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Larsen & Toubro (L&T) has selected Aconex for the US$2 billion Terminal 3 development at Indira Gandhi

International Airport in New Delhi. In 15 months, the system has been used by over 970 users to store and manage more than 350,000 documents and distribute over 1.1 million correspondence items. Aconex has enabled 70 organizations to share information and collaborate, 45 of which are located outside of India. This has helped L&T to meet a compressed construction timetable of just 39 months. The new Terminal 3 will be the worlds second largest airport terminal. Due for completion by mid-2010, in time for the citys hosting of the Commonwealth Games, it will occupy 520,000m2 and be able to accommodate 34 million passengers each year. The terminal, approximately three kilometers in length, will feature 160 check-in counters, 78 aerobridges and 85 aircraft stands. The expansion project also includes Asias second longest runway, and will be over 4,400 meters in length. Mr. Shankar Narayannan, Head of Project Controls at Larsen & Toubro on the DIAL project, said: Due to our timeline we have very strict review cycles and so the distribution of documents between parties has to be fast. We have a wide team of stakeholders, often about 1,200 engineers engaged on the project, and so distributing the right files to these people is a complex task. When information is sent on Aconex, we know its reached the recipient and will be responded to. Aconex is now an indispensible element of the project. Every document and mail distribution is searchable and accessible from remote locations. Narayannan added: Being able to provide local training to our entire global project team was a key reason why we selected Aconex. New participants are quickly comfortable using the system and there is a helpline for when you need to speak to someone. L&T is the engineering, procurement and construction consultant on the project. They are delivering the project in association with the Delhi International Airport Limited (DIAL) joint venture consortium, which comprises the GMR Group, Airports Authority of India, Fraport & Eraman Malaysia and IDF. Along with project managers Parsons Brinckerhoff, L&T is responsible for bringing the project to completion on behalf of DIAL.

Finally some of the airports of our country have come at par with the international standards of services and amenities to passengers but the Indira Gandhi International Airport is all geared up to challenge other airports by getting the second largest airport terminal in the world. This upcoming third terminal building at the Indira Gandhi International airport will be completed by 2010 and this building alone will come up on 20 acres of land. The arrangement of the building would include an entire sevenstorey structure, which would provide the total area of about 5,20,000 square meters and would be able to handle at least 34 million passengers each year. This new terminal building would be referred to as Terminal-3 or T3 at IGI airport and would help India to boast of being home to the second largest terminal in the world. The terminal would stand second to the new terminal at the Beijing airport, which had been recently constructed before the Olympics and has a total floor area of 9,86,000 square meters. Prabhakar Rao, the CEO for Airport Development of Delhi International Airport Limited, gave details on the mega project and said that the focus of the new terminal would be to focus on the 3 M's of material, machinery and men. He added that several factories were functioning at the project site, which was producing materials like concrete steel pipes and airconditioning ducts. It is estimated that about a thousand trucks would be required to bring in bulk materials like steel, stones and bricks to this site each night. This entire construction would be carried out without disturbing traffic anywhere on the near by national highway. But the new terminal would be a real challenge for the Delhi International Airport Ltd because finishing this kind of a mega project in the stipulated time of 37 months was a difficult task. Rao added that the major airports like Changi in Singapore had taken about 76 months for completion and the Heathrow's T5 and Beijing's new terminal took 60 months. The IGI T3 would be able to handle the largest aircraft Airbus A-380, and would be completed by March 2010 before the Commonwealth Games. Almost 24,000 workers from 44 contractors are working day and night to complete this terminal and this would cater to both domestic and international passengers. Since Delhi falls in the high damage risk or Zone IV of quakeprone area, the DIAL is keeping in mind the occurrence of earthquakes and

the building would be made with this consideration to withstand earthquakes and damages caused due to the same.

Terminal 3 Inaugurated on July 3,2010

Terminal 3 : Salient Features Integrated Terminal International and Domestic 34 million passengers per annum capacity 5.4 million sq ft. area 9 level passenger terminal building and 2 piers each 1.2 km long. In-line Baggage Handling System with capacity to handle 12,800 bags per hour 6 Common check-in islands -168 check-in counters 95 Immigration counters (49 Outbound and 46 Inbound Immigration counters) 78 Passenger Boarding Bridges (including 3 Passenger Boarding Bridges for A380 or similar sized aircraft) 14 Baggage reclaim belts including 2 belts for Out of Gauge (OOG) bags 6.7 million sq ft. of apron area 100 room Transit Hotel for Domestic and International passengers (68 rooms for domestic transit and 32 rooms for international transit) 96 automatic travelators /walkways (Longest one being 118 mts in length) Over 20,000 sq mters. of retail space. Multi Level Car Park to accommodate 4300 cars 7 MLD Water and 10 MLD Sewage Treatment Plant (total quantity for entire airport, treatment plant inside airport premises only)

Aconex is a privately held Australian company providing web-based electronic construction collaboration technologies (also sometimes described asproject management or project extranet systems), on a Software as a service basis, to customers in the engineering, natural resources, constructionand property sectors. With over 300 employees worldwide, global revenues of A$40m and offices in 43 [1] locations, Aconex is the largest provider solely dedicated to construction collaboration technologies.

New Delhi International Airport Expansion, India - Larsen & Toubro



$2 billion development, worlds second largest airport terminal Compressed construction schedule due to Commonwealth Games Fast data access for global project team Worldwide training and first-rate service

Client
Larsen & Toubro Limited (L&T) is Indias largest and most respected construction and engineering conglomerate. Founded in 1938, L&T is a $7 billion company that has 30 offices worldwide and services some of the worlds largest PPP developments.

Project
The new Terminal 3 at New Delhis Indira Gandhi International Airport is the worlds second largest airport terminal. Completed in time for the 2010 Commonwealth Games, the US$2 billion development occupies a 20,000m2 site and is able to accommodate 34 million passengers each year. The terminal, approximately three kilometers in length, features 160 check-in counters, 78 aerobridges and 85 aircraft stands. In addition to Terminal 3, the expansion project included a new runway. At 4,430 meters, it is Asias second longest runway and is able to accommodate the worlds largest aircraft, including the Airbus A380.

To complete the project in time for the Commonwealth Games, the construction timetable was compressed to just 39 months which, compared to the timeline of other new airport terminals, was highly ambitious. For example, completion of the new terminal at Changi Airport in Singapore took 76 months and delivery of London Heathrow Airports T5 and Beijings Terminal 3 each took 60 months.

Challenges
The project involved a large, internationally-dispersed project team. In addition to the joint venture parties, thousands of participants from more than 70 organizations were engaged on the project. Forty-five of the companies were based outside of India, in locations as far apart as London, Dubai, Singapore and Sydney.

For the first few months of the project, the team used a combination of FTP systems, hard copies and email to communicate. However, with thousands of documents and correspondence items being exchanged, the team was experiencing bottlenecks and difficulties in meeting their turnaround targets. Factors such as file size restrictions on email accounts meant that drawings sent to external stakeholders were bouncing back and slowing down the review cycle. L&T identified that these issues would only escalate as the project ramped up.

Solution
Following an extensive review of available solutions, L&T implemented the Aconex online collaboration system to control information and link the project team.

Results
Companies engaged on the project used Aconex to manage more than 300,000 documents and one million mail items sometimes up to 100,000 items in a single month.

Finding and retrieving information

Mr Shankar Narayannan, Head of Project Controls at Larsen & Toubro on the DIAL Project, supervised overall project planning, control and coordination with the developer and oversaw the implementation of Aconex. He said, Aconex is now an indispensible element of the project. Every document and mail distribution is searchable and accessible from remote locations. So much time is saved searching for information. The keyword search capabilities are powerful so people can instantly bring up what they need. The time saved in locating documents is very important on this project and its something we can do extremely quickly with Aconex.

Aconex is an indispensible element of the project. Mr Shankar Narayannan, Head of Project Controls at Larsen & Toubro on the DIAL Project
Faster flow of information Due to our timeline we have very strict review cycles and so the distribution of documents between parties has to be fast. We have a wide team of stakeholders, often about 1,200 engineers engaged on the project, and so distributing the right files to these people is a complex task. Previously, when reviewing and corresponding using email, wed get bounce-backs and there would be no record of what was sent and received. When information is sent on Aconex, we know its reached the recipient and will be responded to, said Mr. Shankar. I receive between 400-500 mail and document actions a day, so its crucial that I stay on top of this. With Aconex, I receive notification of new items and can browse my tasks and actions in one place, he added. The fact that contractual correspondence is well documented and can be traced is of great value to us.

Implementation

Initially, because other tools had been used in the early stages of the project, Aconex and L&T worked together to ensure that all existing documentation was uploaded onto the Aconex system. From then onwards, Aconex was the default tool for managing all documents and mails. There were challenges in initial implementation, as loading all our documents onto the system was a considerable task. The fact that Aconex was a new, project-wide system meant that we had to get team members using it instead of FTP and email. However the training by Aconex was excellent and project members quickly got into the routine of using it, said Mr. Shankar.

Global training & support To ensure that project members were adept at using the system, Aconex ran customized training for all participants and supplemented these with unlimited helpdesk and online support. Mr Shankar said, The quality of the customer service and training facilities that Aconex provides is striking. Being able to provide local training to our entire global project team was a very strong advantage and a key reason why we

selected them. New participants are quickly comfortable using the system and there is a helpline for when you need to speak to someone. He added, At one stage, we even had an Aconex representative sitting in our office to help us out. The service is first-rate.

An airport gives travelers their first impression of a city or country. A visitor who arrived at any Indian international airport a decade ago might recall dust, dingy lighting, barefoot men pulling luggage dollies, unclean washrooms, and hazy brown air-not a very welcoming first impression of India. But the India of 2010 is a long way from that. It's become a major player in the global economy and has entered the realm of developed nationsand the Delhi airport, one of India's primary international gateways, needed to reflect these dramatic changes.