WHAT’S INSIDE YOUR

SKULL
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

ILLUSTRATION * POETRY * INTERVIEWS * PHOTOGRAPHY * PAINTINGS * STORIES * & MORE

EDITOR’S LETTER

someone/anyone to witness, and embrace the fact that a whole hell of a lot of visible (or Welcome to the first issue of SKULL invisible) people are eventually going to digest Magazine! Together, we did it! We made an that sucker or maybe even worse - ignore it. independent digital magazine happen. Hell Good news! Not happening here. You guys yeah, comrades! We have only just begun. already won the battle. In the language of SKULL started out as a fleeting thought one SKULL, “creative” is a synonym for brave. restless, half-dreaming night. A ghost whisper “Creative” simultaneously means “appreciator to incite an artistic revolution, to build a new of life,” “fuck you,” “aesthetically inclined,” creative commonwealth, to operate on a “one who stands up,” “from the source,” the broader communicative platform where we are list goes on... all given a chance to showcase our cool shit, You had the balls to make something, to support each other’s endeavors, and be get involved, to recognize yourself as a inspired to live more fully in our creative selves. contributor to our universe and publish that This idea slowly leaked into waking life and shit. Many people aren’t so lucky. you guys excitedly picked it up and ran naked YOU ARE A CREATOR. with it down the street. YOU made it happen. YOU ARE AN ARTIST. SKULL’s mission statement is “to promote And don’t worry, if you still don’t see and publish indie artists and creatives.” We’ve yourself in that light, the SKULL community been giving a lot of thought over here to what does. We’re proud of you! exactly “creative” means. The work in this So spread this collection of kilobits and magazine spans a variety of topics by a variety megabytes around. Share it with friends, of contributors - from comediennes to oil family, coworkers, social media ghosties and painters. What is the common denominator? your dog. Show everyone that you were brave Bravery. so that they can be brave too. Let’s support Bravery, bravery, bravery. creativity and community - inject some hope It takes brave souls to conjure up some into the great shifting, gifting world. It really internal creative magic, plan the process of does make a difference. idea manifestation, spit that black thought glob out onto some form of canvas, tweak and trim Love, skulls, and polish and edit it, hate it for a little while, and green chile, love it for a little while, compassionately accept it as one’s bastard child, put it out there it for

DEAR EVERYONE,

SKULL is a FREE indie platform for artists and creatives to
share their work with the public. The art, articles, advertising, etc. appearing within this publication reflect the opinions and attitudes of their respective authors and do not necessarily represent those of the publisher or editors. We encourage all interested parties to contact the contributors to give them cool creative jobs, money, and kudos. ©2012 WIYSKULL, Inc.

We encourage you to share this publication! Reproduce it, store it in any retrieval system, or transmit it in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise. BUT DO give credit where credit is due and DO NOT alter or republish content without the individual contributor’s express permission. That is fucked up and goes against creative brotherhood. Karma will kick your ass.

For advertising and editorial queries, submissions, subscriptions, email and address changes, and back issues, email skullmag@mail.com. Online at facebook.com/SKULLmagazine. NOV/DEC ISSUE #2 RELEASE: NOVEMBER 15, 2012.

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CONTENT

EVENT!
☥ POEM « Page 4 »
BLANKET By Anonymous

SKULL is a proud sponsor of the upcoming Wild

Winter Bazaar, hosted by Prince Tuesday and the Royal Jellies. Present will be belly dancers sensuously shimmying through a mad man’s mouth, a pagan carnival costume contest, live music, indie art displays, food (can you say vegan?), craft vendors, and everyone’s favorite, FREE BEER! WWB takes place Sunday, December 16 from 4 to 10pm in Fredericksburg, Texas. For more info or to register as a vendor, visit Studio Bumble Moire or email bumble.moire@gmail.com.

SKULL
Magazine
Nov. 15 ☥ Issue No. 2 Jan. 15 ☥ Issue No. 3 March 15 ☥ Issue No. 4 May 15 ☥ Issue No. 5 July 15 ☥ Issue No. 6 Sept. 15 ☥ Issue No. 7 Nov. 15 ☥ Issue No. 8
2013 Quarterly Print Issues: 2013 Digital Issues: Next Digital Issue:

☥ WATERCOLOR « Page 5 »
By Samantha Brickner

☥ INTERVIEW « Page 6 »
From the hips to the heart By Tuesday Shaw & Dana Ross

☥ OIL & PIGMENT « Page 11 »
By Rosalba De Las Flores

☥ PHOTO « Page 13 »
By Jessica Chiles

☥ INTERVIEW « Page 14 »
FUNNY LADY By Jackie Pardue Scripps & Mica McCook

March ☥ Zine No. 1 June ☥ Zine No. 2 September ☥ Zine No. 3 December ☥ Zine No. 4
Coming Soon:

☥ PEN & INK « Page 18 »
By Danny Glix

Blog, EPub Books & MORE
For More Info: FACEbook.com/SKULLMAGAZINE

☥ PHOTO « Page 19 »
By Wade Winchell

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CONTRIBUTORS

☥ Samantha Brickner

graduated from the Art Institute of Dallas in 2010 with a BFA in Graphic Design. After graduation she interned with the Knoxville News Sentinel and currently freelances in graphic design. She has had artistic tendencies since she was a little girl, and always enjoys making images from her mind come to life. Her specialties include advertising design, illustration, painting and HD video editing. Samantha’s portfolio is online at bricknersam.carbonmade.com.
« Page 5 »

☥ Jessica Chiles

has been a passionate photographer since 2005. She quickly fell in love with macro photography and photographing unusual objects. Her desire is that when people view her photography they will see the beauty she tries to capture in things that may otherwise go unnoticed. Jessica is based in Austin. Her fine art and wedding work is at facebook.com/jessicamorganfotography.
« Page 13 »

and we literally could not have put SKULL together without them! Please support them by checking out their sites, attending their shows, buying their work, taking their classes, or donating funds to them so they may continue to practice their craft. The creative community is US, so let’s support it! A special thanks to Dana Ross and Mica McCook for their awesome interviews!

is a Santa Fe-based healer, mother, family member, friend, lover, part of all Humanity, and a medium of Life itself. Her paintings Thank you to our use dreamy lines and colors that channel dramatic inner landscapes of the soul. contributors! She uses art to express images that resonate with her heart, hoping to create a These guys kick ass resonance with others. View more of Rosa’s work at rosalbaart.tumblr.com.
« Page 11 »

☥ Rosalba De Las Flores

☥ Danny Glix

tries to allow unbridled instinct to guide his hand, and to draw from the abstract consciousness or autonomous free association. Drawing gives him the feeling of being before a blank sea -- able to swim in any direction, even up. He is grateful to have the ability to use his penspan as a lever for expressing ideals. Glix is based in New York. More at dannyglix.com.
« Page 18 »

☥ Jackie Pardue Scripps

is a human creator/destroyer fathered by a spirit from Orion and a mother born of bass (i.e. feral cats). Her primary creative interest is storytelling through visual media and written word. She’s worked on projects from Pixies scripts to drive-in theater launches to Austin art walk films to SXSW party organizing for Under the Radar. Jackie posts Buddhist quotes, vegan food pics, and Posada-inspired illustrations at artisarteries.tumblr.com.
« Cover, Page 14 »

☥ Tuesday Shaw

has been belly dancing since she was 17 and can shimmy like nobody’s business. She thrives best hermit-style with a beard, a pipe, her five dogs, and is locally known for her deliciously painted pears. Defined but not limited to: antevasin, aes dana, queer, holder of the vagina, frantic, strong, insane, virgo. Inspired by: bees, plants, earth, Rachel Brice, and hard working, communitydriven individuals. T.Shaw runs Studio Bumble Moire. More at bumblemoire.com.
« Page 6 »

☥ Wade Winchell

dropped out of photojournalism school at the University of Texas in 2006. His passion for photography lies in taking nontraditional photos that can be controversial or not applicable to most mainstream media sources. Using a vintage Canon AE-1 and unusual color from light and low quality film, Winchell brings his subjects to life. His latest work features a set of allmale pin-up models at facebook.com/wadewinchellphotos.
« Page 19 »
Would you like to be a contributor? Are you a poet, artist, writer, photographer, performer, creative visionary, etc.? Have an idea for an interview or a topic you would like to see included in the next issue? Email your submissions to skullmag@mail.com!

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A deep, gentle healing touch to restore your passion for life.

blankets
By Anonymous

this is a time when hearts run still and glass dreams shatter empty clouds love like an endless wall of carved thoughts you make me think blue when our minds are quiet magnetic emotions attract patched destiny links etched into bruised hands cut across footsteps jagged daggers against all space empty or full or parallel or infinite or obsolete reflecting our bodies into our fingertips we feel each other so well

ROOTS
Healing Arts & Polarity Therapy

SACRED

sacredrootsenergy.com 102 San Francisco St. Santa Fe, New Mexico
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Samantha Brickner

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From the Heart to the Hips
A Conversation Between Belly Dancers
By Tuesday Shaw and Dana Ross

Dana Rosa Ross, my friend and belly dance instructor for many years, has been a driving force in the Fredericksburg and surrounding community for over a decade now. Bringing a fierce gypsy passion to her dance and an open heart to her classroom, she has guided women of all ages to express themselves through belly dance and world dance. Dana is currently on hiatus from teaching dance while she creates a new chapter in her personal and dance life, but her dancers patiently await the day to rejoin her hips in dance. T.S. How did you get started in belly dance? D.R. In my late twenties I began teaching aerobic dance and taking dance in college,

mostly African, but also a little ballet and modern. One of my teachers also taught belly dance and convinced me to give it a try. I'd been intrigued with it for years after seeing an amazing dancer at a Greek restaurant in Houston. I was 36 before I took my first class and found it very challenging and emotional, and I didn't feel up to it. I took flamenco for a while, which I was really drawn to, but it was too hard on my ankles and knees. I went back to belly dance for a second semester, and I got hooked. I began to get serious about it around age 40, so I got a much later start than most and have had limitations because of it. Still, one of the beautiful things about this art is that women come to it at all ages. For me it came when I most needed it. It's good for me physically, spiritually, emotionally, and mentally.

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the female body and expresses our deep connection to Nature and her rhythms flowering, the phases of the moon, snakes, and their cycles. It’s a beautiful, meaningful way to worship our Great Mother. The movements required to shimmy, undulate, and snake your arms are muscular therapy. I had a chronic shoulder issue that snake arms completely cured, and it tones and strengthens your female organs, bladder, abdominals, gluts, and quads in the best way for women. It also awakens your kundalini and restores your sexual energy in a healthy, balanced manner. I D.R. The widest age gap I ever performed with plan to always continue my personal practice ranged from 16 to 60! It was an out of the usual of belly dance drills. choreography - "Huliganjetta" - a sort of vaudevillian cheeky burlesque. We had a ball! I think dancing with women in all phases of life increases the humor and decreases the cattiness. Young women in our society tend to be too competitive with each other in the process of developing their own egos. The active presence of mothers makes that a positive process; they encourage maidens to work together and manifest their dreams. Grandmothers who are surrendering egos have the deepest wisdom to share. Belly dance allows us to see the beauty and sensuality of all these ages, something Americans in general don't often consider. Women need to work, T.S. I've been a student of yours off and on talk, create, sing, dance, and play with other now for 10 years. Your style has evolved from a women of all ages. This is how it should be. Gypsy, Latin, Egyptian fusion to Improv Tribal Style. Whom or what has influenced your T.S. What is your dance background? changes and growth? T.S. I love that aspect of the dance as well. Beautiful, big or small, aged or young, real women together expressing shared art and dance. It's such a powerful part of the belly dance community. When I started taking belly dance from you there were more women over 40 than youngsters, and now it’s more of an even split. What have you learned from the connection of female dancers across this 60 year gap? Have the different ages taught you anything in regards to dance or otherwise that have changed or inspired you? D.R. I was too shy to dance as a child. Rock and roll clubs, country western dance halls, and later discos were where I finally let loose.  But I never seriously studied dance until belly dance. It takes you to a deep healing place, where many women are scarred. It celebrates D.R. The most interesting and exciting music and dance are fusions. This is the American experience, taking things and mixing them up in new funky ways. Unless an American belly dancer is of Middle Eastern descent, to me it

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WILD WINTER

BAZAAR
live music costume contest indie art displays craft & food vendors and

eclectic winter party carnival

HOSTED BY PRINCE TUESDAY AND THE ROYAL JELLIES

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16

4pm thru 10pm

belly dance show
$5 Entry Fee St. Joseph’s Hall Fredericksburg, Texas

free beer!
FACEBOOK.COM/GROUPS/STUDIOBUMBLEMOIRE
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seems silly for her to be a purist of any stripe. Our troupe's style had flourishes of flamenco because I love all things Gypsy and Spanish. Those guitars mixed with Middle Eastern drums are so great to dance to. American Tribal Style was also influenced by this same music, dance, and costuming, which drew me to it. I prefer group dance over solo performance, and like the folk dance aspect of ATS, but wanted to have my own dance expression too, so ITS was where I ended up. Gypsy Moon used many of Carolena Nericcio's ATS sequences, and also created many of our own. T.S. We are a short ride from Austin and San Antonio where you have taken classes and workshops for years. Who were your teachers in Austin/Central Texas? Who locally inspires you soloist, troupe, or otherwise? D.R. My first teacher in Austin was Z Helene and I still stay in touch with her. She's a master and taught me the basics well. She's very performance-oriented and theatrical, so her styles aren't my own. I also studied with Lucila, a longtime Austin belly dancer from Columbia, who helped me develop the flamenco attitudes I wanted in my choreography. I took classes from Najla at UT, and from several other Egyptian/restaurant style belly dancers in Austin. Then I fell in love with Rachel Brice and began seeking workshops and videos of tribal style belly

dance because there were no teachers in Austin. I took two intensives from Rose Harden, one with Rachel, and one with Mardi Love. Angela Nations is the only tribal dancer in Austin I know, and I took classes with her a while. The scene has grown since then, but I haven't kept up. One summer I danced with a strict ATS troupe called Joined at the Hip. They've come a long way since then - tight improv down to the details and awesome costuming. T.S. Who would you like to dance with still? D.R. I've been through a terrible tragedy and haven't had the heart for much dance, other than as a discipline. But I sometimes think it could be back in my life on a lesser scale, along with a little bit of the joy and passion it gave me. If so, I would want to dance with you and my former Gypsy Moon troupe members. T.S. What music has greatly influenced you as a dancer? D.R. First, I’m a rock and roller. I have to rein that in for belly dance, but I do think that it informed my dance and the choices of music I made. If it’s fast tribal belly dance - the music has to rock. Then, I love flamenco guitars, gypsy violin. When those get amped up, punked out, and primalized by groups like Gogol Bordello, you have music that inspires you to dance like crazy, and takes belly dance to whole new places. The whole world fusion thing - African, Balkan, Caribbean, Celtic - has given much life to old music and dance forms. Then the dubstep, trip hop, crunk stuff - bands like Beats Antique, which my son introduced me to - love all that being mixed with Middle Eastern rhythms. Equally, when dance is more slow and introspective, the

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fusions make it much more interesting. I've been blessed to have lots of experimental, creative young people in my life like my daughter and you who have turned me on to so much great music. Your choreography to my son's very experimental piece "MOMM" is a perfect example of how music can stretch belly dance into whole new realms of execution and expression. I love this! It keeps it relevant so this art form stays vibrantly alive, and keeps women moving like goddesses!

transcends the divisions of urban/rural, left/ right, black/white. And there's been a wonderful advantage to dancing here - it's inclusive! The competition in the cities and the professional dancers often intimidate the novice and reduce the opportunity for everyone who wants to dance. Belly dance was first a ritual dance of worship, communion, and prayer for safe passages, so it should be open to all women who are drawn to it. We have that here in Fredericksburg, and it's a beautiful thing. It’s so important to me that you younger T.S. Which dancers are pushing the boundaries woman keep it going. and inspiring you right now? D.R. Again, I haven't been involved at all in a year and a half. I did go to a Beats Antique/Zoe Jakes show, and when she was on stage she owned it! In America it’s hard to get people to pay attention to dance for more than a minute. The way [Beats Antique] put it all together is a stroke of genius just on its own. Then with their super originality and consummate talent it's a force to be reckoned with. I enjoyed it T.S. What advice do you have for someone thoroughly, but I’m not personally inspired. I want to play a supportive role in the generation looking to get into belly dance? coming up. And possibly teach belly dance as a feminine discipline for health and wholeness. D.R. Don't really have anything specific to a small town, just for beginners in general. Learn the basics by: Watching - your instructor and T.S. How has living in a rural community in the dancers you love; Listening - to verbal Texas affected your pursuit of dance? instructions/descriptions and to your own D.R. There is some judgment to contend with, body; Drilling - in class and at home - at least 10-15 minutes two to three times a week in as there always is in provincial places when women express their feminine power.  But that addition to class. Most of my students over the certainly hasn't stopped us. Teaching is what I years omit at least one of these. It's really important to observe closely for a moment most love, and my classes were usually full before attempting your own execution of a with women of all ages and from all walks of move. And... get to know your own body and life. Women yearn to dance together, to which muscles you're working to achieve a commune in non-verbal ways, the way our movement. And... ask lots of questions!! ☥ ancestors did. The appeal of belly dance

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Rosalba De Las Flores

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Freshly made juices! Gourmet fruit smoothies! Delicious healthy lunch!
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Jessica Chiles

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Funny Lady

By Jackie Pardue Scripps and Mica McCook

The first time I met Mica McCook was on the set of a Tavia Morra University of Texas student film that we were both cast in. Mica was playing a mad scientist, searching for the perfect “man part” to make her dream robot come to life. A few months later when I needed an unconventional murderess for an Alamo Drafthouse Bloodshots horror short, I was excited when Mica decided to come on board.

JPS When did you first get involved with acting and standup comedy?  MM Acting has been apart of my life for the past 13 years! I began acting when I was in middle school and it became more than a hobby in high school. Come senior year, I knew that I wanted a career in theatre. Standup on the other hand is new in my life. I tried it once a few years ago and bombed! That performance Mica is the ideal actress and comedienne left me scared to try standup again and I didn’t great at emoting, a pro at taking direction, pick it back up until just this past year when I comes from a strong theatre and improv started taking Sam Cox’s class, background, and most importantly, has spot on Comedy Gym. comedic timing! Mica is currently performing at open mics around Austin and is gearing up for JPS You do both film and live performances. Is the Austin Standup Comedy Slam at Hyde Park there one platform you like more? Theatre at the end of September.

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MM Nothing can compare to a live audience. The energy is such a rush and epic historic moments can happen unexpectedly. It’s exactly like runner’s high! JPS I know it can be intense getting on stage in front of people. Do you occasionally get stage fright? And how do you overcome it?

JPS Writing is a big part of many creative processes and can be really tricky sometimes! Do you write your own material, stand-up or otherwise? What is the process behind getting the material from your head to the stage?

MM I do write my own material. My family and childhood background are some inspirations for material. I talk a lot about my mom and what it was like growing up as a biracial child. I MM I have been in theatre for over 13 years and I still get stage fright! It never goes away. I am a storyteller. Sometimes I will record myself telling a story to my friends (they don’t know always get stage fright right before I get on stage. It’s weird. I am calm, cool and collected this!) and later I will listen to it. I’ll find points where I got the most laughs and what I was right until they call my name and then… my heart jumps right in my mouth! My background doing or saying that got the laugh. A lot of the in theatre has helped me control my nerves and time I’ll just start talking out loud when I’m hold it together. The most important thing I try alone. I’ll record myself and I will just improv to remember (and accept) is that I probably will my way through the joke. mess up, but as long as the audience doesn’t Another thing I do is I test the jokes on people I know about it then who cares?! If you let the audience know that you just screwed up then it talk to. I’m lucky enough to have a day-job where I interact with a lot of people during the will be hard to get them back onboard with you. I also think it’s important to take an improv day, so I test my jokes on them and see how class or a workshop so that you will know what they react. They don’t know that I’m testing my jokes on them. If sober people will laugh at to do in case of an emergency. your jokes… imagine how a drunk person would react! (grins) JPS What are some of the other challenges you face when writing and performing? MM It was hard to learn how to write a joke. I have a ton of funny stories, but no jokes! The real challenge was turning those funny stories into jokes. It was also challenging to keep my material genuine and authentic. With standup I have learned that if your audience doesn’t believe what you’re telling them, then you might as well say, “Thank you and good night!” JPS You also occasionally do behind-thescenes tech theater work. Does this contribute to being onstage?  MM Not really, but I enjoy doing tech work! It’s the easiest way to get involved in the theatre community in Austin.

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JPS What other creative projects or hobbies do you like to do? I think it’s important to have alternative ways to engage that energy, sometimes in part so as not to get too attached or too burnt out on a project. MM I am very much into photography. It’s never been anything that I have wanted to pursue as a career, but I do enjoy it very much. I’m currently updating my online portfolio. I’m also a playwright. I have written several plays, and when I was in college it was something that I wanted to focus on primarily. I am a runner. I have been running for a year now and have completed two 5K’s, one 5-miler, one 10K, and one 10-miler. I am training for a halfmarathon as well. I have a blog that I write on, theshortrunner.com, and it is just my way of documenting my experiences and training.

mother. She is the source of 99.9% of my material. JPS What words of advice do you have for those wanting to get into the performing arts? MM Get your butt up and get started! Start thinking about what kind of stuff you want to perform and then find out who is already performing it. If you’re looking to get into comedy, then I would suggest taking Sam Cox’s Comedy Gym class and buying The Comedy Bible by Judy Carter. That book has been a great help in learning, and Sam is a great teacher as well.

JPS And finally... what projects do you have coming up that we can see you in?! MM Right now I am hitting up as many open JPS You have been involved in the Austin mics as possible. I’m entering in a contest at acting/comedy scene for at least the past three Hyde Park Theatre for amateur comedians, first years because that’s when we first met. What place wins $1,000! Check it out! is your take on it? Any pros or cons? MM The comedy scene is a lot more gracious than then acting scene! When I was pursuing an acting career in theatre and film, I found that For more Mica McCook, check out there weren’t a lot of roles available for women theshortrunner.com or visit Mica’s Facebook. For info about the Austin Standup Comedy like me. I couldn’t really find my spot in that Slam and Hyde Park Theatre, visit community. It was discouraging. But with the hydeparktheatre.org. The ASCS preliminary standup comedy scene, I have found that this is a better calling for me. I haven’t been around round is September 23-26, the semifinal round long enough to make any fair comparisons, but is September 30, and the final round is October 1, 2012. The contest is open to all for a $15 so far the comedians I have met have been cool and welcoming. No matter what your size entry fee. All shows start at 8pm with a $10 cover at the door. Cheer Mica on or showcase is or what your skin or hair color is, the only thing they care about is… ARE YOU FUNNY?? your own comedic chops!

JPS Who are your biggest career influences? And who are your biggest personal influences? MM George Lopez, Gilda Radner, Phyllis Diller, and the biggest ones being Richard Pryor and Bill Cosby. Personal influences? Definitely my

Also of note! If you’re a writer, playwright, creative competitor, or theatre buff, see Hyde Park’s site for info on FronteraFest 2013, “five weekes of alternative, offbeat, new, and just plain off-the-wall fringe theatre.” Script application deadline is Novermber 1, 2012.

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TRANSIENT

WORLD
the full-length debut from Austin’s own electric pop duo

GROVE
now available exclusively at

CHEMICAL

CHEMICALGROVE.BANDCAMP.COM
twitter.com/chemicalgrove facebook.com/chemicalgrove

bumble

belly dance studio classes.performances.events

moire

bumblemoire.com
traditional and fusion inspired fbg, tx

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Danny Glix

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Wade Winchell This collection honors Texan youth that have chosen freedom away from...

...conformative ideas of

happiness.
-ww
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SKULL
ISSUE NO. 2 NOVEMBER 15, 2012
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