EFFECTS OF STORYTELLING ON CHILDREN & INCORPORATING GAMES IN THE LIBRARY

Joanna O. Siapno
De La Salle University

EFFECTS OF STORYTELLING ON CHILDREN & INCORPORATING GAMES IN THE LIBRARY
• Part I : CHILDREN & STORYTELLING • Part II : GAMING EXPERIENCE IN THE LIBRARY

Part I: CHILDREN & STORYTELLING

STORYTELLING is the art of using language, vocalization, and/or physical movement and gesture to reveal the elements and images of a story to a specific, live audience.

STORY - a narrative account of a real or imagined event or events TELLING - is the live, person-to-person oral and physical presentation of a story to an audience

STORYTELLING
• Storytelling is an interactive performance art form. • Storytelling is, by design, a co-creative process • Storytelling is, by its nature, personal, interpretive, and uniquely human. • Storytelling is a process, a medium for sharing, interpreting, offering the content and meaning of a story to an audience.

EVOLUTION OF STORYTELLING
• • • • Oral Tales Folk Tales Storytelling in kindergartens Storytelling in libraries

STORYTELLING
Librarians create an interest in reading by choice rather than reading by requirement.

STORYTELLING
Stories lead to questions, which lead to reading non fiction. How do I find out about that? Where is it? Help me do it myself! Tell me a story! Let me tell a story!

VALUES OF STORYTELLING
• • • • • Stimulates interest in reading Teaches and reinforces both oral and listening skills Enhances vocabulary and language development Helps foster self-confidence and poise Nurtures the imagination of students and assists them in mental visualization

VALUES OF STORYTELLING
• • • • • Offers outlets for creative expression Serves as a teaching tool Conveys awareness and appreciation of other cultures Gives fun experience Helps children connect with and understand themselves and other people

TIPS FOR STORYTELLING
I. Selecting a Story • Story should have a definite beginning, middle and end • Consider the age of the audience • Choose story that you enjoy

TIPS FOR STORYTELLING
II. Preparing a Story • Read the story several times, picture the events and hear the voices of the characters • Develop a clear outline of the story plot in your mind • Imagine your audience and practice telling the story aloud numerous times

TIPS FOR STORYTELLING
III. Telling a Story (for Successful Storytellers) • Use your natural voice • Speak loudly enough to be easily heard • Articulate clearly • Use pauses and changes of pace and pitch to create moods

TIPS FOR STORYTELLING
III. Telling a Story (for Successful Storytellers) • Use gestures when appropriate • Keep your face alive and expressive • Maintain eye contact with your listeners • Subordinate yourself to the story.

EXTENSION ACTIVITIES FOR STORIES
• • • • • Discuss possible other endings Interview the characters in a story Write a journal entry as one of the characters Make a comic strip Take turns retelling a story having each one tell a portion of the story

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF THE PHILIPPINES
• Storytelling (Saturday at 10:00 a.m.)

Alitaptap Storytellers Philippines
(Pre-schedule : Field trips or walk in) • Read aloud (Saturday at 10:00 a.m.) • Puppet Show (Saturday at 10:00 a.m. / Pre-schedule : Field trips or walk in)

Part II: GAMING EXPERIENCE IN THE LIBRARY
(Adapted from: Nicholson, S. 2010. Everyone plays at the library : creating great gaming experiences for all ages. New Jersey: Information Today.)

GAME is a form of play with goals and structure.

GAMES/GAMING IN THE LIBRARY?
• What do games have to do with books? • What does gaming have to do with literacy? • What does gaming have to do with information literacy? • Isn’t gaming noisy and disruptive? • What about gaming addiction?

GAMES/GAMING IN THE LIBRARY?
• • • • • Promotes learning / literacy Provides source of entertainment Supports the changing recreational needs Encourages interaction and build communities Changes image/perception of the library

The GAME versus The GAMING EXPERIENCE

GAMING & THE 21ST CENTURY LEARNER
• Inquire, think critically and gain knowledge • Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge • Share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of democratic society • Pursue personal and aesthetic growth

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER FOR THE GAMING EXPERIENCE
• What age groups are we looking to attract with gaming? • What kind of space do we have for the gaming program? • How long do we want the program to run? • What equipment do we already have?

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER FOR THE GAMING EXPERIENCE
• What other library programs or services would we like to integrate or promote? • What expertise do we have available? • What is the goal of the gaming program, and how does this fall in line with the goals and policies of the library?

GAMING EXPERIENCE ARCHETYPES
S N A K S - SOCIAL - NARRATIVE - ACTION - KNOWLEDGE - STRATEGY

KNOWLEDGE GAMING EXPERIENCES
 Environment – quiet environment and game-show environment  Types – educational games ; game show, trivia, and party games ; word games  Examples – quiz/drills, charades, scrabble, boggle  Library goal – support classroom experiences

STRATEGY GAMING EXPERIENCES
 Environment – quiet environment  Types – abstract strategy games ; mechanics-based board games ; card games ; digital games  Examples – chess, monopoly, Pokémon, puzzle games  Library goals – learn different life skills ; marketing of traditional library programs

ACTION GAMING EXPERIENCES
 Environment – noisy environment  Types – digital games ; dexterity games  Examples – dance revolution, Wii games, stacking games  Library goals – facilitate social interactions ; lure people in the library

NARRATIVE GAMING EXPERIENCES
 Environment – loud environment  Types – role-playing games  Examples – Dungeons & Dragons ; Lord of the Rings  Library goals – support reading-based literacy and information literacy

SOCIAL GAMING EXPERIENCES
 Environment – loud environment  Types – party games, strategy games, digital games  Examples – dance revolution, RPGs  Library goal – raise level of social interactions

GOALS OF GAMING
     Attracting underserved users Being a community hub Providing entertainment Serving active users Creating publicity

FACILITATING THE GAMING EXPERIENCE
     Preparing the games Preparing the space Preparing the volunteers and staff Facilitating the experience Limiting the choices

MARKETING AND PARTNERSHIPS
     Reaching out to existing patrons Understanding gamers Marketing to gamers Holding a regular gaming activity Developing a structure

MARKETING AND PARTNERSHIPS
    Bringing in the press Partnering with local game shops Partnering with clubs Engaging volunteers

http://sls.gvboces.org/gaming/

http://ngd.ala.org/

International Games Day @ your library is an initiative of the American Library Association to reconnect communities through their libraries around the educational, recreational, and social value of all types of games.

What do kids learn when they play games at the library?
Video games give kids a chance to practice reading, writing, and computing in the library’s safe environment. They learn a range of media literacies beyond basic reading that give them models for navigating our information-rich world.
-American Library Association

NOTES ON GAMING IN THE LIBRARY
• Gaming is more than video gaming • Gaming is not new to libraries • Gaming must meet the library goals derived from its mission • Gaming can be just one more service that the library provides • Gaming programs do not have to be expensive

NOTES ON GAMING IN THE LIBRARY
• Gaming is for ALL ages!

Questions?

Thank you.

REFERENCES
Bishop, K., & Kimball, M. A. (2006). Engaging students in storytelling. Teacher Librarian, 33(4), 28-31. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/224879261?accountid=28547 Czarnecki, K. N. (2010). Gaming in libraries. New York : Neal-Schuman Publishers. Hanson, A. (2005). Telling Stories in the School Library. Knowledge Quest, 33(5), 43-45. International games day @ your library : game on! Retrieved on 5 November 2012 from http://ngd.ala.org/ Levine, J. (2006). Why gaming? Library Technology Reports, 42(5), 10-17. Retrieved on 5 November 2012 from http://search.proquest.com/docview/202702934?accountid=28547 Nicholson, S. (2010). Everyone plays at the library : creating great gaming experiences for all ages. New Jersey: Information Today. Van Kleeck, A., Stahl, S. A., Bauer, E. B., eds. (2003). On reading books to children : parents and teachers. Mahwah, N.J. : L. Erlbaum Associates. Bishop, K., & Melanie, A. K. (2006). What is storytelling? Retrieved on 5 November 2012 from http://www.eldrbarry.net/roos/st_defn.htm