered an essential, non-negotiable part of life. We transit seamlessly from the drudgery of work and responsibilities of family to the pleasure of time off-and back again. Today's trips are more - organic narratives, and the traveller is the storyteller. "The whole idea of 'If it's Tuesday, it must be Belize'is completely over," says Navin Sawhney, senior Vice President of the Connecticut-based tour operator Tauck World Discovery. "Today's tourists view travel as a form of expressing their personalities, feelings or even desires. They don't want to come back with an object, or even a picture. They want to come back with a story."
(Adapted
fr om

35

40

l{ ew sw e e k, May 21, 2007 )

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t2
destination shows that

30 Sims'choice of holiday

A B C D

he has a fear

offlying

travelling locally is more affordable


there is a change in vacationing style people are taking more days off for holidays

31 ... while chugging past some of the world's most beautiful scenery is the end, not the means to get there (lines 14 and 15) means

A B C D
32
..

selecting the mode of transport and the destination are equally important

travelling on a slow train allows one to appreciate the scenery enjoying the journey is more important than getting there having a meal on a train is enjoyable

. a popular new way to trqvel (line

l6) includes the following features except

A B C D
a

suited to personal taste cosy accommodation group tours

leisurely
step offthe treadmill
..

33 ... when we take a break, we want to truly


holiday should not

(line 18). This suggests that

A B C D
34

be stressful cost too much

entail air travel


be too far away from home

The expression gasp! (line 27) suggests

A B C D
35

anger surprise satisfaction disappointment

The reference to the Arctic (line 30) is to emphasise that

A B C D

time-sharing holidays are becoming popular technology allows you to take longer holidays
more people can afford holidays further from home more people are taking off-the-beaten path holidays

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t3

36

The whole idea

of 'If itb Tuesday, it must be Belize' is completely over (line 38) refers to

holidays that

A B C D
37

involved air travel took up a lot of time


were very structured were very memorable
as

The last paragraph tells us that a modern traveller sees travel

A B C D

an opportunity to collect souvenirs

more important than work

time to bond with family


a form ofself-expression

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14

Questions 38 ta 45 are based on the following passage.

races and religions hc:e a place in this cout1tt1 . Slruring a common destiny, w*e must put our shoulder to the yoke and vork to build tite ttr:tiort. in particulat'preserving the national unity we have enjored througlt 5tt .tears o.f nationhood. Given our plural composition, it is a dffiuilt task hrt it ttttrst be dotte.fbr .failure would prove too costly. The Raja Muda of Perak, Dr. Ra-ia \-ct:rin Siuth. tells of the ways to do this in his keynote address in the lbung JIalm'sians' Roundtahle Discussion on National [JniQ and Development. Here is the -litll tett o.f his speeclt. Malaysians of

all

"It is my pleasure to be here to deliver the keynote address at this Roundtable Discussion on National Unity and Development in lUalalsia: Challenees and Prospects for Nation Building. I am always happy to take pan in an e\.ent u here

t0

3 4

there are many young informed Malaysians. I find that this rs time u'ell spent. \ot only does it give me a chance to share my thoughts, but ii aiso lets me do a bit of opinion research among the younger generation' We like to say that our youth are the future of this countn. but then u'e proceed to ignore or marginalise them, We want our future generations io be able to think and act wisely, but then we do not give them sufficient oppomrnities to do so.

t5

In my view, this is not a good way to prepare those u'ho u'ili take our place. If young are to be good leaders and citizens, they must be erpcsed to more than the just abstract concepts. Even those nation states which har e ieileti niiserabll' have
had great political ideals.
20

I believe that good and upright leadership must be dem..nsrated. It has to be both taught and observed at work. Then, those who are lbund 1.. 'oe abie. must be mentored by those who are capable. In this way. succeis can be leamed and
replicated.

6 7 8

Finally, the young must be given responsibilities thev can handle. Thel should be allowed to make mistakes along the way as parl of therr or erail learning process. If we do these things, our actions will echo loudly into the iun:re. My address this morning is on the challenges and prospecis ot ratirrn-building. a topic that is of the greatest and gravest importance. Natron-builoing is e ssential to national unity which lies at the heart of what this countn' u'as. is and '* iil te.

25

30

With the passage of time, it seems that we are staning to iorgel tiis :nd it rs imperative that rve do not. In the time available, i hope to sa\ en'-rugh lt- nr.rride some fuel for the discussions to follow. it is my earnest riish that )'o.r-niil g.lin some further perspectives on the nature of nation-building ani that rou r',ili also deliberate on specific actionable ways to fuither it in this countr\Confucius rnsisted that language must be properlr usei i: thLn-rs tie lo get .'stand altrut it helpless done, ifjustice is notto go astray, andif people are not to confusion." He disapproved those who misused words to hide their ti-"e irtenttons
and actions.

35

10

Not surprisingll. there are m3n\ defrnitions. some which differ by a little and others by quite a lot. In hrs bt'rok. Tite \fsking of a Nation, for example, Prof. Cheah Boon Kheng defined it as ''c.-'th ecLrnomic progress and socio-political integration of a nation. that is prospen4 and national unity".
So what exactiy is nation-building?

40

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15

11

This captures what are hopefully the n\ o end-results of nation building, but it makesnomentionofitsnatureandprocess. Ipreferthemorecommonunderstanding, which is that it is the use of state power across different dimensions to ensure that a countrv is politically stable and viable in the long term. These dimensions include ethnicitl' and religion. As
a

45

12

hated notion in some parts of the

13 14

brief footnote, it should be noted that nation-building is a heated and even 50 worid. The main reasons for this are, first, that it is taking place in the midst of great domestic rurmoil and, second,thatit is primarily initiated and managed by foreign po\\'ers. In the case of Malaysia, nation-building has occurred in generally peaceful circumstances. It was not imposed b1'another country. And it is undertaken mainly 55 by collective choice rather than compulsion. The t-act that we have been able to forge a nation without resorting to the rule of, the gun has made us something of a rann and a case to be studied, if not emulated. It has allosed a relatively effective s)'stem of governance to develop, Our track record in development and resolving problems such as illiteracy, poverty and poor 60
health has been good. There is. of course, much more that can be done. Our instifutions of governance are far trom perfect and quality improvements rvill probably occupy us for at least rhe nert 50 .vears, if not longer. Nevertheless. for all the criticisms that have been n'la,Je. it is only common sense that u'e couid not have survived, let alone prosper, 65 rhr:e last 50 years if govemment institutions had not been responsive or effective ..."

15

(Adapted from The Sun, April2007)

38 ...;r,r atr
in para_tn;'h
1

shoulder to theyoke... (line 2) is related to the meaning of the following word found

-{ ces:inr-(line 2) B irffcult tline 4) C ::l,ure tline 5) D :,: ':lv line 5)


I

39

The ;313{1-rpmeflt of paragraph 3 is based on

-\

;:rxrast

B :::,--l'rlo.-Q]' C 3r'i:neration D :,r.tlncation


40 \\ ::;:
ot rhe following is not an advice gir-en to the younger generation (paragraphs 4-6)?

-{ T:e1 should learn through experience. B T-:e1 'hould accept responsibilities. C r re1 should have political ideals. D Tnel should be guided by elders. I
E

Sr_'1,

-Tirs .tu-tjon paper is CONFIDENTIAL until the test is over.

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16

4l

.. our actions will echo loudly into


the young there

the

future (line 27) suggests that

A B C D
42

will learn from their elders


be positive results in time to come

will

our mistakes

will have an effect on the fufure will become more


and more prosperous

the future generations

... provide somefuelfor the discussions tofollow (lines 32 and 33) is to

A B C D
43

contribute adequate resources give guidelines for direction


challenge current views present ideas for debate

The reference to Confucius illustrates the importance

of

A B C D
44

determination
fairness courage honesty

Onereason why nation-building is a heated and even hated notion (lines 50 and 51) is that

A B C D
45

it is often imposed by foreign powers it is not supported by the local people


economic progress

will

be uncertain

political stability will be weakened

The speaker ends his speech by

A B C D

providing solutions
predicting the future

giving a balanced view


comparing the past and the present

800/3/E *This question paper is CONFIDENTIAL until the test is over.

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