Basic Cataloging and Classification

By

Ma. Luisa R. Madlangbayan
Librarian IV Supreme Court Library

OUTLINE
Definition of Terms II. Descriptive Cataloging a. Background of AACR b. Eight areas of bibliographic description III. Subject Cataloging a. Sears List of Subjects Headings b. Library of Science Subject Headings IV. Classification
I.

Definitions
CATALOGING – the preparation of bibliographic information for catalog records. - preparing entries for card catalog DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGING – The process which describes an items and identifies access points ACCESS POINT – A heading given to a catalogue or database record or entry in a bibliography which enables a user to find the item

MAIN ENTRY The entry in a library catalog that provides the fullest description of a bibliographic item, by which the work is to be uniformly identified and cited. In AACR2, the main entry is the primary access point. For most items, main entry is under name of author. When there is no author, main entry is under title.

SUBJECT CATALOGING – describing the content of a work using subject headings CLASSIFICATION – The process of dividing objects or concepts into logically hierarchical classes, subclasses, and sub-subclasses based on the characteristics they have in common and those that distinguish them. CALL NUMBER - A unique code printed on a label affixed to the outside of an item in a library collection, usually to the lower spine of a book

Descriptive Cataloging
AACR (Anglo American Cataloging Rules) – A set of rules for descriptive cataloging developed by the Library Association (Great Britain and the American Library Association. The rules are adopted by major libraries and translated into many other languages. The latest edition is 2002 in loose leaf format.

Eight Areas of Bibliographic Description
1.Title and Statement of Responsibility Area 2. Edition Area 3. Material Specific Details 4. Publication, distribution, etc. area 5. Physical description area 6. Series area 7. Note area 8. Standard number and terms of availability

025.3076 M67 1999
1st area 2nd area 5th area

Main entry

4th area

Mortimer, Mary Learn descriptive cataloguing/ by Mary Mortimer.-- 2nd edition.– Canberra : DocMatrix Pty Ltd., c1999. 239 p. :ill. ; 30 cm.– (Library education series). Includes bibliography and index.
6th area

ISBN 974-8279-70-7
8th area Tracing

7th area

1. Anglo American Cataloguing Rules—Problems, exercises, etc. 2. Cataloging—Problems, exercises, etc. I. Title. II. Series.

Z 687 Collection management for libraries and information C65 centers/ edited by Juan C. Buenrostro, Jr.– Quezon 1996 City : Great BooksTrading, c1996. ix, 129 p. : ill. ; 21 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 971-8581-16-2 1. Collection management (Libraries). 2. Information services. I. Buenrostro, Juan C. Jr., ed.

Main entry

I. Title and Statement of Responsibility Area
Basic Rule

Transcribe the title proper exactly as it is found in the chief source of information except that the punctuation and the capitalization found there need not be followed. The chief source of information in cataloging books is the Title Page.

Title Page

Statement of responsibility
Basic rules Always give the statement of responsibility that appears first in the chief source of information Example: Annie Hall : a nervous romance/ by Patrick Hamilton and Jonathan Raban

III. Edition Area Statement
Basic rules Give the edition statement as found 1. Replace words with standard abbreviations 2. Replace words with numbers where appropriate Example: New ed. (appears in item as New Edition) Rev. ed. (appears in item as Revised Edition) 3rd ed. (appears in item as Third Edition)

IV. Publication, distribution, etc. area
Basic rules In this area, give information relating to the publisher, distributor, etc. and the date of its publication, distribution, etc. If the material has two or more places of publication and two or more publishers, give the first named and publisher, distributor, etc.

IV. Publication, distribution, etc. area
Example: London : McGibbon & Kee, c1998 Quezon City : Rex Book Store, 2001. New York : Oxford University Press, c2010. Toronto : Modern Learning Aids, [1989].

V. Physical distribution area
Elements of physical distribution area 1. Extent of an item 2. Other physical details 3. Dimension 4. Accompanying material

V. Physical distribution area
Basic Rules Extent of an item Record the number of pages in the main numbered sequence (Single volume) Example iii, 258 p. 420 p.

V. Physical distribution area
Basic Rules Extent of an item Record the number of volumes in a multivolume book. Example 3 v. 21 v.

V. Physical distribution area
Basic Rules Other physical details If the material contains illustration, give “ill”. If all illustrations are colored give “ill. (col.) Example 32o p. : ill., photos (b&w) 420 p. : ill. (some col.)

V. Physical distribution area
Basic Rules Dimension Give the outside height in centimeters (cm.) to the next centimeter up. Example 350 p. : ill. ; 27 cm. 3 v. : ill. (col.) ; 25 cm.

V. Physical distribution area
Basic Rules Accompanying materials (is material issued with and intended to be used, with bibliographic resource being catalog). Give the number of physical units and the name of an significant accompanying materials. Example 3 v. : ill. ; 27 cm. + 1 Teachers manual (24 p.)

VI. Series area
Basic Rules Transcribe the title of the series as found on the bibliographic resources. Enclose series statement in parenthesis (). Give the numbering or other designation of the bibliographic resource within the series if that numbering appears on the item. Example (Library education series; no. 4)

VII. Note area
Basic Rules Give useful descriptive information that cannot be fitted into the rest of the description in a note. For most books, the presence of the auxiliary parts of the book (bibliography, glossary, index) are indicated in the note area. Example Includes bibliographical references and index.

VIII. Standard Number and Terms of Availability
Basic Rules Give the International Standard Book Number (ISBN) or International Standard Serial Number (ISSN). Give the number of physical units and the name of an significant accompanying materials. Example ISBN 1-85604-540-4

025.3076 M67 1999

Mortimer, Mary Learn descriptive cataloguing/ by Mary Mortimer.-- 2nd edition.– Canberra : DocMatrix Pty Ltd., c1999. 239 p. :ill. ; 30 cm.– (Library education series). Includes bibliography and index. ISBN 974-8279-70-7 1. Anglo American Cataloguing Rules—Problems, exercises, etc. 2. Cataloging—Problems, exercises, etc. I. Title. II. Series.

Tracing

SUBJECT CATALOGING
SUBJECT HEADING - The most specific word or phrase that describes the subject, or one of the subjects, of a work, selected from a list of preferred terms (controlled vocabulary) and assigned as an added entry in the bibliographic record to serve as an access point in the library catalog.

SUBJECT CATALOGING
SUBJECT ANALYSIS - Examination of a bibliographic item to determine the most specific subject heading(s) or descriptor(s) that fully describe its content, to serve in the bibliographic record as access points in a subject search of a library catalog.

SUBJECT HEADINGS LIST

CLASSIFICATION The basic principle of library classification is to group the library materials on the shelves according their subject content or sometimes literary or bibliographic form.

CLASSIFICATION
Purposes of Library Classification 1. It brings related items together in a helpful sequence 2. It provides formal orderly access to the shelves 3. It enables easy reshelving of library materials 4. It provides easy and fast retrieval of library materials

Dewey Decimal Classification

Dewey Decimal Classification
000 – 099 100 – 199 200 – 299 300 – 399 400 – 499 500 – 599 600 – 699 700 – 799 800 – 899 900 – 999 Computer science, information & general works Philosophy and psychology Religion Social sciences Language Science Technology Arts & recreation Literature History & geography

Library of Congress Classification

Library of Congress Classification
A -- GENERAL WORKS B -- PHILOSOPHY. PSYCHOLOGY. RELIGION C -- AUXILIARY SCIENCES OF HISTORY D --WORLD HISTORY AND HISTORY OF EUROPE, ASIA, AFRICA, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC. E -- HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS F -- HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS G -- GEOGRAPHY. ANTHROPOLOGY. RECREATION H -- SOCIAL SCIENCES J -- POLITICAL SCIENCE K -- LAW L – EDUCATION M -- MUSIC AND BOOKS ON MUSIC N -- FINE ARTS P -- LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Q – SCIENCE R -- MEDICINE S -- AGRICULTURE T – TECHNOLOGY U -- MILITARY SCIENCE V -- NAVAL SCIENCE Z -- BIBLIOGRAPHY. LIBRARY SCIENCE. INFORMATION RESOURCES (GENERAL)

Call Number

Call Number

References
Gorman, Michael. 2004. The concise AACR2. 4th ed. Chicago : American Library Association, 2004. Dittman, Helena and Jane Hardy. 2000. Learn LC classification. Canberra : DocMatrix Pty Ltd. Gates, Jean Key. 1983. Guide to the use of libraries and information sources. 5th ed. New York : McGrawHill. Mortimer, Mary. 1999. Learn descriptive cataloging. 2nd ed. Canberra : DocMatrix Pty Ltd. Mortimer, Mary. 1998. Learn Dewey Decimal Classification. Canberra : DocMatrix Pty Ltd. Reitz, Joan M. Online Dictionary for Library and Information Science. http://www.abc-clio.com/ODLIS/odlis_A.aspx