ers

November 24, 2012
®
A publication of Lancaster Newspapers, Inc.
FEATURED BOOMER
ANGELO M
GREENING
YOUR HOME
Finally
at fifty
+More choices +More options
options
om +More friends +More options
ends +More floor plans + More flex
More floorplans +More floor plans
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More choices. Your choices. 3001 Lititz Pike, Lancaster, PA 17606 | (717) 581-4438 | www.bv.org
2 BOOMers ® •
November 24, 2012

Christmas Movies 3
Featured Boomer 4-5
Retirement Ahead 6
Finally at Fifty 7
Greening Your Home 8
Travel Deals 9
Boomer Directory 10
Boomer Directory 11
Holiday Leftovers 12
Contents
14
• First oral contraceptive (the Pill) invented.
• Direct dial coast-to-coast telephone service
begins in the United States.
• First Color Television Pictures broadcast
from Empire State Building.
• Breeder Reactor USA converted Uranium to
Plutonium.

• 22nd Amendment is ratifed which limits
US presidential term of offce to 8 years (2
terms).
• First nuclear bomb tests at Nevada test site.
• President Harry S. Truman fres General
Douglas MacArthur as commander of
United Nations Forces.
EvEryday Living
Average Cost of a New Home ....$9,000
Average Wages Per Year ...........$3,510
Gas Per Gallon .......................19 cents
Average Cost of a New Car .......$1,500
Loaf of Bread ..........................16 cents
LB of Hamburger Meat ............50 cents
Bacon Per Pound .....................52 cents
Eggs per dozen .......................24 cents
Baby’s Diapers (cotton) ........ from $2.79
Children’s Tricycle ...................from $14
1951
Don’t forget your
BOOM
ers

®

Card!
Look on page 10 for more
information on how to get your
very own BOOMers
®
card.
What happEnEd popuLar CuLturE
• The term Rock N Roll is coined by
Cleveland Disc Jockey Alan Freed
• The Dennis the Menace comic strip
appears in newspapers across the
U.S. for the frst time.
popuLar FiLms
• An American in Paris
• The African Queen
• A Streetcar Named Desire
• The Day the Earth Stood Still
popuLar musiC
• Perry Como
• Mario Lanza
• Nat King Cole
• Tony Bennett
popuLar tv
• I Love Lucy
• What’s My
Line? debuts on
BBC Television.
Born
this yEar
• Sting
• Bob Geldof
• Phil Collins
• Jane Seymour

November 24, 2012
• BOOMers
®
3
1. “It came without ribbons.
It came without tags. It came
without packages, boxes
or bags.”
2. “Uh, since the United
States Government declares
this man to be Santa Claus, this
court will not dispute it. Case
dismissed.”
3. “If TV has taught me
anything, it’s that miracles
always happen to poor kids at
Christmas. It happened to Tiny
Tim, it happened to Charlie
Brown, it happened to The
Smurfs, and it’s gonna happen
to us!”
4. “I want an offcial Red
Ryder, carbine action, 200 shot
range model air rife.”
5. “Bless this highly nutritious
microwavable macaroni and
cheese dinner and the people
who sold it on sale. Amen.”
6. “Iris, in the movies, we
have leading ladies and we
have the best friend. You, I can
tell, are a leading lady, but for
some reason, you’re behaving
like the best friend.”
7. “Who gave you permission
to tell Charlie there was no
Santa Claus? I think if we’re
going to destroy our son’s
delusions, I should be a part
of it.”
8. “I want to wash my hands,
my face, my hair with snow.”
9. “We’re not just doing this
for us. We’re doing it for the
kids. For every kid who ever
sat on Santa’s lap. For every
little girl who left cookies and
milk for Santa on Christmas
night. For every little boy who
opens a package Christmas
morning and fnds clothes
instead of toys. It breaks my
heart.”
10. “We all know that
Christmas is a big commercial
racket. It’s run by a big Eastern
syndicate you know.”
11. “I fear you more than
any spectre I have seen. But as
I know your purpose is to do
me good, and as I hope to live
to be another man from what
I was, I am prepared to bear
your company, and do it with
a thankful heart. Will you not
speak to me?”
12. “Seeing is believing, but
sometimes the most real things
in the world are the things we
can’t see.”
13. “Light the lamp, not the
rat, light the lamp, not the rat!
Put me out, put me out, put me
out!”
14. “Tell me something, Billy.
How come a cute little guy like
this can turn into a thousand
ugly monsters?”
15. ‘Wanna see some
magic? OK, let’s watch you
disappear!”
16. “That’s not ‘my’
Christmas! ‘My’ Christmas is
flled with laughter, and joy
... and this: my Sandy Claws
outft. I want you to make it.”
17. “That’s neither pig nor
pork, it’s beef.”
18. “I passed through the
seven levels of the Candy Cane
forest, through the sea of swirly
twirly gum drops, and then
I walked through the Lincoln
Tunnel.”
Test your
knowledge
of popular
Christmas
movies
W
hat would the holidays be
without snowfakes falling
outside, a mug of hot
cocoa in hand and a favorite
Christmas movie on television?
Television is full of feel-good
movies come the holiday season. Choose from
among classic ficks you have watched year
after year or new movies vying for spots as
soon-to-be favorites.
Watching Christmas movies is a holiday
tradition for many families. So much so
that lines from popular movies are easily
remembered and recognized. Those who can
recite movies verbatim might enjoy testing their
mettle with the following Christmas quiz loaded
with memorable quotes from some holiday
classics.
1 . “ T h e G r i n c h W h o S t o l e C h r i s t m a s ” 2 . “ M i r a c l e o n 3 4 t h S t r e e t ” 3 . “ T h e S i m p s o n ’ s C h r i s t m a s ” 4 . “ A C h r i s t m a s S t o r y ” 5 . “ H o m e A l o n e ” 6 . “ T h e
H o l i d a y ” 7 . “ T h e S a n t a C l a u s e ” 8 . “ W h i t e C h r i s t m a s ’ 9 . “ J i n g l e A l l t h e W a y ’ 1 0 . “ A C h a r l i e B r o w n C h r i s t m a s ” 1 1 . “ A C h r i s t m a s C a r o l ’ 1 2 . “ T h e
P o l a r E x p r e s s ” 1 3 . “ T h e M u p p e t s C h r i s t m a s C a r o l ” 1 4 . “ G r e m l i n s ” 1 5 . “ B a d S a n t a ” 1 6 . “ T h e N i g h t m a r e B e f o r e C h r i s t m a s ” 1 7 . “ B a b e s i n T o y l a n d ”
1 8 . “ E l f ”
4 BOOMers ® •
November 24, 2012

Featured Boomer

November 24, 2012
• BOOMers
®
5
T
he saying about the
silver lining in the cloud
could describe Angelo
M’s pathway to his music
career to a “T”. He’s a
singer and songwriter
who performs on guitar,
mandolin, Dobro and harp. He’s also
a stellar example of one who makes
lemonade from lemons and creates a
thriving second career later in life.
Today he’s a respected Lancaster-
area blues musician with a loyal local
and national following and has found
his niche in this second career. Te
transition from steelworker to musician
wasn’t an easy one, but starting another
career later in life is something many
people can identify with. Tey also
identify with his folksy songs that
feature a slice of Americana.
Angelo M (his surname is Melasecca)
is originally from the Philadelphia area.
Te youngest of four boys, all of his
brothers were teenagers before he could
walk, so he grew up listening to the
music playing on their radios. Although
no one else in his family really played
an instrument when he was growing up,
Angelo’s 94-year-old dad is a self-taught
harmonica player, who learned the
instrument later in his life. “Dad always
wanted someone to play the organ,”
he recalls. However, Angelo took an
interest in the guitar when he was
eight-years old.
He worked in a steel mill for nearly
30 years. With his pension fve months
away, he dreamed of a retirement that
included traveling and taking up long-
forgotten hobbies that included playing
the guitar. Te company’s sudden
bankruptcy meant not only the loss
of his job, but also the pension. Te
company was bought out, and since it
had been a union shop, he and a number
of his co-workers could keep their jobs
because of the contract, but they would
have to start over with their pensions.
“I was 48 at that time. I liked my job
and music was my hobby — I played at
some local clubs. I really looked long and
hard at my life and what I wanted from
life. I really didn’t want to start over
again. Many of my co-workers didn’t
have a choice, but I had the option of
music and it seemed to be the right time
to do something,” he explains.
So he shifted gears and fell back on
his music. He not only stepped up his
performance schedule, but he also began
writing. “With what I had been through,
what else could I do but write a blues
song” he says with a smile.
His wife, Jody Murphy, is also his
manager. Te two share a love of music.
Tey met in the 90s at the Philadelphia
Folk Festival. She encouraged him to
expand into writing songs as well as
performing. His guitar infuences come
from legends such as Ry Cooder, Chet
Atkins, Duane Allman and Leo Kottke.
Angelo started playing music
festivals and received a standing
ovation at Johnstown FolkFest. He was
deemed “One of the Highlights” at the
Kalamazoo (MI) Blues Festival and was
selected from more than fve hundred
artists to perform at the Falcon Ridge
Folk Festival (NY) Emerging
Artist Showcase.
“Festivals are awesome. Tey book
so many entertainers — there’s music
everywhere and there’s so much energy.
It’s a great place to get a lot of experience
as a performer and to have fun doing it,”
he says.
And he says that Lancaster is an
amazing place for music — there are lots
of clubs and bars that ofer live music.
He credits the Lancaster Dispensing
Company (known as DipCo by those in
the music scene) with helping boost his
career, and he returns there to perform
periodically. “I love playing small,
intimate places — you really get the feel
of the audience,” he says.
He’s performed several times on
National Public Radio’s “River City Folk”.
Angelo M.’s music is featured in the PBS
Television series “RoadTrip Nation”, is
slated for an indie flm soundtrack and,
garnered songwriting honors in the
prestigious “Mountain Stage”
NewSong contest.
His song, “Every Kind of Blues,” was
selected from thousands as a fnalist in
Billboard’s 17th World Song Contest and
received a Gold/First Place in Blues in
the 27th Mid-Atlantic Song Contest.
His two successful self-released albums
— “Far From Home” released in 2005,
and “Steel Work”, released in 2009 —
brought him to the attention of folks in
Nashville’s music scene, and he’s signed a
contract with Music City Veterans.
“From Steel to Strings”, his frst
album with Creative and Dreams Music
Network, was released earlier this year,
and Angelo says that during the next two
years he will come up with music for two
new albums.
Creative and Dreams Music Network
is a team of music industry veterans
that focuses on emerging talent. Angelo
is excited about working with this team
and continuing to develop his music. Not
only has music provided some fnancial
stability and allowed him to explore his
creative side, it has also helped both him
and Jody realize the dream of traveling.
He’s played venues in Portland, OR;
Virginia Beach; Atlanta; Kalamazoo, MI;
Dewey Beach; and Beaufort, NC. His
European debut was in Limerick, Ireland.
A music career forged by life
Hometown got me down, Uncle
Sam came around fghtin’ for the
Country think I saw it on the evening
news I got every kind of blues”

~ from “Every Kind of Blues”
FAST FACTS

Angelo is the father of fve, The youngest is 20. He says that all of the
children are “into” music and they’ve all been “super supportive and
encouraging” of his music career.

Performers that inspired him — “As a child I remember that my
brothers listened to a lot of Elvis, so I was infuenced by his sound,”
he says. Angelo says he’s a huge John Prine and Bonnie Raitt fan —
their style of folk music inspired him.

What does he do prior to a performance? “Jody helps me get ready to
go on stage. I try to relax as much as I can, but a bit of nervousness
will never go away and that’s good since it keeps me on my toes.”

His thoughts on being a musician or artist “You do it because you enjoy
it; there’s not necessarily a lot of money in it. You have to be committed
to your craft.”

Other interests: Periodically he teaches an electrical course at
ArcelorMittal’s Coatesville facility (formerly the Lukens Steel facility).
He’s also interested in renewable energy.
To check out his music or performance schedule, visit www:angelom.com • To listen to his new CD, visit http://www.creativeanddreams.com/angelo-m
Written by: Rochelle A. Shenk
6 BOOMers ® •
November 24, 2012

1. Early IRA
withdrawals and
401(k) distributions
Withdrawals from IRAs
before age 59 1/2 are
generally subject to a 10
percent early withdrawal
penalty. However, this
penalty may be avoided if
substantially equal periodic
payments are taken from the
IRA based on life expectancy
for at least fve years, or
until age 59 1/2, whichever
is longer. The same early
withdrawal penalty generally
applies to withdrawals
from 401(k) plans that are
made before age 59 1/2.
However, individuals who
are at least 55 years of age
when leaving a job can
begin to take penalty-free
distributions from a 401(k),
although federal and state
income taxes will still be due
upon withdrawal.

2. Minimum IRA
distributions
Minimum distributions must
be made from Individual
Retirement Accounts (IRAs)
by April 1 of the year after
individuals turn 70 1/2
years old. Withdrawals
must begin by December 31
of this year and continue
each year thereafter. The
penalty for failing to take
minimum IRA distributions
is 50 percent of the amount
that should have been
withdrawn.

3. Timing of receiving
Social Security benefts
Currently, you may elect
to begin receiving Social
Security benefts as early as
age 62. However, you will
receive a larger payment
each month if you wait until
your full retirement age of
67 (if you were born after
1959) and an even larger
monthly payment still if you
wait until age 70 to begin
receiving benefts.

4. Enrolling in
Medicare Part B
Currently, Americans are
eligible to enroll in Medicare
at age 65. Once eligible,
though, you must enroll in
Medicare Part B (which
covers outpatient services
and doctor’s appointments)
within three months of your
65th birthday. Otherwise,
a late-enrollment penalty
may apply that would
boost the premium amount
by 10 percent for each
year that’s delayed.
Note that this
penalty is waived
for individuals who
maintain health
insurance through an
employer (or a spouse’s
employer). However,
it is retroactive if
enrollment is not
completed within the
required time frame
after this coverage
terminates.

Given the potential
long-term fnancial impact
of these and other decisions,
it may be advisable to seek
professional assistance from
a fnancial planner and/or
tax expert in making them.
Important
decisions for
retirees and
near-retirees
Te years immediately preceding
retirement, and the frst couple of years
of actual retirement, are a critical time for
individuals. After carefully planning and
diligently saving for retirement most of
their lives, individuals must make some
important decisions during this time.
Some of these decisions fall into the
following areas:
More choices for
Personal Care
+
Nare ckaices
mean a perfect fit. Our
three Personal Care
residences offer choices
for simple personal
care, with specialized
rehab or memory support options. Plus we have a
wide range of apartments in cheerful neighborhood
settings. Call today to tour and find the Personal
Care choices that are best for you.
More choices. Your choices.
3001 Lititz Pike | Lancaster, PA 17606
(717) 581-4438 | www.bv.org

November 24, 2012
• BOOMers
®
7
O
ne of the most
annoying things
about being a
Boomer is the
added worries,
the added
concerns, the
added stuf that we have to
think about now. I understand
that with our added years
comes added life to those
years. And I do know there
are details that have to be
considered with everything.
We have jobs, mortgages, kids,
spouses, relatives and gym
memberships. We’re grown-ups.
But for Pete’s sake, just when
DID everything get so darned
complicated? And does it really
have to be that way?
I’m not talking about
wanting to return to childhood
and only having homework
to think about … though,
honestly, there are days when
that is tempting. And I’m not
talking about not having any
responsibilities at all. We’ve
always had responsibilities.
And that’s good because it’s
those responsibilities that make
our life richer. I understand
that. But somehow, to me, in
our Baby Boomer years, our
responsibilities have gotten
bigger, more serious and
more intense.
Take for example, health.
Of course we are going to all
have more health issues as
we get older. But for many of
us Baby Boomers, now is the
time when it really starts to
hit the fan. With each passing
birthday routine physical tests
and exams get a little more –
uh – physical. And that little
ache, pain or bump is no longer
necessarily just that little ache,
pain or bump that will go away
on its own. Now it’s a rupture,
rip, break, or tumor ... needing
treatment, surgery, rehab and
recovery time.
Concerns for our children
have also gotten bigger. Tough
at the time it didn’t seem this
way, I remember when my
children were small their life
details were also really very
small, just like they were. Of
course there were worries, but
somehow the worries seemed
much simpler and much more
manageable then. I remember
as a young mother one of my
biggest concerns was making
sure I had a purple shirt ready
for my daughter to wear on
purple day at preschool. Fast
forward to the present and the
teenage years and now I have to
think about sex, drugs and rock
and roll. And that’s just on
the internet.
Years ago problems with our
parents would climax around
the holidays when we had to
coordinate where we were
visiting and for how long.
Whose turn is it this year? Our
biggest worry revolved around
how we were going to make it
over the river and through the
woods on time without ticking
anyone of. Now with aging
parents we have to manage
scary health issues, failing
memories, nursing homes, and
taking dad’s car keys away.
Te United States just had
a very important presidential
election and most Americans
were seriously caught up in it.
I was no diferent. I compared
both candidates, I watched the
debates, I watched interviews
and I read a great deal
about them.
While gathering all this
information, it got me thinking
about how the issues that
are important to me now are
probably very diferent from
the ones I thought about in my
twenties. At the age of 50, while
considering the two candidates,
my mind went to the economy,
healthcare and social security. I
thought really hard about this
country, what we stand for and
about my children’s future. And
yes, I worried about who our
next president would be. I spent
a tense election night with Jane
Doe and some other Boomers
waiting for the results to
come in.
I was proud of my 50-year-old
self for taking it all so seriously
and for being knowledgeable
of the issues. I then tried to
remember what I thought about
during my frst elections …
when I was in my late teens and
early twenties. Just what went
through my head during those
times? What was important to
me then?
Ten I remembered a
question that was asked during
the MTV “Enough is Enough”
political forum with President
Bill Clinton (April 19, 1994)
and I got my answer.
Amid questions about drugs
and crime, Bosnia, violence
in schools, and teen suicide,
one question stood out: “Mr.
President, the world’s dying to
know: is it boxers or briefs?”

Written by: Maureen Leader
Finally At Fifty
Hold on to sixteen as long
as you can – changes come
around real soon make us
women and men
Jack and Dianne by John Cougar Mellencamp
8 BOOMers ® •
November 24, 2012

O
ur lives are
more hectic
than ever.
In addition
to working
more than
eight hours a day and caring for
others, the average person (ages
25 to 54) spends approximately
one additional hour per day
on household activities,
according to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics’ American Time
Use Survey. With everyday
maintenance tasks depleting
your free time, you may think
it’s impossible to ft in bigger
home improvement projects.
It’s time to change your
mindset and re-evaluate
your home improvement
to-do list. While it may seem
overwhelming, one weekend
is the perfect amount of time
to tackle a few cost-efective
and eco-friendly home
improvement projects that can
add style and functionality ...
and even save a little ‘green’ as
well. Te following projects will
help to ‘greenify’ your home in
just 48 hours.

Kitchen
convenience
Decorative details, such as
faucets and fxtures, can go a
long way to improve the style
of your kitchen, but what about
functionality and eco-friendly
options? Wave ‘hello’ to your
answer with a motion-sensor
faucet. Imagine the convenience
of having a kitchen faucet that
can sense what you’re trying to
accomplish, and with a simple
wave of the hand, immediately
responds to your needs.
Tese faucets utilize advanced
sensors to detect a user’s
movement, immediately
setting water fow in motion.
Simply place an object — like
a cup or your hand — near the
base of the faucet to turn the
water on and of automatically,
signifcantly reducing water
usage and eliminating the
possibility of leaving the faucet
running when not in use.
Or, simply wave your hand
above the faucet to start water
fow — and a second wave to
stop. You can also adjust the
faucet’s temperature and fow
the traditional way, using its
convenient side handle. Te
faucets are easy to install and
can be purchased at your local
home improvement retailer or
wholesale showroom.

Warm up with
cool savings
Did you know that yearly
heating and cooling costs
average more than $1,000?
Installing a programmable
thermostat takes only a
couple of hours and can
signifcantly help reduce
your energy costs. And,
programmable thermostats
have come a long way with
new, sophisticated technology.
New systems resemble mini-
computers and ofer users an
interactive experience. After
answering questions about
your preferences and usage,
programs are set accordingly,
letting you adjust settings
from any room in the house.
Not going to be home?
Programmable thermostats are
available to control settings
from smartphones and you
can set separate programs for
each day of the week, giving
you complete control over your
heating and cooling and helping
to reduce wasted energy.

Shower in
the savings
Any homeowner would agree
that saving water to help the
environment and to lower
their water bill is a great idea.
However, many may not agree
if these savings interfere
with the enjoyment of their
daily shower. Luckily, a new
showerhead can ofer water
savings without sacrifcing a
quality showering experience.
Installing in just minutes, you
can shower in the savings with
a fow rate of 2.0 gallons per
minute (gpm).

Freshen up

Paint can add an instant facelift
to any room. For as little as $20
per gallon, you can add some
color, refresh the walls and
help pull the room together.
Painting an accent wall is also a
great idea to add a ‘wow factor’
to your room while also saving
time and money. And today,
many paint manufacturers
ofer non-toxic paints with low
volatile organic compounds
(VOCs) formulations to reduce
these pollutants in your home.
Plus, unique formulations can
ofer added mildew resistance
and provide a paint that is not
only healthier for you, your
family and the environment,
but is vibrant and durable
as well.

Not sure how to tackle this project or want
inspiring ideas? New apps for your smart
phone are available, such as ‘Better Homes
& Gardens’ How to Paint Anything, to help
with your room transformation.
Visit www.moen.com for kitchen and
bathroom ‘greening’ ideas.
Although you may not be able to add more
hours to your day, in one weekend you can
easily tackle some environmentally friendly
projects to help “greenify” and improve your
home — and hopefully keep some money
in your pocket.
How to
‘green’
your
home in
48 hours
Cost-efective
and sustainable
projects anyone
can do with ease

November 24, 2012
• BOOMers
®
9
T
here are thousands of
people who anxiously
anticipate the arrival
of winter. Armed
with gloves and
boots, these winter
enthusiasts can’t wait to frolic
in the drifts of snow. Still, there
are many others who would much
prefer sipping tropical drinks on
sun-kissed beaches to freezing
weather and down-flled coats.
Once the temperature begins
to dip, fans of warmer weather
may begin the anxious dance
that is trying to fnd a winter
travel excursion. While there are
some deals to be had, the clever
traveler is one who begins the
process as early as possible.
According to Clem Bason,
president of Hotwire Group, the
winter season is ripe with travel
deals. He ofers that the frst few
weeks of December are the key
times to get the cheapest fares all
year long.
Tis is not the only secret to
winter travel. Follow these other
suggestions for saving on your
next getaway.
Book early.
If you know that each year you start to
get antsy around the middle of winter,
then plan annual vacations around this
time. Make sure you request the time of
from work and buy your tickets several
months before.
Know peak travel dates.
Tere are certain times during the
winter when you probably will pay a
premium for travel. Te holiday season
tends to be the most expensive time to
travel during the winter. Be fexible with
travel dates, and you could see your rate
drop considerably if you travel just a day
or two later.
* Sign up for a hotel reward program.
Chain hotels frequently ofer member
incentives. By signing up for a rewards
program, you can accrue travel points
that can be used toward hotel stays and
other benefts. Being loyal to a particular
hotel brand can help you collect
points faster. Plus, some chains ofer
nonadvertised deals specifcally to their
reward members.
Think about booking a package deal.
Many resort properties partner with
car rental companies and airlines to put
together packages. Packages may be less
expensive overall than booking each
individual element separately.
Look into alternative
accommodations.
When planning a vacation, many
travelers turn to hotels for their
accommodations. However there are
other avenues for afordable rooms.
Web sites like Vacation Rental By Owner
(www.vrbo.com) enable individuals
with rental homes, condominiums or
timeshares to sublet their properties to
deal seekers. You may be able to fnd an
afordable place at a fraction of the cost
of comparable hotels in the area.
Consider a timeshare.
If you travel at the same time each year
and want a designated place to stay
without hassle, timeshares could be the
ideal situation. A timeshare is typically
an apartment in a resort property that
is jointly owned by people who use it at
diferent times. Sometimes it is possible
to trade timeshares among others so that
you can vary or upgrade where you stay.
Still save with ski trips.
If you’re not jetting of to the tropics but
in search of the perfect powder, land a
deal by skiing at the beginning or end
of the season. Also, keep track of the
conditions at ski resorts. If the weather is
questionable, you can probably book trips
at a discount and avoid the crowds. If
you like the atmosphere of a ski town but
don’t really like to ski, book a trip prior to
the frst snowfall when you can enjoy the
shops and the town without the hassle of
fellow tourists.
Check with your credit card company
about exclusive cardmember deals.
Credit card companies can ofer special
members-only deals on travel. What’s
more, being a member of a warehouse
store like Costco or BJs could entitle you
to discount travel packages when booked
through their own travel centers.
Be fexible.
Some of the best deals to be had come
when you can depart at a moment’s
notice. If you’re not hampered by
schedules, check out the last-minute
oferings of resorts and travel sites.
Get the
best
winter
travel
deals
Wintertime is a
season ripe with travel
opportunities. Whether
you’re escaping the cold
or fying directly to a
ski resort, employ some
strategies for getting the
best prices possible.

10 BOOMers ® •
November 24, 2012

ALWAYS NEW TO YOU
21 S. Broad Street (Route 501)
Lititz • 627-5435
MIRACLES CONSIGNMENT SHOP
3545 Marietta Avenue
Lancaster • 285-0058
RED WING SHOE STORE
106 S. Centerville Rd. Lanc.
509-1990 • BDFootwear@verizon.net
BARRY’S PAINT SHOP
Ephrata • 733-6900
barryspaintshop.com
LANCASTER HONDA
2350 Dairy Rd. • 898-0100
www.lancasterhonda.com
LANDIS LUXURY COACHES
4412 Oregon Pike • Ephrata
859-5466 • www.landisenterprise.com
BULLY’S RESTAURANT & PUB
647 Union St., Columbia
684-2854
COLUMBIA FAMILY RESTAURANT
960 Lancaster Ave • Columbia Plaza
Columbia, PA • 684-7503
CONESTOGA RESTAURANT & BAR
1501 E. King St. • Lancaster
393-0290 • www.theconestoga.com
EDEN RESORT INN & SUITES
569-6444
www.edenresort.com
FOXCHASE GOLF CLUB
300 Stevens Rd. • Stevens
336-3673 • www.foxchasegolf.com
HERSHEY FARM RESTAURANT & INN
Rt. 896 • Strasburg, PA
www.hersheyfarm.com
IRON HILL BREWERY &
RESTAURANT
781 Harrisburg Pk • Lancaster
291-9800 • www.ironhillbrewery.com
IRON HORSE INN
135 E. Main St. • Strasburg
687-6362 • www.ironhorsepa.com
La CASETTA
360 Hartman Bridge Rd.
Strasburg • 687-3671
LANCASTER ARTS HOTEL
300 Harrisburg Ave. • 299-3000
www.lancasterartshotel.com
NEPTUNE DINER
924 N. Prince St. • Lancaster
399-8358 • www.theneptunediner.com
PRUDHOMMES CAJUN KITCHEN
50 Lancaster Ave. • Columbia
684-1706 • www.lostcajunkitchen.com
SHANK’S TAVERN
36 S. Waterford Ave. • Marietta
426-1205 • www.shankstavern.com
SPILL THE BEANS CAFE
43 E. Main St. • Lititz
627-7827 • www.spillthebeanscafe.com
SYMPOSIUM RESTAURANT
125 South Centerville Rd.
Lancaster • 391-7656
T. BURK & CO. DELI RESTAURANT
2433A Old Philadelphia Pike
293-0976 • tbd500@verizon.net
THE CHERISHED PEARL
BED AND BREAKFAST
Honeybrook • 610-273-2312
www.thecherishedpearl.com
WILLOW TREE SMORGASBORD
2416 Willow Street Pk • Lancaster
464-2716 • WillowValley-Restaurant.com
CHOO CHOO BARN, INC.
Route 741 East, Strasburg
687-7911 • www.choochoobarn.com
DUTCH APPLE DINNER THEATRE
510 Centerville Rd, Lancaster
898-1900 • DutchApple.com
LEISURE LANES
3440 Columbia Ave.
Lancaster • 392-2121
JUKEBOX NIGHTCLUB
1703 New Holland Ave. • Lancaster
394-9978 • Jukeboxnightclub.com
NEW SINGLES
713-1494
www.newsinglesusa.com
SOVEREIGN CENTER
Reading, PA
www.sovereigncenter.com
TELL LIMOUSINES
18 Richard Dr., • Lititz
www.telllimo.com • 1-866-469-8355
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL
30 E. Roseville Rd. • Lancaster
Ted Williams • 431-0522
MIRUS FINANCIAL PARTNERS
110 E. King St. • Lancaster • 509-4521
www.mirusfinancialpartners.com
AMERICAN SLEEP CENTER
1957 Fruitville Pk. • Lancaster
560-6660 • www.specialtysleepcenter.com
THE BED & FURNITURE
WAREHOUSE
166 Arrowhead Dr.
Rapho Industrial Park • 653-8096
www.bedandfurniture.com
FURNITURE THAT FITS
3515 Columbia Ave
Mountville • 285-2547
HERITAGE DESIGN INTERIORS
1064 Main St., Rt. 23 • Blue Ball
354-2233 • hdi@frontiernet.net
WICKER IMPORTS
1766 Oregon Pike
Lancaster • 560-6325
WOLF FURNITURE
Rohrerstown Rd. exit of Rt. 30 • Lanc
209-6949 • wolffurniture.com
A THERAPEUTIC EFFECT
123 Oakridge Dr.
Mountville • 285-9955
ALBRIGHT & THIRY ORTHODONTICS
1834 Oregon Pk • Lancaster
569-6421
AMERICAN LASER CENTER
898-9170
www.americanlaser.com
BODY & SOUL
WOMEN’S FITNESS STUDIO
618 Columbia Ave. • Lancaster
509-7777 • BSFStudio.com
COCALICO AREA HEARING
SERVICES
3 Cardinal Drive • 336-8198
DR. BENJAMIN F.D. CHIKES
Practice limited to orthodontics
Ephrata • 738-4901
HARMONY FITNESS-A Women’s Gym
3695 Marietta Ave. • Lancaster
285-3476 • harmonyfitness@comcast.net
HARTZ Physical Therapy’s
Medically Adapted Gym (M.A.G.)
90 Good Drive • Lancaster
735-8880 • www.hartzpt.com
HEALTH e-TECHNOLOGIES
538-8392
www.healthe-tech.com
HOME FITNESS EQUIPMENT
1955 Manheim Pk. (Foxshire Plaza)
Lancaster • 509-7752
IDENTITY HAIR SALON
221 Rohrerstown Road • Lancaster
394-1074
JUICE PLUS+/HURST PARTNERS
INTERNATIONAL, LTD.
800-384-1962
www.yourhealthstyles.us
L & E MASSAGE THERAPY CENTERS
Lancaster and Ephrata locations
560-6788 and 721-3254
MERLE NORMAN COSMETIC
STUDIO
Park City Center • Kohl’s Wing
Lancaster • 393-2393
PATRICIA’S HAIRSTYLING CENTER
3844 Columbia Ave.
Mountville • 285-2838
PAVELKO SENIOR CONSULTING
SERVICES, LLC
517-8871 • www.pavelko.org
POUNDS TO FREEDOM
900 B Centerville Rd.
892-7448
SUSQUEHANNA HEARING CENTER
24A E. Roseville Road
Lancaster • 569-0000
THE REJUVENATION CENTER
616 Paxton Place • Suite 102
Lititz • 569-3040
THE SPA AT INTERCOURSE VILLAGE
3544 Old Philadelphia Pk • Intercourse
768-0555 • 800-801-2219
YOUR HEALTH STYLES FOR LIFE
(Laser Skin Care)
148 E. Main St. • Leola • 405-0881
A. E. KEENER ELECTRIC
1510 Quarry Lane
Lancaster, PA • 575-0949
CALDER DOOR & SPECIALTY CO.
1296 Loop Rd. • Lancaster
397-8295
CDR IMPROVEMENTS, INC.
P.O. Box 192 • Denver
800-543-9896 • richardcdr@juno.com
FURNITURE MEDIC
2274 Manor Ridge Dr.
Lancaster • 393-8545
GOCHNAUER’S HOME
APPLIANCE CENTER
5939 Main St • East Petersburg
569-0439 • www.gochnauers.com
HERITAGE DESIGN INTERIORS
1064 Main St., Rt. 23
Blue Ball • 354-2233
www.heritagedesigninteriors.com
HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE
Serving Lancaster County • 207-0755
homeinstead.com/589
INDEPENDENT STAIR LIFT SOLUTIONS
401 Granite Run Dr. • Lancaster
626-4401 • yourIHS.com
ISLAND PAINTING, INC.
3806 Concordia Rd
Columbia, PA • 285-9074
KEN GUNZENHAUSER & ASSOC.
BASEMENT DAMP PROOFING
171 Ridgeway Ave. • Ephrata
368-6183
KREIDER’S CANVAS SERVICE
73 W. Main St. • Leola
656-7387 • www.KreidersCanvas.com
DIRECTORY
Present your BOOMers
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November 24, 2012
• BOOMers
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you were born between 1946 and 1964, you’re considered a Baby Boomer.
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just for presenting your card. It is that simple! A directory of participating
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LANCASTER BUILDING SUPPLY
WINDOWS DOORS and MORE, LLC
1851 Lincoln Hwy East • Lancaster • 393-1321
LANCASTER DOOR SERVICE
1851 Lincoln Hwy East • Lancaster
394-4724 • www.lancasterdoor.com
LANDIS at HOME
www.landisathome.org
PREMIERE CARPET CLEANERS
www.premierecarpetcleaners.com/boomers
842-2015
SCOOTER WAREHOUSE
401 Granite Run Dr. • Lancaster
393-8213 • LancasterScooterWarehouse.com
SIEGRIST DECORATING
232 W. Main St. • Leola • 656-2826
STERMER BROTHERS STOVES & SPAS
1330 Harrisburg Pk • 207-0901
www.stermer.com
TRIANGLE REFRIGERATION CO.
Brownstown • 656-2711
ZIMMERMAN’S ROOFING, LLC
325 B West Main St. • New Holland
354-3737 • www.zimmermansroofing.com
PARKHILL JEWELRY
Ephrata • 733-8800
VINCENT & CO. FINE JEWELERS
1633 Lititz Pike • Lancaster • 299-GEMS
DREAM DINNERS
Lancaster • 509-4530
www.dreamdinners.com
DEB’S PET BUDDIES
In Home Pet Sitting
Lititz • 283-4438
www.debspetbuddies.com
AMERICAN TASTES
Suite E, Silver Spring Center
3545 Marietta Ave. • Lancaster • 285-1361
ELLEN’S HUMMELS
2495 Lincoln Hwy, Quality Center
Lancaster • 394-8138
FLOWERS BY PAULETTE
258 N. Queen St. • Lancaster
295-5411 • www.flowersbypaulette.com
IHDE’S STUDIOS
25 N. Charles St. • Ephrata
738-0835 • www.ihdestudios.com
LEGACY USED BOOKS & COLLECTIBLES
145 E. Main St. • New Holland • 351-0740
www.legacyusedbooksandcollectibles.com
NIMBLE THIMBLE
45 N. Market St. (next to Quilt Museum) • Lancaster
299-5244 • nimthim@epix.net • nimblethimble.biz
PENNSYLVANIA TOY ACADEMY &
THE PARTY SHOP INC
705 Olde Hickory Rd • Lancaster
569-2286 • patoylady@aol.com
PUFF N’ STUFF
253 N. Queen St. • Lancaster • 393-9772
Myspace.com/puffstuff253
SUK SHUGLIE GALLERY
1320 B Manheim Pk (beside Essis)
Lancaster • 393-0966
JEWELRY
SPECIALTY STORES
MEAL ASSEMBLY
PET SERVICES
12 BOOMers ® •
November 24, 2012

T
he food cooked
during the holidays
is often enough to
feed an army. Too
often, hosts and
hostesses prepare
and serve much too much food,
only to fnd themselves left with
a refrigerator full of leftovers
when guests don’t eat as much
as hosts had planned.
In order to avoid wasting food,
many people attempt to create
new meals from their excess
holiday ingredients. Putting
leftovers to good use can take a
little ingenuity to disguise the
reality that you’re eating turkey
or ham for the third consecutive
night. All it may take is a little
inspiration to create delicious
meals with repurposed
holiday foods.
Te frst thing to keep in
mind when using leftovers is
food safety. Any food remaining
after the holiday meal should be
packed into storage containers
and refrigerated or frozen no
more than 2 hours after the
meal has ended. Tis ensures
that bacteria are not able to
proliferate in the food and
cause foodborne illnesses.
Choose shallow containers,
which will enable the food to
chill more uniformly and not
create warmer spots that take
longer to reach a safe storage
temperature. Do not save any
foods that have remained at
room temperature for too long
or seem questionable, especially
dairy products. It is adviseable
to discard leftovers (even if
refrigerated) after 4 days. Use it
or lose it!
What to do with all those
holiday leftovers
1. Turn stuffng into croquettes
or burgers by mixing chopped
turkey with stuffng or adding a
new meat to the equation, like
sausage.
2. Dice ham and potatoes and
add to the morning helping
of eggs for a country-style
omelette.
3. Promptly boil the turkey
carcass to make homemade
stock for soups and stews.
4. Turn leftover mashed
potatoes into a creamy potato
soup, with the addition of
cream, bacon and scallions.
5. Use cranberry sauce in place
of butter on bagels
or toast.
6. Mash up leftover sweet
potatoes and bake into a moist
and delicious sweet potato loaf
bread.
7. Create open-faced
sandwiches for lunch by
layering ham or turkey, stuffng,
cranberry sauce and gravy on
top of a thick slice of bread.
8. Diced meats, vegetables and
onion can be added to a batter
of pancake mix and turned into
an easy quiche.
9. Host Mexican night and use
leftover turkey meat to make
spicy fajitas, complete with sour
cream and salsa.
10. Use stale bread to make
homemade croutons for salad
or use in a bread pudding
recipe.
11. Add cranberry sauce to
boxed muffn mixes for a tart
treat.
12. Turn leftover holiday meats
into an Asian stir-fry with the
addition of water chestnuts,
bean sprouts, soy sauce, and
mixed vegetables.
13. Grind meats to make a
hearty meat loaf.
14. Make leftover potatoes into
hash browns.
15. Cube leftover cake and
serve on skewers and fruit for
dipping into chocolate fondue.
16. Use pie crust and small
ramekins to turn turkey or ham
into savory pot pies.
Once leftovers
are properly
stored, you can
think up some
creative menu
ideas for using
them in the
next few days.

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