Print Delivery Summary

Auckland Council
Monday, 26 November 2012 5:30 AM 1. Print - Auckland Council and Super City New Zealand Metropolitan 1.1 New water bills lead to 765 complaints New Zealand Herald, 26 November 2012, Page 12 By: Wayne Thompson Keywords: Services (2), Auckland Council (2), rates (1), service (2), wastewater (1), waste water (2), Watercare (4), Auckland (1), Council (1) atercare Services has received 765 complaints since radical changes on July 1 to the way Aucklanders pay for water. ... 1.2 Sour taste for Jackson's first cast New Zealand Herald, 26 November 2012, Page 5 By: James Ihaka Keywords: Auckland (4), Airport (1), International Airport (1) star of the classic cult film Bad Taste says awardwinning director Peter Jackson dumped him and his mates after they spent years helping him to make his breakthrough hit. ... 1.3 Spy network posing as CCTV New Zealand Herald, 26 November 2012, Page 13 By: Brian Rudman Keywords: Auckland (1), Council (1) othing quite singles out a member of the babyboomer generation from the Xs and Ys as our differing attitudes to privacy. ... 1.4 Stars return to Middle-earth The Dominion Post, 26 November 2012, Page 1 By: No author Keywords: Auckland (2), Airport (2) STARS of The Hobbit have begun returning to the middle of Middle-earth as Wellington gears up for the film's world premiere. ... 1.5 Hobbitmania takes off in Wellington The Press, 26 November 2012, Page 2 By: No author Keywords: Auckland (1), Airport (1) Stars of The Hobbit have begun returning to the middle of Middleearth as Wellington gears up for the film's world premiere. ... 1.6 Poachers kill park wildlife New Zealand Herald, 26 November 2012, Page 7 By: Lincoln Tan Keywords: Auckland (2), Council (2) Wild birds including ducks, geese and pheasants are being poached from public parks in Auckland and being turned into dinner. ... 1.7 DCC faces rearguard action in bus shelters Otago Daily Times, 26 November 2012, Page 2 By: DAVE CANNAN Keywords: Auckland (2), council (1), Len Brown (1) IT seems the Dunedin City Council is serious about keeping the new seat less bus shelters just that way -- without seats. ... New Zealand Regional 1.8 Camp brings cheer for families Customer Support 02 9322 8222

Southland Times, 26 November 2012, Page 2 By: Terri Russell Keywords: committee (1), Sharon Stewart (1) More than 50 parents and children affected by cancer attended an action-packed camp in Pukerau, near Gore, at the weekend. ...

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New Zealand Herald
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 12 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 1 of 1 Circulation : 170,523 Area Of Clip : 196.47 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000001 Clip ID 5941492

Metro

New water bills lead to 765 complaints
Landlord advises property owners to check monthly bills carefully for errors
atercare Services has received 765 complaints since radical changes on July 1 to the way Aucklanders pay for water. The Auckland Council-controlled agency introduced monthly billing and a standard wastewater tariff based on a more expensive fresh water supply through the meter. Information requested by the Herald shows the main complaint was the new tariff and charges. Aucklanders were used to paying three-monthly or six-monthly bills but now get bills every month, sometimes based on estimates of use. Customers were unhappy about being moved from wholly fixed charges for waste water to paying a $190 fixed charge plus 78.5 per cent of the home’s metered use of fresh water. North Shore, Waitakere, Rodney and Franklin residents did not under-

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Wayne Thompson wayne.thompson@nzherald.co.nz

stand that waste water charges no longer came out of their property rates bill from the council but were now charged directly by Watercare. And fresh water was 3.3 per cent more expensive from July. A Watercare spokesman said 559 of the complaints were about the July 1 changes — rather than errors in billing — and had been easily resolved by explaining the changes. Where billing errors were found, accounts were credited immediately. However, West Auckland landlord Gary Osborne believes people should read their monthly bills closely, because of his two experiences. An estimated reading for the August bill on his rental property was way out of kilter, he said, and this happened again. He pointed out the inconsistency of being charged $ $74.48 in October and $15.64 in November. Watercare apologised for mistakenly increasing the billing period for the property to 41 days instead of

the standard 29 to 30 days. The daily water use was also wrongly calculated — resulting in a high reading of 390 litres a day instead of 300 litres for the 41-day period. Watercare said that even with checks and audits of invoices, a very small percentage of errors occurred. The spokesman said the customer centre would regularly review any customer whose accounts had repeat errors. The Water Utility Consumer Assistance Trust, which was set up in January to help people who cannot settle overdue bills, has 144 applications that meet certain conditions and have been assessed by a budgetary advisory service.

Auckland water bills
● July 1, 2012 changed billing, tariff

and charges
● 420,000 customers ● 2 million invoices issued ● 756 complaints ● 559 about new tariff and charges ● 0.18% of customers complained ● 177 seeking help to pay

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New Zealand Herald
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 5 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 1 of 2 Circulation : 170,523 Area Of Clip : 504.94 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000001 Clip ID 5941482

Sour taste for Jackson’s first cast
Star of Hobbit director’s first hit film, Bad Taste, disappointed that sequel and due recognition didn’t happen
Smith said O’Herne ‘‘was the author of his own misfortune’’ and lost his home in a mortgagee sale before moving into a Paekakariki motorcamp, but Jackson could have helped his childhood friend. ‘‘When he died he was still very much ‘Bad Taste still has to do something for me’.’’ Hammon said it was disappointing when Jackson moved on in the early 1990s, but he bore no ill-will towards him and there was no feud — his old friend was just consumed by his work. He said Jackson remained loyal to O’Herne and gave him a part in his film Braindead. ‘‘Pete [O’Herne] had this part but phoned the night before shooting was meant to start to say that he couldn’t make it — it wasn’t very professional.’’ Hammon stayed in touch and was an extra in a couple of Jackson’s films but has not spoken to him since 2000. ‘‘For me it has been more of a general disappointment,’’ he said. ‘‘Pete does have this kind of nice guy image and it is not entirely earned. He is a ruthless businessman. Nobody ever talks about it, but it’s just a world of a film director. ‘‘As far as I know, you can’t be a film director without being hated by at least someone.’’ Mike Minett, who played ‘‘Frank’’ in the film, said by email that he had not heard from Jackson in years. Wingnut Films spokesman Matt Dravitski said a remastered version of Bad Taste which ‘‘looks and sounds better than ever’’ was in progress but a release date had not been set. Bad Taste was made on a budget of just under $300,000 but made several times that. Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy earned more than $3 billion worldwide.
Price of building an empire, A14-15 James Ihaka james.ihaka@nzherald.co.nz

star of the classic cult film Bad Taste says awardwinning director Peter Jackson dumped him and his mates after they spent years helping him to make his breakthrough hit. The Herald contacted several of the cast and crew from Bad Taste — including Craig Smith, Ken Hammon and Mike Minett — 25 years after filming wrapped up on a film that cost less than $300,000 to make. Smith, who played ‘‘Giles’’, was one of a group of friends who shot the film around Wellington between 1983 and 1987. He was disappointed a Bad Taste sequel Jackson had long talked about never came off and that more recognition had not come their way. Smith felt Jackson had ditched him and his mates not long after the project was finished. ‘‘It wasn’t like an employeremployee relationship, he was our friend and he just dumped us. ‘‘Set aside fame, fortune, any of that stuff, he just dumped us and I don’t think any of us have ever really got over that.’’ Smith — who now works in the health industry in Qatar — said another of the cast, Peter O’Herne, who played ‘‘Barry’’, held on to the belief that Bad Taste would help him financially. He spent most of the last years of his life as a sickness beneficiary and died in 2010 at 49 soon after contracting a virus. Jackson told mourners at his funeral that he had given up on the idea of filming a series of sequels to Bad Taste. S ih id O’H ‘‘ h

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You can’t be a film director without being hated by at least someone.
Ken Hammon

Craig Smith

Peter Jackson

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New Zealand Herald
Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 5 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 2 of 2 Circulation : 170,523 Area Of Clip : 504.94 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000001 Clip ID 5941482

Frodo and Bilbo Baggins stop over in Auckland
Hobbit actors Elijah Wood (left) and Martin Freeman take a break between flights at Auckland International Airport after arriving on a flight from Los Angeles yesterday. Pictures / SNPA

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New Zealand Herald
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 13 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 1 of 2 Circulation : 170,523 Area Of Clip : 379.44 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000001 Clip ID 5941465

Metro
Rudman’s City

Spy network posing as CCTV
Brian Rudman brian.rudman@nzherald.co.nz

othing quite singles out a member of the babyboomer generation from the Xs and Ys as our differing attitudes to privacy. True, it still seems to be common ground that it is beyond the pale for health professionals to email x-ray pictures to journalists of an eel lodged up the backside of a careless outpatient. It’s also still frowned upon for government departments to sloppily email confidential client files to complete strangers. But tomorrow, when Auckland councillors sit down to consider creating a regional wide co-ordinated spy camera network from the CCTV set-ups inherited from the legacy councils, I suspect the big concern will be costs, not the inherent threat to individual privacy that such a proposal still worries an oldie like myself. Even the executive summary sounds like an extract from George Orwell’s novel, 1984. ‘‘The purpose of this report is to outline the issues and opportunities involved in using closed circuit television (CCTV) as a tool to improve public safety.’’ It’s the saccharine Newspeak so beloved of Big Brother’s helpers. Orwell was writing from the ruins of a Europe not just shattered by the excesses of Hitler’s totalitarian nightmare, but learning to co-exist with Stalin’s equally monstrous regime. The Big Brother of Orwell’s imagination, spying on and manipulating every citizen, was just a refinement on reality. As a result, if I spot a CCTV camera in a public space, I think Big Brother, get a proper job. The generation Xs and Ys are more likely to raise their mixer cans and give it a drunken grin. And why wouldn’t they? Chances are, they’ve already revealed the minutest details

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of their lives in an on-going serial on Facebook and Twitter. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, then 25, summed up the change a couple of years ago when he claimed the rise of social networking online meant that people no longer have an expectation of privacy. Privacy was no longer the social norm. ‘‘People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people. That social norm is just something that has evolved over time.’’ With more than one billion people active Facebook users, a vast number of world citizens seem to agree. Meanwhile, back in Auckland, if they can break away from their Facebooking and tweeting, Auckland councillors will be briefed on progress on developing guidelines for use of CCTV cameras in public spaces and a memorandum of understanding with the police. All the usual issues are there: privacy, who will pay, who will monitor, what will the information be used for, how long will it be stored and so on. Regardless of my Orwellian fears, I still find the practical reasons advanced for more CCTV spying unconvincing. The officials tell the councillors ‘‘there is an increasing demand for CCTV as a crime prevention tool’’ and it ‘‘is an increasingly popular community safety tool that is seen to play a part in enhancing both perceptions of safety and crime prevention’’. But note how they don’t say spy cameras actually prevent crime. They just enhance the perception. In other words, people have been talked into believing they do prevent crime, so they feel safer. An earlier report to councillors, in May this year, spelt out this difference between perception and reality. While acknowledging CCTV systems in public spaces ‘‘are generally effective in increasing perceptions of safety . . . the effectiveness of CCTV in actually reducing a wide range of crime in public places is questionable’’.

It pointed to United Kingdom research indicating ‘‘a modest effect on reducing crime in public spaces’’ and that CCTV was most effective in reducing crime in car parks. Australian research, the report added, indicates CCTV ‘‘is effective at detecting violent crime, [but] it is not an effective prevention tool.’’ This echoes other data such as the 2005 British Home Office research paper monitoring 15 spy camera installations that concluded they’d failed to achieve their goal of reducing crime and were ‘‘an ineffective’’ tool. The author of this research, criminology professor Martin Gill, said the installations had also failed to ‘‘make people feel safer.’’ We’re told that Aucklanders do feel safer thanks to our installation, though where this judgment comes from is unclear. At the risk of whistling in a gale, could we at least have some real evidence. If we are to persevere with these expensive spy systems, can we actually have some proof we’re getting value for money.

If I spot a CCTV camera in a public space, I think Big Brother, get a proper job.

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New Zealand Herald
Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 13 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 2 of 2 Circulation : 170,523 Area Of Clip : 379.44 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000001 Clip ID 5941465

The Auckland Council wants to link all CCTV camera networks across the region in order to improve public safety. Picture / Steven McNicholl

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The Dominion Post
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 1 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 1 of 2 Circulation : 98,326 Area Of Clip : 785.23 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000002 Clip ID 5941197

Stars return to Middle-earth
Jackson scrambling to finish ‘Hobbit’
STARS of The Hobbit have begun returning to the middle of Middle-earth as Wellington gears up for the film’s world premiere. At least four leading actors arrived in the capital yesterday in preparation for Wednesday’s big event, when tens of thousands of people are expected to line the streets for a glimpse of the stars on the red carpet. Martin Freeman, who plays Bilbo Baggins, Elijah Wood (Frodo), Andy Serkis (Gollum), and Richard Armitage (Thorin Oakenshield) were all spotted at Auckland Airport. They flew on to Wellington yesterday afternoon. Wood and Serkis both attended the parade through central Wellington in December 2003 for the world premiere of the final Lord of the Rings movie, The Return of the King. But while they relax in and around the city, director Sir Peter Jackson has revealed he is still flat-out adding the finishing touches to the first film. In a video posted on Facebook, he said it would ‘‘hopefully’’ be finished today. Hobbit fever is already building in the city, with the launch of The Hobbit Artisan Market at Waitangi Park on Saturday, along with a big-screen showing the Rings films, and Air New Zealand’s unveiling of an official Hobbit aircraft, decked out with a 73-metre-long image of the stars. About 30 artists are hawking Tolkienesque wares at the market. Stallholder Barry Eldridge said the new films had ramped up interest in the replica ‘‘fellowship cloaks’’ and scarves made from the wool of sheep raised on the family’s hill country station in Wairarapa. His daughter, Kiri, said there had always been demand for the items from passionate fans from across the world. ‘‘People ring up and ask for them in Elvish and we have no idea what they’re saying.’’ Steve Wheeler, official knifesmith and cutler of The Hobbit films, has created thousands of knives, swords and daggers, as well as countless table knives, forks and spoons. He said he was constantly surprised by the film-makers’ attention to detail, and the level of intricacy demanded from him. ‘‘There was stuff there I’d look at the job sheet and think, ‘What, you can’t be serious’ and you rock up and see the boss and he says, ‘Yep, that’s what we want’.’’ The Waitangi Park market, which is free, and family-focused, will run until the end of the movie premiere on Wednesday. Air New Zealand’s Hobbit-themed 777-300 will fly between Auckland, Los Angeles and London. Earlier in the month, the airline released its in-flight safety video An Unexpected Briefing, created by the Academy Award-winning Weta Workshop and starring cast and crew from The Hobbit. It has had almost 10 million views on YouTube.

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The Dominion Post
Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 1 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 2 of 2 Circulation : 98,326 Area Of Clip : 785.23 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000002 Clip ID 5941197

Plane packaging: Air New Zealand unveils its new-look Hobbit plane at Auckland Airport.

Expected journey: Elijah Wood and Martin Freeman are among the stars who have flown in for the premiere of The Hobbit on Wednesday.
Photos: SNPA

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Christchurch Press
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 2 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 1 of 1 Circulation : 83,024 Area Of Clip : 124.35 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000004 Clip ID 5941160

Hobbitmania takes off in Wellington
Stars of The Hobbit have begun returning to the middle of Middleearth as Wellington gears up for the film’s world premiere. At least four leading actors headed for the capital yesterday in preparation for Wednesday’s big event, when tens of thousands of people are expected to line the streets for a glimpse of the stars on the red carpet. Martin Freeman, who plays Bilbo Baggins, Elijah Wood (Frodo), Andy Serkis (Gollum), and Richard Armitage (Thorin Oakenshield) were all snapped at Auckland Airport before boarding flights to Wellington. But while they relax in and around the city, director Sir Peter Jackson has revealed he is still flatout adding the finishing touches to the film. In a video posted on Facebook, he said it would ‘‘hopefully’’ be finished today. Hobbit fever is already building in the city, with the launch of The Hobbit Artisan Market at Waitangi Park on Saturday, along with a big screen showing the Rings films, and Air New Zealand unveiling an official Hobbit aircraft, decked out with a 73-metre-long image of the stars. About 30 artists are hawking Tolkienesque wares at the market, which stays open until the premiere ends. Stallholder Barry Eldridge said the new films had ramped up interest in the replica ‘‘fellowship cloaks’’ and scarves made from the wool of sheep raised on the family’s hill country station in Wairarapa. Air New Zealand’s Hobbit-themed 777-300 will fly between Auckland, Fairfax NZ Los Angeles and London.

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New Zealand Herald
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 7 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 1 of 2 Circulation : 170,523 Area Of Clip : 417.43 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000002 Clip ID 5941811

News A

Poachers kill park wildlife
Thieves are stealing birds and eggs for the dinner table, say shocked witnesses
Lincoln Tan lincoln.tan@nzherald.co.nz

ild birds including ducks, geese and pheasants are being poached from public parks in Auckland and being turned into dinner. Witnesses told the Herald they have seen birds being caught with nets and hooks, and some even having their necks wrung in front of shocked onlookers at Cornwall Park and Western Springs. Ram Patel said he was ‘‘totally stunned’’ when he saw two Asian men catching a goose and a duck using a net at Western Springs last Tuesday, and then taking them away in a canvas bag. ‘‘At first I thought they were park rangers or something but realised they were poachers when I saw them driving off in an old Japanese car,’’ he said. Mr Patel, 21, a student living in Mt Roskill, said the two men had a bag of

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eggs with them which he believed were also collected from the park. ‘‘They were really rough with the animals and didn’t care if they lived or died when they were shoved into the bag, which made me think that these people wanted them for food and not pets.’’ Warwick Palmer, who wrote to the Herald, said he had a friend who saw another man at Cornwall Park who ‘‘caught a pheasant, wrung its neck in front of passersby and then took off with it in his car’’. The Auckland Waikato Fish and Game Council says the number of wild ducks and geese from parks being caught and killed is on the rise, and he wants the Auckland Council to put up signs to deter poaching. ‘‘We don’t have numbers, but it seems to be on the rise,’’ said Fish and Game northern wildlife manager John Dyer. Unauthorised removal of birds from parks was an offence under the Wildlife

Act, and offenders could be fined up to $5000. He said birds being poached were primarily ducks and geese, but ‘‘anything else not tied down or fenced off, such as pukeko, quail and swans’’, was also being stolen. And he warned it could spell the end for the Cornwall Park pheasants. ‘‘Pheasants have probably been there since the 1860s; now the area is built over if these last pheasants are killed, that’s it,’’ said Mr Dyer. ‘‘They’ll never be seen there again as pheasants don’t fly that far.’’ Cornwall Park director Michael Ayrton said he was unaware of the park having lost livestock through theft and was shocked to learn about the pheasant incident. Council spokeswoman Lydia Blatch said anyone seeing people taking wildlife in council parks should call the police or the council on (09) 301-0101.

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New Zealand Herald
Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 7 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 2 of 2 Circulation : 170,523 Area Of Clip : 417.43 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000002 Clip ID 5941811

A spate of brazen thefts — and slaughter — of park dwelling birds from city parks has stunned onlookers.
Picture / Greg Bowker

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Otago Daily Times
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 2 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Metropolitan

Page : 1 of 1 Circulation : 40,448 Area Of Clip : 288.22 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000002 Clip ID 5944204

DCC faces rearguard action in bus shelters
IT seems the Dunedin City Council is serious about keeping the new seat­ less bus shelters just that way — without seats. Halfway Bush resident Barrie Kendall tells me that after he read in The Wash last week (22.11.12) about the DCC’s determination to remove any ‘‘general bric­a­brac’’ (read second­hand chairs), he decided to show his displeasure at this decision. So, he bought two chairs from a charity shop and placed them in the new shelter at the top of Taieri Rd. ‘‘They stayed there about two hours before being removed,’’ he says. Barrie, however, is undaunted. ‘‘I think anyone with a spare chair or stool should put them in one of our seat­less shelters. Perhaps then, City Hall will get the message. People should not have to stand while waiting for a bus!’’ Neville Idour, who featured in last week’s column about this issue, says he has the perfect solution to the problem. ‘‘Instead of the students burning couches they should systematically donate them to the bus shelters around the city. Not only would it solve the seating problem, it would add even more unique character to this wonderful city.’’ Another correspondent, preferring anonymity, says she has noticed there is a new shelter almost at the gate of the recently­built Yvette Williams retirement home in Highgate. ‘‘Yes, it is seat­less. How ridiculous is that? Or perhaps the young staff at the DCC think that the elderly residents can’t possibly be able to catch a bus to town. Believe me, there are quite a few who do.’’ Ian McKay is also taking a keen interest in the bus­shelter saga and k it d t t th reckons its demonstrates they were
designed, approved and installed by people who will never have to use the bus service. ‘‘Until the employees of the ORC and DCC use the bus service to move around town, get to work on time and use the service, nothing will change.’’ Ian says he was in Auckland recently and took particular notice of the bus shelters there. ‘‘Len Brown may have his detractors but the Auckland council certainly knows what a bus shelter is supposed to look like.’’ A Roxburgh reader, Margaret McKinnel, reckons there was something familiar about Stephen Jaquiery’s eye­catching front­page photograph last Thursday, showing John Nolan, of Haast, herding a mob of calves across the Okuru River. Was the Appaloosa horse ‘‘Spot’’, being ridden by ‘‘J.J.’’, the same station hack which she had read about in the ODT, back in June 2006, she asks? In that story, Spot had been injured during a 10­day cattle muster and had had to be transported home for treatment in a jet­boat, 40km along the Arawhata River, being supported by four musterers. Well Margaret, the answer is yes, it’s the same ‘‘Spot’’, now an 18­year­ old, who, I’m told is ‘‘semi­retired’’ but still regarded as being a special part of the Nolan family. More thoughts from a reader on this getting old business that I’ve been pondering lately. Fred tells me it’s only when I start recognising some of the names in the ODT’s popular ‘‘100 Years Ago’’ column that I will really need to start worrying. ill ll d i ‘‘I’ve been worrying for a few years now,’’ he joked.

“All information contained herein is protected by copyright. You may not copy, reproduce, record, retransmit, sell, publish, distribute, share or store this information in any form or by any means without the prior written consent of the Print Media Copyright Agency. You may not remove any copyright notice or proprietary notices. Ph (04) 498-4488 or email info@pmca.co.nz for further information.”

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Southland Times
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Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 2 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Regional

Page : 1 of 2 Circulation : 29,002 Area Of Clip : 561.61 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000006 Clip ID 5941345

Camp brings cheer for families
Terri Russell
More than 50 parents and children affected by cancer attended an action-packed camp in Pukerau, near Gore, at the weekend. It was the first time child cancer organisations, Camp Quality and the Child Cancer Foundation, came together to deliver a two-day camp to celebrate Christmas. Child Cancer Foundation Otago Southland regional chairwoman Karen Heslip said the camp was a great outing for families that had battled with cancer. ‘‘The kids can mingle and have some fun without being in hospital. ‘‘They get to meet other families that could be in the same situation,’’ she said. The families that stayed overnight were served an early Christmas dinner and watched fireworks by a bonfire. There were plenty of activities to keep the children busy during the day, including a flying fox and waterslide. A highlight was a demonstration by the Pukerau fire service on how to use their fire equipment. Some children took hold of the fire hose as it powered water through the trees while others took a seat in the fire engine. Santa also made a visit to give presents to the children and parents were given a food hamper with locally donated produce. Organising committee member Sharon Stewart said it was a nice gesture to give parents a gift as well as the children. ‘‘It’s good to recognise and acknowledge the difficulties they have,’’ she said. Invercargill boy Brayden Te Amo, 10, said the camp was heaps of fun and a good chance to play and make new friends. Tuatapere parent Tracy Mulgrew said she went to the camp with her husband, Bill, and two sons Curtis, 10, and Travis 13, to have some fun and meet new people. Her daughter lost her battle with leukemia 11 years ago and it was good to talk to other parents whose children had suffered from the same condition, she said. Camp Quality are hosting a week-long camp in Queenstown from January 5 to 7. terri.russell@stl.co.nz

“All information contained herein is protected by copyright. You may not copy, reproduce, record, retransmit, sell, publish, distribute, share or store this information in any form or by any means without the prior written consent of the Print Media Copyright Agency. You may not remove any copyright notice or proprietary notices. Ph (04) 498-4488 or email info@pmca.co.nz for further information.”

Southland Times
Monday, November 26, 2012 Page : 2 Section : Edition : Region : New Zealand Regional

Page : 2 of 2 Circulation : 29,002 Area Of Clip : 561.61 sqcm Clip ID :: 0000006 Clip ID 5941345

Pumped up: Brayden Te Amo, 10, of Invercargill, and Pukerau senior firefighter Bernie Lieshout test the fire hose at a child cancer camp near Gore.
Photo: TERRI RUSSELL/FAIRFAX NZ 627357133

“All information contained herein is protected by copyright. You may not copy, reproduce, record, retransmit, sell, publish, distribute, share or store this information in any form or by any means without the prior written consent of the Print Media Copyright Agency. You may not remove any copyright notice or proprietary notices. Ph (04) 498-4488 or email info@pmca.co.nz for further information.”

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