HONOUR MODERATIONS IN CLASSICS

BIBLIOGRAPHY (Revised August 2007)

This is a bibliography designed to help you find your way through the bewilderingly large number of books and articles that exist on almost every topic in the classics. It includes many ‘standard’ items which you will find frequently cited, and so may be useful for regular reference; but it does not represent a single faculty orthodoxy, and certainly must not be treated as a reading-list, since it contains far more than anyone can be expected to master. The compilers have assumed that you can read some French but no other modern language. If you are lucky enough to have a working knowledge of German or Italian the range of useful literature is widened a good deal and you should get your tutor's advice. The titles of academic journals, in Classics as in many other disciplines, are normally abbreviated and referred to by initials: thus CQ = Classical Quarterly. Some of the most common are given at the end of this Bibliography: for a fuller list, see the new edition of the Oxford Classical Dictionary (1996) pp. xxix onwards. When you consult a particular book, it is often worth your while to find out what reviewers in periodicals such as CR, JHS and JRS thought of it. A few reviews, not all unfavourable, are mentioned in the course of this document, and you may do well to look up some more. For further suggestions you can consult the bibliographies in The Cambridge History of Classical Literature (I. Greek Literature, ed. P. E. Easterling and B. M. W. Knox, 1985; II, Latin Literature, ed. E. J. Kenney and W. V. Clausen, 1982); and Gian Biagio Conte, Latin Literature: A History (1994). In the Homer, Virgil, and Texts and Contexts sections that follow, material is grouped thus: 1. 2. 3. 4. Prescribed Texts. Translations. Commentaries. Books and Articles.

P = available in paperback.

HOMER 1. OCT (Monro-Allen, Iliad). 2. R. Lattimore (Iliad, Chicago, 1951 P); M. Hammond (revised Penguin, 1987); for the Odyssey, W. Shewring (Oxford, World's Classics, 1980). 3. M. W. Willcock (Macmillan, 1978). W. Leaf - M. A. Bayfield (Macmillan, 1898) and especially the large commentary of W. Leaf (ed. 2, Macmillan, 1900-2) are still useful; so is M. W. Willcock, Companion to the Iliad (Chicago, 1976 P) . 1

The introduction to C. W. Macleod, Homer: Iliad XXIV (Cambridge, 1982 P) discusses the Iliad as a whole. The most comprehensive modern commentary on the Iliad is that under the general editorship of G. S. Kirk, with many valuable overviews of modern scholarship in the various Introductions (6 vols., P., Cambridge 1985-93). There is a recent shorter commentary on Iliad 9 by J. Griffin (Oxford, 1995 P); on a similar scale is the edition of book 1 by S. Pulleyn (Oxford 2000; includes translation and vocabulary). 4. Language and Grammar The standard grammar is Chantraine, Grammaire Homérique, 2 vols., 1958 and 1963. In English, there are introductions in L. R. Palmer in Wace-Stubbings, Companion to Homer and G. Horrocks in Morris-Powell, A New Companion to Homer. The concordances of G. L. Prendergast (Iliad) and H. Dunbar (Odyssey) are useful for the study of formulae, including their creative uses. 5. (a) Surveys and General Studies C. M. Bowra, Tradition and Design in the Iliad, 1930. G. S. Kirk, Songs of Homer, 1962. Homer and the Epic, 1965, is a shorter, revised version. J. Griffin, Homer (Past Masters, 1980). A. J. B. Wace & F. H. Stubbings (edd.), Companion to Homer, 1962. G. S. Kirk (ed.), The Language and Background of Homer, 1964. R. B. Rutherford, Homer (Greece and Rome, New Surveys 26, 1996 P). M.L. West, The East Face of Helicon: west asiatic elements in Greek poetry and myth, Oxford 1997. I. Morris and B. Powell (eds.), A New Companion to Homer, 1997. R. Fowler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Homer Cambridge, 2004. M. S. Silk, Homer: The Iliad, 2nd ed., Cambridge 2004. (b) Literary Criticism (see also the general works in 5 (a)) J. Redfield, Nature and Culture in the Iliad, 1975, an anthropological approach. P J. Griffin, Homer on Life and Death, 1980 P M. W. Edwards, Homer: Poet of the Iliad (Baltimore, 1987 P) R.P. Martin, The Language of Heroes: speech and performance in the Iliad, Ithaca & London 1989. O. P. Taplin, Homeric Soundings: the Shaping of the Iliad (Oxford, 1992 P). J. Griffin & M. Hammond, 'Critical Appreciation: Homer, Iliad 1.1-52', Greece and Rome 29 (1982), 126-142 [repr. In McAuslan-Walcot, see [i] below. J. Griffin, 'The epic cycle and the uniqueness of Homer', JHS 97 (1977), 39-53. Simone Weil, The Iliad or the Poem of Force (trans. M. McCarthy, or available in Intimations of Christianity among the ancient Greeks, tr. E. Geissbuhler, Routledge, 1957) O. P. Taplin, 'The shield of Achilles within the Iliad', Greece and Rome 27 (1980), 1-21 [reprinted in McAuslan-Walcot, see [i] below] Matthew Arnold, 'On translating Homer', in various editions of his Essays. C. W. Macleod, 'Homer on Poetry and the Poetry of Homer', in his Collected Essays, 1983, 1-15. G.M. Wright and P.V. Jones (ed.) Homer; German Scholarship in Translation (1997) includes valuable essays by Reinhardt, Schadewaldt, Burkert

2

R. Seaford, Money and the early Greek mind : Homer, philosophy, tragedy, Cambridge, 2004. B. Graziosi & J. Haubold, Homer : the resonance of epic, London, 2005. W. Allan, ‘Divine Justice and Cosmic Order in Early Greek Epic’, JHS 126 2006 (forthcoming). Works of comparative literature sometimes have useful insights, e.g. T. M. Greene, The Descent from heaven: a study in Epic Continuity, 1963 A. S. Cook, The Classic Line: a study in Epic Poetry, 1966. D.A. Miller, The epic hero, Baltimore & London 2000. (c) Analytic Criticism Traditionally this has been the preserve of German scholarship, but something of its methods may be gleaned from D. L. Page, History and the Homeric Iliad, Oxford 1959, Appendix. (d) Historical Background (see also 'Homeric Archaeology' Special subject) N.B. Studies in this area may rapidly be superseded. H. L. Lorimer, Homer and the Monuments, 1950, ch. viii M. I. Finley and others, 'The Trojan War', JHS 84 (1964) 1 ff. M. Woods, In Search of the Trojan War, 1985 (well-illustrated). L. Foxhall & J. K. Davies (edd.), The Trojan War: its historicity and context, 1985. M. Finkelberg, Greeks and Pre-Greeks: Aegean prehistory and Greek heroic tradition, Cambridge 2005. See also Companions above. (e) Homeric Society and Values E. R. Dodds, The Greeks and the Irrational, 1951, ch. 1 P A. W. H. Adkins, Merit and Responsibility, 1960, chs. 2-4 P H. Lloyd-Jones, The Justice of Zeus (ed. 2, 1983), chs. 1-2 P A. M. Snodgrass, 'An historical Homeric society?', JHS 94 (1974), 114-25 M. I. Finley, The World of Odysseus (ed. 2, 1977). P (Pelican) (f) Oral Tradition and Techniques M. Parry, The Making of Homeric Verse: the collected papers of M. Parry, 1970 P. A. B. Lord, The Singer of Tales, 1960 P B. C. Fenik, Typical Battle Scenes in the Iliad, 1968 G. S. Kirk, Homer and the Oral Tradition, 1976 A. Parry, 'Have we Homer's Iliad?', Yale Classical Studies 20 (1966), 177ff., reprinted in The Language of Achilles and other papers (Oxford 1989). J. B. Hainsworth, Homer, Iliad, commentary on books 9-12, 1993 [in the Cambridge series edited by Kirk], introduction pp. 1-31. R. Finnegan, Oral Poetry, 1977. (g) Comparative Study C. M. Bowra, Heroic Poetry, 1952 B. C. Fenik, Homer and the Nibelungenlied: comparative studies in epic style

3

(Harvard, 1986) (h) History of Scholarship R. Pfeiffer, History of Classical Scholarship, i, 1968 (on the Alexandrians) H. W. Clarke, Homer's Readers (London and Toronto, 1981) A. Parry, Introduction to M. Parry, The Making of Homeric Verse, 1970; reprinted in A. Parry, The Language of Achilles and other papers (Oxford 1989) (i) Reception B. Graziosi, Inventing Homer: the early reception of epic, Cambridge 2002. Useful collections of modern articles D. Cairns (ed) Oxford Readings in Homer’s Iliad, 2002. I.McAuslan and P. Walcot (ed.) Homer (Greece and Rome Studies 4, Oxford 1998) I. de Jong (ed.) Homer (4 volumes), Critical assessments of Classical Authors (Routledge, London and New York 1999)

VIRGIL 1. OCT (Mynors) 2. D. A. West (Penguin, 1991: prose); R. Fitzgerald (Penguin, 1983: verse); W. F. Jackson Knight (Penguin, 1956: prose). 3. R. D. Williams (Macmillan, 1972), 2 vols.; J. Conington (London, 4th edn., 1881) For separate books, consult commentaries of R. G. Austin (1, 2, 4, 6), R. D. Williams (3, 5), and C. J. Fordyce (7, 8) in the Oxford series; there are also commentaries on 3 and 7 by N. Horsfall (Mnemosyne Supps. 198, Leiden 2000 and 273, Leiden 2006), on 8 by P. T. Eden (Leiden 1975) and K. W. Gransden (Cambridge 1976), on book 9 by P. Hardie (Cambridge 1994), on book 10 by S. J. Harrison (Oxford 1991), and on 11 by K. W. Gransden (Cambridge, 1991) and N. Horsfall (Mnemosyne Suppl. 244, 2003) . Concordance: H. H. Warwick (Minnesota, 1975) 4. R. Heinze, Virgil's Epic Technique (originally published in German, 1903; Eng. tr. Bristol, 1993). W. A. Camps, An Introduction to Virgil's Aeneid (Oxford, 1969) W.R. Johnson, Darkness Visible: A Study of Vergil’s Aeneid (California, 1976 P) G. Williams, Technique and Ideas in the Aeneid (Yale, 1983) K. W. Gransden, Virgil's Iliad (2nd ed. by S.J. Harrison) Cambridge 2004. G.B. Conte, The Rhetoric of Imitation: Genre and Poetic Memory in Virgil and Other Latin Poets (Ithaca, 1986) P. Hardie, Virgil's Aeneid: Cosmos and Imperium (Oxford, 1986): see review by J. Griffin, JRS 78 (1988)

4

R. O. A. M. Lyne, Further Voices in Virgil's Aeneid (Oxford 1987) R. O. A. M. Lyne, Words and the Poet (Oxford, 1989) W. Clausen, Virgil's Aeneid and the Tradition of Hellenistic Poetry (California, 1987) F. Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (Cambridge, 1989) J.J. O'Hara, Death and the Optimistic Prophecy in Vergil's Aeneid (Princeton, 1990) D.C. Feeney, The Gods in Epic (Oxford 1991 P) chs. 3-4 N. Horsfall, A Companion to the Study of Virgil (Leiden, 1995). C.A. Martindale (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Virgil (Cambridge, 1997). P. Hardie, Virgil (Greece and Rome, New Surveys 28, Oxford 1998) P. R.H.A. Jenkyns, Virgil’s Experience: nature and history, names, and places, Oxford 1998. A. Rossi, Contexts of War: manipulation of genre in Virgilian battle narrative, Ann Arbor 2003 (rev. BMCR 2004 (11)). B. M. W. Knox, 'The Serpent and the Flame', AJP 71 (1950), 379-400 W. V. Clausen, 'An Interpretation of the Aeneid', HSCP 68 (1964), 139-47 G. N. Knauer, 'Virgil's Aeneid and Homer', Gr. Rom. Byz. Stud. 5 (1964), 61ff. and (updated) Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt (edd. W. Haase & S. Temporini) 31.2, 870-918. R. D. Williams, 'Changing Attitudes to Virgil', in D. R. Dudley (ed.),Virgil (Routledge, 1969), 119ff. H D. A. West, 'Multiple-correspondence similes in the Aeneid', JRS 59 (1969), 40ff.; also Philologus 114 (1970), 262ff. J. Griffin, 'The Creation of Characters in the Aeneid', in B. K. Gold (ed.), Literary and Artistic Patronage in Ancient Rome (Texas, 1982), 118-34, or in his Latin Poetry and Roman Life (Duckworth, 1986) H R. O. A. M. Lyne, 'Virgil and the Politics of War', CQ 33 (1983), 188-203. W. J. N. Rudd, 'The Idea of Empire in the Aeneid', Hermathena 134 (1983), 35-50 H D. Feeney, ‘The Taciturnity of Aeneas’, CQ 33 (1983), 204-19. D. Fowler ‘Deviant focalisation in Virgil’s Aeneid’, PCPhS 36 (1990) 42-63. The articles of Knox and Clausen are reprinted in Virgil, A Collection of Critical Essays, ed. S. Commager (Prentice-hall, 1966) P; S. J. Harrison (ed.), Oxford Readings in Vergil's Aeneid (Oxford, 1990) reprints a range of useful articles, including some of those listed above, marked with an H. Another (much larger and more expensive) collection of articles is P. Hardie (ed.) Virgil (4 volumes), in the series Major assessments of classical authors (Routledge, London and New York 1999) As with Homer, works of comparative literature may be valuable, e.g., S.L. Wofford, The Choice of Achilles (Stanford, 1992); D. Quint, Epic and Empire (Princeton, 1993 P). For those who read German: E. Norden, edition of Aeneid 6 (4th edn., 1957) G. N. Knauer, Die Aeneis und Homer, 1964: the fold-out charts at the back of

5

the book are suggestive even to those without German V. Pöschl, Die Dichtkunst Virgils (3rd edn., 1977). translation of an earlier edition exists (= The Art of Virgil)

An unsatisfactory

Further material in CHCL II 848 f. and the massive bibliography by W. Suerbaum in ANRW II.31.1 (1980); cf. also R. D. Williams, Virgil (Greece and Rome, New Surveys in the Classics 1, 1967). For the historical background cf.: R. Syme, The Roman Revolution (Oxford, 1939). P. A. Brunt, 'Laus Imperii', in P. D. A. Garnsey & C. R. Whittaker (edd.), Imperialism in the Ancient World (Cambridge, 1978), 159-92 (revised version in Brunt, Roman Imperial Themes [Oxford 1990]). F. Millar & E. Segal (edd.), Caesar Augustus: Seven Aspects (Oxford, 1984). P. Zanker, The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus (Michigan, 1988), reviewed by A. Wallace-Hadrill, JRS 79 (1989), 157-64. K. Galinsky, Augustan Culture (Princeton, 1996). H.-P. Stahl (ed.), Vergil’s Aeneid: Augustan epic and political context, London 1998. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS: BIBLIOGRAPHY This is designed to help you find your way through the bewilderingly large number of books and articles that exist on almost every topic in the classics. It includes many ‘standard’ items which you will find frequently cited, and so may be useful for regular reference; but it does not represent a single faculty orthodoxy, and certainly must not be treated as a reading-list, since it contains far more than anyone can be expected to master. The texts are the prescribed editions; the translations are recommended versions. OCT = Oxford Classical Text. CLL = Classics Lending Library. GENERAL: GREEK O. Taplin (ed.), Literature in the Greek and Roman Worlds: A New Perspective (Oxford, 2000) C. Pelling, Literary Texts and the Greek Historian (London, 2000) M. Hansen, The Athenian Democracy in the Age of Demosthenes (Oxford, 1991) N. Loraux, The Invention of Athens (Harvard, Cambridge Mass., 1986) S. Goldhill, Reading Greek Tragedy (Cambridge, 1986) C. Bérard and others, A City of Images: Iconography and Society in Ancient Greece (Princeton, 1989) J. Boardman (ed.), ) Oxford Illustrated History of Classical Art (Oxford, 1993) J. McK. Camp, The Archaeology of Athens (New Haven, 2001) J. Whitley, The Archaeology of Ancient Greece, 1100-300 BC (Cambridge, 2001) 1. SYMPOSIUM, LOVE, AND ARISTOCRATIC POLITICS. Prescribed Text, with commentary: D. A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poetry (Macmillan, repr. Bristol Classical Press); poems not included in Campbell are c available for downloading from Weblearn (http://www.weblearn.ox.ac.uk/bodington/site/human/classics/teaching/ll/contexts/). G.O. Hutchinson, Greek Lyric Poetry (Oxford, 2001) has commentaries on Sappho 6

1, 31, and 96, Alcaeus 129 and 130, and Anacreon 358 and 417.] Translations:
Translations: Here is a guide to where you can find translations of the texts, both those which have to be read in Greek and those to be read in translation (huge thanks to Dr Llewelyn Morgan for this, but send corrections to angus.bowie@classics). Reference in the following is to M. L. West, Greek lyric poetry (Oxford); D. E. Gerber, Greek iambic poetry (Loeb); D. E. Gerber, Greek elegiac poetry (Loeb); D. A. Campbell, Greek Lyric I (Loeb) [Sappho and Alcaeus], II (Loeb) [Anacreon], III (Loeb) [Ibycus and Simonides], IV (Loeb) [Bacchylides], V (Loeb) [Scolia]; W. H. Race, Pindar II (Loeb). IA Archilochus 3 (West p. 13; Gerber, Iambic p. 79), 60 (West no. 114, p. 9; Gerber, Iambic 114, p. 153), 79a (West Hipponax 115, pp. 121-2; Gerber, Iambic Hipponax 115, pp. 437-9), fr. 23 West (West p. 5; Gerber, Iambic pp. 97-9), 196A West (West pp. 3-4; Gerber, Iambic pp. 211-5); Mimnermus 1, 2, 5 (West p. 28; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 81-5), 13 (West no. 14, p. 30; Gerber, Elegiac no. 14, pp. 95-6); Solon 3 (West no. 4, p. 74; Gerber, Elegiac no. 4, pp. 113-7), 5 (West nos. 5-6, p. 75-6; Gerber, Elegiac nos. 5-6, pp. 121-3), 23 (West no. 33+32, p. 81; Gerber, Elegiac no. 33+32, p. 155), 24 (West no. 36, p. 82; Gerber, Elegiac no. 36, pp. 157-61); Sappho 1, 2, 16, 31 (West pp. 36-8; Campbell I pp. 53-5, 57, 67, 79-81), 81b (West no. 81, p. 42; Campbell I no. 81, p. 109), 94, 96 (West pp. 42-4; Campbell I pp. 117-9, 121-3), 130 (West p. 46; Campbell I p. 147); Alcaeus 38A (West no. 38, p. 60; Campbell I pp. 251-3), 129 (West p. 54; Campbell I pp. 297-9), 130 (West no. 130b, pp. 545; Campbell I no. 130B, pp. 301-3), 332 (West p. 56; Campbell I p. 373), 333 (West p. 60; Campbell I p. 373), 335 (West p. 60; Campbell I p. 373), 338 (West pp. 60-1; Campbell I p. 375), 362 (West p. 61; Campbell I p. 395); Ibycus 286, 287 and 288 (West pp. 99-100; Campbell III pp. 255-7); Anacreon 356, 358, 359, 360, 376, 388, 395, 396, 398 and 417 (West pp. 103-8; Campbell II pp. 55-97); Xenophanes 1, 3 (West pp. 157-8; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 413-9); Theognis as in Campbell (Gerber, Elegiac between pp. 177 and 335; West covers nearly everything, following the same numeration, between ‘Theognis’, pp. 64-73, and ‘Anonymous Theognidea’, pp. 125-56); Simonides 542 (West pp. 163-4; Campbell III pp. 435-7), fr. 22 West (West p. 171); Scolia 884, 889, 890, 892, 893, 900, 901, 902, 903, 907 (West pp. 177-9; Campbell V pp. 279-93); Bacchylides fr. 20B (Campbell IV pp. 2779); Pindar frr. 123, 124ab, 127, 128 Maehler (Race pp. 353-9). Texts to be known in translation: in M. L. West, Greek lyric poetry, all of Theognis (pp. 6473), Anonymous Theognidea (pp. 125-56), and Euenus fr. 8 (pp. 184-6) that you haven’t already read: note that you have already translated the central section of the latter poem as “Theognis 667-82” in Campbell; and that all this is also covered in Gerber, Elegiac 177-335. IB, IC, IIB Archilochus 60 (West no. 114, p. 9; Gerber, Iambic 114, p. 153), 196A West (West pp. 3-4; Gerber, Iambic pp. 211-5); Mimnermus 1 (West p. 28; Gerber, Elegiac p. 81); Solon 3 (West no. 4, p. 74; Gerber, Elegiac no. 4, pp. 113-7), 5 (West nos. 5-6, p. 75; Gerber, Elegiac nos. 5-6, pp. 121-3); Sappho 1, 2, 16, 31 (West pp. 36-8; Campbell I pp. 53-5, 57, 67, 79-81), 94, 96 (West pp. 42-4; Campbell I pp. 117-9, 121-3); Alcaeus 38A (West no. 38, p. 60; Campbell I pp. 251-3), 129 (West p. 54; Campbell I pp. 297-9), 130 (West no. 130b, pp. 54-5; Campbell I no. 130B, pp. 301-3); Ibycus 287, 288 (West pp. 99-100; Campbell III pp. 257); Anacreon 356, 358, 395, 417 (West pp. 103-8; Campbell II pp. 55-97); Theognis 19-26, 39-52, 53-68, 155-8, 173-82, 183-92, 237-54 (Gerber, Elegiac between pp. 177 and 209; West covers everything and follows the same numeration as Campbell, but divides it between ‘Theognis’, pp. 64-73, and ‘Anonymous Theognidea’, pp. 125-56). Texts to be known in translation: Archilochus 3 (West p. 13; Gerber, Iambic p. 79), fr. 23 West (West p. 5; Gerber, Iambic pp. 97-9); Mimnermus 2, 5 (West p. 28; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 83-5), 14 (West p. 30; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 95-6); Solon 32, 33, 36 (West pp. 81-2; Gerber, Elegiac no. 33+32, pp. 155-61); Sappho 81 (West p. 42; Campbell I p. 109), 130 (West p. 46; Campbell I p. 147); Alcaeus 332 (West p. 56; Campbell I p. 373), 333 (West p. 60; Campbell I p. 373), 335 (West p. 60; Campbell I p. 373), 338 (West pp. 60-1; Campbell I p. 375), 362 (West p. 61; Campbell I p. 395); Ibycus 286 (West p. 99; Campbell III pp. 255); Anacreon 359, 360, 376, 388, 396, 398 (West pp. 104-7; Campbell II pp. 57-83); Xenophanes 1, 3 (West pp. 157-8; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 413-9); rest of Theognis (West

7

pp. 64-73), Anonymous Theognidea (West pp. 125-56); Euenus fr. 8 (West pp. 184-6); Hipponax 115 (West pp. 121-2; Gerber, Iambic pp. 437-9); Simonides 542 (West pp. 163-4; Campbell III pp. 435-7), fr. 22 West (West p. 171); Anonymous party songs (Scolia) 884, 889, 890, 892, 893, 900, 901, 902, 907 (West pp. 177-9; Campbell V pp. 279-93); Praxilla 750 (West p.189 = Anon Songs 903); Bacchylides fr. 20B (Campbell IV pp. 277-9); Pindar frr. 123, 124ab, 127, 128 Maehler (Race pp. 353-9). IIA Texts to be known in translation: Archilochus 3 (West p. 13; Gerber, Iambic p. 79), 114 (West p. 9; Gerber, Iambic p. 153), fr. 23 West (West p. 5; Gerber, Iambic pp. 97-9), 196A West (West pp. 3-4; Gerber, Iambic pp. 211-5); Mimnermus 1, 2, 5 (West p. 28; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 81-5), 14 (West p. 30; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 95-6); Solon 4 (West p. 74; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 113-7), 5, 6 (West p. 75-6; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 121-3), 32, 33 (West p. 81; Gerber, Elegiac p. 155), 36 (West p. 82; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 157-61); Sappho 1, 2, 16, 31 (West pp. 36-8; Campbell I pp. 53-5, 57, 67, 79-81), 81 (West p. 42; Campbell I p. 109), 94, 96 (West pp. 42-4; Campbell I pp. 117-9, 121-3), 130 (West p. 46; Campbell I p. 147); Alcaeus 38 (West p. 60; Campbell I pp. 251-3), 129 (West p. 54; Campbell I pp. 297-9), 130b (West pp. 54-5; Campbell I pp. 301-3), 332 (West p. 56; Campbell I p. 373), 333 (West p. 60; Campbell I p. 373), 335 (West p. 60; Campbell I p. 373), 338 (West pp. 60-1; Campbell I p. 375), 362 (West p. 61; Campbell I p. 395); Ibycus 286, 287 and 288 (West pp. 99-100; Campbell III pp. 255-7); Anacreon 356, 358, 359, 360, 376, 388, 395, 396, 398 and 417 (West pp. 103-8; Campbell II pp. 55-97); Xenophanes 1, 3 (West pp. 157-8; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 413-9); Theognis and Anonymous Theognidea (West pp. 64-73, 125-56; Gerber, Elegiac pp. 177-335 [unseparated]); Euenus fr. 8 (West pp. 184-6); Hipponax 115 (West pp. 121-2; Gerber, Iambic pp. 437-9), Simonides 542 (West pp. 163-4; Campbell III pp. 435-7), fr. 22 West (West p. 171); Anonymous drinking songs (Scolia) 884, 889, 890, 892, 893, 900, 901, 902, 903, 907 (West pp. 177-9; Campbell V pp. 279-93); Bacchylides fr. 20B (Campbell IV pp. 277-9); Pindar frr. 123, 124ab, 127, 128 Maehler (Race pp. 353-9).

O. Murray, Early Greece, 2nd edn (London, 1993), ch. 12 ‘Life styles: the aristocracy’. E. L. Bowie, ‘‘Early Greek elegy, symposium, and public festival’’, JHS 106 (1986), 13–35 [= CLL] O. Murray (ed.), Sympotica (Oxford, 1990) A. P. Burnett, Three Archaic Poets: Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho (London, 1983) D. E. Gerber (ed.), A Companion to the Greek Lyric Poets (Leiden, 1997) J. Boardman, The History of Greek Vases: Potters, Painters, and Pictures (London, 2001), 51-64, 79-97, 217-26 (on symposium high-life) R. Neer, Style and Politics in Athenian Vase-Painting (Cambridge, 2002) F. Lissarrague, The Aesthetics of the Greek Banquet: Images of Wine and Ritual (Princeton, 1990). Very valuable on the vase evidence. 2. STATE AND INDIVIDUAL. Prescribed Text, with commentary: Sophocles, Antigone, ed. M. Griffiths (Cambridge, 1999) Translation: H. Lloyd-Jones (Loeb). C. Sourvinou-Inwood, ‘‘Assumptions and the creation of meaning: reading Sophocles’’ Antigone’’, JHS 109 (1989), 134–48 [= CLL] C. Sourvinou-Inwood, Reading Greek Death, Oxford 1995. S. Goldhill, Reading Greek Tragedy (Cambridge, 1986), ch. 4. R. Winnington-Ingram, Sophocles, an Interpretation , (Cambridge, 1980), chs. 5-6 D. C. Kurtz and J. Boardman, Greek Burial Customs (London, 1971) I. Morris, Death Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity (Cambridge, 1992), chs. 4–5

8

3.

THEATRE IN THE CITY. Prescribed Text, with commentary: Aristophanes, Frogs, ed. K. J. Dover (Oxford, 1993). There is also an abridged version of Dover, including vocabulary. Note also the smaller edition (including translation) by A. Sommerstein (Aris and Phillips 1996) Trans. A. Sommerstein (see above); also D. Barrett (Penguin), but this is very loose indeed: watch for jokes not in the original.

K. J. Dover, Aristophanic Comedy (LondonBatsford, 1972). S. Halliwell, ‘‘Comic satire and freedom of speech in classical Athens’’, JHS 111 (1991), 48–70. S Halliwell (1991) ‘The uses of laughter in Greek culture’, CQ 41: 279-96. J. Winkler and F. Zeitlin (eds.), Nothing to do with Dionysos? Princeton, 1990 (various articles on comedy and the city). A. H. Sommerstein, S. Halliwell, J. Henderson, and B. Zimmermann (eds.), Tragedy, Comedy and the Polis (Bari, 1993). E. Csapo E. and W. J. Slater, W.J. The Context of Ancient Drama (Michigan Ann Arbor, 1994), 53-88 A.M. Bowie, Aristophanes: myth, ritual and comedy, Cambridge 1993. O. Taplin, O. Comic Angels and other Approaches to Greek Drama through VasePaintings (Oxford, 1993). M.S. Silk, Aristophanes and the Definition of Comedy, Oxford 2000. M. Revermann, Comic Business: theatricality, dramatic technique and performanced contexts of Aristophanic Comedy, Oxford 2006. FAMILY, MARRIAGE, AND THE OIKOS Prescribed Texts: Lysias 1 (Hude, OCT); Xenophon. Oeconomicus (Marchant, OCT, vol. ii). The commentaries of Carey and Pomeroy (below) both list the small number of instances where their texts diverge from the OCT. Commentaries: Lysias: Selected Speeches, ed. C. Carey (Cambridge 1989); Xenophon, Oeconomicus (ed. S.B. Pomeroy, Oxford, 1994). Translations: Lysias, tr. S.. C. Todd (Austin, 2000); Xenophon, Pomeroy (as under commentaries); Agamemnon in Aeschylus: Oresteia, tr. H. Lloyd-Jones (London, 1982). C. Pelling, Literary Texts and the Greek Historian (London, 2000), 218–45 J. Gould, ‘Law, custom, and myth: aspects of the social position of women in Classical Athens’, JHS 100 (1980), 38-59 [= CLL], repr. in his Myth, Ritual Memory and Exchange (Oxford 2001), 112-57. C. Carey, ‘Rape and adultery in Athenian law’, CQ 45 (1995), 407-17 S. B. Pomeroy, Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves. Women in Classical Antiquity (London, 1975), chs 4-6 R. Just, Women in Athenian Law and Life (London, 1989) M. Lefkowitz and M. Fant (eds) Women’s Life in Greece and Rome (London, 1992) N. Cahill, Household and City Organization at Olynthus (New Haven, 2002) L. Nevett, House and Society in the Ancient Greek World (Cambridge, 1999) E. Fantham & al. Women in the Classical World (1994). 4.

9

5. ‘‘ORIENTALISM’’ Prescribed Text: Herodotus 1: OCT (Hude) Commentaries: H. H. How - J. Wells (Oxford, 1912): very out of date; J. H. Sleeman (repr. Bristol, 2002). More recent is the Bryn Mawr commentary by G. A. Sheets (1993); in Italian see D. Asheri (Fondazione Valla 1988). Translations: J. Marincola (revised Penguin, 1996: good introduction), or R. Waterfield/C. Dewald (Oxford, World’s Classics, 1998) with full notes and maps. A. Kuhrt, The Ancient Near East (c. 3000–330 b.c.) (London, 1995). [can hardly ask students to read all this] J. Gould, Herodotus (London, 1989) C. Pelling, ‘‘East is East and West is West – or are they? National stereotypes in Herodotus’’, Histos1: http://www.dur.ac.uk/Classics/histos/1997/pelling.html D. Konstan, ‘‘Persians, Greeks, and Empire’’, Arethusa 20 (1987), 59–73 [= CLL] E. Hall, Inventing the Barbarian (Oxford, 1989). A. Kuhrt, The Ancient Near East (c. 3000 - 330 BC) (London, 1995), II. 562-72 (on Phrygia and Lydia), 647-61 (on Persia) M. C. Miller, Athens and Persia in the Fifth Century BC: A Study in Cultural Reciprocity (Cambridge, 1997). J. Boardman, J. Persia and the West: An Archaeological Investigation of into the Genesis of Achaemenid Art (London, 2000) R. Thomas, Herodotus in Context. Ethnography, Science and the Art of Persuasion (Cambridge, 2000), esp. Ch. 3 ‘Dividing the World: Europe, Asia, Greeks and Barbarians’. I. Özgen, I. and J. Öztürk, J.Heritage Recovered: The Lydian Treasure (Istanbul, 1996) W. Burkert, Babylon, Memphis, Persepolis: eastern contexts of Greek culture, Cambridge Mass. & London 2004. GENERAL: ROMAN G. B. Conte (revised D. Fowler and G. W. Most), Latin Literature: a History (Baltimore and London, 1994) O. Taplin (ed.), Literature in the Greek and Roman Worlds: a New Perspective (Oxford, 2000) J. Griffin, Latin Poets and Roman Life (Oxford, 1985) S. M. Braund, Latin Literature (London, 2002) G. O. Hutchinson, Latin Literature from Seneca to Juvenal (Oxford, 1993) M. Beard and M. Crawford Rome in the Late Republic (London, 1985; 2nd ed. 1999) C. Edwards and G. Woolf (eds) Rome the Cosmopolis (Cambridge, 2003) J. Griffin, ‘Caesar qui cogere posset’, in F. Millar and E. Segal (eds) Caesar Augustus. Seven Aspects (Oxford, 1984), 189-215

10

C. Edwards Writing Rome. Textual Approaches to the City (Cambridge, 1996) A. Claridge, Rome: An Oxford Archaeological Guide (Oxford, 1998) P. Zanker, Power of Images in the Age of Augustus (Ann Arbor, 1988) J. Elsner,,Imperial Rome and Christian Triumph (Oxford, 1998) 6. SEX AND THE CITY

Texts: Cicero, Pro Caelio: Clark (OCT), which is also the text printed in R.G. Austin’s Oxford edition (3rd edition, 1960, often reprinted) with the exception of one reading in § 5. Catullus: Mynors (OCT). Propertius 1: G.P. Goold (revised Loeb edn., 1990; but note that the re-issue of this volume in 1999 included some changes to the text [listed on p. xi]) Commentaries: Cicero: Austin, as above. Catullus: C. J. Fordyce (Oxford, 1961); K. Quinn (Macmillan, 1971); J. Godwin, Catullus, the Shorter Poems (Aris and Phillips, 1999). Propertius 1: W. A. Camps (Cambridge, 1961); R. J. Baker (2nd ed., Aris and Phillips, 2000) Translations: Cicero: D. H. Berry, Cicero: Defence Speeches (Oxford 2001; World’s Classics). Catullus: G. P. Goold (Duckworth, 1983) Guy Lee (Oxford 1990; paperback 1991). Note that neither of these is based on the OCT. Propertius: G. P. Goold, see above. There is a freer version in verse by Guy Lee (World’s Classics 1994). R. O. A. M. Lyne, The Latin Love Poets, from Catullus to Horace (Oxford, 1980), chs. 1-5. J. Griffin, Latin Poets and Roman Life (Oxford, 1985) T. P. Wiseman, Catullus and his World (Cambridge, 1985) P. Veyne, Roman Erotic Elegy (Chicago, 1988) M. Wyke, The Roman Mistress (Oxford, 2002) C. Edwards The Politics of Immorality (Cambridge, 1993) S. Pomeroy Goddesses, Whores, Wives and Slave (London, 1975) M. Lefkowitz and M. Fant (eds) Women’s Life in Greece and Rome (London, 1992) B. Bergmann, ‘The Roman house as memory theater: The House of the Tragic Poet in Pompeii’, Art Bulletin 76 (1994), 225-56

11

J. Clarke, Looking at Love-making: Constructions of Sexuality in Roman Art, 100 BC - AD 250 (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1998) 7. USES OF MYTH

Text: Ovid, Metamorphoses III Commentary: D. E. Hill, Ovid Metamorphoses 1–4 (Aris and Phillips, 1984); A. S. Hollis, Metamorphoses 8 (Oxford, 1970) Translation: Ovid: D. E. Hill, as above. Lucretius: Loeb, rev. M. F. Smith, 1975; C. Bailey, 3 vols., text, trans. and comm.(Oxford, 1947). J. B. Solodow, The World of Ovid’s Metamorphoses (Chapel Hill and London, 1988), esp. chs. 3, 5 and 6. A .Sharrock, ‘Womanufacture’, JRS 81 (1991), 36-49 G. O. Hutchinson, Hellenistic Poetry (Oxford, 1988), 329-52 E. Hobsbawm and T. Ranger (eds), The Invention of Tradition (Cambridge, 1983). P. Hardie, A. Barchiesi, and S. Hinds (eds.), Essays on Ovid’s Metamorphoses and its reception (Cambridge, 1999). M. Fox, Roman Historical Myths (Oxford, 1996) P. Zanker, The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus (Ann Arbor, 1988), ch. 5, B. Bergmann, ‘Rhythms of recognition: mythological encounters in Roman landscape painting’, in F. de Angelis, S. Muth (eds), Im Spiegel des Mythos: Bilderwelt und Lebenswelt (Wiesbaden 1999), 81-107 S. Wood, ‘Alcestis on Roman sarcophagi’, American Journal of Archaeology 82 (1978), 499-510, reprinted in D’Ambra, E. (ed) Roman Art in Context: An Anthology (Englewood Cliffs 1993), 84-103 8. ARISTOCRATIC LIFE

Text:: Cicero: D.R. Shackleton Bailey, Cicero: Select Letters (Cambridge, 1980); Pliny, letters in A.N. Sherwin-White, Fifty Letters of Pliny (Oxford, 1967, often reprinted). Commentary: Shackleton Bailey and Sherwin-White, as above.

12

Translations: Cicero: Shackleton Bailey (Penguin: Letters to Atticus [1978], Letters to his Friends [1978]). Pliny: B. Radice (Penguin); Statius, Silvae: Shackleton Bailey (Loeb). G. O. Hutchinson, Cicero’s Correspondence: a Literary Study (Oxford, 1998). S. Hoffer, The Anxieties of Pliny the Younger (Atlanta, 1999). Arethusa 36 (2003) collects essays on ‘Reimagining Pliny the Younger’.

G. Woolf, ‘The City of Letters’, in C. Edwards and G. Woolf (eds) Rome the Cosmopolis (Cambridge, 2003), 203-21. N. Purcell, ‘The Roman garden as a domestic building’, in I.A. Barton, Roman Domestic Buildings (Exeter 1996), 121-51 A. Wallace Hadrill, ‘The social structure of the Roman house’, Papers of the British School at Rome 56 (1988), 43-97, reprinted in Houses and Society in Pompeii and Herculaneum (Princeton, 1994), 3-61. 9. CLASS.

Text: Petronius, Cena Trimalchionis: M. Smith (Oxford, 1975) Commentary: Smith, as above. Translations: J.P.Sullivan (Penguin, 1965); P.G.Walsh (World’s Classics, 1997); R.Bracht Branham and D.Kinney (London, 1996). Juvenal: N. Rudd (World’s Classics) N. W. Slater, Reading Petronius (Baltimore and London, 1990), ch. 4. P. G. Walsh, The Roman Novel (Cambridge, 1970; repr. paperback, Bristol, 1995) S. J. Harrison, Oxford Readings in the Roman Novel (Oxford, 1999) G .B. Conte, The Hidden Author (Berkeley, 1996) J. H. D’Arms, Commerce and Social Standing in Ancient Rome (Cambridge MA, 1981) 97-120 N.M. Horsfall, ‘Petronius‚ Cena and The Uses of Literacy’. G&R 36 (1989), 74-89 and 194-209. T. Wiedemann, Greek and Roman Slavery (London, 1981) S. Walker, Memorials to the Roman Dead (London, 1985)

13

P. Zanker, Pompeii: Public and Private Life (Cambridge, Mass. 1998), 135-203 10. GAMES AND SPECTACLES

Text: Martial: Shackleton Bailey (Loeb)., Cicero, Ad Familiares VII.1 = nr. 18 in Cicero, Selected Letters (ed. D. R. Shackleton Bailey, Cambridge 1980). Ovid, Amores: Kenney (OCT). Seneca, Epistle 7: in Select Letters, ed. W.C. Summers (Macmillan, repr. Bristol Classical Press). Seneca, Epistle 70: Reynolds (OCT). Tertullian, De Spectaculis: Glover (Loeb). Commentaries: Martial 5: P. Howell (Aris and Phillips, 1995: with translation); ); 5.24 = 26 in L. and P. Watson, Martial: Select Epigrams (Cambridge, 2003). K. Coleman awaited. Cicero, ad Fam. VII.1: Shackleton Bailey, as above. Seneca, Epistles 7: in Summers, as above; also in Seneca: Seventeen Letters, ed. C. D. N. Costa (Warminster, 1988). Ovid, Am. 3.2: cf. A. S. Hollis’ commentary on Ars Amatoria i. 58-62. Tertullian E. Castorina (Florence, 1961; in Italian). Translations: Martial: Shackleton Bailey (Loeb). Cicero: Shackleton Bailey (Letters to his Friends, Penguin); Seneca: E. P. Barker (Oxford, 1932); the Loeb (R. M. Gummere) is less good but easier to come by. For Epistle 7 see Costa, as above. Ovid: A.D. Melville (Oxford World’s Classics, 1990), with intr. by E. J. Kenney. Tertullian: Glover, as above. E. Thomas, ‘Ovid at the races’, in J. Bibauw (ed.), Hommages à Marcel Renard i (Coll. Latomus 101, Brussels, 1969), 710-24 J. Sullivan, Martial: the Unexpected Classic (Cambridge, 1991), 6-12. R. C. Beacham, Spectacle Entertainments of Early Imperial Rome (New Haven, 1999) K.M. Coleman, ‘Fatal charades: Roman executions staged as mythological enactments’, JRS 80 (1990), 44-73. P. Plass, The Game of Death in Ancient Rome: Arena Sport and Political Suicide (Madison, 1995) B. A. Bergmann and C. Kondoleon (edd.), The Art of Ancient Spectacle (New Haven, 1999), esp. J. Bodel, ‘Death on display: looking at Roman funerals’ (pp. 259-82). K. M. D. Dunbabin, The Mosaics of Roman North Africa (Oxford, 1978), ch 5: ‘The Amphitheatre’ K. E. Welch, The Roman Amphitheatre: From its Origins to the Colosseum (Cambridge, 2004).

THE LATIN LANGUAGE

14

B. L. Gildersleeve and G. Lodge, Latin Grammar, ed. 3 (Macmillan, 1895) E. C. Woodcock, A New Latin Syntax (Methuen, 1959) J. Morwood, A Latin Grammar, Oxford 1999. E. Norden, Die antike Kunstprosa, ed. 5, 2 vols., (Stuttgart, 1958) M. Von Albrecht, Masters of Roman Prose from Cato to Apuleius (tr. N. Adkin, Leeds 1989) L. R. Palmer, The Latin Language (Faber, 1954) A. D. Leeman, Orationis ratio, 2 vols. (Amsterdam, 1963: in English) L. P. Wilkinson, Golden Latin Artistry (Cambridge, 1963) J.N. Adams, The Latin Sexual Vocabulary (London 1982)

THE GREEK LANGUAGE W. W. Goodwin, A Greek Grammar, ed. 2 (Macmillan, 1894, often reprinted) W. W. Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, ed. 2 (Macmillan, 1889, often reprinted) H.W. Smyth, Greek Grammar, Cambirdge Mass. 1920 (often reprinted; an excellent, detailed grammar). J. D. Denniston, The Greek Particles, ed. 2, revised by K. J. Dover (Oxford, 1954) J. D. Denniston, Greek Prose Style (Oxford, 1952) L. R. Palmer, The Greek Language (Faber, 1980) A. Meillet, Aperçu d'une histoire de la langue grecque, ed. 8 (Paris, 1975) K.J. Dover, The Evolution of Greek Prose (Oxford, 1997) J. Morwood, The Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek, Oxford 2001.

GENERAL, esp. works of reference The Oxford Classical Dictionary [usually abbreviated as OCD] (3rd edn., edited by Simon Hornblower and A. Spawforth, 1996) gives valuable information and references on a host of topics, not only individual authors or historical figures. An illustrated abridgement of the OCD compiled by the same editors is now available, entitled The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilisation (1998). This however lacks bibliographies and many more detailed references. M. H. Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms (5th edn. 1988, or later versions, should be used). P J. Boardman, J. Griffin, O. Murray (edd.) The Oxford History of the Classical World (Oxford 1986; now available as 2 separate pb. volumes) Cambridge History of Classical Literature: Vol. I (Greek) edited by P. E. Easterling and B. M. W. Knox (Cambridge, 1985), Vol. II (Latin) edited by E. J. Kenney and W. Clausen (Cambridge, 1982). Albin Lesky, History of Greek Literature (Eng. Tr., 1966). Despite its date, still the best one-man history of the field; but the translation was not well done. A. Dihle, A History of Greek Literature (London, 1994) G. B. Conte, A History of Latin Literature (Princeton, 1994) Elaine Fantham, Roman Literary Culture from Cicero to Apuleius (Johns

15

Hopkins 1996) O. Taplin (ed.), Literature in the Greek and Roman Worlds (Oxford 2000), now available (2001) in two separate paperbacks More Specific Studies D. A. Russell and M. Winterbottom, Ancient literary criticism: the principal texts in new translations (Oxford, 1972) P. There is a shorter selection by the same editors, Classical Literary Criticism (Oxford, World's Classics 1990) P D. A. Russell, Criticism in Antiquity (Duckworth, 1981 P) G. Williams, Tradition and Originality in Roman Poetry (Oxford, 1968) M. L. West, Greek Metre (Oxford, 1982), abridged as An Introduction to Greek Metre (Oxford 1987) P D. S. Raven, Latin Metre (London, 1967) R. Pfeiffer, History of classical scholarship: from the beginnings to the end of the Hellenistic age (Oxford, 1968) L. D. Reynolds and N. G. Wilson, Scribes and Scholars, ed. 3 (Oxford, 1991 P) J. A. Crook, Law and Life of Rome (Thames & Hudson, 1967) D. M. MacDowell, The Law in Classical Athens (Thames & Hudson, 1978) S. B. Pomeroy, Goddesses, Whores, Wives and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity (New York, 1975 P) W. K. C. Guthrie, A History of Greek Philosophy, 6 vols. (Cambridge, 19621981). Vol. 3 is available in two paperback parts, The Sophists and Socrates. K. J. Dover, Greek Popular Morality in the time of Plato and Aristotle (Blackwell, 1974) W. Burkert, Greek Religion (Blackwell, 1985 P). This work is a masterpiece, but a shorter and more readable account is available in Jan N. Bremmer, Greek Religion (Greece and Rome New Surveys in the Classics 24, 1994) P. E. Easterling & J. Muir (edd.) Greek Religion and Society (Cambridge, 1985) P M.Beard, J. North, S. Price, Religions at Rome (2 vols., Cambridge 1998). Volume 1 is a history, vol. 2 a detailed source-book. A much shorter treatment by J.North, Roman Religion (Greece and Rome New Surveys in the Classics 30, 2000) T.E. Rihll, Greek Science (Greece and Rome New Surveys in the Classics 29, 1999). C. M. Robertson, A History of Greek Art (Cambridge, 1975): abbreviated paperback available J. H. W. G. Liebeschuetz, Continuity and Change in Roman Religion (Oxford, 1979) E. Rawson, Intellectual Life in the late Roman Republic (Duckworth, 1985) P Abbreviations for periodicals: a select list (For a full list, see the third edition of the Oxford Classical Dictionary (1996), pp. xxix onwards.) AJP = American Journal of Philology BICS = Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies (London) BMCR = Bryn Mawr Classical Review (http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr/) CP or CPh = Classical Philology CQ = Classical Quarterly CR = Classical Review

16

G&R = Greece and Rome GRBS = Greek Roman and Byzantine Studies JHS = Journal of Hellenic Studies JRS = Journal of Roman Studies PCPS = Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society TAPA = Transactions of the American Philological Association ZPE = Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik

17

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful