Cltlzoo lloooloo Cococlls.

locroosloo Clvlc |ooooo¬oot oou loclcslvo lloooloo lo
too Dotrolt Clty Coortor






Cootor Ior o Llvoblo Dotrolt
1ococolloo ßoj¬o
Wor|loo lopor, Vorco 2ull




2

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
How Cbor|er kevision o||ec|s Communi|y Advisory CounciIs
Residents of the City of Detroit spoke clearly in the last municipal election: more
transparent, effective and accountable government is a primary concern amongst
community members. Voters overwhelmingly approved electing council members by
district (instead of at-large) in an effort to check rampant corruption and to address a lack
of responsiveness to community needs.
The charter revision commission has been tasked with drafting a new charter that will
incorporate council members elected by district, and have the opportunity to drastically
impact the community involvement process that is so desperately needed in Detroit.
The Commission has agreed to consider the concept of Community Advisory Councils, a
provision that was included in the 1997 Charter, but removed by a November 1998
resolution of the Detroit City Council. The inclusion of newly structured Community
Advisory Councils in the new draft charter provides a unique opportunity to create a new,
inclusive, adaptable and responsive body that will allow residents to have a direct impact
on how their communities will look in the future.
Creating effective Community Advisory Councils (CAC) requires research into best
practices and case studies from other cities as well as thoughtful investigation into the
roles and responsibilities of current City commissions, departments and operating
procedures and the State of Michigan’s provision for Citizens’ District Councils.
Findings on this research along with recommendations for the framework of newly
structured CAC’s – renamed Citizen Planning Councils - in Detroit’s new draft charter
are outlined below.

wby De|roi| needs Ci|izen IIonninq CounciIs
The City of Detroit has a long history of civil unrest and top-down planning that has
negatively impacted its residents. Decades of urban renewal projects, government
subsidies for automotive plants, and an entrenched system of downtown development
strategies have left the residents of Detroit feeling like outsiders in their own city. Further
exacerbating the problem are generations of leadership that have preserved the practices
of the past, broad and deep corruption, severe racial and economic divides and
widespread unemployment. Detroiters are looking to each other, and to the city
government, to make significant changes that will make our city as vibrant as it was in
the 1920s – 1950s.
With the down-sizing of many of Detroit’s core industries and a sea change in the global
economic environment, the City is presented with an opportunity for change that must
include the participation and input of all community members. Residents clearly have an
interest in what happens in their future, as has been demonstrated in the massive turnouts
for community meetings to inform the public about Mayor Bing’s Detroit Works Project.
Initial meetings, intended to be roundtable sessions related to specific master planning
issues turned into Town Hall forums where residents unloaded years of concerns and
frustrations on the Mayor and his planning team. Residents cared less about urban farms
and boutique economic development and more about city services, education, public
transportation and jobs. Residents and city government lack a common language and goal
from which to begin the work of reshaping our City.
3

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
A revision of the city charter, with this divide between residents and municipal
government in mind, provides an opportunity to use the process to establish a common
vision for the city and basic standards for services.

The Charter Revision Commission has agreed to consider the concept of Community
Advisory Councils (CAC), a provision that was included in the 1997 Charter
1
, but
removed by a subsequent resolution of the Detroit City Council. The inclusion of
redesigned Citizen Planning Councils in the new draft charter provides a unique
opportunity to create a new, inclusive, adaptable and responsive framework that will
allow residents to have a direct impact on how their communities will look in the future.
Article 9, Chapter 1 of the 1997 Detroit Home Rule City Charter contains a provision for
Community Advisory Councils that have several objectives:
1. To clarify issues in the community;
2. To use proper procedures to access city government;
3. To disseminate information;
4. To provide advice to community representatives and city council on housing
development, commercial blight, safety and security, economic opportunity and
employment;
5. To assist in understanding the city charter;
6. To meet annually with the mayor and city council to discuss problems and needs
in the district
As currently written, CAC’s would have 7 members who are community residents and
are elected in regular municipal elections and one city council member. CAC’s are
established and dissolved by petition of 10% of qualified, registered community voters.,
receive no compensation, and the organization is to receive no city funding, but is
allowed to accept donations or grants. The CAC must hold at least four public meetings
annually.
The CAC is not an unusual system in municipal government. Many cities in the United
States and abroad engage a similar body to assist in community-based planning and
planning-related issues. Some systems work better than others, but each can provide
insight on how to create the most effective Citizen Planning Councils in Detroit.
In New York City, the Community Board system is employed to facilitate the 197-A
section of the City’s charter – the section that makes a provision for communities to
develop their own plans. Community boards have up to 50 members, all of whom are
appointed by the Borough President, and half of whom are subject to council approval.
Other cities across the United States have engaged communities in their futures; Seattle,
WA, Baltimore, MD, Buffalo and Rochester, NY and Portland, OR have all adopted
long-term master plans and have given communities full opportunity and funding to
create community-based plans that fit within the strategic framework created by those
master plans.
2

Seattle, Washington has created an Office of Neighborhoods that provides a citizen led
planning council with technical assistance and funding that will accommodate a projected
100,000 additional residents by 2024. Similarly, in Buffalo, New York, the Good

1
Charter of the City of Detroit, §9-101 through §9-103. Adopted by voters November 5, 1996.
2 Municipal Art Society, Livable Neighborhoods Report

=

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
Neighbors Planning Alliance helps residents to create neighborhood-based plans and is
tied directly to the city’s capital budget, allowing for effective creation and
implementation of these plans. In 2000, Baltimore, Maryland created the Neighborhood
Planning Program that places an emphasis on inclusion, participation and planning to
address a wide array of community issues.
3

The community-based planning process is a way to develop and redevelop areas with
specific community needs and challenges in mind, builds consensus among community
members and results in plans that are collaborative and have the potential to reach
common goals. However, research has shown that if advisory councils do not have the
cooperation of local government and are not given some authority over the decision-
making process, the level of civic engagement and effectiveness of the council will be
diminished.
4

The City of Detroit is in a position to both learn and innovate. The charter revision
process gives the opportunity to draft new guidelines that can ensure community input
and involvement. The Detroit Works Project will ostensibly establish a master land use
plan for the next 20-30 years that can be implemented by a new version of the CAC that
better reflects and implements community needs. However, the current provision in the
1997 charter for Community Advisory Councils is inadequate to address the multitude of
social, economic and physical planning issues in the City of Detroit, and provides for
little real community input or accountability into future development or redevelopment.
The Citizens’ District Council provides a more effective method of community
involvement in planning and redevelopment processes, but can only work within a
district system and lacks the technical representation and governmental cooperation that
is needed to develop and implement community-based plans.
Other cities have embraced a community-based planning process that can help to bridge
gaps in communication and understanding about civic engagement and community
development – gaps that are at the forefront in Detroit. The Community Boards of New
York, along with the 197-A charter provision are problematic for communities. Often,
board members, who are chosen almost solely at the discretion of the Borough President,
are not representative of the entire community, and an entrenched system has developed.
Further, while the 197-A provision allows communities to develop their own plans, the
system is weak in regard to inclusivity, funding and guarantees of implementation.
Further, New York City has not adopted a master plan, thus there are no benchmarks or
guidelines for communities to follow when developing plans.
5

Places like Seattle have different issues to address than Detroit – the main goal is to
create an effective growth management plan – but the inclusive and transparent process is
one that provides a good example for our City. Cities like Buffalo and Baltimore are
similar to Detroit in history and are facing many of the same problems – how to create a
vibrant city when growth management is not the issue, but rather, the management of
equitable development in a city that is much less dense than it once was.
There are several keys to the successful integration of community members into
development, redevelopment and planning processes. First, government must be willing

3 Municipal Art Society, CCBDP Legislation White Paper.

4 Silverman, Mark. “Citizens’ District Councils in Detroit: the promise and limits of using planning advisory boards to promote citizen participation.” 2003.

5
New York City Consumer Affairs Unit: http://www.nyc.gov/html/cau/downloads/pdf/community_board_basics.pdf
5

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
to accept citizen input and make information available to the public. Any plan for a city is
ultimately a plan for the residents of that city, and should be open for comment, concern
and suggestions. Next, governmental bodies like City Planning Commissions do little
actual planning, act in an advisory capacity for city councils, and have little interaction
with communities or their residents – a missed opportunity to provide each neighborhood
with special expertise that would help create more inclusive and equitable plans that truly
reflect community needs. Community-based planning groups, whether a local community
group, community development organization or block club, lack the technical and
financial resources to create professional plans, communicate those plans to the local
planning department or implement plans or ideas – any new iteration of a CAC must be
sufficiently funded. Finally, creating a body that is truly representative of the district and
will be responsible to the residents of that district is crucial to success.

kecommendo|ions
Below is a proposed revision to Article 9, Chapter 1 of the Detroit Home Rule City
Charter – a framework for Citizen Planning Councils. See Table 1, following the
proposed Article 9 revision for a comparison of Community Advisory Councils, Citzens’
District Councils and Citizen Planning Councils.

Pr Pr Pr Proposed Artiole 9, Chapter 1 of the Uetroit ¬ome Rule Citv Charter: oposed Artiole 9, Chapter 1 of the Uetroit ¬ome Rule Citv Charter: oposed Artiole 9, Chapter 1 of the Uetroit ¬ome Rule Citv Charter: oposed Artiole 9, Chapter 1 of the Uetroit ¬ome Rule Citv Charter:
Article 9: Miscellaneous Provisions
Chapter 1: Community Advisory Councils
Chapter 1: Citizen Planning Councils
Section 9-101.
Community Advisory Councils are established by ordinance by petition of city residents
Citizen Planning Councils will be created.
Community Advisory Councils are meant to improve citizen access to city government
The task of Citizen Planning Councils is to work with local residents, businesses, other
stakeholders, city government departments and agencies to assist with the creation of a Master
Plan and to create and implement comprehensive community-based plans that include the social,
economic and physical planning aspects of each district using the master plan adopted by the City
of Detroit as a guiding document.
City council creates advisory districts based on council districts or 9 contiguous districts of
roughly the same size
Citizen Planning Councils will be created in districts based on city council districts.

Section 9-102.
City council will accept the creation of a Community Advisory Council by ordinance
10% of qualified registered voters must sign the petition to create the Community Advisory
Council
Councils will have 8 members elected from the district
Citizen Planning Councils will have 9 members, determined as follows:
· (1)District City Council member (elected – acts as government liaison);
· (1)City Planning Commission member, to be renamed District Planner (city council
appointment, by district – provides technical expertise to create and implement plans in
conjunction with Planning & Development Department);
ó

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
· (1)Economic Development Department member (hired by Economic Development
Director, by district– provides technical expertise to create and implement plans in
conjunction with mayor’s office);
· (1)Human Rights Commission member (mayoral appointment-provides technical
assistance and acts as liaison with Police, Fire, and Public Works);
· (5) Citizen Commission Members (elected in each district in the general municipal
election-represents community needs).
Members must live in the district and be registered voters
Members must live in the district a minimum of two (2) years before election and must be
registered voters.
1 member of city council will also serve on the Community Advisory Council
Members are elected in regular municipal elections
Citizen Commission Members are elected in regular municipal elections.
Citizen Commission Members may not hold, or have held, any public office or appointment or sat
on the board of any commission, council, agency or department (aside from the Citizen Planning
Council) within two (2) years of nomination for election.
A Citizen Commission Member may be removed for cause by petition of district residents, signed
by 10% of the number of votes cast in the prior district election.
In case of vacancy, the remaining Citizen Commission Members will nominate a new member,
with the approval of the district city council member, who will serve until a permanent member
can be elected in the next regularly scheduled municipal election.
Members serve 4 year terms
Members serve 2 year terms.
City council members serving on the Community Advisory Council cannot chair the council
Chairperson of the Community Planning Council will be elected by the body at large, and must
be a Citizen Commission Member.
Members receive no compensation
Citizen Commission members will receive a per diem per meeting, up to 12 meetings per year, in
an amount to be established by city council.

Section 9-103.
City council provides procedures, powers and duties for Community Advisory Councils by
ordinance
Community Advisory Councils receive no city funds but may accept donations or grants
Citizen Planning Councils will be funded through appropriations of federal and state funds
typically allocated to the Planning & Development Department and the Planning Commission, in
an amount sufficient to professionally develop and implement community-based plans.
Community Advisory Councils can be dissolved by a petition signed by 10% of qualified,
registered voters
Community Advisory Councils will hold public meetings with reasonable public notice at least 4
times per year
Citizen Planning Councils will hold at minimum, one meeting per month that will be subject to
the Open Meetings Act, and any other meetings it deems necessary.
Community Advisory Councils have the power to communicate concerns about program and
service delivery to city council
Assist in community problem solving to:
1. Clarify issues
2. Use proper procedures to access city government
3. Disseminate information
7

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
4. Provide advice to community representatives and city council on housing development,
commercial blight, safety and security, economic opportunity and employment
5. Assist in understanding the city charter
6. Meet annually with the mayor and city council to discuss problems and needs in the
district
See above description of Citizen Planning Council objective.

8

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull

CAC/CDC/Proposed CPC Comparison Chart
Community Advisory Councils Citizens’ District Councils Citizen Planning Councils
Enabling Legislation 1997 Detroit City Charter State of Michigan Public Act 344 and
Detroit City Ordinance No. 429-H
2010 Detroit City Charter (proposed)
Legislation Location Article 9, Chapter 1: Community Advisory
Councils

Article VI, Detroit City Code Article 9, Chapter 1: Citizen Planning
Councils

Method of
Establishment
Community Advisory Councils are
established by ordinance by petition of city
residents.

Ordinance to implement the power
granted under PA 344, establishing a
method for participation and
representation by residents of a district in
an area where rehabilitation and
redevelopment are proposed.
Citizen Planning Councils will be
created.

Task/Purpose Community Advisory Councils are meant to
improve citizen access to city government.

Establishes a method for participation
and representation by residents of a
district area and by persons with a
demonstrable and substantial interest in
an area where rehabilitation and
redevelopment activities are proposed to
take place by the public sector.

The task of Citizen Planning Councils
is to work with local residents,
businesses, other stakeholders, city
government departments and agencies
to assist with the creation of a Master
Plan and to create and implement
comprehensive community-based
plans that include the social, economic
and physical planning aspects of each
district using the master plan adopted
by the City of Detroit as a guiding
document.
Geographic Guideline City council creates advisory districts based
on council districts or 9 contiguous districts of
roughly the same size.
A citizens' district council shall be
established for each district area
designated by the city council.

Citizen Planning Councils will be
created in districts based on city
council districts.

Creation/Acceptance City council will accept the creation of a
Community Advisory Council by ordinance




Mandatory Mandatory
9

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
Voter Qualification for
Establishment
10% of qualified registered voters must sign
the petition to create the Community Advisory
Council.

Persons eligible to vote in district council
elections must fulfill one of the following
requirements:
Be a citizen eighteen (18) years of age or
older who resides in the district area;
Be a noncitizen resident of the district
area who is eighteen (18) years of age or
older and registered with the U.S.
Immigration Service;
Be a person with substantial and
demonstrable interest in the area.
Voters must be qualified, registered
voters and residents of the district.
Size of body Councils will have 8 members elected from
the district

Each CDC shall consist of not less than
twelve (12) nor more than twenty-four
(24) members. Membership to the
citizens' district council shall be attained
either by mayoral appointment or by
election. Eight (8) members shall serve
one-year terms; Two (2) members shall
serve two-year terms; Two (2) members
shall serve three-year terms.

6 members are elected, a maximum of 6
members are mayoral appointments.

Special rules apply for newly created
CDCs.

Citizen Planning Councils will have 9
members, determined as follows:
(1)District City Council member
(elected – acts as government liaison);
(1)City Planning Commission
member, to be renamed District
Planner (city council appointment, by
district – provides technical expertise
to create and implement plans in
conjunction with Planning &
Development Department);
(1)Economic Development
Department member (hired by
Economic Development Director, by
district– provides technical expertise to
create and implement plans in
conjunction with mayor’s office);
(1)Human Rights Commission
member (mayoral appointment-
provides technical assistance and acts
as liaison with Police, Fire, and Public
Works);
(5) Citizen Commission Members
(elected in each district in the general
municipal election-represents
community needs).
lu

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
Residency Requirement
for Members
Members must live in the district and be
registered voters

In order to be eligible for candidacy for
election to a district council, a person
must:
(1)
Reside within the district council area;
(2)
Be a registered voter in the district area at
the time the nominee petition is filed;
and,
(3)
File a nominating petition containing
signatures of at least ten (10) and not
more than thirty (30) registered voters
who reside in the citizens' district council
area. The nominating petition must be
filed at the Detroit election commission
no later than thirty (30) days prior to the
scheduled date of election.
Members must live in the district a
minimum of two (2) years before
election and must be registered voters.

City Council
Representation
1 member of city council will also serve on
the Community Advisory Council.

The director of the community and
economic development department or the
designated deputy shall serve as ex
officio on the citizens' district council,
without vote. The foregoing city
department shall have the responsibility
for administering the requirements of this
article which pertain to liaison between
the citizens' district council and the city
agencies.









District City Council Member will be a
member of the Citizen Planning
Commission.
ll

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
Elections Members are elected in regular municipal
elections

Notice of the election shall be distributed
throughout the district area to each
resident, property owner, place of
business or institution at least forty (40)
days but not more than sixty (60) days
prior to the election.
Notice of election shall contain a map of
the district area for which the election is
being held. It shall also contain a
summary of election and candidacy
procedures and requirements.
The first special election and all
subsequent annual elections for citizens'
district councils shall be conducted by the
Detroit Election Commission pursuant to
rules which it will adopt in accordance
with the rule making procedures set forth
in the Charter for the city. These rules
shall be in conformity with the
requirements of this article and Public
Act No. 344 of 1945, as amended [MCL
125.71 et seq., MSA 5.3501 et seq.].
The election commission shall consult
with the coordinating council on
community redevelopment in preparing
rules of procedure for holding district
council elections. The rules shall be
adopted by the city council after a public
hearing is held.
Citizen Commission Members are
elected in regular municipal elections.
Citizen Commission Members may not
hold, or have held, any public office or
appointment or sat on the board of any
commission, council, agency or
department (aside from the Citizen
Planning Council) within two (2) years
of nomination for election.
A Citizen Commission Member may
be removed for cause by petition of
district residents, signed by 10% of the
number of votes cast in the prior
district election.
In case of vacancy, the remaining
Citizen Commission Members will
nominate a new member, with the
approval of the district city council
member, who will serve until a
permanent member can be elected in
the next regularly scheduled municipal
election.

Term Length Members serve 4 year terms

Eight (8) members shall serve one-year
terms;
Two (2) members shall serve two-year
terms;
Two (2) members shall serve three-year
terms


Members serve 2 year terms.

l2

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
Chairperson of Body City council members serving on the
Community Advisory Council cannot chair
the council

Not specified Chairperson of the Community
Planning Council will be elected by
the body at large, and must be a
Citizen Commission Member.

Compensation Members receive no compensation

Not specified. Citizen Commission members will
receive a per diem per meeting, up to
12 meetings per year, in an amount to
be established by city council.


Rules City council provides procedures, powers and
duties for Community Advisory Councils by
ordinance.

The Community and Economic
Development department has
responsibility for administering the
requirements of this article which pertain
to liaison between the citizens' district
council and the city agencies.
Defined by task/mission/purpose.
Body will make its own rules of
operation.
Funding Community Advisory Councils receive no city
funds but may accept donations or grants.

Citizens' district councils may, after
consultation with the community and
economic development department, be
eligible for funding for staff where
project activities are underway
Citizen Planning Councils will be
funded through appropriations of
federal and state funds typically
allocated to the Planning &
Development Department and the
Planning Commission, in an amount
sufficient to professionally develop
and implement community-based
plans.











l3

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
Dissolution Community Advisory Councils can be
dissolved by a petition signed by 10% of
qualified, registered voters

A public hearing shall be held by the city
council at least nine (9) months prior to
any proposed discontinuance of a
citizens' district council and then for
cause only. Examples of cause shall be
the completion of physical project
activities as defined in the adopted
development plan or failure of the city to
attain development funds for the project.
Should a designated district area be
discontinued by action of city council or
by operation of state legislation, then the
district for that district area shall be
discontinued.
If a citizens' district council is to be
discontinued, formal written notice of
such proposed action must be given by
the city council to the citizens' district
council.



Cannot be dissolved.
Meetings Community Advisory Councils will hold
public meetings with reasonable public notice
at least 4 times per year

The district council shall hold meetings
regularly, at least once each month, and
shall designate the time and place thereof.
It shall adopt its own rules of procedure
and shall keep a record of its proceedings.
All meetings and records of the council
shall be public. A majority of the
members of the council shall constitute a
quorum for the transaction of business.
Available positions which were not filled
by election or appointment shall not be
counted in determining a quorum



Citizen Planning Councils will hold at
minimum, one meeting per month that
will be subject to the Open Meetings
Act, and any other meetings it deems
necessary.

l=

ClJl2|N lLANNlNG COuNClL8.
lNCk|A8lNG ClvlC |NGAG|V|NJ AND lNCLu8lv| lLANNlNG lN Ju| D|JkOlJ CuAkJ|k
ߥ. C|NJ|k |Ok A LlvAßL| D|JkOlJ, 1ACOu|LlN| ß|1VA÷ VAkCu 2ull
Task/Mission/Purpose Community Advisory Councils have the
power to communicate concerns about
program and service delivery to city council
and to:
Clarify issues
Use proper procedures to access city
government
Disseminate information
Provide advice to community representatives
and city council on housing development,
commercial blight, safety and security,
economic opportunity and employment
Assist in understanding the city charter
Meet annually with the mayor and city council
to discuss problems and needs in the district


The purpose of a citizens' district council
is to advise the appropriate city
departments on planning and
development as well as other matters
delineated in Public Act No. 344 of 1945,
as amended [MCL 125.71 et seq., MSA
5.3501 et seq.] for the district area it
represents.
District councils, to the extent consistent
with Public Act No. 344 of 1945 as
amended, [MCL 125.71 et seq., MSA
5.3501 et seq.] shall work with and
through appropriate city agencies and in
particular with the director and staff of
the community and economic
development department which is the city
department responsible for administering
programs carried out under Public Act
No. 344 of 1945 as amended [MCL
125.71 et seq., MSA 5.3501 et seq.].

The task of Citizen Planning Councils
is to work with local residents,
businesses, other stakeholders, city
government departments and agencies
to assist with the creation of a Master
Plan and to create and implement
comprehensive community-based
plans that include the social, economic
and physical planning aspects of each
district using the master plan adopted
by the City of Detroit as a guiding
document.