AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

1

N610

N766

Figure 1 - Americana Glenmont (parcels N766 and N610), M-NCPPC GIS. 11-5-2012

Figure 2 - Americana Glenmont, aerial view, 2008. M-NCPPC GIS.

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

2

Figure 3 - Americana Glenmont. Clare Lise Kelly, November 4, 2011

Figure 4 – Americana Glenmont. Clare Lise Kelly, November 4, 2011.

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

3

Figure 5 - Detail, Americana Glenmont. Terraces and balconies are accessed by exterior doors set within a window wall that lights living space. Common stairwells (center left) are also lit by a large expanse of windows. Bedrooms are lit by picture windows (at right). Clare Lise Kelly, November 4, 2011.

Figure 6 – Balconies have alternating open railings and solid panels. These are currently covered with removable green panels. Source: apartments.com

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

4

Figure 7 – Central common space in the complex includes a pool with poolhouse. Source: apartments.com

Figure 8 - Two bedroom unit with optional den. Source: Glenmont Forest, GradyMgt.com

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

5

Figure 9 – By the 1950s, developers were under criticism for clear cutting trees and leveling ground for housing developments. This view of Viers Mill Road was taken in March 1952. Washington Post, March 30, 1952.

Figure 10 – By the time he built Americana Glenmont, Carl M. Freeman already had a reputation for innovation in housing projects and a trendsetter for modern design. Washington Post, January 21, 1961.

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

6

Figure 11 - In 1963, Americana Glenmont was publicly recognized for its innovative preservation of natural topography and mature trees by an award from the County Council and M-NCPPC. Source: Washington Post, June 22, 1963. Figure 12 (below) – In citing Americana Glenmont for a land planning award, the Council and Commission emphasized the advantageous site plan which situates buildings pointing inward so units look onto green space rather than parking lots. Other features recognized were preservation of trees and a small stream, and a large central recreation area. Bird’s eye aerial view looking west, bing.com. 2012

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

7

Figure 13 - Fritz Burns, seen here in 1938, was an ambitious Los Angeles developer known for his sales innovations. Carl Freeman was his divisional sales manager from 1937 to 1941. Photo source: John T. Keane, Fritz Burns and the Development of Los Angeles (2001), p136.

Figure 14 - Kiplinger’s Changing Times magazine (May 1953) described Carl M. Freeman as a new breed of builder whose success was based on entrepreneurial talent rather than simply construction skills.

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

8

Figure 15 – Starting in 1947, in Carole Highlands, Carl M. Freeman began building modern “California cottages” designed by Berla and Abel architects, which featured low-pitched roofs with wide eaves and rear window walls—a modern look compared to conservative Cape Cods being built at the time. Front kitchen windows enabled mothers “to watch children trip off to school,” and had a cutaway roof detail to bring in natural light. The houses featured such innovations as a wall of bedroom closets. Washington Post, August 17, 1947

Figure 16 –Freeman’s Parkwood house was illustrated in Architectural Record as a Revere Quality Home, for its open floor plan, outdoor living, and wise use of space.The floorplan bears great resemblance to his apartment floorplans, with the exception of the bathroom location. Freeman later advocated for bathroom vents so the rooms could be interior space, and then windows could be used for living space. (Architectural Record, May 1950)

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

9

Figure 17 - Freeman used the Americana name to brand his type of modernist residences. Washington Post, May 15, 1955

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

10

Figure 17 - At Rollingwood Terrace, Freeman experimented with features which would characterize his garden apartments, including balconies, terraces, banking the building into a hillside, and preserving the natural setting. Arnold Kronstadt and Richard Collins designed the Rollingwood houses, including the Brookville model, illustrated here. Washington Post, June 12, 1955.

Figure 18 – When he shifted to apartment projects, Freeman used features that had been popular in his Americana houses. Americana Riggs (1953), a six-building complex, was Carl Freeman’s first apartment project. Arnold Kronstadt was credited with the design, likely with the assistance of his associate Richard Collins. View from 18th Street. Source: bing.com. 2012

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

11

Figure 19 – The Colonial Revival Falkland Apartments (1936-37) were the first FHA funded garden apartments in the county (Master Plan site 36/12). Clare Lise Kelly, April 2008.

Figure 20 - Garden apartments of the postwar era, such as Arlington’s Buchanan Gardens (1949), were characterized by design that was austere, yet met the minimum requirements for FHA financing. Photo: EHT Traceries, April 2009.

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

12

Figure 21 - Carl M. Freeman set about to change the mold of uninspired garden apartments in the Washington area. His modernist apartments featured window walls, balconies, and terraces. This 1958 view of Americana Hampshire shows shared balconies and new plantings typical of Freeman’s early apartments. Washington Post, August 9, 1958.

Figure 22 - Carl M. Freeman’s earliest apartments, built 1953 to 1959, were located along the MontgomeryPrince George’s border, accessible to such employment centers as the University of Maryland and the Naval Ordnance Lab. Photo source: Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington.

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

13

Figure 23 – Freeman’s Americana Park (1961) was featured in House and Home (July 1961) for its preservation of open space and its natural setting. (The site, incorrectly identified as being in Bethesda, is located on New Hampshire Avenue, in Prince George’s County.)

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

14

Figure 24 –Americana Fairfax (1961) was recognized with an award from the Northern Virginia Home Builders for its architectural design, which matches Americana Glenmont. The complex was also praised for its natural setting. Washington Post, March 3, 1962.

Figure 25 –Americana Fairfax balcony railings match those found beneath coverings at Americana Glenmont. The former Americana Fairfax is today’s Heritage Woods condominiums, on Americana Drive. Clare Lise Kelly, July 22, 2012

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

15

Figure 26 - Before it was developed, the Americana Glenmont property was a heavily wooded tract, seen in the center of this 1951 aerial. Source: M-NCPPC, GIS.

Figure 27 - Land planner S. E. Sanders designed the Americana Glenmont complex, seen here in 1978, to preserve the naturally sloping landscape and mature trees. Source: Glenmont Sector Plan, July 1978.

AAMERICAAMERICANA GLENMONT FIGURES

16

Figure 28 - When Americana Glenmont was platted in 1961, Glenmont was already a newly established community, including fire station, police station, school, a church, and (north of Randolph Road) a shopping center. Wheaton Regional Park is at lower right. Plats.net

Figure 29 - Americana Glenmont apartments were situated to fit into the sloping land, as seen in this topographic map. Source: M-NCPPC GIS.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful