SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.

COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 2
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 3
Expectant parents
always want the best for their
unborn children. November
is Prematurity Awareness
Month. Premature birth is a
serious health problem and
hospitals like Sierra Provi-
dence East Medical Center
along with the March of
Dimes are doing everything
they can to
raise awareness
for the city of
El Paso.
The March of Dimes was
founded by President Franklin
Roosevelt at a time in this
country when polio was on
the rise. Research and Vac-
cines eventually led to the end
of the polio epidemic. Infant
Mortality and Birth Defects
were the new focus after the
polio epidemic ended. Today
about 1 in 8 babies is born
prematurely in America.
Worldwide about 15 million
babies are born prematurely
every year. Early labor is
usually defined by 37 weeks
or less.
Speaking to the parents of a
baby born 25 weeks gave per-
spective to something that
happens a lot in this country..
The parents described the ex-
perience as nerve-wrecking
when the Dr. told the expec-
tant mother that she would be
having her baby early. They
described how stressful the
experience has been but kept
reiterating how much help the
staff at Sierra Providence East
has been. Staff that was con-
stantly giving them informa-
tion and facts about their baby
helped them a lot.
There is no clear cause for
why babies are born early but
there are measures that can be
taken to lessen the chance of
it happening. Healthy eating,
exercising and prenatal dr vis-
its are the first step for the
healthy pregnancy. March of
Dimes is seeking to find the
causes of prematurity birth in
order to develop ways to pre-
vent it. As of now Doctors
know that there are three
types of women who are at
higher risk of having a prema-
ture birth for their baby.
These include women who
have had a premature birth in
the past, women with abnor-
malities in the cervix and
women who are pregnant with
multiple babies. If you or and
your family can go to Mar-
chofdimes.com for
more information on
premature births and
healthy pregnancies.
Life too Early
sphn.com - 888-º8-kO8OI
7:00 pm, Wednesday -
home for the holidays.
‘Tis the season...
7:00 am, Tuesday -
da Vinci Surgery...
T
his holiday season, spend more
time with the family and less time
recovering! Experience the world’s
most advanced system for complex
surgeries: urologic, gynecologic and
general surgery. Learn about the
physicians who perform these cutting
edge surgeries and discover how you
could have surgery today and be
home for the holidays tomorrow.
Ask your physician if da Vinci surgery
is right for you. Call 888-98-ROBOT for
more information.
e h tth s iis TTi ‘‘T








. . . n o s aas e s e
































u S i c n i V a d
u TTu , m a 0 0 : 7
t r o ffo e m o h
W , m p 0 0 : 7







. . . yy. r e g r u
- y a d s e u
. s yys a d i l o h e h t
- y a d s e n d e WWe































hi
could have surgery today and be
edge surgeries and discover how you
physicians who perform these cutting
general surgery. Learn about the
surgeries: urologic, gynecologic and
most advanced system for complex
recovering! Experience the world’s
time with the family and less time
is holiday season, spend more
TT
h








today and be
discover how you
form these cutting
arn about the
gynecologic and
tem for complex
Experience the world’s
y and less time
n, spend more







n o i t a m r o ffo n i e re o m
a C . u o y r o ffo t h g i r s i
a i c i s y h p r u o y k s A







. n
r o ffo T OOT B O R - 8 9 - 8 8 8 l l a
y ry e g rg u s i c n i V a d f i n
















sphn.com - 888-º8-kO8
home for the holidays tomorrow.
g y today and be








8OI
ays tomorrow.
y
Spotlight Staff
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 4
weekly column
MINER KICKS
Destination EL PASO
by the Ball Boy
Alot happened this past week for
the Miner nation. UTEP lost to 12th ranked
Arizona and got a commitment from 5-star re-
cruit Isaac Hamilton out of Los Angeles.
Lights out 3-point shooting and monster re-
bounding are the main two reasons Arizona
won the way they did. Arizona was 9-of-18
from the arc and looked almost unstoppable in
the first-half. Arizonas 35-15 advantage on
the boards created lots of second-chance
points against a great UTEP front line. Ari-
zona senior-transfer Mark Lyones was very
impressive with 17 points to lead Arizona to a
much needed win after playing sloppy and
barely beating an inexperienced Charleston
team. UTEP got within 8 points towards the
end of the game but then completely feel apart
and ended up losing 72-51.
Without a doubt, Isaac Hamilton is the most
highly touted recruit to sign out of UTEP.
The high school senior chose UTEP over of-
fers from UCLA, UNLV, SDSU and Baylor.
Isaac comes from a family of basketball play-
ers. His uncle played for Don Haskins in the
80s and his older brother Jordan currently
plays for the Denver Nuggets. Ranked #25 in
the ESPN top 100 list, Isaac brings huge lead-
ership and energy to Tim Floyds class
of 2013. The icing on the
cake is that Isaacs younger
brother Daniel is the
#23 ranked player in
the ESPN 60 for the
class of 2014. Will
he follow in his
brother Isaacs foot-
steps? UTEP fans
can only hope this
leads to another big
signing for the fol-
lowing year and help
recruiting overall for
the Miners.
The Miners take their tal-
ents to Florida this
week for the OLD
SPICE Classic
Baketball tourna-
ment. UTEP
will face
Okla-
homa(2-0) and then face either Clemson or
Gonzaga. The Miners beat Oklahoma last sea-
son and beating them again this season isn't
out of the question for the Miners. Oklahoma
is coming off a slight 63-59 win against UT-
Arlington. Oklahoma Freshmen Bobby Hield
has been scoring a lot for the Sooners and will
be a factor against the Miners. Facing
Oklahoma and Gonzaga/Clemson will
give the Miners some much needed
experience against some BIG con-
ference foes.
Another recruit to be on the
look out for is Senior Vince
Hunter of Los Angeles Califor-
nia. Vince is a 4-star recruit
and took his visit to UTEP over
the weekend. Adding him to the
2013 class would just add to what
looks like being UTEPs strongest
class in its history.
Regular Season Schedule
11.22.2012 VS Oklahoma Orlando, Florida
11.23.2012 VS Clemson Orlando, Florida
11.25.2012 VS Davidson Orlando, Florida
11.28.2012 VS NMSU El Paso, Texas
12.08.2012 VS IDAHO El Paso, Texas
WINTER / HOLIDAY SEASON SAFETY TIPS
EL PASO, TEXAS – The El Paso Police Department wants everyone to have a safe winter and upcoming Holiday Season. As a re-
minder here are some safety tips to keep in mind.
At Home:
NEVER LEAVE YOUR CHILDREN ALONE
• Be sure to lock your doors and windows when you leave your home.
• Do not display holiday gifts where they can be seen from a window
or doorway.
• Leave some lights on
• Leave a radio on
• Leave drapes/curtains in a normal position
• Mark your valuables with your driver’s license number
• Pickup mail and newspapers
• Never give information about your home over the telephone
• Always call police to report any suspicious activity
While Shopping:
• Always keep your children close to you
• Do not shop alone
• Never take more money than you need to make
your purchases
• Do not flash your money when paying for items
• Pay with a check card or credit card
• Be aware of your surroundings
• Do not leave any purchases or purses unattended
• Do not overburden yourself with packages
• Carry your purse close to your body
CoNtiNUES oN pagE 6
By: “Doppler” Dave
Speelman
WEDNESDAY
NOV 28
THURSDAY
NOV 22
High: 69º Low: 47º High: 65º Low: 43º High: 64º Low: 42º High: 70º Low: 38 º High:67º Low: 36º High: 59º Low: 37º
TUESDAY
NOV 27
“Doppler" Dave Speelman is the chief meteorologist at KVIA-TV in El Paso. You can watch his forecasts at 4, 5,
6 and 10 pm on ABC-7 (channel 6 cable). If you would like Doppler Dave to address (explain) any weather is-
sues you can email him at Dopplerdave@kvia.com.
FRIDAY
NOV 23
SUNDAY
NOV 25
My Snowfall
Prediction
If you follow the latest computer models and keep up with the recent long range forecast,
you might not be too pleased with El Paso's winter outlook.
The Climate Prediction Center has just updated the winter forecast for December, January
and February (winter months).
As you can see from the graphics below (courtesy of the Climate Prediction Center), much
of the west is expected to see above normal temperatures. Notice that Florida and places
like Minnesota and Wisconsin are expected to see below normal temperatures. Most of the
Midwest and Deep South are a little more uncertain.
When it comes to precipitation (rain and/or snow) the El Paso area is under the "equal
chance" (EC). This means that we will have an equal chance of seeing above, below or
normal amounts of precipitation. My prediction is that the El Paso area will see some snow-
fall accumulation, but not much. I would anticipate around 4.0" of total snow accumulation
this winter, with most of it arriving during the month of January. Again, the models are
having a hard time predicting what will develop due to the complex weather pattern setting
up.
Notice from the graphics below those areas hit hard by extreme drought over the past
year, (like the Midwest) not expected see much relief from dry conditions. Portions of Ken-
tucky and Tennessee are more likely to have an above normal winter for when it comes to
precipitation.
MONDAY
NOV 26
High: 70º Low: 46º
SATURDAY
NOV 24
Partly Cloudy
10% Rain
a n s w e r : C - 3 . 1 "
How much snow did El Paso receive last winter?
Weather Trivia:
Mostly Sunny
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 5
Mostly Sunny
Mostly Sunny
Mostly Sunny
A. 1.4"
B. 2.0”
C. 3.1"
D. 5.3"
Partly Sunny
temperature outlook for Winter precipitation outlook for Winter
Thanksgiving Day
Partly Sunny
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 6
Thanksgiving a day of celebration for some, a day of sadness
for others
By Joe Olvera ©, 2012
Thanksgiving is supposed to be
a day of reflection, a day for re-
membering the good times in
the year which a family has un-
dergone. In El Paso, the day is
no different than it is in other
parts of the country – it is a day
when family members make
their way from disparate places
to once again settle on the
home front, to re-unite, to give
abrazos to people who have not
been seen for a long while. It is
a day for feasting, to sit down
at a table groaning with the
weight of a huge turkey and
ham, with dozens of pies, po-
tato salads, corn on the cob,
and other samples of fine din-
ing. It’s a given that families
must eat enough to almost ex-
plode, to partake of delicious
meats and desserts. That’s the
tradition that greets Americans
once a year, on the fourth
Thursday of November.
But, not everyone is so lucky.
For some, it is a time of sad-
ness, a time that cannot be,
should not be celebrated in the
traditional way. The Mendoza
family is one such. Like many
unfortunates, they lost a son
when he suffered a heart attack.
Throughout America, families
are having to forego the na-
tional day of feasting, because
one of their loved ones will not
be at table. “Oh, we will gather
at one of our son’s houses,”
said Mrs. Mendoza. “After all,
there are still others to con-
sider. There are two other sons,
plus the grandkids. But, it just
won’t be the same. Our hearts
will all be reminded that there
is an empty place at table.”
Mrs. Mendoza laments also the
fact that the son who died was
always the one to offer the
prayer, the convocation. “He
was very religious, and, al-
though very sickly, he knew we
depended on him to give thanks
for all of us,” Mrs. Mendoza
said. “After that, each one of us
gathered around the table
would say a few words about
why they felt thankful. This
year, we’re thankful to be alive,
but, beyond that, it’s tough.”
But, not everyone is suffering
from a tragedy or from missing
persons at the holiday table.
Many El Pasoans and other
Americans are truly thankful
because they have what they
have, however little that may
be. In El Paso, people will be
celebrating by attending the
Sun Carnival Parade. There
will be clowns and high school
bands, there will be horses and
floats, pretty girls will wave at
the public as they ride by on
their convertibles, and politi-
cians will make their presence
known to a cheering public.
Later, they will gather in
homes, restaurants, cafes and
other locales to watch the Dal-
las Cowboys take on the Wash-
ington Redskins, as the two
rival professional football
teams take their places on the
gridiron of Cowboy Stadium in
Arlington.
Many people will attend reli-
gious services, where they may
thank their Lord for whatever
kindnesses He may have be-
stowed upon them. Children
will be all decked out in their
Sunday best, little boys will be
tugging at their pants, while lit-
tle girls will struggle to keep
themselves clean. They will be
thinking of another little holi-
day that’s only about 30 days
away – yep, you guessed it –
Christmas, Santa Claus, and,
best of all, presents for one and
all. Thanksgiving is the day
when they start to behave, be-
cause they know that Santa can
see them when they’re sleep-
ing, and he knows when
they’re awake. Worst of all, he
knows if they’ve been bad or
good, so they know, they had
better be good.
Then comes the inevitable – the
start of the Christmas shopping
season – Black Friday. Actu-
ally, the name should be
changed to Black Thursday, be-
cause blockbuster deals on
toys, clothing, and everything
imaginable will start anywhere
from 8 p.m. to 12 midnight at
El Paso stores. The left-over
turkey has now been put away
for later use as any number of
concoctions, pies are stored in
the fridge, while all the other
goodies that were not finished
off, will also be put away. The
kids will be tucked into bed,
while parents take off to the
nearest big store to either buy,
lay away, or otherwise make
their purchases, trying to beat
other shoppers to the best and
cheapest items. Well, Black
Friday is not about buying
cheap items, but, it is about
getting an early start to the hol-
iday shopping season.
And, for the last, our
military men and women will
also partake of the feasts
around El Paso, as another tra-
dition comes full bloom - that
is, inviting any number of
troops to individual homes to
become part of a family, at
least for that one special day
known as Thanksgiving. So,
feast up, El Paso, enjoy the day
with your families, and if you
have troops at your table, don’t
forget to thank them for if it
wasn’t for them, for their sacri-
fices, why, we wouldn’t be cel-
ebrating Thanksgiving, would
we?
Your car:
• Lock your vehicle
• Use any antitheft devices
• Do not leave any packages or valuables inside
the vehicle
• Approach your vehicle with your keys out and ready
• Park in well lighted areas
• Keep your vehicle in proper working order
• If something seems wrong, get help from security
or call the police
Outside Activities:
• Dress appropriate to weather conditions and type
of activity
• If Walking, Running, or Riding a Bike
• Wear reflective of light colored clothing
• Be aware of your surroundings
• Obey all traffic laws
• Don’t let yourself become distracted
• Hiking – notify individuals of intended route
• Estimated length of trip
• Expected return time
• Be prepared for inclement weather
• Driving – obey all traffic laws
• Be aware of individuals walking, running, and
biking during the cooler weather
• Don’t drink and drive
• Be aware of your surroundings.
SAFETY TIPS...
By Sharon Mosley
When style savant Stacy London started writing her latest
book, "The Truth About Style," she decided to take a new
approach and throw out all the fashion cliches, such as the
"must-have trench for spring" or the "three ways to rock a
poncho."
"Let's be honest," says the co-host of TLC's long-running
"What Not To Wear" series: "If 'how to' advice was that useful,
you'd all be dressing well, and I'd be out of a job. The 'how
to' approach is about changing your look. From years of
working with women, I've discovered that that is only part of
what they're really after."
Instead, London concentrates on why we often "don't" dress
well. "We all put obstacles in our own path toward personal
style, myself included. If we understood why we constructed
these practical and emotional obstacles, we might move
beyond them to healthier, happier perceptions of ourselves
and, ideally, a better sense of self-esteem," admits London.
"Style can change your look, certainly, but it can also
change your life."
London picked nine "real" women —
each of whom faces a particular issue when shopping and
getting dressed, and then she leads them through "start-
overs." London inspires them to celebrate their unique body
types and personalities. From a 19-year-old pre-med major
in Texas to a petite New Yorker who recently moved from
Arkansas and a working mom who has a decade of over-
sized black clothing in her closet, London takes us on a
fashion trip that is chock full of useful advice that all women
can use to transform themselves and their
wardrobes.
In a holiday season full of one style crisis after
another, take a few cues from London's "start-
overs" in "The Truth About Style" (You might want to
put this one on your holiday wish list!).
—The
process of cre-
ating an outfit allows you to see your
present body more clearly. Give thought to
the detail, and take time with it. It's the same process as
painting a picture. Assemble your pieces and your color
palette. Ask yourself whether you have filled the canvas
properly.
—Be strategic when it comes to wearing
shiny fabrics, says London. The eye gravitates to
shine because it reflects light. If you want to highlight some-
thing, put shine there. If you want to camouflage it, go with
matte.
—How to do fur, according to London: Fake
it. You can buy synthetic fur that looks and feels a lot like
the real thing. Use it as a go-to piece to wear with trousers,
or to make a pair of jeans look more
sophisticated.
—Accessories must
be proportional with
your frame. For plus-
size women, that
means a thicker
belt, bigger bag,
scarf and
jewelry.
The same rule holds true for prints. The print needs to match
the stature of the woman who's wearing it.
—To have presence, small-framed women should
wear form-fitting clothes, such as skinny jeans and pencil
skirts. Wider-cut clothes look like you're drowning in them.
—Shoes are a game changer for any basic
outfit. Look for shoes that have some visual interest,
whether it is embellishments, color or shape. These days,
there are so many reasonably priced, well-made brands,
you don't need to bust the piggy bank, says London.
—Get yourself a jersey dress you can roll up
in a ball and leave on the floor for six
months, pick it up and it'll still look great. It's the least
time-consuming wardrobe item for a mom I can think of.
—Denim is a great wardrobe chameleon,
according to London. You can wear it to work or
dress it up for evenings or dress down with it on weekends.
Think of it as a blank canvas to test out trends that
might be too risky head to toe. Anyone in the world
— of any size or age — can rock a good trouser
jean.
Sharon Mosley is a former fashion editor of
the Arkansas Gazette in Little Rock and
executive director of the Fashion
Editors and Reporters Asso-
ciation.
COPYRIGHT 2012 CRE-
ATORS.COM
Style expert Stacy London touts shoes as "game changers" for basic out-
fits in her newest book "The Truth About Style." Shown: Mossimo
Women's colorful pumps and jeweled flats. (www.target.com)
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 8
DEAR ABBY by Abigail Van Buren
MOM AND DAUGHTER DISCONNECT
OVER PHONE-ANSWERING ETIQUETTE
DEAR ABBY: My daughter
thinks if people are busy they
should not answer the phone. I
believe it's better to answer and
tell the person you're busy and
that you will return their call.
Sometimes she doesn't call me
back for nine hours or even the
next day. Then I find out she was
watching a movie or walking her
dog, and didn't think my call was
"important" enough to respond
promptly. As her mother, if I
don't hear back, I start to worry,
even though she's in her 20s and
married with a family.
When she calls me and
I say I'm busy and will call her
back, she gets mad and says I
shouldn't have answered at all.
Will you please tell us what you
think? -- KARI IN MONTANA
DEAR KARI: OK. I think that
for your daughter to keep you
waiting nine hours for a return
call if she can answer more
promptly shows a lack of respect
for your feelings. And for you to
obsess that something awful
might have happened is a waste
of your time because, trust me,
bad news travels fast. It's also
possible that you may be calling
too often. But only you can an-
swer that.
**
DEAR ABBY: Some members
of my family continually ask me
for money. I feel obligated be-
cause they are family and they
helped me in the past. But since
then, I have turned my life
around.
I have a great job, a home and
I'm in a serious relationship. This
isn't the first time they have
asked. I have tried refusing, but
they persist and after a while I
feel guilty.
This is creating a rift between my
girlfriend and me. She feels these
family members need to take re-
sponsibility for their own prob-
lems and make choices to better
themselves rather than rely on
others to enable their bad habits.
How do I put an end to this an-
noyance? -- CASHED OUT
DEAR CASHED OUT:
There is a difference between
giving people money to enable
them to continue making poor
choices, and giving them money
if they are really in need. Be-
cause your relatives helped you
when you needed money to tide
you over, there is a moral obliga-
tion for you to reciprocate if they
are truly in need.
**
DEAR ABBY: When I met
my husband he was married. I
told him at first that I was not in-
terested. But as time went on he
ended up divorcing his wife. We
have been together for 11 years,
married for three.
The problem is his
kids. They are all adults. His
youngest was 15 when he left.
The daughter is angry and
blames me for his leaving. This
was not the first time he had left
her mother. He had a child from
another relationship who was
conceived during one of his ab-
sences.
I am getting tired of
the drama and I'm about ready to
divorce him for my peace of
mind. During the time we have
been together he has never
strayed and has always been
there for me. Should we divorce?
-- SECOND WIFE IN CALI-
FORNIA
DEAR SECOND WIFE:
Heck, no! If you love your hus-
band, stick with him. Because
your husband's daughter is creat-
ing drama, he should set her
straight. She may feel that he
didn't love HER enough to stay,
when the truth is that his mar-
riage to her mother had been on
the rocks for years. He should
also make sure she understands
that if she wants him in her life,
she will need to make an attitude
adjustment.
**
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
**
Abby shares more than 100 of her fa-
vorite recipes in two booklets:
"Abby's Favorite Recipes" and
"More Favorite Recipes by Dear
Abby." Send your name and mailing
address, plus check or money order
for $14 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Shipping and handling are included
in the price.)
COPYRIGHT 2012 UNIVERSAL UCLICK
The unpleasant arrangement of
Mars and Uranus dissolves early in
the week, and stressful events are
soon overshadowed by more favor-
able aspects. In general, it will be
easier to face feelings. New hope
takes hold and brings with it a
greater sense of control. Mercury
goes direct, and Venus aligns with
Saturn. Instead of reacting to life, it's
easier to pause, regain equilibrium
and take action from a sense of
calm.
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You have
a burning need to confide in some-
one, though it's still difficult to know
who is trustworthy. Even your own
diary, if left unprotected, could reveal
you. So be judicious. Protect your
right to privacy, and you'll control
your image and reputation.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). People
don't always behave nicely or re-
spond in the expected way. But when
people disappoint you, there's some-
thing to gain from the experience —
namely, you develop tolerance. Toler-
ant people are happier, more ener-
getic and more likely to change the
world even, as they contribute to
world peace.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). There's
very little you could say about your-
self now that wouldn't come across
as bragging. Better to leave the com-
mentary about you and your accom-
plishments to someone else. You'll be
surprised at who sings your praises
when you refuse to do so. You have
more fans than you know.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). This
week your choices will have a favor-
able affect on a younger person.
You'll make this person happy twice:
first, when your action makes life
easier and better, and then again
when this person imitates your action
and makes another person's life eas-
ier and better.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You can roam
far without moving a muscle. Some-
times this doesn't serve you well.
This week the daydreams that come
at inappropriate times are a distrac-
tion that could hurt your productivity.
Remember, if you can focus your
mind, you can rule your world. Make
the effort.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Personal
ambition has a way of limiting a per-
son's experience. Your happiness will
be amplified as you broaden your
definition of success to include goals
that encompass not only your own
achievements but the achievements
of others, as well. You can judge the
worthiness of a goal by how many
people it will touch.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Wanting a
moment to end so you can get to the
next one is a trap. There is no "later."
Everything happens now. So don't
run from the uncomfortable mix of
anticipation and apprehension in the
air this week. Instead, take a breath
and agree to feel it. The now moment
is a gift; that's why it's called the
present.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). The
week's events will seem designed to
highlight your individuality and style.
You'll remain uniquely yourself. You'll
teach others through your action. You
won't teach them how to be you or
do as you do. Instead, you'll teach
that it's best for everyone to express
a unique spirit.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
The proof isn't always in the pudding.
Sometimes, for reasons beyond your
control, the end result does not re-
flect the good intention and solid ef-
fort that went into a task. But when
you do the right thing, the satisfac-
tion you derive from your action is
"pudding" enough and most fulfilling.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You
rightly feel that situations are made
or broken by the level of attention
that goes into the finer points. It
takes time to become masterful, but
you're hard-pressed to think of a bet-
ter way to spend the hours. Your thor-
oughness will refine not only your
contribution, but also your character.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You
will be blessed with reliable sources.
This is true partly because you've al-
ready been extremely discerning as
to where you seek advice and help.
You know better than to trust anyone
who doesn't have first-hand experi-
ence in your area. Your chosen ad-
visers won't let you down.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Obsti-
nance is its own obstacle. If you in-
sist that there's only one way a task
can be completed, you're sure to
come across a blockage of that one
path. But when you're open to differ-
ent perspectives, such blocks are
merely indicators to go around, over
or under.
THIS WEEK'S BIRTHDAYS: Within
the next six weeks, you'll change
your mind about what you really
want, and by the start of 2013, you'll
happily be pursuing a new trajectory.
December events are made memo-
rable by romantic scenarios. January
brings creative influences. You'll
make more money when your work
environment becomes healthier, pos-
sibly because of a personnel change.
March brings a better balance of
work and family. A mentor encour-
ages self-reflection, which leads to
an important discovery.
ACROSS
1 #10
6 Nursery rhyme vessel
10 Yank
14 Lariat
15 Not in favor of
16 Robt. ___
17 #1
19 Dossier
20 Singers Adams and Brickell
21 Beach cover-up
23 Analyzed grammatically
25 Jack-of-spades feature
26 Planet
27 Corn holder
29 Roman spirit
30 Portal
32 Ram's mate
33 Maxima maker
37 Sign up
39 Apprehend
41 Like used bath water
42 Captured anew
44 Seville or Daytona, e.g.
46 Significance
47 German pronoun
48 Dominion until 1806: abbr.
49 Video game mfr.
50 Abaft
53 Kitchen gadget
56 Close or clean follower
57 Actress Ekberg
58 To a degree
59 #34
64 First name among daredevils
65 Phooey!
66 Valuable violin
67 Check, with for
68 Pound sounds
69 #37
DOWN
1 Large credit agcy.
2 Vote for
3 ___ Vegas
4 Erstwhile anesthetic
5 Forays
6 Computer key
7 Uninvited picnic guests
8 Court VIP of 1995
9 #16
10 #3
11 Upscale
12 Pass along
13 New Hampshire city
18 Family reunion attendee
22 Diarist Nin
23 Tending
24 Cancel, as a lift-off
26 River to the Baltic
28 Summer vacation destination
31 #26 or #32
34 River to the Rhone
35 More suitable
36 Louis and Carrie
38 Longest river in France
40 Dames' spouses, perhaps
43 #35
45 Attach anew
50 Balance sheet item
51 Jostle
52 Brings under control
54 One of the film-making
Coens
55 Mother-in-law of Ruth
57 Urgent memo letters
60 Pt. of a nestegg
61 Carwash option
62 59 Across' WWII command
63 ___ Tin Tin
Hail the Presidents
By Holiday Mathis
week 11/22 - 11/28
Favorable Aspects Offer New Hope
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 9
Preventing Diabetes Best
Way to Halt Heart Failure
Aresearch paper in the Amer-
ican Journal of Cardiology re-
ports that during the course of
our lifetimes, one in four black
people and one in three white
people will develop heart fail-
ure that can lead to sudden
death or, more frequently, a
progressive deterioration of
heart function with worsening
symptoms including shortness
of breath, abdominal pain and
swelling of the legs.
Often patients are unable to
sleep flat and frequently wake
up at night gasping for breath.
Heart failure accounts for 40
percent of the half million
deaths related to heart disease
each year.
The common conditions that
lead to heart failure are high
blood pressure and coronary ar-
tery disease. Diabetes, cigarette
smoking and being signifi-
cantly overweight also increase
the risk of heart problems.
Chronic lung disease, including
emphysema and bronchitis, can
damage the pulmonary arteries,
which eventually cause the
heart to fail. More rarely, heart
failure can occur because of
damage to the heart valves or
damage to the heart muscle
from viruses, hormonal disor-
ders (such as thyroid disease)
or rare abnormalities of the
heart muscle called cardiomy-
opathies.
Heart failure often occurs when
the heart muscle becomes so
weak that insufficient blood is
pumped out with each heart-
beat. This condition is referred
to as systolic heart failure. Al-
ternately, the heart can fail be-
cause it becomes too rigid.
After each beat, the heart re-
laxes and fills with blood. In
this form of heart failure, re-
ferred to as diastolic dysfunc-
tion, less blood can enter the
heart and be pumped out with
each beat. Over time, the ab-
normality becomes so severe
that symptoms of heart failure
develop.
Heart failure causes blood to
back up in the lungs. Increased
pressure in the lung veins re-
sults in the seepage of fluid into
the tiny lung air pockets. This
leads to a condition called pul-
monary edema that frequently
results in a sudden shortness of
breath. Blood also can back up
in the abdomen and legs, caus-
ing liver enlargement, abdomi-
nal pain and marked swelling
of the legs.
As the heart fails, hormonal
changes occur that reduce the
production of urine and result
in retention of excessive fluid.
A sign of impending heart fail-
ure is a sudden increase in
weight that may average as
much as two or three pounds a
day.
Treatment usually involves the
use of diuretics (water pills)
that get rid of excess fluid and,
together with other medica-
tions, reverse most or all of the
symptoms. With treatment, the
patient may remain symptom-
free for extended periods of
time. In many cases, the condi-
tion gradually worsens and
eventually may contribute to
the patient's death.
As with any other illness, the
most effective treatment of
heart failure is prevention. In a
recent study published in the
American Journal of Cardiol-
ogy, the factors influencing
heart failure were studied in a
group of 14,700 black and
white men and women between
the ages of 45 and 64. They
were followed for an average
of 17.6 years.
Five major modifiable risk fac-
tors for heart failure were iden-
tified, including diabetes,
elevated cholesterol, high blood
pressure, smoking and obesity.
Much to their surprise, the most
frequent risk factor leading to
heart failure was diabetes. They
noted that a reduction in the
risk of diabetes by a few per-
centage points led to a substan-
tially lower incidence of heart
failure.
The benefits were far greater
for blacks than whites, but the
reason for the ethnic difference
is not clear. They suggest the
small reductions in the preva-
lence of diabetes has the poten-
tial to prevent 30,000 cases of
heart failure annually.
Diabetes does not cause heart
failure by itself. Rather, it
makes all of the other risk fac-
tors, such as high levels of cho-
lesterol and triglyceride,
hypertension and obesity, much
worse and more dangerous. Re-
ducing the risk of diabetes re-
duces the effects of all of the
other risk factors.
The prevalence of heart failure
is truly staggering and remains
an enormous epidemic that re-
ceives too little attention. No
question staying healthy, main-
taining a reasonable weight, not
smoking and treating hypercho-
lesterolemia will together de-
crease the prevalence of
adverse effects of diabetes that
is first and foremost the great-
est risk factor for heart failure.
Dr. David Lipschitz is the au-
thor of the book "Breaking The
Rules Of Aging."
More information is available
at: DrDavidHealth.com.
COPYRIGHT 2012 CREATORS.COM
Dr. David Lipschitz
LifELong hEaLth By dr. david LipsChitz
EvEryday ChEapskatE By Mary hunt
Celebrate?
With all that's
going on in our
economy, our na-
tion — our world?
You may be thinking that's the
last thing you'll be doing now
during the holiday season, or
anytime soon. If so, let me en-
courage you to think again.
Now, of all times, we need to
celebrate wherever and when-
ever possible.
In their book, "Why Good
Things Happen to Good Peo-
ple" (Broadway Books, 2007),
authors Stephen Post and Julie
Neimark tell us that celebration
is one of the most important
ways that we express gratitude.
Celebration is gratitude in ac-
tion, and celebration — like
rest, seat belts and green leafy
vegetables — is good for us!
Celebration creates
joy. Feeling down in the
dumps? Celebrate something
or someone. The gratitude you
feel as a result of celebrating
others, or creation in general,
will help you to be less materi-
alistic and therefore more eas-
ily satisfied with what life
brings your way. It's a fact that
gratitude actually creates joy
within our souls.
Celebration is good
for your health. The
gratitude that wells up from the
act of celebration has been
studied scientifically for its
health benefit. The results
prove that gratitude is strongly
linked to emotional and physi-
cal health. Just five minutes of
gratitude can shift the nervous
system toward a calmer state.
Celebration creates a
circle of love. When we
rejoice in the presence and ac-
com-
plishments of others, they feel
uplifted. Research has shown
that acts of gratitude encourage
those around us, creating a cir-
cle of reciprocal love.
Celebration moves us
from fear to faith. Stud-
ies show that the most grateful
people have often been through
difficult and challenging expe-
riences. Individuals who have
overcome adversity are more
optimistic and grateful than the
average person.
Celebration shifts us
from tired to inspired.
Reminding ourselves of how
good life really is cultivates
gratitude. Recent research
shows that emotions work at
lightening speed and often by-
pass reasoning. By cultivating
gratitude, we encourage posi-
tive feelings that are almost in-
stantaneous — feelings that are
more powerful in their own
way than even positive
thoughts.
Celebration heals. Ac-
cording to a recent study on
organ donations, the more grat-
itude a recipient of an organ
feels, the faster that person's re-
covery. There were 74 trans-
plant recipients of either a
heart, liver, lung, kidney or
pancreas who participated in
the study. Those recipients who
expressed gratitude — directly,
or indirectly by journaling —
felt physically better and
functioned at a higher
level than those who
did not.
Looking at the cal-
endar, we will have
three natural rea-
sons to celebrate:
Christmas,
Hanukkah and New
Year's. So pull out all the
stops. Celebrate! But don't
let your celebrations end
there. Look for every reason
imagi-
nable to celebrate: the last day
of autumn, the first day of win-
ter, the first snowfall, the short-
est day of the year, a child's
progress report, the 100th day
of the school year, birthdays,
anniversaries, significant mile-
stones, important events.
As you look at life through
eyes of gratitude, you will dis-
cover many reasons to cele-
brate — no matter what's going
on in the world. Never miss an
opportunity to celebrate.
Mary Hunt is the founder of
www.DebtProofLiving.com and au-
thor of 22 books, including her hol-
iday 2012 release, "Debt-Proof
Your Christmas: Celebrating the
Holidays Without Breaking the
Bank." You can email her at
mary@everydaycheapskate.com,
or write to Everyday Cheapskate,
P.O. Box 2099, Cypress, CA 90630.
COPYRIGHT 2012 CREATORS.COM
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 10
foCus on thE faMiLy with JiM daLy
Q: My teenage daughter was
not asked to the homecoming
dance, and she's heartbroken.
How can I convince her that it's
not the end of the world?
Jim: For better or worse,
many teens infuse high school
dances with a sense of impor-
tance rivaling that of a state
dinner (albeit a state dinner
characterized by loud music
and a lack of decorum!). Those
of us on the other side of ado-
lescence look back on the
homecoming dance as a fun
but essentially inconsequential
diversion. But for your daugh-
ter and her peers, this is a mon-
umental event.
We'd encourage you to avoid
making a fuss over your
daughter's disappointment ei-
ther way. Trying to convince
her that this isn't a big deal in
the grand scheme of things is a
fool's errand. At the same time,
don't empathize with her too
much or do anything else that
might prolong her sense of
melancholy.
The bigger issue here
is your daughter's sense of self-
worth. The emotions she's ex-
periencing are real. She wants
to feel accepted by her peers,
not like an outcast. Give her
time to be sad and withdrawn,
and if she wants to talk about
it, listen with an open heart.
Reaffirm her as a person and
reinforce the importance of
character as opposed to mere
popularity. When the night of
the dance arrives, help her
avoid wallowing in her misery.
If she has any other dateless
friends, perhaps you could host
a slumber party for them. Or
make it a "family date night" at
a destination of her choosing.
With some patience
and sensitivity, you can help
your daughter weather this
storm. Once the dance is over
and the homecoming hype dies
down, she'll feel like her old
self again.
**
(Jim Daly is president of Focus
on the Family, host of the
Focus on the Family radio
program, and a husband and
father of two. )
(Submit your questions to:
ask@FocusOnTheFamily.com)
COPYRIGHT 2012 FOCUS ON THE FAMILY,
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO 80995
INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. ALL
RIGHTS RESERVED.
PARENTS TRY TO MINIMIZE
GIRL'S DEJECTION OVER DANCE
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 11
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 12
SAFE AT HOME
A move is the perfect time to
convert outdoor cat to inside life
By Gina Spadafori
Universal Uclick
A few months ago, I moved to
a place for all my animals, not
only three dogs and a cat, but
also chickens, ducks, horses
and goats.
While it’s good to
have everyone together — and
a big garden planned for spring
— there was one change I
made for one of them that was
long overdue: I ended my cat’s
roaming days.
In effect, I was taking
my own advice. I’m well aware
that a cat who has been used to
going out as he pleases won’t
accept a closed door quietly.
But when you move, every-
thing’s new, and a cat won’t
miss territory he hasn’t claimed
as his own. Six months later,
Ilario, my fluffy orange tabby,
is content with the change.
As am I, and that’s
because in the house I left be-
hind remains the memory of
the cat who never came home.
Clara was a sweet little thing
who rarely left the yard. Nei-
ther cat did, which is why I in-
dulged them when they asked
to go outside. After she disap-
peared, I did all the things
you’re supposed to: let the mi-
crochip registry know, put out
flyers, checked the shelters.
I never saw her
again.
I’d never meant for
either cat to go outside, and
after Clara disappeared, I
closed the door on Ilario. It did-
n’t go well. He yowled, he
paced and he threw himself at
the window screens. And
whenever he could, he’d take
advantage of the opportunity to
slip out.
The new house was
easier to secure than the old
one, and Ilario has adjusted
well to indoor life. That’s be-
cause I made sure it works for
him. He’s an active cat, and
I’ve worked hard to keep him
that way. Some tips:
Set aside time
every day to play with
your cat. Cat fishing poles,
with strings ending in feathers
or other cat-attracting toys, are
a great way to get your cat
moving. Some cats love chas-
ing dots of light from a laser
pointer, while others can be en-
couraged to chase toys and
even retrieve them.
Offer your cat
ways to play when
you’re not around. Cat trees
and tunnels can be great for ca-
vorting or for hiding when a cat
just wants to be left alone.
Check out toys stuffed with
catnip for extra appeal, or those
puzzle toys that keep a cat’s in-
terest by making play a test of
both body and mind.
Make getting food
more difficult for your
cat. All most cats have to do to
eat is waddle over to a full dish.
End free-feeding, and make a
cat’s food hard to get. Break
the daily measured portion into
smaller meals, and put these
small plates in places that re-
quire jumping or climbing to
find. Some cats may also enjoy
puzzle toys that make them
work to get out bits of kibble.
Consider safe out-
door space. Convert-
ing a screened-in porch to a
feline jungle gym will give
your pet more reasons to stay
active. Remember that cats like
heights, so build in tempting
overhead spaces that require ef-
fort to reach. There’s nothing a
cat likes better than looking
down on people, after all!
I wish the world were
safe enough that Ilario could
enjoy the little farm I have
now, but I know it’s not. We
live on a road where people
drive by at highway speeds,
and every night I can hear the
cries of coyotes.
So I’ve compro-
mised, and it’s working out
well for us both. Cats can and
do live happily indoors. What-
ever you do, don’t keep your
cat inside and offer nothing in
exchange for the pleasures of
nature you’re denying him. En-
rich the indoor environment,
and you’ll have a cat who’s not
only safer, but also healthier
and every bit as content as one
who comes and goes at will.
No longer free to roam, ilario enjoys a life indoors with plenty to
keep him busy.
Check the dryer
before closing door
Q: One of my co-workers had a
horrible experience: Her cat died
in the dryer. There were some
clothes in there, still warm, and
her teenage daughter threw more
in without looking, and turned
on the dryer. I did an Internet
search, and found out this isn’t
uncommon. Can you spread the
word? — via Facebook
A: Cats love warmth,
and at this time of year they are
especially eager to search out the
warmest, softest place to nap. As
you now know, sadly, it’s easy
for a person not to notice a cat in
the dryer, to add clothes and then
turn on the appliance. Over the
last 25 years or so, I have had
two co-workers lose cats that
way. Heartbreaking.
The obvious answer is
to keep the dryer door shut at all
times, but it’s hard to get an en-
tire family to comply. If you
can’t be sure you can keep the
door closed, it’s important to
convince your cat that the
dryer’s not a good place to nap.
You can try scaring
your cat to help convince him to
stay clear of this dangerous ap-
pliance. If you find your cat in
the dryer, close the door for a
few seconds (with the machine
off, of course) and pound on the
metal with your palms, making
as much noise as you can. Then
open the door and let your cat
make a run for it.
I normally would not
recommend any training method
that would scare an animal, but
the risk of death here is too great
to ignore. A couple of scary mo-
ments in the dryer is vastly
preferable to such a horrible
death, in my book. — Gina
Spadafori
Do you have a pet
question? Send it to petconnec-
tion@gmail.com or visit Face-
book.com/DrMartyBecker.
Q&A
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 14
Schedule good for Nov 23rd& 24th
FLIGHT (R)12:00 | 4:00 | 7:10 |
10:20
LIFE OF PI 2D (PG)
11:00 | 2:00 | 5:00 | 8:00 | 11:45
LIFE OF PI 3D (PG)
10:00 | 1:00 | 4:00 | 7:00 | 10:00
LINCOLN (PG13)10:30 | 1:50 |
5:10 | 8:30 | 12:00am
RED DAWN (PG13)10:00 | 11:00
| 12:50 | 1:50 | 3:40 | 4:40 | 6:30 |
7:30 | 9:20 | 10:20 | 12:15am
RISE OF THE GUARDIANS 2D
(PG)12:00 | 2:30 | 5:00 | 7:30 |
10:00
RISE OF THE GUARDIANS 3D
(PG)11:00 | 1:30 | 4:00 | 7:00 |
9:30 | 12:00am
SKYFALL (PG13)11:00 | 1:00 |
2:15 | 4:15 | 5:25 | 7:30 | 9:00 |
11:15
TAKEN 2(PG13)7:00 | 9:25
TWILIGHT:BREAKING DAWN
PT.2 (PG13)
10:00 | 10:30 | 11:00 | 12:00 |
1:05 | 1:35 | 2:05 | 3:05 | 4:10 |
4:40 | 5:10 | 6:10 | 7:15 | 7:45 |
8:15 | 9:15 | 10:20 | 10:35 | 11:00
| 12:00am
WRECK IT RALPH 2D (PG)
11:30 | 2:10 | 4:50 | 7:30 | 10:10
WRECK IT RALPH 3D (PG)
10:00 | 12:40 | 3:20
END OF WATCH (R)11:30 am | 2:30
pm | 5:30 pm | 8:30 pm
*HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG)
| 11:05 am | 1:50 pm | 4:35 pm | 7:20
pm | 10:05 pm
2D HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG)
| 10:30 am | 1:15 pm | 4:00 pm | 6:45
pm | 9:35 pm
PITCH PERFECT (PG-13)10:50 am |
1:45pm | 4:40 pm | 7:35 pm | 10:30 pm
*2D RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG)
10:30am | 1:15 pm | 4:00 pm | 5:00 pm
| 6:45 pm 7:45pm | 9:30pm | 10:30 pm
*3D RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG)
11:00am | 11:30 am | 1:45 pm | 2:15
pm | 4:30 pm 7:15 pm | 10:00 pm
*SINISTER (R)10:55 am | 1:45 pm |
4:35 pm | 7:25 pm | 10:15 pm
TAKEN 2 (PG-13)11:10 am | 11:45 am
| 1:45 pm | 2:20 pm | 4:20 pm 4:55 pm
| 7:00pm | 7:30pm | 9:40pm | 10:05 pm
*THE SESSIONS (R)11:10 am | 1:50
pm | 4:30 pm | 7:10 pm | 9:50 pm
*TWILIGHT: BREAKING DAWN P
(PG-13)10:30 am | 11:00 am | 11:30
am | 12:05 pm | 1:30 pm 2:05 pm |
2:35 pm | 3:10 pm | 4:35 pm | 5:10 pm
| 5:40 pm | 6:15 pm | 7:40 pm | 8:20
pm | 8:45 pm 9:20 pm | 10:45 pm
*D-BOX TWILIGHT: BREAKING
(PG-13)10:30 am | 1:30 pm | 4:35 pm
| 7:40 pm | 10:45 pm
*2D WRECK-IT RALPH (PG)
| 10:45 am | 11:30 am | 1:45 pm | 2:30
pm | 4:45 pm 5:30 pm | 7:45 pm | 8:30
pm | 10:45 pm
*3D WRECK-IT RALPH (PG)
| 10:30 am | 1:30 pm | 4:30 pm | 7:30
pm | 10:30 pm
* -- denotes Pass Restricted features
2D BRAVE (PG) 11:20a | 1:45p | 4:10p | 6:30p |
8:55p
3D BRAVE (PG) 12:15p | 2:40p | 5:00p | 7:30p |
9:50p
CHASING MAVERICKS (PG) 2:10p | 7:05p
2D FINDING NEMO (G) 11:00a | 1:20p | 6:55p
3D FINDING NEMO (G)
| 11:55a | 2:15p | 4:35p | 7:40p | 10:00p
FUN SIZE (PG-13) 11:15a | 4:50p | 9:40p
HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13)
| 12:30p | 2:55p | 5:15p | 7:35p | 9:55p
2D ICE AGE CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG)
| 11:05a | 3:55p | 8:30p
3D ICE AGE CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG)
| 1:25p | 6:10p
LOOPER(R)11:25a| 2:05p| 4:45p | 7:25p | 10:05p
2D PARANORMAN (PG) 11:10a | 3:50p | 8:40p
3D PARANORMAN (PG) 1:35p | 6:20p
2D SILENT HILL REVELATION (R)
| 11:40a | 4:20p | 9:20p
3D SILENT HILL REVELATION(R) 1:55p | 7:00p
THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13)
| 3:40p | 9:15p
THE EXPENDABLES 2(R) 11:50a | 2:25p | 7:10p
THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG)
| 11:35a | 2:00p | 4:25p | 6:50p | 9:25p
THE POSSESSION(PG-13) 4:55p | 9:35p
EAST POINTE
MOVIES 12
I-10 & Lee Trevino
Schedule good for 11/23- 11/29
Schedule good for
Friday November 23rd
PREMIERE MONTWOOD 7
Schedule good for 11/23- 11/29
BRAVE (PG)11:45 am | 2:05 pm | 4:25 pm | 6:50 pm
| 9:20 pm
FUN SIZE (PG-13)12:10 pm | 2:20 pm | 4:30 pm |
7:20 pm | 9:30 pm
HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13)
| 7:30 pm | 9:35 pm
ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 12:50 pm |
3:00 pm | 5:10 pm
LOOPER (R) 1:40 pm | 4:20 pm | 6:55 pm | 9:30 pm
PARANORMAN (PG) 12:15 pm | 2:30 pm | 4:45 pm |
7:00 pm | 9:15 pm
SILENT HILL: REVELATION (R)
| 11:50 am | 2:00 pm | 4:15 pm | 6:30 pm | 9:00 pm
THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG)
| 12:00 pm | 2:25 pm | 4:50 pm | 7:10 pm | 9:25 pm
2200 N. Yarbrough
CINEMARK CIELO VISTA
Gateway West Blvd/Cielo Vista Mall
CINEMARK 14 - EL PASO
West side of El Paso at Mesa & I-10
Las Palmas i-10 @ Zaragosa
Life of Pi PG125
MinsCinemark XD -
RealD 3D 9:30am
12:40pm | 3:50pm
7:05pm | 10:15pm
RealD 3D 11:40am
2:50pm 6:05pm
9:15pm Digital Cin-
ema 10:30am |
1:40pm | 4:50pm
8:05pm 11:15pm
Rise of the
GuardiansPG97
Mins RealD 3D
10:15am 12:00pm
12:55pm | 3:35pm
| 5:20pm 6:25pm
| 9:05pm 10:40pm
11:35pmDigital Cin-
ema 9:25am |
11:15am | 1:55pm
| 2:40pm |
4:35pm | 7:15pm
8:00pm | 9:55pm
Red Dawn PG-1393
Mins Digital Cinema
10:10am 11:45am |
1:10pm | 2:20pm
3:45pm 5:00pm |
6:45pm 7:35pm |
9:30pm | 10:25pm
Midnight Showtimes
(Late Friday Night)
12:05am
The Twilight Saga:
Breaking Dawn
Part 2 PG-13115
MinsDigital Cinema
9:55am | 10:35am
12:10pm 1:00pm
1:45pm 2:30pm |
3:15pm 4:00pm
4:45pm | 5:30pm
| 6:15pm 7:00pm
| 7:45pm 8:30pm
9:20pm 10:00pm
10:45pm 11:30pm-
Midnight Showtimes
(Late Friday
Night)12:01am
SkyfallPG-13142
Mins Digital Cinema
9:50am | 11:55am
1:20pm 3:25pm
4:55pm 6:55pm
8:20pm 10:30pm
11:45pm
Lincoln PG-13149
Mins Digital Cinema
11:30am | 3:00pm
6:35pm | 10:05pm
Flight R138 Mins
Digital Cinema
9:30am | 12:50pm
4:10pm 7:30pm |
10:50pm
Wreck-It
RalphPG101 Min-
sRealD 3D 10:40am
1:30pm 4:25pm |
7:25pm10:20pmDig-
ital Cinema
9:35am | 12:15pm
| 3:05pm |
6:00pm | 8:50pm
The Sessions
R98 MinsDigital Cin-
ema 11:00am
Here Comes the
BoomPG104 Mins
Digital Cinema
2:10pm | 8:10pm
SinisterR110 Mins
Digital Cinema
11:20am | 5:10pm
| 11:00pm
Taken 2
PG-1393 Mins
Digital Cinema
11:05am | 1:50pm
| 4:30pm |
7:20pm | 10:10pm
Schedule good for Friday Nov 23rd
TINSELTOWN
Life of Pi PG125 Mins
Cinemark XD - RealD 3D
9:00am 12:15pm 3:20pm
7:00pm 10:15pm
RealD 3D 11:05am |
4:00pm 6:00pm Digital
Cinema 1:00pm 8:00pm
Rise of the Guardians
PG97 Mins RealD 3D
10:00am | 1:05pm |
4:20pm 7:15pm 10:00pm
Digital Cinema 9:00am |
12:10pm | 3:25pm |
6:30pm | 9:25pm
Red DawnPG-1393 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:30am
| 1:40pm | 4:45pm |
7:50pm | 10:20pm
The Twilight Saga:
Breaking Dawn Part 2
PG-13115 Mins
Digital Cinema 9:05am |
10:00am | 11:00am |
12:00pm | 2:00pm |
3:00pm | 5:00pm |
6:10pm | 7:30pm |
8:10pm | 9:40pm |
10:35pm | 11:10pm
SkyfallPG-13142 Mins
Digital Cinema 9:10am |
10:35am | 12:30pm |
2:35pm | 3:55pm |
6:20pm | 7:20pm |
9:45pm | 10:50pm
LincolnPG-13149 Mins
Digital Cinema
10:50am | 2:50pm |
6:50pm | 10:10pm
FlightR138 Mins
Digital Cinema 9:15am |
12:35pm | 4:00pm |
7:10pm | 10:25pm
Wreck-It Ralph
PG101 MinsRealD 3D
2:40pm | 9:20pm
Digital Cinema
9:40am | 4:40pm
ArgoR120 Mins
Digital Cinema 9:30am |
3:10pm | 9:35pm
Here Comes the Boom
PG104 Mins
Digital Cinema
12:30pm | 6:40pm
Schedule good for Friday Nov 23rd
Life of PiPG125 Mins
RealD 3D 10:00am |
12:00pm 1:00pm 3:00pm |
4:00pm | 6:00pm |
7:00pm 9:00pm 10:30pm
Digital Cinema
11:00am | 2:00pm |
5:00pm | 8:00pm
Red DawnPG-1393 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:40am |
1:40pm | 4:40pm |
7:40pm | 10:40pm
Skyfall PG-13142 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:00am |
11:45am | 1:45pm |
3:15pm | 5:30pm |
7:00pm 9:15pm 10:15pm
Lincoln PG-13149 Mins
Digital Cinema 12:00pm |
3:25pm 6:45pm 10:15pm
Flight R138 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:05am |
12:00pm | 1:30pm |
3:30pm | 4:45pm |
6:45pm 8:15pm 10:00pm
The Man With the Iron
Fists R95 Mins
Digital Cinema
7:20pm | 10:20pm
Fun Size PG-1386 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:20am |
1:20pm | 4:20pm
Silent Hill: Revelation
R95 MinsDigital Cinema
1:25pm | 7:25pm
Argo R120 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:30am |
1:30pm | 4:30pm |
7:30pm | 10:30pm
Seven Psychopaths
R111 Mins Digital Cinema
10:25am 4:25pm 10:25pm
Bless Me, UltimaPG-
13102 MinsDigital Cinema
10:10am | 1:10pm |
4:10pm 7:10pm 10:10pm
The Perks of Being a
WallflowerPG-13103 Mins
Digital Cinema 10:05am |
1:05pm | 4:05pm |
7:05pm | 10:05pm
Schedule good for Friday Nov 23rd
Premiere Cinemas
6101 Gateway West S.15
Now Showing
LIFE OF PI
Open Nationwide 11/21/12
Runtime 125 min
MPAA Rating PG for Peril,
Emotional Thematic Content,
Some Scary Action.
Starring Suraj Sharma, Irrfan
Khan, Tabu, Rafe Spall,
Gérard Depardieu, Adil Hus-
sain, Gautam Belur, Ayush
Tandon
Genre Adventure
Synopsis After deciding to
sell their zoo in India and
move to Canada, Santosh and
Gita Patel board a freighter
with their sons and a few re-
maining animals. Tragedy strikes when a terrible storm sinks the
ship, leaving the Patels' teenage son, Pi (Suraj Sharma), as the
only human survivor. However, Pi is not alone; a fearsome Ben-
gal tiger has also found refuge aboard the lifeboat. As days turn
into weeks and weeks drag into months, Pi and the tiger must
learn to trust each other if both are to survive.
Director Ang Lee
Producers Gil Netter, Ang Lee, David Womark
Distributor 20th Century Fox
Official Website http://www.lifeofpimovie.com/
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 15
If you want your upcoming event listed in SPOTLIGHT’S Out & About section, please send all your relevant data
by e-mail to: editorial@spotlightepnews.com
Out & About
Calendar of upcoming events for El Paso/ Southern New Mexico are
from November 22nd - 28th, 2012
NORTHEAST/
CENTRAL
El Paso Rhinos - El
Paso’s Junior League ice
hockey team takes on the Wi-
chita Thunder at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 21, and Fri-
day and Saturday, Nov. 23-24 at
the Sierra Providence Events
Center, next to the Coliseum,
4100 E. Paisano. Ticket infor-
mation: 479-PUCK (7825) or
elpasorhinos.com.
‘Seussical the Mu-
sical’ — Kids-N-Co. 1301
Texas, presents the musical
based on the works of Dr. Seuss
Nov. 23-Dec. 16. Written by
Lynn Ahrens, Stephen Flaherty
and co-conceived by Eric Idle.
Directed by Laura Sambrano.
Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Fri-
days and Saturdays and 2:30
p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $7 ($5
children, seniors, students and
active military); available at the
door one hour before show. in-
formation: 351-1455 or face-
book.com/elpasokids-n-co.
‘Lend Me A Tenor’
– El Paso Playhouse, 2501
Montana, presents Ken Lud-
wig’s comedy Nov. 16-Dec. 8.
Showtimes are 8 p.m. Friday
and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sun-
day. Directed by Vanessa
Keyser. Tickets: $10 ($8 sen-
iors, $7 military/students with
ID; $5 students under 18). In-
formation: 532-1317, elpaso-
playhouse.com.
MISSION
VALLEY
Ballet Folklorico
Paso del Norte — The
folklorico group’s annual gala
performance is 7:30 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday and 3 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 23-25, at the
Chamizal National Memorial,
800 S. San Marcial, with
dances from various
regions of Mexico, accompa-
nied by live music. Admission:
$7. Information: 588-5743.
The MMG Tour —
Maybach Music Group’s rap
music tour is 7:30 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 25, at El Paso County
Coliseum, 4100 E. Paisano,
with Rick Ro$$, Meek Mill,
Wale and Machine Gun Kelly
(aka MGK). Tickets: $37.25,
$47.25 and $67.25 (Ticketmas-
ter).
EASTSIDE
Turkey Bowl
Shootout — El Paso Flag
Football’s 9th annual 8-man in-
door adult football event is Sat-
urday and Sunday, Nov. 24-25,
at various city parks. Double
elimination format;
TFFA/SCFFL rules apply. Fee:
$75 per team (teams pay their
own referee fee). Registration
deadline is Nov. 13. Informa-
tion/locations: 227-9947 or el-
pasoflagfootball.com.
WESTSIDE/
DOWNTOWN
El Paso Model
Railroad and His-
torical As-
sociation
50th
An-
nual
Open
House
Nov 25th Three giant
model train layouts in
three scales. Features a
mini-camera mounted in
the headlight of a locomo-
tive for live video feed,
brings new meaning to
"Honey I Shrunk the Kids."
6335 Vaughn Ct. Off Alameda
Avenue on the corner of As-
carate Street and Vaughn. Free
Admission.
Treble Clef Ball —
The El Paso Symphony Guild’s
annual dinner-dance gala is Sat-
urday, Nov. 24. Details to be
announced. Information/reser-
vations: Symphony office, 532-
3776.
UTEP Department
of Music — Performances
are at 7:30 p.m. at Fox Fine
Arts Recital Hall,. Tickets for
most performances are $5 ($3
seniors/military/non-UTEP stu-
dents; free for age 6 and
younger/UTEP students/fac-
ulty/staff). Ticket information:
747-5606 or utep.edu/music.
• UTEP Percussion Ensemble
and Pandemonium Steel Drums
— Monday, Nov. 26. UTEP
Percussion Ensemble and Pan-
demonium Steel Drum Ensem-
ble have performed in venues
across the US Southwest, as
well as in Indianapolis,
Dallas, Los Angeles and in
Cancun, Mexico. Their fall con-
cert features a variety of com-
positions from classical and
contemporary composers. Pan-
demonium will again feature
traditional calypso music as
well as arrangements of music
from all eras.
• UTEP Choirs “Holiday Festi-
val” – Thursday and Friday,
Nov. 29-30, with familiar and
new music celebrating the sea-
son.
UTEP Men’s Bas-
ketball – The Miners host
nearby rival NMSU at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the
Don Haskins Center. Ticket in-
formation: 747-5234 or
utepathletics.com.
UTEP Football —
The Miners host Rice in the
final game of the season, 5 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 24, at Sun Bowl
Stadium. Tickets are $20-$55.
Ticket information: 747-5234,
544-8444 or utepathletics.com.
El Paso-Juarez
Historical Museum
— Curator and founder is histo-
rian Fred Morales, who hosts
historic exhibits at various loca-
tions and walking tours. Infor-
mation: 771-6727,
fredmorales7@yahoo.com, or
elpasowalkingtours.com.
The museum hosts the exhibit
“Francisco Madero and the
Mexican Revolution” in No-
vember at El Paso Public Li-
brary’s Main Branch, 501 N.
Oregon, Downtown.
A historic walking tour of the
Buena Vista Community and
the Rio Grande Power Plant is
11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 24,
starting at 3454 Doniphan
..Continues on page 18
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 16
Built to party, impregnate and conquer the
world, Kronic is Australia’s most reckless en-
tertainer. Fueled with Ciroc, Patron and an
alarming disregard for personal safety, his
electronically sequenced on-stage acro-
batics take dj’ing to the next level, leaving
crowds everywhere throbbing, engorged
and yearning for more.
Raised on tapes from AM and Rectangle,
Kronic originally sported his hip-hop wares
across house parties and boudoirs of Ade-
laide, wooing friends, foes and women with
a west coast influenced take on musical
curation. Mixing things up towards the end
of 2000’s, his sound became more electric
and diversified, with artists such as Chuckie
and Afrojack finding their way into the mix.
One morning, or afternoon (the details are
pretty hazy), while laying hung over and be-
sieged by a bunch of scantily clad women
in a candle lit room, he realised that there’s
something in this dance music business.
Sensing the imminent club music invasion,
Kronic set his gold chains aside and
hopped onto the glow stick electro-club
revolution.
Five years on, with tour supports for LMFAO,
Afrojack, David Guetta, Snoop Dogg, Lil Jon
notched into his bed post, alongside lan-
yards from Creamfields and a handful of
Australia’s biggest festivals slung over the
door, it’s obvious that Kronic has a pen-
chant for picking the right track. Trading
Adelaide for the sun, sand and single ladies
of the Gold Coast, Kronic hooked up with
fellow party enthusiasts Bombs Away, and
transformation from mixtape DJ to party-
proven producer began.
Locking in some studio time along the way,
with a handful of infamous mash-ups, mix-
tapes and bootlegs filling out his discogra-
phy, Kronic delivered his debut release and
Top Ten ARIA Club chart single - ‘Looking for
Some Girls’ in early 2012. Rich in synth,
donk and sex sweat, the appropriately artis-
tic video clocked over a million view within
it’s first 7 days before YouTube deemed it
too hot for the internet’s eyes. Taking it all in
stride, Kronic is currently in the studio craft-
ing the next generation of party-starting an-
thems alongside Seany B, FlyGirl Tee, Krunk,
Uberjakd and more.
DJ Spoltight | Kronic
Music Releases
November 27th
Alicia Keys - Girl on Fire
Rage Against the Machine-
XX 20th anniversary edition
Glee the music- Season 4 vol 1
Great Big Sea- Xx
Therion-Les Fleurs Du Mal
Dio- Last in Line
Judy Collins-Judy Collins
Live
Example- Evolution of Man
The Who-My Generation
Michael Buble- Christmas
Special
Canned Heat- Boogie With
Canned Heat
The Pogues- Pogues in Paris
Whitney Houston- Best of
Joe Cookier- Fire it Up
Nightlife calendar
Nov 24th
SUPERNITE W/ PAT MAHONEY OF LCD SOUNDSYSTEM
Late Nite Social Club & The Lowbrow Present...
PAT MAHONEY OF LCD SOUNDSYSTEM
(Special Disco Version/DFA)
EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT $10 PRESALE TIX AVAILABLE ONLINE
NOW:
http://fla.vor.us/2218591-Late-Nite-Social-Club-tickets.html
Dec 19th
KINKY @LOWBROW PALACE. More info TBA
Dec 29th
AUDIBLE Feat. DEADMAU5, Chris Lake, Audrey Napoleon
Sat.Dec.29th | El Paso, TX
9pm to 2am line starts at 8pm
EVERYONE WELCOME
21+ Designated Drinking Section
Judson F. Williams Convention Center.One Civic Center Plaza
El Paso, Texas 79901
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 17
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 18
El Paso-Juarez
Historical Mu-
seum.Continued from page
15...(across from Rosa’s Can-
tina). Admission: $5. Proceeds
from admission go towards his-
torical exhibitions at area li-
braries.
SUPERNITE W/
PAT MAHONEY
OF LCD
SOUNDSYSTEM
Saturday nov 24th
Late Nite Social Club & The
Lowbrow Present...
PAT MAHONEY OF LCD
SOUNDSYSTEM
(Special Disco Version/DFA)
WE ARE VERY EXCITED TO
PRESENT ANOTHER MEM-
BER OF ONE OF OUR FA-
VORITE BANDS LCD
SOUNDSYSTEM. A FEW
MONTHS AGO WE RAGED
HARD WITH NANCY
WHANG TO A BEAUTIFUL
DISCO SET THIS TIME
AROUND WE GO HARD
WITH PAT MAHONEY FOR
ANOTHER EL PASO
DEBUT!
SOUTHERN
NEW MExICO
Christmas on the
Pecos — One of America’s
top holiday traditions, the boat
tour along the Pecos River runs
Nov. 23-Dec. 31 in Carlsbad,
N.M. The 21st annual event
showcases the winter wonder-
land of more than 100 festively
decorated houses. Twelve to 15
tours are offered nightly 5:15 to
9:30 p.m.; ticket office opens at
4:30 p.m.
The 40-minute tours depart
from Pecos River Village Con-
ference Center, 711 Muscatel.
The village includes a gallery
full of Southwestern gifts and
refreshments and holiday
lights. Ticket are $12.50 Sun-
day through Thursday and
$17.50 Friday and Saturday;
$7.50 and $12.50 for ages 2-11
(under two free with lap pass).
Tickets should be purchased in
advance; many dates are sold
out. Information: (575) 628-
0952; Carlsbad Chamber of
Commerce at (575) 887-6516
or christmasonthepecos.com.
The 2nd annual Carlsbad
Winter Wine Festival is noon to
6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1.
Silver City Lighted
Christmas Parade
— The 22nd annual Silver City
Lighted Christmas Parade be-
gins at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
24, in the historic Downtown
district. Information: (575)
534-1700.
The parade begins at the
Grant County Courthouse, trav-
els east on Broadway Street
and turns north onto Bullard
Street. The parade includes mo-
torized floats, wagons or carts,
lighted cars and bicycles, walk-
ing and other entries.
Spencer Theater
for Performing
Arts — Airport Hwy 220 in
Alto, N.M. (about 12 miles
north of downtown Ruidoso).
Information: (575) 336-4800,
(888) 818-7872 or spencerthe-
ater.com.
“A Chorus Line,”
Winner of nine Tony Awards
including “Best Musical,” is 7
p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday,
Nov. 20-21. This choreographic
masterpiece is about the blood,
sweat and tears of dancers and
their quest to be members of a
chorus line. Tickets: $56 and
$59. A pre-show glazed ham
buffet served at 5 p.m. for $20.
‘Still Life With
Iris’ — No Strings Theater
Company holiday production
of the adventure by Stephen
Dietz is Nov. 9-25 at the Black
Box Theatre, 430 N. Down-
town Mall, in Las Cruces, di-
rected by Nikka Ziemer.
Showtime is 8 p.m. Friday and
Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 18 and 25, and 7 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 22. Tickets:
$10 ($9 students and seniors
over 65 and $7 all seats Thurs-
day). Information/reservations:
(575) 523-1223 or no-
strings.org.
‘Rocky Horror
Show’ — NMSU’s Ameri-
can Southwest Theatre Com-
pany presents Richard
O’Brien’s campy cult classic
musical Nov. 16-Dec. 2 at Her-
shel Zohn Theater, 3014 McFie
Circle on the NMSU campus.
The production is the com-
pany’s final one at the Hershel
Zohn. Showtime is 7:30 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday and
2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $10
and 15; available at the theatre
box office between noon and 4
p.m. at (575) 646-4515 or
(575) 646-1420.
Guatemalan Holi-
day Market — The an-
nual sale of Guatemalan crafts
is 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 Saturday,
Nov. 24, at the Mimbres Re-
gion Arts Council Gallery,
1201 Pope (at 12th) in Silver
City, with handmade
Guatemalan crafts. Proceeds
benefit the artisans and the Arts
Council. Information: (575)
538-2505 or mimbresarts.org.
NMSU Men’s Bas-
ketball — Home games
are usually 7 p.m. (except as
listed) at the Pan American
Center in Las Cruces. Tickets
to be announced. (Ticketmas-
ter). Information: (575) 646-
1447.
• Wednesday, Nov. 21 —
Northern New Mexico
• 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 23 —
Louisiana
‘Rocky Horror
Show’ — NMSU’s Ameri-
can Southwest Theatre Com-
pany presents Richard
O’Brien’s campy cult classic
musical Nov. 16-Dec. 2 at Her-
shel Zohn Theater, 3014 McFie
Circle on the NMSU campus.
The production is the com-
pany’s final one at the Hershel
Zohn. Showtime is 7:30 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday and
2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $10
and 15; available at the theatre
box office between noon and 4
p.m. at (575) 646-4515 or
(575) 646-1420.
Ruidoso Festival of
Lights — The mountain
village of Ruidoso hosts the
following events though the
Christmas season. Information:
1-888-71-LIGHTS (714-4448)
or RuidosoFOL.org.
Christmas in the Park is 6
p.m. Thursday, Nov 29, at
School House Park. Includes
lighting of the Yule Log, music
and caroling, cookies and a
visit with Santa. Admission is
free.
The annual “Parade of Lights”
is 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1,
in downtown Ruidoso (from
Sudderth/Mechem to Pizza
Hut), featuring floats packed
with seasonal decorations and
lights.
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S
O
N
L
Y
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 19
Brad Keselowski and team owner Roger Penske stand with the Sprint Cup trophy between them as they celebrate winning the 2012 series championship at Sunday’s NASCAR Ford EcoBoost 400
at Homestead-Miami Speedway. (NASCAR photo)
New era
Keselowski wins Cup
title, ending Johnson
streak
S
everal years ago, Jim-
mie Johnson and his
crew chief Chad
Knaus seemed a bit miffed
when they were asked
about the upcoming season
during their championship
interview at Homestead-
Miami Speedway.
But on Sunday at Home-
stead, a good bit of the
questioning of NASCAR’s
newest champion, Brad Ke-
selowski, was focused on
the future.
In winning the title, Ke-
selowski, 28, becomes the
first driver born in the
1980s to win the Cup title
and thereby becomes the
face of NASCAR for many
fans. He’s already a garage
leader in the relatively
modern world of social
media, which is popular
among the younger audi-
ence that NASCAR wants
to add to its fan base.
“He’ll do great,” said
Homestead winner Jeff
Gordon, who at age 41 is
long past his “Wonder Boy”
years. “He’s entertaining.
You never know what
you’re going to get with
Brad. I enjoy or look for-
ward to watching him, and
I think this experience, he
will just mature to a whole
’nother level because of
being in this position and
carrying this responsibil-
ity.”
Gordon also said he ex-
pects Keselowski, like oth-
ers who have won their
first Cup titles, to be
changed by the experience.
“Every champion that
I’ve ever seen win their
first one, they always come
out of it with a whole new
perspective on past champi-
ons,” he said.
Continues on page 21
By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 20
NASCAR’s Camping World
and Nationwide Series champi-
onships wound up being won by
the drivers who were atop the
points standings as they entered
the series finales at Homestead-
Miami Speedway.
In the closest contest, 22-year-
old James Buescher, who had an
11-point lead before the Truck
race, won the title by six points
over Timothy Peters. Peters fin-
ished eighth at Homestead while
Buescher was 13th en route to
his first-ever major NASCAR
title.
In the Nationwide Series, de-
fending series champion Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. took the title by 23
points over Elliott Sadler with a
sixth-place finish to Sadler’s
ninth.
Stenhouse’s celebration
seemed a bit subdued, and much
of his post-race press conference
was spent talking about an issue
late in the race when his spotter
Mike Calinoff urged him to let
Brian Scott pass by rather than
risk a championship-crushing
wreck. Stenhouse ignored Cali-
noff ’s instructions and held
down the button of his two-way
radio for the rest of the race.
“There were some anxious mo-
ments for our spotter, and I got
tired of listening, so I keyed up
the mic so he couldn’t talk to me
the rest of the way,” Stenhouse
said. “I wanted 20 top-fives [fin-
ishes for the season] at least, so I
came up one spot short. We
wanted to win the race; that’s
what we come to do each and
every week and that’s what got
us in the position that we were
in …
“I like racing hard like that.
That’s what I do, that’s what I
enjoy, and that’s why I love rac-
ing. That’s just how I drive.”
Sadler, who won four races
this season to Stenhouse’s six
and stayed at or near the top of
the series standings for most of
the season, said his team just
couldn’t overcome a controver-
sial penalty at Indianapolis
Motor Speedway in mid-season
and a crash at Phoenix the week
before Homestead.
At Indy, Sadler was penalized
for jumping a late-race restart,
and his resulting 15th-place fin-
ish saw his points lead over sec-
ond place drop from 11 points to
one.
“You win some races, you have
some peaks and you have some
valleys, and we just had a few
valleys there coming down the
stretch that just kind of took the
momentum away from us and
where we lost control of the
championship,” said Sadler, who
lost to Stenhouse for the second-
straight year. “All in all, yes, it is
disappointing. This one does
hurt worse than last year be-
cause we did control the points
the whole entire season, and we
knew Ricky was going to be
tough to race for the champi-
onship.
“But I want to try to take the
positives out of it, learn from it,
and go home and spend some
time with my family.”
On the Truck Series side, the
champion ended a dream season
on a positive note. Buescher
started the year with an upset
victory in the Nationwide Series
race at Daytona and won the
Truck title on the strength of a
series-high four race wins.
“This year has been incredible
for me,” Buescher said. “First of
all, I got married in January, and
my wife is my No. 1 supporter, so
to be able to start off the race
season after taking that next
step in my life with a win at
Daytona was incredible, best
thing I’d ever done in racing.
“That kind of opened the flood-
gates for us to win some races on
the Truck side … It’s been a phe-
nomenal year for my racing ca-
reer and for my personal life. I
just feel really blessed.”
Cale Gale won the Truck race
at Homestead, beating Cup reg-
ular Kyle Busch in a shootout on
a green-white-checkered-flag
run to the finish. It was his first
Truck Series victory.
In the Rookie of the Year con-
tests, Austin Dillon won in the
Nationwide Series while his
brother Ty Dillon took the hon-
ors in the Truck Series
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. poses with his second consecutive Nationwide Series champi-
onship trophy. (NASCAR photo)
Stenhouse wins 2nd Nationwide title;
Buescher Truck champ
“Generation
Six” race car
detailed
NASCAR officials have released
more details about the new race
cars that will be run in the Sprint
Cup Series beginning next season.
The new car, which is being re-
ferred to as the “Generation Six” ve-
hicle, more closely resembles the
models being sold to the public, and
it’s designed to provide more com-
petitive racing.
Among the changes fans will see
are the driver’s last name featured
on the windshield and a smaller car
number as the car is slightly
smaller. Sponsor decals will not be
allowed on the headlights and tail-
lights, two places where the manu-
facturer’s look is unique. The
smaller numbers will be moved to
the front and rear bumpers.
A small sponsor logo will be al-
lowed on the roof, and there will be
larger areas on the sides of the car
for sponsor logos.
NASCAR also will lower the mini-
mum age for drivers in the Truck
Series from 18 to 16, but only at
road courses and tracks 1.1 miles in
length or less.
Some of the Truck schedule is
being revealed, including the addi-
tion of a race at Canadian Tire Mo-
torsports Park in Bowmanville,
Ontario. That allows NASCAR to re-
main in Canada with one of its top-
three touring series after the
Nationwide race at Montreal was
dropped.
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 21
Continued from page 19. “I remember
when Jimmie [Johnson] won his, he was
overwhelmed with everything that comes
along with it. It makes you grow up …
There’s a lot to take in, and it makes you re-
ally look at things a lot differently and rec-
ognize that responsibility that you have.”
There also was talk about how Ke-
selowski and his Paul Wolfe-led team will
perform on the track in the future as the
relatively young team gets more experience.
Keselowski has just three full seasons in
NASCAR’s elite division.
“It doesn’t take long to have [the champi-
onship] sink in, and we’ve got to think about
the future,” said Keselowski’s car owner
Roger Penske, who finally got his first Cup
title after competing on and off in NASCAR
since 1972. “Obviously Brad has got not only
the raw talent, but I think he’s a thinking
driver. I think his windshield is bigger than
people realize. He knows what’s going on
and takes care of his car …
“I think he’s going to be a multiple cham-
pion, and I hope that Paul [Wolfe] and the
team can continue to grow on the success
we had this weekend and this year and we
can go on and do it again.”
Keselowski said he too is looking forward.
“I feel like the best is yet to come. I really
do,” he said. “I feel like we’re still at the be-
ginning. You can’t judge something off the
beginning. If you were building a house and
you just looked at the foundation, it doesn’t
look like much of anything. I feel like we’re
very early. We’ve got the cement poured, and
I want to keep building.”
Brad Keselowski in the No. 2 Dodge celebrates winning the Sprint Cup title. (NASCAR photo)
New era...
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 22
By Christopher A. Randazzo
Ford keeps the party going with the Fiesta!
For years American
economy cars were hardly
worth mentioning. Cars like the
Escort, Neon and Cavalier,
while good sellers, didn’t score
well when stacked up against
the competition from Japan.
But recently that scenario has
been changing as American car
makers have shown that they
can make cars that not only de-
livery great fuel economy, but
are fun to own and drive.
Last year, Ford got the party
started when it stepped into the
subcompact class with the Fi-
esta. Available in both sedan
and hatchback body styles, the
Fiesta, which comes in under
the Focus to become Ford’s
entry-level model, features
sporty driving dynamics, awe-
some fuel economy and a wide-
range of features.
The designers wanted the Fiesta
to be expressive, and they ap-
peared to have succeeded. The
Fiesta sports Ford’s now-com-
mon front-grill along with the
trapezoidal shaped intake. Scal-
loped side panels show the Fi-
esta’s body creases that add
character to the overall shape.
And the Fiesta comes in a wide
array of colors including Lime
Squeeze and Yellow Blaze. Add
in the optional 17” wheels and
the Fiesta will be the talk of the
neighborhood.
As good as the Fiesta looks on
the outside the inside is even
more impressive. With its soft-
touch dash, edgy styling that
uses metallic accents and good
build quality, the Fiesta will
have you do a double take at its
sub $20K base price tag. The
leather wrapped steering wheel
feels perfect in your hands and
the seats provide excellent
comfort and are available in ei-
ther cloth or leather. The center
stack which houses most of the
controls appears odd at first,
proves to be intuitive and
quickly becomes second nature.
When it comes to utility, the
hatchback is the way to go, pro-
viding a maximum cargo ca-
pacity of 26 cubic feet with the
seats folded. The sedan allows
for 12.8 cubic feet of cargo to
be stored in the trunk.
Under the hood of every Fiesta
is a 1.6 liter inline four-cylinder
that makes 120 horsepower.
Buyers can choose transmis-
sions – a five-speed manual is
standard on the Fiesta, with a
six-speed automatic available
as an option. To maximize fuel
economy, the auto is the way to
go by delivering 30 mpg in
town and 40 mpg on the high-
way. Shifting gears yourself
will bring those numbers down
a smidge to 29 city / 38 high-
way.
With an attractive exterior and
in impressive interior, the Fi-
esta is starting to sound pretty
good, huh? Well the best is yet
to come – for out on the road is
where the Fiesta really shines.
The more I drove my Race Red
hatchback the more I was im-
pressed with the way it handled
and how it communicated to
me through the steering wheel.
The connection to the road re-
minded me of some high-end
sports cars – minus the harsh
sports car ride. I later learned
that Fiesta uses a steering sys-
tem called Power Assist Steer-
ing with Active Nibble
Cancellation. I have to admit, I
hardly understood what the
Ford engineer was talking
about when he tried to explain
it to me, but I have to guess it
has something to do with giv-
ing the Fiesta its remarkable
feel and drive.
And even though the Fiesta
isn’t loaded with tons of horse-
power, I never felt the Fiesta
needed any extra oomph. Sure I
would have liked a little more
(low end torque is somewhat
lacking), but in everyday driv-
ing, the Fiesta was fine. My
tester was equipped with the
automatic. It’s not the
smoothest around, and I would
have preferred the 5-speed
manual, even if it does appear
to be lacking a gear.
Depending on what trim level
you get you can really deck the
Fiesta out with cool features.
There are LED parking lights, a
rear spoiler, premium sound
system, ambient lighting to set
the interior mood, heated seats,
push button start, a sunroof and
of course, Ford’s Sync system.
And every Fiesta comes with
the EasyFuel Capless Fuel Fill
– in other words – no more gas
caps.
Ford is really on to something
here. Until recently, the sub-
compact car market has been
hardly exciting, but that’s
changing partly because of the
Fiesta. Here is a car that is gen-
uinely fun to drive, economical
and practical – yet feels far
more expensive than its
$14,000 starting price. With the
Fiesta there are lots of reasons
to celebrate.
By The Numbers:
2012 Ford Fiesta SES Hatchback
Base Price: $17,500.00
Price as Tested: $21,135.00
Layout: front-engine / front-wheel drive
Engine: 1.6 liter 4-cylinder
Transmission: six-speed automatic
Horsepower: 120 hp
Torque: 112 ft-lbs
EPA Fuel Economy:30 city / 40 highway mpg
[Visit me at www.carsbycar.blogspot.com
or email me at autocran@gmail.com]
SPOTLIGHTEPNEWS.COM NOVEMBER 22, 2012 PAGE 23
1. Brad Keselowski 2,400 (finished 15th)
His No. 2 Dodge team seemed to be playing it
conservatively to protect the points lead they
brought into the finale, but despite a mid-race
challenge from Jimmie Johnson, his car ap-
peared fast enough to finish at least 15th and
secure the title, even if Johnson hadn’t dropped
out with a mechanical failure. “I think that as
bad as we ran tonight that that made it more
special that we were still able to finish 15th re-
gardless of what happened to [Johnson],” said
crew chief Paul Wolfe.
2. Clint Bowyer -39 (finished second)
Few thought it would be possible for Bowyer
to claim the runner-up spot in the Chase, but
Johnson’s rear-gear failure, coupled with
Bowyer’s strong finish, made it happen by a sin-
gle point. “I didn’t see that coming,” Bowyer said.
“But just a great year, super excited about how
far we’ve come in a short amount of time.”
3. Jimmie Johnson -40 (finished 36th)
Crew chief Chad Knaus’ strategy had John-
son in position to win the race, but a penalty for
a loose lug nut on a pit stop followed by rear-gear
failure ended his bid for a sixth Cup title. “I’m
proud of the fact that we went out there and
backed up what we said we could do and we put
the pressure on [Keselowski],” Johnson said. “It
doesn’t take the sting away from losing the
championship. It helps in some ways and stings
in others, so it balances out.”
4. Kasey Kahne -55 (finished 21st)
He was in contention to win before a penalty
for speeding on pit road and an extra stop for
fuel put him out of the running. “We just got off,
we had to pit more than the other guys,” he said.
5. Greg Biffle - 68 (finished fifth)
His fifth-place finish at Homestead moved
him to the top five in the final standings. He’s
the top performer from the Ford camp.
6. Denny Hamlin -71 (finished 24th)
He was in the running for the championship
before a parts failure at Martinsville. Since then
he’s been a non-factor in the Chase, with three
finishes of 20th or worse in the final four races.
Still, he had five wins for the season.
7. Matt Kenseth -76 (finished 18th)
His final run for Roush Fenway Racing wasn’t
what he’d hoped for. “We were one of the cars
that didn’t pit to make it on fuel, and then that
cost us a good 10 spots,” he said. “A frustrating
ending to the season.”
8. Kevin Harvick -79 (finished eighth)
He had just three top-10 finishes in the Chase,
and they all came in the final three races, includ-
ing his win at Phoenix.
9. Tony Stewart -89 (finished 17th)
His 500th career Cup start wasn’t one to re-
member. The defending series champion ran in
mid-pack all day. “We just never got the balance
of the car right,” he said.
10. Jeff Gordon -97 (finished first)
A week after being docked 25 points and fined
$100,000 for wrecking Clint Bowyer, he outran
Bowyer to get his 87th career victory and a spot
at the awards banquet, as only the top 10 are
honored. “I can’t believe that we finished first
and second after what happened last week,” he
said.
11. Martin Truex Jr. -101 (finished sixth)
His Homestead finish was his third top-six
run in a Chase that didn’t work out like he’d
planned. “Should have won four races this year,
and we just keep giving them away,” he said.
12. Dale Earnhardt Jr. -155 (finished 10th)
His overall performance was much improved
throughout the season, but his Chase effort was
dealt a blow when he missed two races because
of concussions.
2012 CHASE RESULTS
Following the Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful