most titles through 12/31/12 online and in stores.

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BOOKS OF THE

The Travelers’ Local Bookstore

2012 BOOK OF THE YEAR
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DROP DEAD HEALTHY
BY A.J. JACOBS
Simon & Schuster $16.00

See last page for exclusive A.J. Jacobs essay.
This is first ‘health book’ I’ve read that was hilarious and covered every part of the body, but not in that way that wouldn’t be able to hold your attention. It’s amazing how Jacobs actually applies so many theories and related studies. This book is downright hilarious and should have a ‘laugh out loud’ warning for anyone who reads it in public (unless you like the weird looks from people around you). Great read, funny, and helpful all wrapped into one book. – Mark, General Manager, Roanoke, VA
Excerpt from Drop Dead Healthy It occurs to me that writing a book about health is not healthy. In fact, writing any book is bad for you. There’s the sedentary lifestyle (which I’ve curbed somewhat with my treadmill desk.). There’s the isolation – being alone breeds depression, which helps explain the absurd number of authors who’ve come to unhappy endings (Hemingway, Woolf, Plath – I could fill up the rest of the page). And then there’s the pressure. I’m way behind schedule. My publisher keeps reminding me of my deadline, and I keep replying that deadlines are incompatible with health. As are book releases. If and when my book comes out, what if I get the flu or an eye infection or something? I worry about that a lot. “You see the world’s healthiest man?” they’ll say. “He’s the one in the corner with a hacking cough.”

bestbooks of the
non fiction
The Finish -by Mark Bowden
Other books about the killing of Bin Laden may have made more headlines this year but no book gives a more complete picture of the events surrounding the mission than The Finish. Bowden’s insight into the special ops community provides a rich background to the mission. If you are like me and Blackhawk Down is your favorite military book then you will not be able to put The Finish down until you reach the last page. – Justin, Marketing Manager, Atlanta, GA

YEAR
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Atlantic Monthly Press $26.00

Mortality -by Christopher Hitchens
Christopher Hitchens’ final book, Mortality, is written in his usual penetrating, intelligent and witty style and considering that he was going through harrowing treatment for esophageal cancer at the time of its composition this in itself is a remarkable achievement. He continued to engage in writing this deeply personal and philosophical series of essays right up to his death making the book’s final chapter, a collection of fragments and half articulated thoughts all the more haunting. – Anne, Buyer, Atlanta, GA

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Twelve $22.99

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened -by Jenny Lawson
On some level each of us wants to ‘fit in’. Some of us achieve that goal, some of us don’t and then there is Jenny Lawson. Her “mostly true memoir” is one of the few books I have read that has made me laugh out loud and the ONLY book that made me call various friends around the country to read chapters to them over the phone. My long suffering husband actually asked me to refrain from reading it in bed because, not only was I laughing so hard I was disturbing his beauty sleep, I kept reading passages out loud to him further interrupting said beauty sleep (the chapter entitled “A Series Of Helpful Post-it Notes I Left Around The House for My Husband This Week” was a big hit in that regard). By the end of the book you will not only have laughed yourself into an acute tizzy but you will also feel like you have found the friend that all of us are truly looking for, the friend that can appreciate and point out the absurdities in life but the friend that makes you feel like you truly do fit in. – Shannon, Regional Book Manager, Chicago, IL

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Putnam $25.95

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bestbooks of the

YEAR

non fiction
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Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power -by Jon Meacham
Thomas Jefferson was a master politician. While he hated confrontation, he was able to persuade and use proxies to navigate a very young country through a very contentious, partisan era rife with economic issues and foreign threats. While he had many passions – science, architecture, food, family, women – Meacham shows us Jefferson’s drive for power, progress and individual liberty. He was a man of many contradictions which are not excused but examined in the context of his times. – Sydne, Buyer, Atlanta, GA

Random House $35.00

How to be a Woman -by Caitlin Moran
Caitlin Moran is so funny. The last thing I thought I wanted to read was a book about feminism. But, I devoured How To Be a Woman. OK, I blushed A LOT and hoped that no one was reading over my shoulder. With opinions on pornography, big undies, her childhood love for Chevy Chase, slang for body parts, wedding trauma, sexism, childbearing and abortions, Lady Gaga and David Bowie, she’s daring, revealing, righteous, and (despite her sarcasm) poignant. You (and not just you women) MUST read this book! – Sara, Vice President, Atlanta, GA

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Harper Perennial $15.99

Joseph Anton -by Salman Rushdie
In 1989 I worked in a chain bookstore situated in a strip mall in La Jolla, California. The only Salman Rushdie I had read was something called Grimus, a fantastical flibbertigibbet of a book. It was disappointing. Having heard good things I had more recently considered picking up Midnight’s Children but the lingering stink of Grimus had dissuaded me and anyway who cares about the Booker prize? It 20% would be years before I corrected this mistake but once I did I quickly went on to read and enjoy many of Rushdie’s other novels. I am now a fan. OFF But back to 1989. In February word came to us from on corporate high regarding the special handling of Rushdie’s new book, The Satanic Verses. We were told to merchandise the book towards the back of the store, given directions on how to handle odd phone queries and told to report anything suspicious; pretty much a perfect recipe for paranoia. All because of something called a fatwa. This was a word I had Random House never heard before. $30.00 And of course speculation ran wild. We scanned the strip mall parking lot looking for strange vehicles or men in robes. We exchanged unsettling accounts of odd behaviors exhibited by our clientele; actually this last bit wasn’t a new practice. I don’t remember who first came in wearing one of those “I am Salman Rushdie” buttons. It wasn’t me. Nor was it me who placed 3 ribbons of the book in the middle of our front window. It would be nice to say otherwise but such is nostalgia: ever the challenge is to avoid lying to yourself. It was then with a certain sense of nostalgia that I came to Rushdie’s new book, Joseph Anton; his account of his years spent living under the shadow of that fatwa. You don’t have to be a Rushdie fan to enjoy this book. Aside from being a straight forward autobiography and compelling account of his dark decade the book serves also as a bracing defense of free speech, and a case study of the recent history of militant Islam and the ever volatile Middle East. And of course given the fame and life style of the author we find here aspects of the ‘tell-all’. The book is rife with celebrity gossip and name dropping. Some people go for this, me not so much but the book possesses so much else of merit that I am willing to overlook this occasional shortcoming. Much has been made of Rushdie’s decision to tell his story in the third person and for good reason. The strategy allows him sufficient authorial distance from the subject while also granting him access to the novelistic tool box. He takes full advantage. The book is fascinating, granting an inside view of the process of being taken into government protection while also providing a sense of historical and biographical scope and establishing context over the whole. – Matt, Vice President, Los Angeles, CA

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bestbooks of the
non fiction
The End of Your Life Book Club -by Will Schwalbe
Reader Alert: If you truly are a book lover, you will be unable to put this book down! The author, who has worked in publishing as an editor-in-chief, and as a journalist, tells a very personal story of his recent time with his mother in what he calls a 2-person Book Club. As he takes his mother to chemotherapy treatments, they develop a tradition of reading the same book so they have that in common to talk about during long hours in the hospital waiting room. What this book brings to the reader is a story of a very unusual family; a mother whose life has been extraordinary, a powerful love between mother and son, and a testament to what the power of books and reading can be in our lives. Prepare to immerse yourself in a smorgasbord of books! – Margaret, Bookseller, Pittsburgh, PA

YEAR
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Knopf $25.00

Wild -by Cheryl Strayed
Some women deal with a life crisis by splurging on something expensive or updating their appearance. Cheryl Strayed, however, hikes the Pacific Crest trail…alone...with no former backpacking experience. A memoir about a woman’s grief and her mission to come to peace with a divorce and the death of her mother, Wild is powerful and profoundly honest. You will feel the suspense, the heart-break, and the overwhelming joy that comes with trying something so bold and gutsy after going through a time when just getting out of bed was a struggle. – Georgia, Bookseller, Roanoke, VA

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Knopf $25.95

Comet’s Tale -by Steven Wolf
Comet’s Tale is an extraordinary story that cuts to the heart. Comet was an abandoned race dog that ended up as a withdrawn fosterling until Steven Wolf entered her foster home. Steven had a serious spinal condition making everyday tasks challenging, so adopting a Greyhound seemed an overwhelming endeavor. But Comet had been gifted with superb intuitive abilities that kicked in the moment she set eyes on Steven. Comet knew Steven needed her. That was the day Steven’s life changed forever. Their life journey is full of humorous antics, failures and successes as Comet is trained to become Steven’s service dog. It speaks so highly of this gentle breed of dog. This emotionally charged book is a MUST READ! – Valerie, Bookstore Supervisor, Cleveland, OH (owner of a former cancer detecting/hospice volunteer Greyhound)

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Algonquin Books $23.95

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bestbooks of the
Bookseller Favorites
1. 2. 3. 4.

YEAR

Matt Vice President, Los Angeles, CA
Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan Mortality by Christopher Hitchens Music for Chameleons by Truman Capote (1980) What to make of the work and career of Truman Capote? One of the most gifted prose stylists of his generation, author of the ground breaking non-fiction novel, In Cold Blood, raconteur and high society gadfly; Capote nevertheless is looked upon as someone who didn’t quite stack up. He left more than a little on the table is the sentiment most often voiced. And this is maybe true, probably in no small part due to his active social life and near constant self-promotion, not to mention his liberal use of various substances (controlled or otherwise). Certainly he was not as prolific as his noted rivals Norman Mailer and Gore Vidal. Nor did Capote excel in the long form novel so often associated in people’s minds with literary accomplishment. Much of Capote’s best loved work comes in the form of novella or short story. This year I went on a Capote jag, careening thru Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Other Voices, Other Rooms, The Grass Harp and finally, Music for Chameleons. Any of the other titles could have made my list but I chose Music for Chameleons because it is so representative of Capote’s many gifts. In it you will find reportage of the first order, a haunting true crime novella that reads like the perfect whodunit, and poetic short stories that evoke the subtlest shades of human emotion. 5. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline (2011) 6. Joseph Anton by Salman Rushdie 7. The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving by Jonathan Evison 8. Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain 9. Damascus by Joshua Mohr (2011) 10. West of the West by Mark Arax (2011)

Bookseller Favorites

Anne Book Buyer, Atlanta, GA
1. Mortality by Christopher Hitchens 2. How to be a Woman by Caitlin Moran 3. Dodger by Terry Pratchett 4. Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance by Lois McMasters Bujold 5. Hide Me Among the Graves by Tim Powers 6. No Safety in Numbers by Dayna Lorentz 7. Spark by Brigid Kemmerer 8. Storm by Brigid Kemmerer 9. Master & God by Lindsey Davis 10. The False Prince by Jennifer A. Nielsen Beware of beginning The False Prince as it is the first book in a brand-new trilogy, the rest of the series cannot come out soon enough!

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bestbooks of the
Bookseller Favorites
Justin Marketing Manager, Atlanta, GA
1. The Dog Stars by Peter Heller 2. The Finish by Mark Bowden 3. Makers by Chris Anderson If the idea of being able to make that plastic thingamajig that broke on your car instead of going to the auto parts store to buy one intrigues you, buy this book now. Manufacturing is being digitized and democratized and could possibly be the next big thing for you to do with your free time. 4. This Machine Kills Secrets by Andy Greenberg 5. The Walking Dead Book 8 by Robert Kirkman 6. The Twelve by Justin Cronin 7. Chew Volume 5: Major League Chew by John Layman 8. Nocturnal by Scott Sigler 9. Locke & Key Volume 5: Clockworks by Joe Hill 10. The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving by Jonathan Evison

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Bookseller Favorites
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Shannon Regional Book Manager, Chicago, IL
The Prisoner of Heaven by Carlos Ruiz Zafon Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon Sacre Bleu by Christopher Moore Building Stories by Chris Ware America Again by Stephen Colbert Wherever I Wind Up by R. A. Dickey In Wherever I Wind Up, Major League baseball knuckleballer R.A. Dickey tries his hand at writing his first book. Although it is clearly not written by the pen of a professional writer, R.A. creates an achievement of storytelling, casually telling the tale of a struggle from poverty and abuse to achievement in the major leagues. In a sport where egos often rule, Dickey holds back none of the embarrassing details of his childhood including growing up with alcohol abuse, facing childhood molestation and even wetting his pants just because he didn’t care. A teenage sensation in sports, Dickey’s dreams came crashing down when he lost his signing bonus and his prospect status on the same day, when an MRI in his team physical for the Rangers showed he lacked an ulnar collateral ligament in his pitching arm. While combating his personal demons, Dickey battled back by teaching himself to pitch the most elusive and mysterious pitch in baseball, the knuckleball. Released in the beginning of the 2012 season, where the 37-year-old Dickey pitches a Cy Young caliber performance rivaling the best pitchers in baseball, Wherever I Wind Up is a quick and pleasurable read that seems destined for a movie deal.

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bestbooks of the
The Twelve -by Justin Cronin

YEAR

fiction
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My personal pick for the Best Book of 2012 just so happens to be the sequel to my personal pick for Best Book of the last decade. Justin Cronin ups the ante in the follow up to 2008’s The Passage. Cronin goes back to the time before the fall to better explain the rise of the Virals and the fall of civilization as we know it. The original storyline picks up shortly after where it left off in the previous book, showing us how the times are changing. The characters that readers fell in love with in the first book are given more page time and are fleshed out into living, breathing people who become your best friends. Be forewarned, this book leaves you wanting more! Long after I read the last sentence of Cronin’s unbelievably brilliantly woven story, I found myself wishing I was back with these characters following more of their adventures as they battle the Virals for survival. – Josh, Bookstore Manager, Chicago, IL

Ballantine Books $28.00

Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend -by Matthew Dicks
I just finished this wonderful book & I’m drying my eyes it was that good. Growing up I didn’t have an imaginary friend, but I could have used one exactly like the one in this book, Budo, looking back, maybe, in geometry class, to give me the answers because the nun was a really mean evil one. The character, Budo, was so thoughtful, helpful, independent, unselfish & funny. Read this “can’t put down book” for a really good story about friendship and courage. – Susan, Bookstore Manager, Pittsburgh, PA

St. Martin’s Press $24.99

The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving -by Jonathan Evison
From page one, Evison’s emotions are unmistakable. The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, the newest novel by Jonathan Evison, shows us another layer of this talented author. His debut novel, All About Lulu, was a poignant coming of age story, his next book West of Here, was an epic saga, and now we learn about the courage it takes to take the next step. Ben has lost his children, wife and livelihood, and at rock bottom, takes a class to become a caregiver. His first assignment is Trevor, a nineteen year-old, with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The lack of control they both have over their lives bonds them and leads them on a life altering journey. – Sandra, Bookstore Manager, Seattle, WA

Algonquin Books $23.95

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bestbooks of the
Bookseller Favorites
Sara Vice President
The Dog Stars by Peter Heller Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter How to be a Woman by Caitlin Moran God’s Middle Finger by Richard Grant (2008) You have got to read this book! The jacket blurbs are no hyperbole. It is simply fabulous travel & adventure writing, and I couldn’t put it down. The blend of machismo & mysticism that Grant encounters is surreal. The land is wild & magnificent. And Grant himself is an ideal companion; intrepid, witty, and insightful. I kept reading sections out loud to anyone who would listen. 5. Drop Dead Healthy by A. J. Jacobs 6. We Learn Nothing by Tim Kreider 7. Everybody Loves Our Town by Mark Yarm (2011) 8. City of Bohane by Kevin Barry (2011) 9. Things That Are by Amy Leach 10. Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan
1. 2. 3. 4.

YEAR

Bookseller Favorites

Susan Bookstore Manager, Pittsburgh, PA
1. The Flight of Gemma Hardy by Margot Livesey 2. The Soldier’s Wife by Margaret Leroy (2011) 3. The Inn at Rose Harbor by Debbie Macomber 4. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien 5. An Invisible Thread by Laura Schroff & Alex Tresniowski (2011) 6. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (2010) 7. Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks 8. Hearts, Smarts, Guts, & Luck by Anthony K. Tjan 9. Fifty Shades of Grey by E L James 10. The Marriage Bargain by Jennifer Probst

Bookseller Favorites
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Josh Bookstore Manager, Chicago, IL
The Twelve by Justin Cronin Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King Mud, Sweat, and Tears by Bear Grylls Cyndi Lauper: A Memoir Whether you’re a fan of Cyndi Lauper the musician, a proponent of Cyndi Lauper the actress, or a supporter of Cyndi Lauper the activist, this book is an exceptional read for any fan of the musician biography. This memoir, penned by Cyndi Lauper herself, follows the Renaissance woman through her thirty year career, from her years as a troubled teen punk rocker all the way through her present duties as a mother. This is a must read for fans of Patti Smith’s Just Kids! 6. My Life as a White Trash Zombie by Diana Rowland (2011) 7. Breed by Chase Novak 8. White Horse by Alex Adams 9. The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater 10. Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter

VISIT WWW.HUDSONBOOKSELLERS.COM FOR SPECIAL OFFERS.

bestbooks of the
Gone Girl -by Gillian Flynn

YEAR

fiction
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Gone Girl is Gillian Flynn’s breakout novel. This stunningly dark thriller is brilliant. There’ve been ‘missing wife’ novels written before where the husband is suspect #1 but this one will snatch you and test your ability to hold on through the ride. The wife (Amy) and husband (Nick) tell their stories through alternating voices (Amy by journals) that when put together form this skillful thriller that is sure to become a genre classic. – Ron, Regional Book Manager, Los Angeles, CA

Crown $25.00

The Dog Stars -by Peter Heller
I came to The Dog Stars both curiously and skeptically. Peter Heller has written some very good nonfiction. In fact, The Whale Warriors is one of my favorite books. But a poetic novel about the few remaining survivors of a flu pandemic? In retrospect, there is a sensibility and style that I love which informs all of Heller’s work. And I needn’t have worried about The Dog Stars. The rare imperfections make it human. And that is one of its central questions – it makes us think about what that really means. Also about the myriad connections that create and sustain life on this planet, and what happens when they fall apart. There is a scene in which the main character, Hig, has to calculate and recalculate the weight he’s taking onto his Cessna in preparation for a desperate take-off from a short runway. “Not a regulation take-off.” It is terrifying, and when he clears the trees, exhilarating. The Dog Stars as a whole is more than a little like that take-off. It is risky, adventurous and unfashionably earnest. But, like poetry and the wings of Hig’s plane, it is well-crafted, and it bears the weight, if only just. Unapologetically romantic, in the old sense of the word, The Dog Stars is unbearably sad, acerbically funny, a riveting adventure, and piercingly hopeful. I love it. – Sara, Vice President, Atlanta, GA

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Knopf $24.95

Flight Behavior -by Barbara Kingsolver
In Barbara Kingsolver’s newest novel, she returns to Appalachia where Dellarobia Turnbow lives with her husband and two kids on her in-laws’ sheep farm. On the verge of changing her stifled life, she witnesses a natural phenomenon that changes her in ways she never could have imagined. This amazing novel illuminates the clashes between faith and science: immediate needs and long-term goals, and studying life and actually living it. – Sydne, Buyer, Atlanta, GA

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Harper $ 28.99

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bestbooks of the
fiction
The Yellow Birds -by Kevin Powers
Iraq war vet and author Kevin Powers has delivered a war novel worthy of the many comparisons it has received to classics like The Things They Carried and All Quiet on the Western Front. On its face, the story is intriguing. Told in non-chronological episodes it chronicles the training and deployment, and war’s aftermath of two young soldiers who become quick friends. Beyond the plot lines, though, Powers has created a powerful story that reflects on things much larger than the experience of just one or two soldiers. That all being said, I would recommend reading this book based on the sheer quality of the writing even if what I’ve already said doesn’t grab your attention. Striking images abound. Powers has an undeniably poetic touch. – Kevin, Bookseller, Denver, CO

YEAR
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Little, Brown & Company $24.99

The Light Between Oceans -by M.L. Stedman
In this debut novel Tom Sherbourne is a lighthouse keeper on the isolated island of Janus Rock where he lives with his wife, Isabel. They have been trying unsuccessfully to have a baby. A day after Isabel’s stillbirth a boat washes up on shore. Inside it they find a baby crying and a dead man presumed to be the baby’s father. After much conflict between Tom and Isabel they decide to claim the baby as their own. This decision becomes a very tangled web when they return to the mainland as others will be impacted by the ramifications of their deceitful act. The characters are brought to life in this heartbreaking and thought provoking book. It will haunt readers long after its end. – Valerie, Bookstore Supervisor, Cleveland, OH

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Scribner $25.00

Beautiful Ruins -by Jess Walter
The award-winning author of national bestseller The Financial Lives of the Poets returns with a gorgeously romantic new book. Called by Richard Russo “an absolute masterpiece” Beautiful Ruins is the story an ill-fated love affair that begins on the Italian coast in 1962 and is rekindled in Hollywood fifty years later. At turns funny and elegiac Beautiful Ruins stakes new territory for a writer of great promise and accomplishment. – Matt, Vice President, Los Angeles, CA

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Harper $25.99

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bestbooks of the
Alif the Unseen -by G. Willow Wilson

YEAR

fiction

Alif the Unseen introduces the reader to a fantastical world as the Arab Spring unfolds. Combining cyber hackers, jinn, and a popular revolt, G. Willow Wilson has created a thriller that works on all levels. Alif also serves as a gateway to the Muslim faith, easily accessible to readers of the East or West. The character Alif serves as the everyman as he is transported across the spectrum of the Arab culture. Wilson’s Alif the Unseen is readily compared to the early works of Neil Stephenson and William Gibson. – Ed, Manager of Inventory Planning & Analysis, Atlanta, GA

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Grove Press $25.00

Bookseller Favorites

Georgia Bookseller, Roanoke, VA
1. The Twelve by Justin Cronin 2. Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed This is one of those books you try not to read too fast because you want to make it last as long as possible. Life can be hard, but Strayed’s words are all at once honest and full of comfort and encouragement. Set aside any reservations you have about self- help books, because this one deserves its own genre. Keep it on your shelf to go back to later or share it with a friend who is going through a rough spot. Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on love and life from Dear Sugar is timeless, life- changing and beautifully written. 3. No Easy Day by Mark Owen 4. The Orchardist by Amanda Coplin 5. The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman 6. Wild by Cheryl Strayed 7. Divergent by Veronica Roth (2011) 8. Ten Girls to Watch by Charity Shumway 9. Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver 10. The Dog Stars by Peter Heller

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bestbooks of the
Bookseller Favorites

YEAR

Ron Regional Book Manager, Los Angeles, CA
1. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn 2. The Twelve by Justin Cronin 3. Drift by Rachel Maddow 4. A Wanted Man by Lee Child 5. American Sniper by Chris Kyle 6. All I Did Was Shoot My Man by Walter Mosley 7. In One Person by John Irving 8. What Color is My World? by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 9. Black Count by Tom Reiss 10. Smart Trust by Stephen M.R. Covey & Greg Link Stephen M.R. Covey follows up his million-copy bestseller The Speed of Trust and its revealing importance of global trust with Smart Trust, a powerful book that identifies trust as an important leadership skill in both personal and professional lives. Covey uses many stories, illustrations and principles of apprised people who benefit from trust based relationships. They attain enduring success in work and play. By becoming a trustworthy individual, one can change the environment and the attitudes of relationships that result in a more beneficial workplace and home life.

Bookseller Favorites

Valerie Bookstore Manager, Cleveland, OH
1. The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman 2. The Hypnotist’s Love Story by Liane Moriarty The Hypnotist’s Love Story is a suspenseful, heart racing, fast paced ride! Widowed Patrick tells his new girlfriend Ellen that his previous girlfriend is stalking him. Ellen has a desire to meet the stalker, but unbeknownst to her and Patrick the stalker is already a patient of hers. The stalker’s motives become more disturbing as the relationship between Patrick and Ellen deepens. Ellen’s life becomes full of complications due to Patrick’s ghost wife and the stalker. Readers will not be able to put this book down! 3. The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt by Caroline Preston (2011) 4. Dancing on Broken Glass by Ka Hancock 5. Love Anthony by Lisa Genova 6. Comet’s Tale by Steven Wolf & Lynette Padwa 7. The Time in Between by Maria Duenas (2011) 8. He’s Gone by Deb Caletti (2013) 9. A Stolen Life by Jaycee Dugard (2011) 10. Turn of Mind by Alice LaPlante (2011)

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bestbooks of the
Bookseller Favorites

YEAR

Sandra Book Supervisor, Seattle, WA
1. The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving by Jonathan Evison 2. Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel Historical fiction at its best! Hilary Mantel brings to life 16th century England in the second installment of the Wolf Hall trilogy. Bring Up the Bodies focuses on the demise of Anne Boleyn, as orchestrated by Thomas Cromwell. Mantel gives us a glimpse of this significant time period and the pressure that Thomas was under to keep the King happy. In using the viewpoint of Cromwell, Mantel is able to add interest to a story to which we already know the ending. 3. Quiet by Susan Cain 4. Drop Dead Healthy by A. J. Jacobs 5. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green 6. The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe 7. Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver 8. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg 9. The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore by William Joyce 10. Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher by Timothy Egan

Bookseller Favorites

Laura Bookseller, Pittsburgh, PA
1. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green Not only the best YA novel I’ve read in 2012, the best novel I’ve read all year. John Green brings his wry humor and intelligence to tell the story of Hazel and Gus, two teenagers battling cancer. After meeting in a support group, the two fall for each other and deal with the normality of teen love along with struggling with their bodies’ limitations. This book will make you laugh out loud and stay up until three in the morning, sobbing your eyes out. A MUST READ. 2. Every Day by David Levithan 3. Cinder by Marissa Meyer 4. The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling 5. Feed by Mira Grant (2010) 6. Size 12 and Ready to Rock by Meg Cabot 7. Redshirt by John Scalzi 8. Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon 9. The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett & Stephen Baxter

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bestbooks of the
business interest
Leadership 2.0 -by Travis Bradberry & Jean Greaves
Do you think you’re a good leader? How would you know? From the writers of Emotional Intelligence 2.0 comes a great new book, Leadership 2.0. Sometimes the hardest thing to do is look at yourself clearly and objectively. Whether you’re a CEO, small business owner or a group leader everyone needs leadership skills to succeed. Leadership 2.0 breaks down all levels on what makes a great leader and helps you develop those skills. With 22 leadership skills defined and an on-line self-assessment tool you can learn the secrets of great leaders. The book provides access to 360 Refined tm online testing, a program designed to test yourself objectively. This testing helps you identify your weaknesses and provides you with the tools to correct them. The objectivity and individual assessment is the most useful component of the book. Most people will not tell their bosses what they are doing wrong in an organization. The information provided will help you communicate more clearly; learn to seek knowledge over information; mobilize others and learn to embrace flexibility. So if you want to take your business or career to the next level I highly recommend this book. – Rosa, Regional Book Manager, New Jersey

YEAR
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TalentSmart $19.95

Quiet -by Susan Cain
Have you noticed that when someone is described as outgoing, it is usually meant as a compliment? When someone is described as quiet? Not so much. Why is that? Why are outgoing, talkative people more likely to be perceived as strong, capable leaders than quiet, soft spoken people? Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain addresses that question in depth. You don’t have to be an introvert to read this book. Of course, there is a lot of helpful information for introverts. But there is insight for everyone into the Extrovert Ideal and its effect on both business and personal success. – Kara, Bookstore Manager, Nashville, TN

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Crown $26.00

The Power of Habit -by Charles Duhigg
A fascinating, insightful and fun read about habits (and we all have them). Broken down into 3 sections- ‘Personal’, ‘Corporate’ and ‘Societal’ The Power Of Habit explains how we develop habits (good or bad), how we can change those habits (good or bad), and how companies use those habits to market their products to us (good or bad). – Shannon, Regional Book Manager, Chicago, IL

20%
OFF

Random House $28.00

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bestbooks of the
End This Depression Now! -by Paul Krugman

YEAR

business interest
20%
OFF

Don’t be scared away by the topic (economic policy) or Krugman’s credentials (Nobel Prize winner). This is a book written expressly for the non-expert. And it’s expertly done. Using as little jargon as possible, and relying on clear, understandable analogies, Krugman takes the reader where few post-2008 recession books have gone: toward remedies for what is ailing the economy. The book is strongest when it’s exposing the kinds of red herrings politicians use for political gain (“cut the deficit now!”), but prove ineffective in jump-starting the economy. Krugman focuses on America, but explains world economies as they impact America’s. If you haven’t read much on the current economic crisis this is great place to start. Those wellread on the topic will find this book a must read for its authorial clout, and focus on how to move beyond the blame game and toward a brighter economic future. – Kevin, Bookseller, Denver, CO

W.W.Norton & Company $24.95

Heart, Smarts, Guts, & Luck -by Anthony K. Tjan, Richard J. Harrington, & Tsun-Yan Hsieh
It may sound like another trip to Oz, but Heart, Smarts, Guts, and Luck is a true story about what it takes to start your own business and become a successful entrepreneur. It is a solid, enjoyable read, as well as an inspirational tool for anyone who wants to take their passion and ideas to the next level. Not interested in business books? I challenge you to pick this one up, get creative, and apply it to your life. I think it will change your mind! – Georgia, Bookseller, Roanoke, VA

Harvard Business Review Press $25.00

Bookseller Favorites
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Kara Book Supervisor, Nashville, TN
Quiet by Susan Cain Wild by Cheryl Strayed Things That Are by Amy Leach Along the Way by Martin Sheen & Emilio Estevez The Dog Stars by Peter Heller The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn Albert of Adelaide by Howard L. Anderson Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin Some people say this book is crazy. I say this book is crazy good. The title kind of says it all, Dragons Love Tacos. The book has a lot going for it. It is educational. Did you know that dragons love tacos? I did not know that. It is entertaining. It shows us a never before seen look at dragons partying poolside, playing charades, and dressing up in costumes! It is suspenseful. Will your house survive a party with taco eating dragons? It is adorable. The artwork is joyous. It is original. The story is hilarious. It is controversial. Is spicy salsa really the secret to how dragons are able to breathe fire? You decide. Most of all, it is FUN! Every time I open this book it makes me happy. Read it now. Thank me later. 10. More by I.C. Springman

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bestbooks of the
young readers
The Fault in Our Stars -by John Green
This is my choice for best book of the year for many reasons; it’s beautifully written, has amazing dialog and a great cast of characters. But mostly it’s because I love a good love story. This is an epic love story. It follows a terminal cancer patient named Hazel who’s 16 and depressed. She is sent to group therapy where she meets Augustus; a fellow cancer survivor. John Green’s ability to channel teenage girls and teen interaction is exceptional. To make cancer funny is no easy feat; yet he does it easily. Follow Hazel and Gus as they fall in love and live life to its fullest. This is a book that will have you laughing and crying at the same time. A guaranteed “must read”. – Rosa, Regional Book Manager, New Jersey

YEAR
20%
OFF

Dutton Juvenile $17.99

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore -by William Joyce
This picture book touches upon so many aspects of life—books, journals, aging, friendship, passing-it-on and paying-it-forward. This is a picture book for All Ages. While appropriate to read to children, I would really recommend it for older readers and adults, those who have a passion for books. But I think that the book would be far less special if it weren’t for the illustrations. – Mark, General Manager, Roanoke, VA Atheneum Books for Young Readers $17.99

This is Not My Hat -by Jon Klassen
Check out Jon Klassen’s picture book, This is not My Hat. Children and adults will get a kick out of the search for a missing hat, and the darkly humorous conclusion leaves it up to your imagination on whether the missing hat is recovered or not! The illustrations are awesome, every page is a delight – Anne, Buyer, Atlanta, GA Candlewick $15.99

Cinder -by Marissa Meyer
A clever reimagining of an oft-retold fairy tale: a cyborg Cinderella with too small feet? With an android fairy godmother? Cinder lives in the futuristic Eastern Commonwealth, working as a mechanic with her trusty android, Iko, by her side. When the handsome Crown Prince Kai visits her stall, Cinder gets pulled into a conspiracy involving the villainous Lunar Kingdom, the deadly plague that took her stepfather and stepsister, and a missing moon princess. Fresh and imaginative, this is one of the top debuts of 2012, and I’m eagerly awaiting the next installment. – Laura, Bookseller, Pittsburgh, PA

Feiwel & Friends $17.99

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bestbooks of the
More -by I.C. Springman

YEAR

young readers

Author I.C. Springman wrote this story for her grandsons but it brings a universal message for all. Don’t hoard stuff because it may be your ruin! A hoarding Magpie is questioned by his mice friends about having too much stuff. His love and collecting of shiny things overwhelms his space and puts him in danger. Can he be saved? Does he learn his lesson? Brian Lies’ beautiful and clever illustrations bring to life this simply worded story. It’s a counting book too that will help all kids learn lessons about overconsumption and looking out for friends. – Ron, Regional Book Manager, Los Angeles, CA

Houghton Mifflin Books for Children $16.99

Bookseller Favorites
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Kevin Bookseller, Denver, CO
Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank by Nathan Englander Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers The Dog Stars by Peter Heller The Dog Stars is a post-apocalypse story that balances the physical, tactical, and emotional difficulties faced in a desolate world. Peter Heller creates a narrator in Big Hig who has a unique voice, and an insightful intellect. Most important, Hig hasn’t lost a desire to hold on to all the things that “being human” meant before a mysterious disease wiped out a large portion of the population. 6. Quiet by Susan Cain 7. Drop Dead Healthy by A. J. Jacobs 8. The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth 9. The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce 10. Satan is Real by Charlie Louvin & Benjamin Whitmer

Bookseller Favorites
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Sydne Book Buyer, Atlanta, GA
Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver Requiem by Frances Itani Far From the Tree by Andrew Solomon Wild by Cheryl Strayed How to be a Woman by Caitlin Moran The Coldest Night by Robert Olmstead Robert Olmstead has the amazing knack of being economical with his words while delivering maximum emotion. The Coldest Night is his third book to follow a member of the Childs’ family, though each stands on its own. When Henry Childs’ relationship with a judge’s daughter is broken up by her disapproving family, he lies about his age to join the Marines and is sent to the Korean War. After being bewildered and broken by love, Korea shatters what is left of Henry with atrocities, exhaustion and freezing cold. Returning home after his time in the Marines is as foreign an experience as was his time in war. Olmstead takes us from the ache of first love to the pain of battle and back to what is supposed to be normal with the skill of a master storyteller. 7. The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker 8. American Ghost by Janis Owens 9. Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham 10. Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

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Am I happy that Hudson Books has chosen Drop Dead Healthy as its Book of the Year? Absolutely, without a doubt. And what’s more, I feel healthier. Consider this: A University of Toronto study found that actors who win Oscars live almost four years longer than their non-Oscar-winning friends. Scientists have yet to study the average lifespan of Hudson-Book-of-the-Year authors. But I’m ready to be a guinea pig. Who knows? Maybe four additional years of life is too much to ask for, but I’m hoping the Hudson bump gives me at least a few more weeks on this earth. I’m especially honored because I’m such a Hudson Books fan. I’ve spent many hours browsing the aisles of this wonderful bookstore. No doubt it’s the best part of the airport experience, right up there with scoring the last available electrical outlet in LaGuardia’s Concourse C. I try to buy at least one book per trip – along with a couple of bottles of hand sanitizer, of course. As I learned while writing my book, airplanes aren’t exactly sterile. If you want to lose your appetite, try Googling the list of germs that lurk on airplane table trays. It’s a microscopic menagerie. Your more germ-conscious doctors recommend wiping those trays down with a sanitizing cloth. In fact, since my book is about my quest to be the healthiest person alive (a journey that involved revamping my diet, exercise regimen, sleep and stress levels), now seems a good time to give a few quick tips on healthy air travel. --Turn the airport into your gym. Well, maybe don’t do pull-ups from the metal detector – the TSA might not find that amusing. But try walking as much as possible. Doctors recommend that we strive for 10,000 steps per day. So I try to avoid those People Movers. Yes, I move my own person. I actually roll my suitcase over the stationary ground. I know! Heroic. Also, if your luggage isn’t filled with bricks, try taking the stairs. --Go nuts. Finding healthy food at airports is as hard as finding overhead luggage space when you’re stuck in Zone 14. My friend Tim Ferris – author of The 4-Hour Body – recommends unsalted cashews as the best airport fare. They’ve got the good kind of fat, and also protein that keeps you satiated longer. And of course, go ahead and have a cup of coffee. I was delighted to learn that coffee, in moderation, is good for you. It staves off Alzheimer’s and certain types of cancer. (Too many cups per day can lead to heart problems, but one or two is generally beneficial). --Get up out of your seat There’s an alarming amount of data showing that prolonged sitting is harmful to your health. One doctor told me “sitting is the new smoking.” Which is an exaggeration, but the gist is true: The sedentary life increases your chance of heart disease. When I’m on the plane, I try to get up every 30 minutes and stroll the aisle for a minute or two. Or if I’m stuck in a window seat, I at least try to stretch my legs while seated. This also helps prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis – a rare but unpleasant blood clot from prolonged sitting. --Relax Travel can be stressful. You can’t eliminate that. But you can adjust your attitude. In my book, I describe being frisked by airport security. I was furious, a supernova of negative energy. But for what? Halfway through my pat down, it occurred to me: I’m spending a lot of my brain’s bandwidth being annoyed. Is it so bad to have this guy touch me? Is he hurting me? He’s just doing his job. In fact, doesn’t the research show that human touch is healthy? It helps fight depression and high blood pressure. What if I thought of this as a free massage? It’s kind of relaxing when he’s patting my shoulders. Get him some coconut massage oil and a citrus-scented candle, and I’d have to pay him $100. At the end, the guy gave me a friendly pat on the back. A signal that I’m good to go. “Thanks,” I said. My governmentmandated shiatsu may not have lowered my blood pressure, but it probably didn’t raise it either.

Exclusive A.J. Jacobs Essay

FROM THE DOG STARS BY PETER HELLER
Now we walk fast in the dark. Me and Jasper, the sled scraping behind. Cold. Good and cold. High stars nettle the black, no moon, crossing under the Milky Way like crossing a deep river. Never will get to the other side. We never do. The argument with Bangley still rankles. Now just our breaths. Winter fat. Can feel it in my legs. Good to move, move fast. I pull the sled on a lead with my right hand then switch. Pack is in the sled, rifle too. This time, Thanks Bangley, wearing a subcompact handgun, a plastic Glock weighs almost nothing. A sense of more survivors around, increasing traffic, don’t know why. Pass the tower on our right. Pass the Spot without a shudder. Thoughts come with the rhythm of the fast steps. Can get used to killing the way you can get used to a goat on the doorstep. Uncle Pete. With his bottle and cigarillos and stories. His living on a yacht with Louise. Their living in a trawler in Alaska. As if somehow being afloat could make a life more compelling. Never liked whisky, he told me. But I drink it because it has a storied history.

Books were chosen by a committee of Hudson booksellers in the field and in the buying office. Thank you Alden, Anne, Ed, Georgia, Jennifer, Josh, Justin, Kara, Kathy, Kevin, Laura, Margaret, Mark, Matt, Michelle, Mike, Ron, Rosa, Sandra, Sara, Shannon, Susan, Sydne, and Valerie. This would not have been possible without you. Meet our Booksellers at www.HudsonBooksellers.com