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Math Unit: Understanding Money

Standard: 1.3.1.4.1 “Determine the value of any set of pennies, nickels, and dimes.”

Day One Objectives: The students will identify pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. The students will determine the value of a set of pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. The students will explore the value of a set of coins using technology. Direct Instruction: The teacher will introduce the theme “Understanding Money” to the class. The teacher will begin the lesson by gathering the students on the reading rug. The teacher will then read the book, “The Penny Pot” by Stuart J. Murphy. This is a wonderful book about a young girl named Jessie trying to come up with 50 cents in order to get her face painted at the fair and the author introduces the concept of counting coins in such a fun and simple way. After the teacher finishes reading the story she will ask what kinds of purchases students have made with coins. They will share ideas in order for the students to use background knowledge to think of times they’ve interacted with money. From there the students will be directed back to there seats. The teacher will use the SMART Board to introduce each type of coin. On four separate slides the teacher will go over the values of a penny, nickel, quarter, and dime; making sure to introduce the characteristics of each coin as well. For example: A Penny is U.S. coin worth one cent. It can be written as 1¢ or $0.0. It is made of Copper and is very smooth. Abraham Lincoln-our 16th president is on the front of the Penny and the Lincoln Memorial is on the back. Guided Practice (with hands-on activities): The teacher will wrap up the SMART Board presentation by having one student from each table come up to the front and grab a plastic tub. In each of the plastic tubs there will be 4 separate baggies, each separately filled with plastic play pennies, dimes, nickels, and quarters. There will also be several sheets of blank white paper [1 per student] and crayons. The teacher will say, “now that we have gone over the values and characteristics of each coin, can someone tell me the value of a quarter?” The teacher will ask a few questions of the same nature in order to review the concept they have just learned. The teacher will answer any questions or concerns the students have. From there the teacher will give the students 1 minute of play time where they can look at and play with the play coins. After that, she will have the students fold their blank sheets of white paper into four sections. In each section the students will be directed to draw one coin, the coins value, and an observation they made about the coin. The teacher should be circulating the classroom, helping and guiding students with their drawings during this time. When they are finished, the will turn to their shoulder partners and share their papers with each other. The teacher will hang all of the students’ papers on the bulletin board for them to refer back to throughout the 5-day unit. Independent Practice (paper/pencil): Once the class has put away their previous materials, the students will grab their personal whiteboards and markers. The teacher will tell them they are going to be doing “Numbered Heads Together.” Using the SMART Board the teacher will show a variety of slides to the whole

class with either a picture of a coin or the amount the coin is worth (for example: 5¢) on each slide. The students will have to decide the name of each coin being represented on the different slides. They will then belly write their answer on their whiteboard. When the teacher calls “Numbered Heads Together”, they show their boards to their group members. The students will praise each other if they are all the same and discuss with each other if different until they come up with one answer. Finally, the teacher calls on a number teammate to stand and show team’s answer. Ticket Out the Door: The teacher will write 2 questions on the board for each student to answer on their index card known as the “Ticket Out the Door.” This ticket is required to leave class after the math portion of the day, whether it is going to specials, recess, lunch, or home. The questions for day one will be: 1. Please tell me about an experience you have had using coins. 2. Why do you think learning about coins and how to spend them is important? Assessment: Informal assessment takes place during both guided and independent practice as the teacher walks around the room, observing the students and the work they are accomplishing. Ticket out the door will also be used for informal assessment. Materials: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. SMART Board/PowerPoint Plastic Tubs Plastic play coins [pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters] Blank sheets of white paper Crayons Index cards

Day Two Objectives: The students will determine the value of a set of pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. The students will count on to determine the value of a set of coins. Students will enhance their understanding of coin values. Direct Instruction: The teacher will begin day two by asking questions like, “Does anyone remember what the value of a quarter is?” “Can someone tell me what coin is worth 10¢?” Along with other questions relating to the previous days material in order to get an idea of what the students retained from the previous day. The teacher will then quickly go over the four SMART Board slides that describe each coin, to review what they have learned so far. She will say, “Now that we know the value of each coin, we are going to play a game with the coins that will allow us to become more familiar with coins and their values, while also practicing our addition skills!” Guided Practice: The students will clear off their desks and a designated student from each table will come up and grab a “Money Pot” for their table. Students will get into groups of four. Each student will begin the game with 10 pennies. The Money Pot will be placed in the middle of their table. They "pot" will be full of plastic pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. The teacher will model how to play the game in front of the students before they play on their own. The teacher will then explain the rules of the game. The rules are as follows: The students will take turns rolling a pair of dice. During each turn, the student will add the number rolled to the amount of money that they started with. The student then adds money from the pot to their pile to create a new total. The student should exchange several smaller coins for larger coins of equal value. To keep track of their money, the students will be writing and calculating each time they roll and how much money they add to their personal money pot in their math journals. The students will play 3 rounds and the winner of each game will be student with the greatest amount of money. Independent Practice: The students will get out their math journals. The teacher will direct the students to draw a picture of the coins they ended up with at the end of the game. The students will also be asked to create a picture and number sentence that shows the addition of all of their coins to total the money at the end of the lesson. Ticket Out the Door: The students will be asked the following questions: 1. Can you please draw me 2 out of the 4 coins we have learned about and write their values. 2. Tell me one thing you learned from today’s lesson. Assessment: The teacher can determine whether each child comprehends the values of each coin/dollar, and whether the student comprehends how to add together the coin values while walking around during the guided practice portion of the lesson. Ticket out the door will also be used for informal assessment. Materials: 1. Plastic pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters

Day Three Objectives: The students will determine the value of a set of pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. The students will count on to determine the value of a set of coins. Students will enhance their understanding of coin values. Direct Instruction: Guided Practice: 1. Divide your class into groups of 3 students. 2. Explain the game

instructions to your students. 
 The teacher will write a coin amount for all the students to see. (S)he will then select coins out of the “teacher’s pile” that equal the amount written on the board. These coins will be held secretly in the teacher’s fist or pocket. 
 Each group member will either be the counter, the checker, or the announcer for his or her group. These roles will rotate at the start of each new round of the game. 
 Each group will be given one minute to find a way to represent the coin amount using only the coins in their pile. After their minute is over, the announcer from each group will report back to the class about the coin combination they used to reach the listed amount. 
 Each group will be given one point for being accurate with their coin combination. The teacher will then reveal the combination (s)he used to make the stated amount. An additional point is given to those groups whose choice of coins matches the teacher's selection of coins. 
 3. Distribute a pile of coins to each group of students. Each student should have the same number of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters. The teacher will also have the same number of coins in the "teacher's pile". 

Independent Practice: Assessment: In the process of play, students will see that there are many possible

solutions to putting coins together to equal a specified amount. Equaling the teacher's choice was guesswork (random choice within a possible set), but accuracy counts for a point as well. The teacher will be observing to see who seemed to have difficulty in adding up coins and who accomplished the task with ease.
Materials:

Day Four

Objectives: The students will count on to determine the value of a set of coins. Students will enhance their understanding of coin values. Students will construct number meanings through real-world experiences and the use of physical material Direct Instruction: Guided Practice: 1. Read "Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday" aloud to

your students. 2. Divide the class into pairs, and give each a set of coin manipulatives. Tell them that you are going to read the book again and that they are to remove the number of coins Alexander spends at each point in the story from their manipulatives. When you've finished the book, check to see if any pair still has "unspent" coins. 
 3. Hand out a large (12" x 18") piece of paper to each student pair. Ask them to fold the paper into tenths, and then have them draw a box around each of the ten sections. 
 4. Read the book again, stopping at each "transaction" so the students can record it on the paper. For example, have students write the amount of money Alexander receives from his grandparents in the first box. Then in the second box, have them calculate how much money Alexander has left after he buys all his gum. Continue this way throughout the story until Alexander has spent his last 20 cents.
Independent Practice: Assessment: Were the students successfully able to calculate how Alexander spent

his dollar.
Materials: A copy of the book "Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday" by

Judith Viorst, several sheets of 12-by-8-inch paper, pencils, manipulatives (play or real coins), and calculators.

Day Five Objectives: The students will count on to determine the value of a set of coins. Students will enhance their understanding of coin values. Students will apply mathematics strategies of counting, adding, and subtracting decimal amounts to create change for a dollar. Direct Instruction: Guided Practice: 1. After introducing students to the value of all currently circulating

U.S. coins (including cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, and dollar coins), explain that the students will be exploring how to make change for a dollar. 2. The teacher explains that there are different ways in which to make change. A person can either subtract the cost from the amount given, or they can count up from the cost until they reach the amount given. Today you’re going to work with counting up. 
 3. The teacher asks one student to be the shopper and one to be the clerk to model the activity for the class. The shopper wants to purchase one pencil which (s)he is told costs $0.25. (S)he gives clerk $1.00, and the clerk counts out (aloud) how much change to give back (starting at $.25, they will count $.50, $.75, $1.00), and gives back three quarters. Ask someone else to be shopper and clerk, model another simulation with whole class. Repeat again until students grasp this concept. 
 4. Provide class with a sheet listing 6 different scenarios to act out in pairs. 
 5. Once the students seem comfortable with making change, provide each student with 3 more scenarios to work out independently. Provide manipulatives to help students visualize their work. Then ask that students write out number sentences to show how they solved each problem.
Independent Practice: Assessment: Teacher will observe group interactions. Each child will complete a

worksheet which may be formally assessed. The students will also complete an end of the unit test. The test is attached below.
Materials:

1. What is the name of this coin? ______________ How much is the coin worth? _______________

2. What is the name of this coin? ______________ How much is the coin worth? _______________

3. What is the name of this coin? ________________ How much is the coin worth? _________________

4. Draw a line from the coin to the correct amount the coin is worth.

5 cents 1 cent 10 cents

5. How much money do you see? ____________________

6. How much money do you see? _____________________

7. How much money do you see? ___________________

8. Circle the coins that equal one dime.

9. Circle the coins that equal one nickel.

10. Circle the coins that equal one dime.

11. How much money do you see? _________________

12. How much money do you see? __________________

13. How much money do you see? ___________________

14. Find a set of coins that equal the same amount as the ones in the box.

a.

b.

c.

15. Find a set of coins that equal the same amount as the ones in the box.

a.

b.

c.