GETTING THE BEST OF SHAWN KEMP

ROBERT L. JAMIESON JR. B1

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CULTURE

OUTDOORS

BASEBALL

‘Star Trek’s’ Seattle gala: Dr. Phlox is onboard
LIFE AND ARTS D1

ROLLING WITH THE CRUNCHES
Spills, skills at bike boot camp
GETAWAYS

No sweep: Angels stop M’s run at 6
SPORTS C1

T H U R S D AY, A U G U S T 3 1 , 2 0 0 6

TOP STORIES

The latest in California cool

296 square feet – but it’s home
Tiny condos in Belltown to start at $149,950
BY AUBREY COHEN
P-I reporter

High-octane alcohol sales banned in much of city
But other neighborhoods fear trade will move there
BY ANGELA GALLOWAY
P-I reporter

SMALL SPACES
A new Belltown condo development set to break ground in October will feature smaller units at affordable prices. Below is a floor plan for a 338-square-foot unit. Represents the size of a queensized bed 13 ft. Living space Kitchen

California’s political leaders reached an agreement Wednesday on the nation’s most sweeping controls on greenhouse gas emissions. That puts the state at odds with the Bush administration on curbing man-made causes of climate change. SEE A9

Closet

New skipper after accident
The skipper of the Seattle-based icebreaker Healy was relieved of command Wednesday as the Coast Guard investigates the deaths of two divers from the ship who were killed in the Arctic Ocean. SEE B1

Park two of GMC’s biggest Sierra pickups next to each other. That’s a lot of truck, but a small condominium – at least by Seattle standards. But a local developer is betting Seattle urbanites are primed to carve out their own two-truck chunks of Belltown. The moda condos, set to break ground in October, promise “New York-style living,” with units as small as 296 square feet that start at $149,950. “I think there’s unmet demand for affordable
SEE CONDO, A6

Bath

26 ft.
Source: H+dlT Collaborative, LLC
SEATTLE P-I

Stores throughout much of Seattle soon will be forbidden to sell cheap, extra-strong beers and wines, thanks to rules approved by the state Wednesday. But that’s got folks in some neighborhoods worrying whether homeless alcoholics will then head to communities such as Wallingford, Eastlake and southwest Seattle for their bottle of Thunderbird. “There’s several stores that sell the highoctane stuff in my neighborhood,” said Will Barker, a 40-year-old computer graphic artist.
SEE ALCOHOL, A7

Costco warns of lower profit
A warning from Costco Wholesale that fourth-quarter profit will be below analysts’ estimates sent the company’s shares down more than 4 percent Wednesday. The company said sales of some items have slowed and gas prices are a problem. SEE E1

THE GLOW OF DYING EMBERS?

ALSO IN THE NEWS
NATION/WORLD
New park policy: The National Park Service to side with conservation over recreation when they conflict. A4 Military optimism: The U.S. commander in Iraq says there’s progress on security despite continuing deadly attacks. A10

PASSAGES
Glenn Ford dies: The actor, whose dozens of films included Westerns, comedies and dramas, was 90. A11

SEATTLE
Wah Mee parole hearing: Relatives of victims in the 1983 massacre oppose putting one of the gunman on a path to freedom. B1 Oil spilled: The search is on for the source of a mysterious spill found near the Edmonds ferry terminal. B5

BUSINESS
Quick layoffs: About 400 workers got e-mails from RadioShack telling them they were fired immediately. E1 Russians buying into Airbus? Shares of Airbus’ parent rise amid reports a Russian bank bought more than 4 percent of the company. E2 Labor abuses alleged: Apple is delving into allegations against an iPod manufacturer in China. E2
MERYL SCHENKER / P-I

Tony Lyons, 21, of Seattle has a cigarette outside Ozzie’s on lower Queen Anne Hill, where he works as a bouncer. Lyons says most of the people he is around at Ozzie’s and at the car dealership where he also works smoke. He has smoked since he was 13 and says he is not ready to quit yet. So he was surprised to hear that the number of adult smokers in Washington has declined by 21 percent since 2000, meaning there are 205,000 fewer smokers in the state these days. SEE B1

Medical costs are justified, study asserts
Spread over many years, the benefits of pricey treatments are worth it
BY JEFF DONN
The Associated Press

INDEX
TODAY’S WEATHER Fog in the morning, then clearing. High 75. Low 53. B8 Comics Crosswords Editorial Horoscope Lottery Obituaries Television
★★★

D4,5 D4,5 B6,7 D2 B2 B4 E6

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© 2006 SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER

(FJECD|14000X

Despite exploding costs, most Americans got sizable life-extending bang for their medical bucks over recent decades, says one of the most sweeping studies ever of health care value. That might come as a surprise to anyone who has ever shuddered over a med-

ical bill, and the report itself raises doubts over how quickly costs have escalated. However, the study calculated that Americans of all ages spent an average of $19,900 on medical care for each extra year of life expectancy gained over the last four decades of the 20th century. And that cost is worth it, the study authors say. “On average, the return is very high,” concludes study leader David Cutler, a Harvard University health economist. “But it’s getting worse for . . . in particular, the elderly.” “The rising cost of health care has been the source of a lot of saber rattling in the media and the public square, without anyone seriously analyzing the benefits

gained,” Cutler said. “But the dramatic increase in life expectancy that we’ve seen over the last decades shows that rising medical costs have been largely justified.” The analysis was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Aging and the Lasker Foundation and was published in today’s New England Journal of Medicine. Patrick Boyle, 74, is a prime example of what good medical care and intervention can do. The Shoreline resident climbed Mount Si when he was 57 years old. When he reached the top, he was in the midst of a
SEE HEALTH, A9

COMING TOMORROW
Pop, punk, rap . . . eccentric films . . . roller derby . . . must be Bumbershoot time.

AMERICAN LIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH
Source: National Vital Statistics System

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

69.9 70.8 73.9 75.4 76.9

A6

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER ❘ THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2006

CONDO: Downtown location, price the major attraction
treux. “People around the world new construction in downtown,” live in places a lot smaller,” she said developer G. David Hoy, said. “I think that definitely influpresident of HMI Real Estate Inc. enced my perspective.” Stines got married and “I also believe downtown needs moved out in 2002. She now more diversity.” Debra Smith, who now lives rents out her condo, holding onin a studio apartment in Queen to it for possible future use as an Anne, has already reserved a mo- urban crash pad – something she said some other da studio. She exMontreux owners tolled the location, “I like having already do. the price and even everything in A quick review the size. of real-estate listings “I like having evjust one room. shows “New Yorkerything in just one I just think style living” is, inroom,” she said. “I it’s a waste of deed, available in just think it’s a waste money to have New York, with conof money to have all dos as small as 250 this space that you all this space that square feet on the don’t really need.” you don’t really market in ManhatModa is not Seneed.” tan. attle’s first smallRick Hooper, condo project. The Debra Smith, who now policy director for Montreux building, lives in a studio Seattle’s Office of built in 1999 at 425 in Queen Anne but Housing, noted in a Vine St., has condos who has reserved a moda news release barely above 300 moda studio that city officials square feet. condominium want more affordErin Stines, one able homes downof the first Montreux buyers, said it was a place she town, close to jobs and transporcould afford within walking dis- tation. “To find a developer who’s tance of Seattle University, where she was going to law able to put an attractive product school at the time, and the law on the market that hits that lower price range is fantastic,” he firms where she worked. “It was easy to clean,” she said. The building’s 251 condos said. “I didn’t really have money for furniture, so whatever I did will range up to two-bedroom, have, it just instantly filled it up.” two-bath units selling for more Stines lived in small student than $400,000. All of the condos housing in England and a “min- will have such luxury touches as iature little apartment” in Japan appliances with stainless-steel before buying into the Mon- finishes, granite or limestone

FROM A1

ABOUT MODA CONDOMINIUMS
What: 251 condos, including units as small as 296 square feet that start at $149,950, and 8,000 square feet of commercial space. Where: 2312 Third Ave. When: Anticipated groundbreaking in October, with occupancy in summer 2008. Who: HMI Real Estate, developer More information: The sales center is set to open Sept. 23 at 314 Bell St. Preregister at modacondos.com.

GRANT M. HALLER / P-I

Iolanthe Chan-McCarthy of Urban Pacific Real Estate, left, and G. David Hoy, president of HMI Real Estate Inc., in a 300-square-foot unfinished condo. Studios that size range from $149,950 to $245,950.

countertops, floors finished with cherry or walnut and tile bathrooms. The developers know they’re up against some trepidation about small condos. So they’re building several of the units in their sales office. “Everybody always thinks, ‘Oh my God, what can I put in 300 square feet?’ ” said Iolanthe Chan-McCarthy of Urban Pacific

Real Estate, moda’s marketing firm. “So we decided to show them 300 square feet.” The smallest display unit includes a bathroom and kitchen, walk-in closet, eating counter and areas to fit a desk, table, foldaway bed and other bare necessities. The fridge and dishwasher are smaller than most and other touches, such as sliding doors and small light fix-

tures, are designed to fit a little place. So will the small-condo lifestyle catch on in Seattle? Chan-McCarthy said she often hears complaints about the lack of less-expensive units in other projects she represents. Interest in moda already has been strong, she said, with 228 people preregistering at the development’s Web site since the start of

advertising Saturday. Matthew Gardner, a local land-use economist, said moda hits an unmet price range downtown while still generating a decent return per square foot for the developer. “It’s a gutsy move, certainly,” he said. Stines noted that many friends who visited her condo were interested in something similar. “I think now the problem is there’s just not very many spaces like that downtown,” she said.
P-I reporter Aubrey Cohen can be reached at 206-448-8362 or aubreycohen@seattlepi.com.

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