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419-692-2202
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944 E. Fifth St. Delphos
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• NEW ENGLAND CLAM CHOWDER
• CREAM OF POTATO • CREAM OF BROCCOLI
• ITALIAN WEDDING SOUP
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$20
FETZER JEWELRY
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with purchase of each
soup basket or box
Thursday, November 29, 2012
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Elida FFA places in Parliamentary
Procedure, p8

Hall of Fame ballot released, p6
Upfront
Sports
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-8
Farm 8
Classifieds 10
TV 11
World News 12
Index
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR WEEKEND WEATHER OUTLOOK
FRIDAY
EXTENDED
FORECAST
SATURDAY SUNDAY
Partly
cloudy.
Highs
in the
lower 50s.
Lows in
the upper 30s.
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in
the mid
50s. A 30
percent
chance of showers in the
evening. Lows around 50.
Mostly cloudy Monday with a 20 percent chance of showers
during the day. Highs in the lower 60s. Mostly cloudy Monday
night with a 50 percent chance of showers. Lows around 50.
Mostly
cloudy
with a 50
percent
chance of
showers.
Highs in the upper 50s.
Lows in the lower 50s.
Library to host
‘Breakfast with
Santa’ Dec. 8
The Delphos Public Library
will welcome that ‘Jolly Old
Elf’ for some holiday fun.
“Breakfast with Santa” will
be held from 10-11 a.m. on
Dec. 8 in the First Edition
Building. Children should
bring their wish lists.
Signup is underway with
a limit of 50 total attendees
— adults and children. To
allow for more children, when
possible, one adult should
accompany the children.
A light break-
fast will be served.
Call the library at
419-695-4015.
Students taste adult life
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
sgroves@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE — Fort
Jennings and Ottoville
eighth-graders and freshmen
students experienced a “trial
run” at adult spending in a
two-hour program simulating
the real-life experiences of
money management and the
correlation between educa-
tional attainments and earn-
ing power.
Each year, America’s high
schools graduate thousands of
young adults who are unpre-
pared in matters of employ-
ment and financial decisions.
With Real Money, Real World
programs — partnerships of
the OSU County Extension
Office, schools and business
communities — young peo-
ple are given the opportunity
to make lifestyle and budget
choices through an active,
hands-on experience.
Putnam County 4-H Youth
Development Educator Jason
Hedrick explained the pre-
liminary work the students
perform prior to attending the
hands-on program.
“Each student completes
three or four lessons in a
careers- and/or finance-
related class,” Hedrick said.
“Then they are given a ran-
dom generated ‘family’ — a
wife or husband and children
— and then try to balance
the necessities, as well as
luxuries, with the reality of
monthly income.”
Fort Jennings eighth-
grader Kyle Maag chose his
profession as an electrician.
With a family of three to sup-
port and a budget of $3,125
per month, he found that after
deducting a car with insur-
ance, a house with insurance,
entertainment, a credit card,
college loan payment and a
loss of income on a chance he
took, he had only $1,042 left
to purchase the balance of his
necessities.
“It’s been a good learn-
ing experience and teaches
real life situations,” Maag
was introspective, especially
when you jump from high
school to paying for every-
thing yourself.”
Jessica Young, a freshmen
from Fort Jennings, chose to
be a pharmacist. Her simu-
lated family included a hus-
band, one toddler and a bud-
get before taxes of $6,500.
“This experience opened
my eyes to the expenses my
parents incur everyday,”
Young spoke insightfully.
“I’ll purchase items that are
not as expensive. It gives me
Hometown
Christmas set
The Delphos Area Chamber
of Commerce and Kiwanis
Club will present Hometown
Christmas on Friday.
The annual parade
showcasing the arrival of
Santa steps off at 6:30 p.m.
from The Delphos Herald
parking lot and heads south on
Main Street, east on Second
Street and ends at Santa’s
house in the First Financial
Bank parking lot.
Horse and carriage rides
will be offered until 8:30
p.m. from the bank parking
lot; Maverick Media will
have cookies, hot dogs and
hot chocolate; The Grind
Cafe will host a craft show;
Schrader Realty will have
Santa’s Workshop; the Canal
Commission Christmas Tree
Festival will be open; and the
EMS will offer its annual ham
and bean supper from 5-8 p.m.
OHSAA Football State
Championships
Friday’s Games
11 a.m. Division VI:
Massillon Paul Brown Tiger
Stadium - Newark Catholic
(12-2) vs. Maria Stein Marion
Local (12-2); 3 p.m. Division
IV: Canton Fawcett Stadium
- St. Clairsville (14-0) vs.
Clarksville Clinton-Massie
(14-0); 7 p.m. Division II:
Tiger Stadium - Toledo
Central Catholic (13-1) vs.
Trotwood-Madison (12-2)
Saturday’s Games
11 a.m. Division III:
Fawcett Stadium - Akron
St. Vincent-St. Mary (12-2)
vs. Bellevue (13-1); 3 p.m.
Division V: Tiger Stadium -
Kirtland (14-0) vs. Coldwater
(14-0); 7 p.m. Division I:
Fawcett Stadium - Toledo
Whitmer (14-0) vs. Cincinnati
Archbishop Moeller (11-3)
Real Money, Real World
Fort Jennings eighth-grader Conner Stechschulte determines his monthly expenses at
the “Utilities” booth. (Delphos Herald/Stephanie Groves)
NY mayor seeks more disaster
aid for Sandy victims
By ANDREW MIGA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — New
York City Mayor Michael
Bloomberg appealed to con-
gressional leaders Wednesday
for quick action on provid-
ing tens of billions of dollars
in new federal aid to help
his city and state and oth-
ers recover from Superstorm
Sandy but was told it might
be some time before it’s
forthcoming — and it likely
won’t be all at once.
Bloomberg met with more
than a half-dozen lawmakers,
including several who chair
or sit on committees control-
ling the government’s purse
strings, as well and both par-
ties’ leaders in the House and
Senate.
“Hurricane recovery is
not a partisan issue,” he told
reporters at a news confer-
ence in between the meetings.
“We have to bring together
both sides in Washington.”
New York state alone is
seeking $42 billion in addi-
tional federal aid. New Jersey
is seeking federal aid to cover
most of the nearly $37 billion
cost for recovery and rebuild-
ing.
So far about $2 billion in
federal funds — about half
for direct assistance to indi-
viduals — have been pro-
vided to the two most heav-
ily damaged states and nine
others in the storm’s path.
There’s about $5 billion left
in the Federal Emergency
Management Agency’s disas-
ter relief fund, but last year’s
budget agreement permits
President Barack Obama
to seek another $5.4 billion
without hitting a ceiling on
spending.
Sen. Susan Collins of
Maine, a member of the
Appropriations Committee
and the top Republican on
the Homeland Security
Committee that oversees
disaster relief, struck a skep-
tical note after her meeting
with the mayor.
“It’s going to be a
hard sell,” she said, given
Congress’s preoccupation
with the fiscal cliff crisis
and tight budget restraints.
Reflecting a line taken in
the past by House Budget
Committee Chairman Paul
Ryan and other fiscal con-
servatives, she said at least
some of the new spending for
Sandy relief and rebuilding
should be offset by spend-
ing cuts in other government
programs.
“Otherwise it’s just going
to be added to the debt and
that makes it even more dif-
ficult for us to deal with the
fiscal challenges,” she said.
Collins said she needs to
see more detailed numbers
on damages before deciding
on how much Sandy aid is
needed. But she said New
York’s request is “reason-
able” if the damages can be
documented and added that
state and city officials have
not tried to exaggerate the
damages, as she claims hap-
pened with Hurricane Katrina
seven years ago.
Bloomberg and New York
Sen. Chuck Schumer said
they were pressing White
House officials for as much
money as possible, as soon
as possible, but they didn’t
know what amount Obama
will seek. Whatever it is, the
request could get tied up in
the talks aimed at averting
the fiscal cliff — a $6 trillion
combination of automatic tax
increases and spending cuts
— beginning in January.
“There’s no doubt this is
going to be a hard fight,”
said Schumer. “We have a
Congress that is decidedly
less friendly to disaster aid
than any in 100 years. We’re
in very strenuous negotia-
tions over the fiscal cliff.
We know money is short in
Washington, just as it is in
New York.”
Schumer said he expects
the fight for Sandy money
to drag on for months and
that several emergency
spending bills will be need-
ed. State officials worry that
Congress’s desire to satisfy
the hunger for aid will fade as
time wears on.
Faber to lead Ohio Senate
Faber
Information submitted
COLUMBUS — State
Senator Keith Faber (R-Celina)
Wednesday was unanimously
elected by the Senate Majority
Caucus to serve as President of
the Ohio Senate for the 130th
General Assembly.
President-Elect Faber, who
was first elected to the Ohio
Senate in 2007, has served on
the Senate leadership team
since 2009 when he was select-
ed as Majority Floor Leader
by his colleagues. Currently,
Senator Faber serves as the
Senate President Pro Tempore,
the chamber’s number two post.
Prior to his time in the Ohio
Senate, Senator Faber served three terms in the Ohio House of
Representatives.
“Keith Faber is an outstanding legislator with well-respected
leadership abilities,” said outgoing Senate President Thomas E.
Niehaus. “I am confident with Senator Faber’s background in
both the private and public sector. He has the experience the
Senate needs to navigate these challenging economic times.”
The Senate President presides over the chamber when the
Senate is in session and is in charge of enforcing the rules of the
Senate. He also serves as the leader of the Majority Caucus.
“I am humbled that my Senate colleagues have placed their
trust in my leadership for the coming General Assembly,” said
Faber. “As our economic recovery continues, I look forward
to working with Governor Kasich and Speaker Batchelder to
maintain a responsible, balanced state budget while continuing
our work to make Ohio more business friendly.”
Having maintained their control of 23 of the chamber’s 33
seats, the Republicans continue to hold the largest Ohio Senate
majority in more than four decades.
Senator Faber will take the gavel as Senate President when
the 130th General Assembly convenes on Jan. 7, 2013.
Joining the new president will be a newly elected Republican
leadership team that will be made up of Senator Chris Widener
(R-Springfield) as President Pro Tempore, Senator Tom Patton
(R-Strongsville) who will return as Majority Floor Leader and
Senator Larry Obhof (R-Medina), who will serve as Majority
Whip.
Senator Faber resides just outside Celina with his wife and
two children. He is active with the Chamber of Commerce,
the Ohio Farm Bureau and the Ohio Right to Life. He is also
a member of the National Rifle Association and the Mercer
County Sportsman Club.
“Hurricane recov-
ery is not a parti-
san issue. We have
to bring together
both sides in
Washington.”
— New York City Mayor
Michael Bloomberg
See REAL, page 12
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222 N. Canal St.
Delphos, Ohio 419-692-0961
2 – The Herald Thursday, November 29, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
FUNERAL
BIRTH
LOTTERY
VAN WERT COUNTY COURT NEWS
WEATHER
TODAY
IN HISTORY
POLICE
REPORT
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CorreCtions
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 120
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will
be accepted in towns or villag-
es where The Delphos Herald
paper carriers or motor routes
provide daily home delivery for
$1.48 per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Delphos weather
John Henry
Wrocklage Jr.
High temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
41 degrees, low was 27. High
a year ago today was 43, low
was 32. Record high for today
is 67, set in 1951. Record low
is 21, set in 1929.
No citations were issued
following a two-vehicle acci-
dent Monday at 134 Monroe
St.
Larry Carder, 50, of
Delphos was traveling north-
bound on Monroe Street in
a pickup truck owned by St.
John the Evangelist Cemetery
when an oncoming vehicle
caused him to swerve to the
right, striking a parked vehicle
owned by Marilyn Lyle.
The Lyle vehicle sus-
tained functional damage. The
Carder vehicle sustained non-
functional damage.
Truck strikes
parked car
A boy, Jack Charles, was
born Nov. 23 to Benjamin and
Melissa Maag of Ottawa.
He was welcomed home by
his big sister, Carliegh.
Grandparents are Kevin
and Kelly Ardner of Delphos
and Dean and Cindy Maag of
Ottawa.
WALter, John Henry
“Jack,” 70, of Delphos, Mass
of Christian Burial will begin
at 10:30 a.m. Friday at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church, the Rev. Chris
Bohnsack officiating. Burial
will follow in Spencerville
Cemetery, with military rites
by the Spencerville Veterans.
Friends may call from 3-5
p.m. and 7-9 p.m. today at
Thomas E. Bayliff Funeral
Home, where a parish wake
will begin at 7:30 p.m.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
1 6 - 3 0 - 3 5 - 3 6 - 3 7 - 4 5 ,
Kicker: 9-9-9-4-5-7
Estimated jackpot: $22.6 M
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $12 M
Pick 3 evening
0-2-0
Pick 3 Midday
4-5-3
Pick 4 evening
7-8-1-0
Pick 4 Midday
7-7-2-0
Pick 5 evening
5-5-6-8-5
Pick 5 Midday
2-3-0-2-4
Powerball
0 5 - 1 6 - 2 2 - 2 3 - 2 9 ,
Powerball: 6
Estimated jackpot: $550 M
rolling Cash 5
03-13-14-17-36
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
nov. 5, 1948-nov. 27, 2012
John Henry Wrocklage Jr.,
64, formerly of Spencerville,
died at 3:25 p.m. Tuesday
at the Mary Ann Brown
Residence Center in Lima,
where he had resided since
1995.
He was born Nov. 5,
1948, in Lima to John and
Evelyn (Pavel) Wrocklage Sr.
His father preceded him in
death. His mother survives in
Spencerville.
Other survivors include
two sisters, Renee (David)
Garza of Delphos and Tracy
Holbrook of Spencerville;
nieces and nephews, Michele
Wrocklage of Russells Point,
Rodney (Martha) Wrocklage
of Bellefontaine, Brittney and
Marissa Garza of Delphos,
Eddie Keyton of Spencerville
and Brandon (Kiley Diltz)
Salyer of Delphos; great-niec-
es and nephews, Megan Hook,
Rahin and Drew Wrocklage,
Blaze Wickman and Aiden
Salyer; and two aunts,
Eleanor Louise Barnt Ditto of
Spencerville and Joan (Harry)
Landwehr of Lima.
He was also preceded in
death by his brother, Rodney
Wrocklage.
Mr. Wrocklage was bap-
tized and a member of St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church in Delphos. He
had attended Robin Rogers
School and later worked at
the Marimor Industries, being
affiliated with them for more
than 50 years. He participated
and won medals in the Special
Olympics over the years.
Funeral services will begin
at 10 a.m. Saturday at Thomas
E. Bayliff Funeral Home,
Spencerville, the Rev. Stephen
Blum officiating. Burial will
be in New Salem Cemetery
south of Monticello.
Friends may call from 3-7
p.m. Friday at the funeral
home.
Preferred memorials are to
Marimor Industries.
WeAtHer ForeCAst
tri-county
the Associated Press
toniGHt: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the lower
30s. Southwest winds 10 to
15 mph.
FriDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the lower 50s.
Southwest winds 5 to 15
mph.
FriDAY niGHt: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the upper
30s. South winds around 5
mph.
eXtenDeD ForeCAst
sAtUrDAY niGHt:
Partly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 50s. South winds 5 to 15
mph.
sAtUrDAY niGHt:
Mostly cloudy with a 30 per-
cent chance of showers. Lows
around 50.
sUnDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 50 percent chance of
showers. Highs in the upper
50s.
sUnDAY niGHt: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the lower
50s.
MonDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 20 percent chance of
showers. Highs in the lower
60s.
MonDAY niGHt:
Mostly cloudy with a 50 per-
cent chance of showers. Lows
around 50.
The following individu-
als appeared Wednesday
before Judge Charles Steele
in Van Wert County Court of
Common Pleas:
Arraignment
nicholas Devecchio, 27,
Van Wert, was arraigned
on two counts of trafficking
heroin, each a felony of the
fourth degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and a pretrial was set
for Dec. 19.
Change of plea
Megan Lippincott, 32,
Middle Point, entered a plea of
guilty to an amended charge of
attempted aggravated posses-
sion of drugs, a misdemeanor
of the first degree. The orig-
inal charge was aggravated
possession of drugs, a felony
of the fifth degree.
The court then sentenced
her to one year of commu-
nity control, 100 hours com-
munity service, substance
abuse assessment and treat-
ment, pay court costs and par-
tial appointed attorney fees.
A $1,000 fine and 180 days
in jail were deferred pend-
ing completion of community
control.
sentencing
Adam stripe, 35, Van
Wert, was sentenced on a
charge of trafficking drugs, a
felony of the fourth degree.
His sentence is 3 years
community control, 30 days
jail with work release, 100
hours community service,
substance abuse assessment
and treatment, 2 years inten-
sive probation, driver’s license
suspended 6 months, ordered
to pay court costs and par-
tial appointed attorney fees.
Twelve months prison was
deferred pending completion
of community control.
Jessica thompson, 26,
Van Wert, was sentenced on
a felony five charge of traf-
ficking drugs.
Her sentence was six
months in prison with credit
for 3 days already served.
Lisa Hundley, 32, Middle
Point, was sentenced to six
years in prison following her
no contest plea to aggravated
vehicular homicide, a felony
of the first degree.
sam Whisman, 20, Van
Wert, was sentenced for a
charge of trafficking drugs, a
felony of the fifth degree.
His sentence was 3 years
community control, 30 days
jail, substance abuse assess-
ment and treatment, 2 years
intensive probation, driv-
er’s license suspended for 6
months, ordered to pay court
costs and the $25 indigency
fee. A 9-month prison term
was deferred.
Kyle Bourelle, 29, Celina,
was sentenced to 9 months
in prison for abusing harm-
ful intoxicants, a felony of
the fifth degree. This sentence
was ordered to run concur-
rently with a similar sentence
from Mercer County.
Bond violation
Zachary Brooks, 19, Van
Wert, appeared for violat-
ing his surety bond by fail-
ing to report to probation as
ordered.
He was re-released on the
same conditions after agree-
ing to follow the conditions.
Probation violations
ryan King, 26, Van Wert,
appeared for a probation vio-
lation for failing to report to
probation as ordered.
He admitted the violation
and was ordered to serve one
year in prison with credit for
227 days.
Justin taylor, 27, Van
Wert, appeared for a proba-
tion violation for failing to
report to probation as ordered
and for failing to complete
counseling.
He was sentenced to pris-
on for 9 months with credit
for 157 days served.
Judicial release hearing
Chris Lane, 49, Delphos
requested judicial early
release from prison. He was
originally sentenced on Aug.
22 to 12 months prison for
trafficking in drugs, a felony
of the fourth degree.
The court granted his
request for Judicial Release
and modified his sentence as
follows: 3 years community
control, up to 6 months at
WORTH Center, 30 days jail,
100 hours community ser-
vice, substance abuse assess-
ment and treatment, 2 years
intensive probation, ordered
to pay court costs and par-
tial appointed attorney fees.
His 12-month prison sentence
was deferred.
two lucky winners for
record Powerball jackpot
By M. sPenCer
Green and JiM CoLe
the Associated Press
CHICAGO — Powerball
officials say tickets sold in
Arizona and Missouri matched
all six numbers to win the
record the record $579.9 mil-
lion jackpot. Now the hunt for
the winners begins.
Early this morning officials
confirmed that two winning
tickets had been sold.
The numbers drawn
Wednesday night are: 5, 16,
22, 23, 29 and Powerball of 6.
A lottery official said late
Wednesday that the jackpot
increased to $579.9 million by
the time of the drawing, mak-
ing the cash option $379.8
million.
Americans went on a tick-
et-buying spree in recent days,
the big money enticing many
people who rarely, if ever,
play the lottery to purchase
a shot at the second-largest
payout in U.S. history.
Among them was Lamar
Fallie, a jobless Chicago man
who said his six tickets con-
jured a pleasant daydream:
If he wins, he plans to take
care of his church, make big
donations to schools and then
“retire from being unem-
ployed.”
Tickets were selling at
a rate of 130,000 a minute
nationwide — about six times
the volume from a week ago.
That pushed the jackpot even
higher before the Wednesday
night drawing, said Chuck
Strutt, executive director
of the Multi-State Lottery
Association.
The jackpot had already
rolled over 16 consecutive
times without a winner, but
Powerball officials said ear-
lier Wednesday they believed
there was a 75 percent chance
the winning combination will
be drawn this time.
Some experts had pre-
dicted that if one ticket hit
the right numbers, chances
were good that multiple ones
would. That happened in
the Mega Millions drawing
in March, when three ticket
buyers shared a $656 million
jackpot, which remains the
largest lottery payout of all
time. And it happened again
for Wednesday’s Powerball
drawing.
Yvette Gavin, who sold
the tickets to Fallie, is only
an occasional lottery player
herself, but the huge jackpot
means she’ll definitely play
this time. As for the promises
she often gets from ticket pur-
chasers, Gavin isn’t holding
her breath.
“A lot of customers say if
they win they will take care of
me, but I will have to wait and
see,” she said.
In the hours before
Wednesday’s drawing,
Associated Press photogra-
phers across the nation sought
out ticket buyers and asked
about their lottery fantasies.
Here’s a look at what they
found:
———
When Atlanta barber Andre
Williams buys scratch-off tick-
ets, he typically does a dance
in his shop for good luck. As
a first-time Powerball player,
he plans to reprise the dance
— and buy a few extra tickets
to enhance his chances.
“I don’t even know if I’ll
look at it,” said Williams, who
bought his ticket at a news-
stand. “If I win, I might pass
out.”
Paralegal Pat Powell was
buying her first Powerball
ticket at another store in
Atlanta, even though she
acknowledged her odds were
probably “zero to zero.”
Still, Powell has specific
plans should she win: start
an Internet cafe in the West
Indies and a learning center in
Georgia.
“I’ve been thinking about
winning this money and what
I’d do with it,” Powell said.
“There’s no ritual, but it’s just
been on my mind. So it’s like,
let me just join the hype and
just do it.”
Atlanta accountant Benita
Lewis, who had never played
the lottery before, didn’t want
to be the only one left in her
office without a ticket.
“I did feel nervous buying
it like I could be the one,” she
said. “I’m going to retire and
pay off all my family’s debt.”
———
In Philadelphia, seafood
salesman Billy Fulginiti
bought 50 Powerball tickets
with co-workers and a few
more with a small group. He
said he only plays when the
jackpot is especially large.
“You go to bed at night
wishing you wake up a mil-
lionaire,” Fulginiti said. He
planned to take a long vaca-
tion and “help a lot of people,
a lot of charities,” if any of his
tickets turn out to be winners.
Fewer fatalities this
Thanksgiving holiday
information submitted
COLUMBUS —
Provisional numbers
released today by the Ohio
State Highway Patrol show
fewer motorists were killed
on Ohio’s roadways this
Thanksgiving Holiday.
During the reporting peri-
od, which began at mid-
night on Nov. 21 and ran
through 11:59 p.m. Sunday,
11 people were killed on
Ohio’s roadways. This is a
decrease from the past three
years when 17 were killed
in 2011; 18 in 2010; and 20
in 2009.
Even though fatalities
were on the decline this
holiday weekend, all of
those killed in motor vehi-
cle crashes were not wear-
ing a safety belt. During
the initial hours of the holi-
day reporting period, four
people were killed when
they were ejected during
a single vehicle crash in
Warren County where alco-
hol is suspected.
“We are encouraged by
the reduction of fatalities
this weekend – however,
motorists need to remember
that wearing a safety belt
is the single most impor-
tant thing they can do to
protect themselves during a
crash,” said Colonel John
Born, Patrol superintendent.
“Simple things like wearing
a safety belt or designating
a sober driver can go a long
way in ensuring these trag-
edies don’t occur.”
The patrol arrested 459
drivers for OVI during the
holiday weekend.
A complete statisti-
cal analysis of the patrol’s
enforcement activity over
the holiday weekend is
available at statepatrol.ohio.
gov.
LOCAL PRICES
Corn $7.73
Wheat $8.51
Soybeans $14.39
By the Associated Press
Today is Thursday, Nov.
29, the 334th day of 2012.
There are 32 days left in the
year.
today’s Highlight in
History:
On Nov. 29, 1952, President-
elect Dwight D. Eisenhower
secretly left on a trip to Korea,
keeping his campaign promise
to assess the ongoing conflict
first-hand.
on this date:
In 1864, a Colorado militia
killed at least 150 peaceful
Cheyenne Indians in the Sand
Creek Massacre.
In 1912, the Maryland
Agricultural College, located
in College Park, was destroyed
by fire.
In 1947, the U.N. General
Assembly passed a resolution call-
ing for the partitioning of Palestine
between Arabs and Jews.
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Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH WOMEN
211 E. Third St., Delphos
ARE INVITING YOU TO ATTEND THEIR ANNUAL
Christmas
Dinner
and Bazaar
Wed., Dec. 5
Serving from 4 to 6:30 p.m.
MENU: Beef or Ham, Noodles, Whipped Potatoes & Gravy,
Green Beans, Slaw, Applesauce, Pies, Rolls, Coffee
THE GENERAL STORE OPENS
AT 2:00 p.m. UNTIL 7:00 P.M.
(Baked goods - Home made candies - Crafts)
All proceeds go toward special church projects.
$
8
00
Adults
$
4
00
Children (Thru 12)
Carry-Outs Available at Rear Parking Lot Entrance - Upstairs
Pre-sale tickets only for Home Delivery are available by
calling the Church Office 419-692-0651
This message published
as a public service
by these civic
minded firms.
AUTO DEALERS
•Delpha
Chev/Buick Co.
AUTO PARTS
•Pitsenbarger Auto
FINANCIAL
INSTITUTIONS
•First Federal Bank
FURNITURE
•Lehmann’s Furniture
•Westrich Home
Furnishings
GARAGE
•Omer’s Alignment
Shop
HARDWARE
•Delphos Ace
Hardware & Rental
BY LINDSAY MCCOY
DHI correspondent
VAN WERT — Main
Street Van Wert Holiday
Extravaganza Gift and Craft
Fair will be coming to the
Hotel Marsh this Saturday,
Dec. 1, from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. The entire commu-
nity is invited to come view
the diverse variety of items
to be presented by over 30
vendors. Great Christmas
gifts and decorating ideas
will be among the many
pieces to be displayed.
Vendors will be selling
art, handcrafted housewares,
jewelry, quilted handbags,
children’s boutique items,
and many more one-of-a-
kind objects. Direct sales
representatives will be avail-
able from favorite home
company product compa-
nies to display and show-
case their latest items.
Each vendor will also
be providing a raffle basket
filled with their goods to be
raffled during the day. Free
goodies and refreshments
will also be available for
those who attend. This is not
just an event for adults as
Mrs. Claus will be present
at the event to color with the
children. There is also rumor
on Main Street that Santa
himself will be making an
appearance to hear the wish
lists of area children.
Admission to the event
is free, and everyone is
invited to make an appear-
ance downtown for an old
fashioned shopping expe-
rience. There will be an
immense amount of displays
to browse to find the perfect
individualized Christmas
gift for friends, family, and
co-workers.
Main Street Holiday
Extravaganza set Saturday
Check us out online: www.delphosherald.com
Under the Covers
with Sara Berelsman
November is a month about gratitude.
There are so many things I’m grateful for. One
thing I am grateful for each and every day is
my sobriety. Quitting drinking a little over a
year ago is one of the best decisions I’ve ever
made. I’d
like to share
a book that’s
helped me.
It’s called
“Living Sober
Sucks (but
living drunk
sucks more)”
and it’s writ-
ten by Mark
Tuschel.
I was
b r o w s i n g
A m a z o n
when I dis-
covered this,
and the title
immediately
drew me in. I am rather sarcastic by nature,
and the name of this book just sounded like
something that would very well accommodate
my sardonic nature. I was right.
Mark Tuschel doesn’t have a PhD and he’s
not claiming to be a Dr. Phil or Dr. Drew. He
is simply sharing his experience of becom-
ing sober, and sharing some strategies that
have worked for him. His writing voice is
extremely accessible, and I love his sense of
humor. Overcoming alcoholism is no easy
feat, but I’ve found that, like with anything
else in life, it helps to accomplish something
big by lightening the mood and being able to
have a sense of humor about it.
Mark Tuschel doesn’t hold back when it
comes to…anything. If you’re turned off by
profanity, then this might not be for you. If
you’ve made the decision to quit drinking and
want an incredibly caring, yet wisecracking
friend to help you along the way, then this
might be for you. Tuschel talks about the
emotional roller coaster one embarks upon
when sobering up, he talks about how friends
might/will most likely change, he tells of
when he hit rock bottom. He is honest. He is
hilarious. He is smart. And, above all, he’s
devoted his life to helping others sober up and
stay that way.
I have read a few other books on this topic,
and their tone was so somber that I couldn’t
take it. I kinda wanted to drink after reading
them. This book, though, has been like the
diamond in the rough for me. He has also
written several other books, like his follow-
up to this one, Okay, I quit. Now what? and I
plan on reading those, too.
So obviously this book might not appeal
to everyone, like those who have no inten-
tion of quitting drinking — and that’s fine.
I think it could be a breath of fresh air for
those who attend AA meetings — and those
who don’t, but who are interested in becom-
ing sober on their own. I know it’s helped me
tremendously.
Sara Berelsman lives in Fort Jennings with
her husband and their two daughters. She
leads the book club discussions at the Delphos
Public Library.
“Statistics can prove anything — even the truth.”
— Sir Noel Moynihan, British physician and writer (1916-1994)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Thursday, November 29, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Delphos Museum of Postal History Curator Gary Levitt
congratulated the winners in the museum’s stamp contest held
during Canal Days festivities. Winners were Chelsey Bishop,
17, Jefferson High School, Herald Building; Laci Roby, 8,
Franklin Elementary, Turkeys; Lilly Huffman, 11, Franklin
Elementary, Lady Bug; and People’s Choice winner Avery
Schulte, 8, Landeck Elementary, Football.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• The 12th annual Delphos Ministerial Association
Christmas Choral Worship will be held at 3 p.m. Dec. 13 at
St. John the Evangelist Church. This year seven area choirs
(Trinity Methodist, First Presbyterian, St. Peter Lutheran, St.
John the Baptist Catholic, St. Paul Methodist, Morris Chapel
and St. John the Evangelist) will join with the DMA pastors in
rendering a song-filled worship of the season.
• SBR Inc., doing business as 7-Eleven Food Stores,
announced the promotion of Janet Shenk to the position of
manager, 7-Eleven Computer Services. Her responsibilities
will include supervision of all management information sys-
tems for the 7-Eleven Stores in West Virginia and northern
New England.
• St. John’s Old-Timers held their own for the first four
minutes of the Alumni Prevue Friday night but then the 1987-
88 Blue Jays boys varsity began to show its strength. The
varsity took the lead for good on a three-point field goal by
Duane Grothause, led 29-18 after one quarter and ended up
winning 68-34.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• Spencerville’s Trinity Methodist Church held its home-
coming this past Sunday. Letters were read from former min-
isters and their wives and incidents and old acquaintances
from as far back as the year 1851, were recalled. In 1851 the
first organization of the Arcadia Mission was begun with
services being held in the school house on South Mulberry
Street.
• Lloyd B. Smith, lieutenant commander in the U.S. Naval
Reserve, addressed the members of the Optimist Breakfast
Club of Delphos Thursday morning. Smith told club members,
“Turmoil and trouble are always with us, and the United States
sea power has protected the country upon 13 occasions since
the conclusion of World War II.”
• Mrs. Roger Briggs was hostess to the Rebecca Circle
Tuesday evening in her home on North Main Street. The les-
son, titled “You Are A Missionary, Too,” was given by Mrs.
Clark Williams. At the conclusion of the meeting, Mrs. Briggs
and her co-hostesses, Mrs. James Wiltsie and Mrs. Ed Becker,
served a luncheon.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• With Christmas weather much in evidence at the pres-
ent time, plans are being rapidly completed for the decorating
of the business district. Approximately 50 Christmas trees
will be placed on the light standards in the business district.
Ed Wulfhorst is in charge of the light wires and the decoration
and placing of the trees.
• John Abel of Marion, past state president, will be the
guest speaker at a meeting of the Delphos Aerie of Eagles
which will be held this Monday night. Plans for the annual
Christmas Party will also be considered. Jos. Minnig has
been named as the general chairman of the annual festival
for the Eagles and their families and the poor children of
Delphos.
• Approximately 50 members of St. John’s student body
were in Lima Friday afternoon to attend the annual Catholic
Chronicle rally held in the St. Rose auditorium. “Pep talks,
cheers and music comprised the program. St. John’s cheerlead-
ers, Betty Schosker, Ruth Beck, Janice Kaverman and Carl
Hotz led cheers.
By ANDREW TAYLOR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Amid increasing anxiety
that the White House and
top Republicans are wasting
time as the government slides
toward an economy-rattling
“fiscal cliff,” administra-
tion officials are heading to
Capitol Hill for talks with
congressional leaders.
Treasury Secretary Tim
Geithner and senior White
House aide Rob Nabors were
to visit separately today with
the four leaders of the House
and Senate to discuss how to
avert a series of tax increases
and spending cuts due to begin
in January. Republicans com-
plain that the White House is
slow-walking the talks and
has yet to provide specifics
on how President Barack
Obama would curb the rapid
growth of benefit programs
like Medicare and Medicaid.
There’s been little evi-
dent progress in negotiations
between the White House
and the lead GOP negotiator,
House Speaker John Boehner
of Ohio. Boehner’s lieuten-
ants say the White House has
been slow to engage.
“We have not seen any
good-faith effort on the part
of this administration to talk
about the real problem that
we’re trying to fix,” said
House Majority Leader Eric
Cantor, R-Va.
Obama is mounting a pub-
lic campaign to build support
and leverage in the negotia-
tions, appearing at the White
House with middle-class tax-
payers and launching a cam-
paign on Twitter to bolster
his position.
“Right now, as we speak,
Congress can pass a law that
would prevent a tax hike on the
first $250,000 of everybody’s
income,” Obama said. “And
that means that 98 percent
of Americans and 97 percent
of small businesses wouldn’t
see their income taxes go up
by a single dime.”
Obama is insisting that tax
rates go up on family income
exceeding $250,000; Boehner
is adamant that any new tax
revenues come from over-
hauling the tax code, clearing
out tax breaks and lowering
rates for all.
Republicans are also
demanding significant cuts
to so-called entitlement pro-
grams like Medicare, such as
an increase in the eligibility
age for the program from 65
to perhaps 67.
“It’s time for the presi-
dent and Democrats to get
serious about the spend-
ing problem that our coun-
try has,” Boehner said at a
news conference Wednesday
in the Capitol. Boehner, like
Obama, expressed optimism
that a deal could be reached.
At issue are steep, across-
the-board cuts to the Pentagon
and domestic programs set to
strike the economy in January
as well as the expiration of
Bush-era tax cuts on income,
investments, married couples
and families with children.
That combination of tax
increases and spending cuts
would wring more than half a
trillion dollars from the econ-
omy in the first nine months
of next year, according to
the Congressional Budget
Office.
No one anticipates a stale-
mate lasting that long, but
many experts worry that even
allowing the spending cuts
and tax increases for a rela-
tively brief period could rattle
financial markets.
From their public state-
ments, Obama and Boehner
appear at an impasse over
raising the two top tax rates
from 33 percent and 35 per-
cent to 36 percent and 39.6
percent. Democrats seem
confident that Boehner ulti-
mately will have to crumble,
but Obama has a lot at stake as
well, including a clear agenda
for priorities like an overhaul
of the nation’s immigration
laws.
By JULIE PACE
and STEVE PEOPLES
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Bitter
campaign foes just weeks
ago, President Barack Obama
and Mitt Romney are sharing
lunch at the White House
with an eye on overlapping
interests rather than the sharp
differences that defined their
presidential contest.
In their first meeting since
the election, Obama and the
Republican nominee are to
meet in the White House’s
private dining room today,
fulfilling a promise Obama
made in his victory speech
the night of Nov. 6.
White House spokesman
Jay Carney said Obama had
no specific agenda for the
meeting, but he said the presi-
dent would like to discuss
Romney’s ideas for making
government more efficient.
Obama has proposed merging
some functions of government
related to business and has
asked Congress for authority
to undertake some executive
branch reorganization.
“The president noted that
Gov. Romney did a terrific
job running the Olympics and
that that skills set lends itself
to ideas that could make the
federal government work bet-
ter, which is a passion of the
president’s,” Carney said.
Obama aides said they
reached out to Romney’s team
shortly before Thanksgiving
to start working on a date
for the meeting. The two
men will meet alone in the
White House’s private dining
room, with no press coverage
expected.
While in Washington,
Romney will also meet with
his former running mate,
Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan,
according to a Romney cam-
paign aide. Ryan is back
on Capitol Hill, where he’s
involved in negotiations to
avert a series of automatic
tax increases and deep spend-
ing cuts that have come to be
known as the “fiscal cliff.”
Much of that debate cen-
ters on expiring tax cuts first
enacted in the George W. Bush
administration. Obama and
Romney differed sharply dur-
ing the campaign over what
to do with the cuts, with the
Republican pushing for them
to be extended for all income
earners and the president run-
ning on a pledge to let the
cuts expire for families making
more than $250,000 a year.
The White House sees
Obama’s victory as a signal
that Americans support his
tax proposals.
Obama and Romney’s sit-
down today was expected to
be their most extensive pri-
vate meeting to date. The
two men had only a handful
of brief exchanges before the
2012 election.
Even after their political
fates became intertwined,
their interactions were largely
confined to the three presi-
dential debates.
Romney has virtually dis-
appeared from politics fol-
lowing his election loss. He’s
spent the past three weeks
largely in seclusion at his
family’s Southern California
home. He has made no public
appearances, drawing media
attention only after being
photographed at Disneyland
in addition to stops at the
movies and the gym with his
wife, Ann.
———
Peoples reported from
Boston.
By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A
pickup in consumer spend-
ing and steady home sales
helped lift economic growth
from October through early
November in most parts of
the United States, accord-
ing to a Federal Reserve
survey released Wednesday.
The one exception was the
Northeast, which was slowed
by Superstorm Sandy.
Growth improved in nine
of the Fed’s 12 regional bank-
ing districts, the survey said.
Growth was weaker in New
York, Philadelphia and Boston
— areas where Sandy caused
widespread disruptions.
The survey noted that
growth was better despite
nervousness about the “fis-
cal cliff.” That’s the name
for automatic tax increases
and spending cuts that could
kick in next year if Congress
and the Obama administra-
tion can’t reach a budget deal
before then.
Hiring increased in more
than half of the districts. But
manufacturing shrank or
slowed in seven regions and
was mixed in two others.
“The weakening in the tone
of the Beige Book is clearly
linked to the massive disrup-
tions and damage related to
Hurricane Sandy and there is
no evidence of a wider slow-
down in the economy,” said
Terry Sheehan, an analyst at
Stone & McCarthy Research
Associates.
Sal Guatieri, senior econo-
mist at BMO Capital Markets,
said the message from the
survey was “the economy
looks to have improved
slightly in the current quarter,
led by housing and consum-
ers though businesses remain
worried about the outlook.”
The report, called the
Beige Book, provides anec-
dotal information on eco-
nomic conditions around the
country from October through
Nov. 14. The information col-
lected by the regional banks
will be used as the basis for
the Fed’s policy discussion at
the Dec. 11-12 meeting.
Many economists believe
the Fed could announce plans
to buy more Treasury bonds
at that meeting to replace a
program set to expire at the
end of the year. The goal
of the program is to lower
long-term interest rates and
encourage more borrowing
and spending.
The purchases would come
on top of the Fed’s mortgage
bond buying program, which
is intended to lower mortgage
rates and make home-buying
more affordable.
Recent government and
private reports show the econ-
omy improved in October
and early November, even as
Sandy halted business activity
along the East Coast.
Employers added 171,000
jobs last month and hiring
in September and August
was stronger than previously
thought.
Rising home values, more
hiring and lower gas prices
pushed consumer confidence
in November to the highest
level in nearly five years. A
better mood among consum-
ers appears to have encour-
aged businesses to invest
more in October after pulling
back over the summer. And it
could point to a stronger holi-
day shopping season.
There are already signs
that consumer optimism is
leading to more spending. A
record number of Americans
visited stores and shopping
websites over the four-day
Thanksgiving weekend,
according to a survey by the
National Retail Federation.
Still, if lawmakers and the
Obama administration fail to
reach a budget deal soon, the
threat of tax increases could
make consumers more cautious
in the final weeks of the year.
Many economists say wor-
ries about the fiscal cliff could
be among a number of fac-
tors that keep growth in the
October-December quarter
below an annual rate of 2 per-
cent. That’s too slow to make
much of a dent in unemploy-
ment and could prompt the
Fed to take further action at
its next meeting.
By KEVIN FREKING
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
House Veterans’ Affairs
Committee warned the VA
Wednesday to expect much
more aggressive oversight in
the coming months as law-
makers review the depart-
ment’s conference and travel
spending.
“The truce is over,” said
Rep. Jeff Miller of Florida,
the committee’s Republican
chairman, at the conclusion
of an often contentious hear-
ing on spending at employee
training conferences.
Miller called the hearing in
response to an inspector gen-
eral’s report from Oct. 1 that
described some $762,000 in
expenses from two Orlando,
Fla., conferences that were
deemed as wasteful or unnec-
essary, such as a $50,000 video
featuring a parody of former
Gen. George S. Patton.
W. Scott Gould, a depu-
ty secretary at the VA, told
lawmakers that the depart-
ment had taken several steps
in response to the inspector
general’s report, including
ethics training for all VA per-
sonnel involved in planning
and overseeing the confer-
ences. He also noted that one
employee, an assistant secre-
tary, resigned.
Miller’s committee has
sought more detailed infor-
mation from the VA about
the department’s overall train-
ing and travel budgets. He
said dozens of queries appear
to have been ignored, while
Gould said that the sheer
amount of information sought
as well as the need to ensure
accuracy required time.
The committee chairman
said that while he could get
little information from the
VA, social media websites
used by VA workers hinted at
some extravagance. He noted
one Facebook page comment
on a trip to Italy, but it was
not clear that the pictures
were part of an official trip
or an employee’s vacation.
One viewer responded to the
pictures by saying tough trip,
prompting a response from the
VA’s Canteen Service stating:
“Research is tough, but some-
one has to do it.”
“Is this a boondoggle or not
a boondoggle?” Miller said.
Gould said that the VA is
working to improve its health
care at every turn and that can
include leaving the country on
occasion to hear from leaders
in various health fields.
At one point, Gould said he
was not aware of the pictures
that the committee reviewed
and posted as part of a slide-
show. However near the end,
he told lawmakers he had
subsequently learned that the
pictures came from a personal
vacation. While the pictures
should not have been made
part of the department’s social
media outlets, he wanted law-
makers to know the VA did
not fund the trip. He also took
some exception to the com-
mittee making an issue of the
pictures.
“I think that we need to
think carefully when we
talk about culture, that there
are 320,000 hard-working
employees at VA that don’t
like having their reputation
damaged and sullied by this
kind of activity,” Gould said.
White House, Congress
talk as ‘fiscal cliff’ nears
Victor and vanquished:
Obama has Romney to lunch
Fed survey: US economy growing at steady pace
House panel
promises more
aggressive VA
oversight
Franklin Elementary
School
1
Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos City
Council meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
Delphos Parks and
Recreation board meets at the
recreation building at Stadium
Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
8 p.m. — The Veterans
of Foreign Wars meet at the
hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.

WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
9 p.m. — Fort Jennings
Lions Club meets at the
Outpost Restaurant.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
Happy Birthday
NOV. 30
Barry Ladd
Cody Diltz
Melony Sunday
Avery Mesker
J.R. Hempfling
Teresa Metzger
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
THRIFT SHOP
WORKERS
NOV. 29-DEC. 1
THURSDAY: Bet h
Metzger, Janet Grothause,
Lorene Jettinghoff, Kay
Meyers, Sue Vasquez and
Diane Kimmett.
FRI DAY: Kar en
Nomina, Shirley Ditto,
Judy Kundert and Marge
Kaverman.
SATURDAY: Carol
Hohman, Sandy Hahn,
Joyce Day, Linda Spring,
Lorene Jettinghoff and
Martha Etzkorn.
THRI FT SHOP
HOURS: 5-7 p. m.
Thursday; 1-4 p.m. Friday;
and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like
to volunteer should con-
tact Catharine Gerdemann,
419- 695- 8440; Al i ce
Heidenescher, 419-692-
5362; Li nda Bockey
419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, con-
tact the Thrift Shop at 419-
692-2942 between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. and leave a
message.
WEEK OF DEC. 3-7
MONDAY: Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, peas and
onions, brad, margarine, peaches, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Pork roast with gravy, red bliss potatoes, green
beans, roll, margarine, custard, coffee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Chicken Alfredo, tossed salad, bread,
margarine, fruit, coffee and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Beef tips, scalloped potatoes, wax beans,
roll, margarine, cherry crisp, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Chicken patty on bun, cole slaw, Mandarin
oranges, coffee and 2% milk.
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press Instant party
recipes to enjoy at
home or on-the-go!
Chocolate Peppermint
Pretzel Rods
12 ounces dark choco-
late chips
20 pretzel rods
1 cup crushed candy
cane
In microwave, melt 6
ounces chocolate in 30-sec-
ond increments at medium
power; stir in remaining
chocolate until melted.
Coat top two-thirds of
each pretzel with melted
chocolate; sprinkle with
crushed candy cane and
place on wax-paper-lined
baking sheet. Refrigerate
to harden, about 30 min-
utes. Serves 10.

Sweet and Spicy Spread
1 8-ounce package
cream cheese, room tem-
perature
1 small jalapeño, seeded
and chopped
1/2 cup apricot pre-
serves
Place cream cheese on
plate. Mix jalapeño into
preserves; spoon over
cheese. Serves 6.

Whiskey Sours
4 cups fresh orange
juice (from 8 oranges)
1 cup fresh lemon juice
(from 8 lemons)
1 cup triple sec
2 1/2 cups whiskey
Combine in a pitcher.
Serve over ice, topped with
an orange slice and a mara-
schino cherry, if desired.
Serves 8.
If you enjoyed these
recipes, made changes or
have one to share, email
kitchenpress@yahoo.com.
Dunn
family five
generations
Five generations of
the Dunn family recently
gathered. They include,
front from left, great-
grandson Brandon
Worden and great-great-
grandmother Bernice Dunn,
holding her great-great-
grandson Liam Worden;
and back, mom Sandy King
and Grandmother Alice
Garber.
Honor Roll
Jefferson High School
4.0
Seniors
Dyl a n Ha e hn,
Jacob Violet and Seth
Wollenhaupt.
Juniors
Kenidi Ulm
Sophomores
Kelli Kramer and Gaige
Rassman.
Freshman
Claire Thompson

3.5 - 3.9
Seniors
Jordan Barclay, Adam
Bastian, Zach Bland, Taylor
Branham, Casey Cameron,
Whitney Hohlbein, Kayla
Kill, Zach Kimmett, Kaitlyn
Kirk, Corinne Metzger,
Paige Miller, Zach Ricker,
Evan Stant, Christopher
Truesdale and Courtney
VanSchoyck.
Juniors
Makayla Binkley, Zavier
Buzard, Jared Elwer, Dena
Frye, Rebekah Geise, Logan
Gross, Isaac Illig, Austin
Jettinghoff, Zach Johnson,
Ryan Kerby, Tyler Mox,
Gabrielle Pimpas, Kamie
Pulford, Tyler Rice, Hannah
Sensibaugh, Justin Stewart,
Rileigh Stockwell, Brooke
Teman, Billy Tracy and
Amanda Truesdale.
Sophomores
Kaitlyn Berelsman,
Donavon Catlett, Karen
Cline, Brenton Erman,
Tyler Fisher, Andrea Geise,
Kelsie Gerdeman, Chase
Getz, Jacob Hamilton,
Harrison He, Devon Krendl,
Desteni Lear, Lucas Miller,
Carter Mox, Dominic
Munoz, Logan Pruett,
Taylor Sheeter, Elizabeth
Spring, Morgan Sterchak,
Kurt Wollenhaupt and
Emma Wurst.
Freshman
Shyanne Caudill, Michael
Cline, Dalton Durbin,
Brooke Gallmeier, Cole
Gasser, Bailey Gorman,
Noah Illig, Eli Kimmett,
Emily Marks, Gage Mercer,
Jessica Pimpas, Adam
Rode, Natashia Shaeffer,
Easton Siefker, Trey Smith,
Christian Stemen, Sophia
Thompson, Rileigh Tippie
and Sophia Wilson
3.0 - 3.49
Seniors
Chel sey Bi shop,
Colin Brand, Alex Cross,
Lindsey Dancer, Sydney
Drerup, Maddie Flack,
Nick Gallmeier, Alyssa
Hall, Jaylynne Hamilton,
Drew Kortokrax, Emily
Lambert, Caitlin Landwehr,
Serena Lorencovic, Colin
McConnahea, Alyssa Miller,
Rachel Miller, Dakota
Stroh, Destiny Thompson,
Gage Townsend-Schleeter,
Fallon VanDyke, Quinten
Wessell, Josie West and
Tony Wiechart.
Juniors
Kyle Berelsman, Kiara
Brinkman, Hayden Brown,
Devin Coronado, Katelyn
Goergens, Kimberly Kill,
Rachel Mahlie, Jasmine
McDougal l , Bri t ney
McElroy, Macy Pier, Hallie
Runyan, Tori Suever, Ross
Thompson and Tanner
Vermule.
Sophomores
Jordan Bl ackburn,
Samant ha Branham,
Austin Carder, Troy
Claypool, Shannon Coil,
Reid Corzine, Brooke
Culp, Alyssa Fetzer, Kylee
Haehn, Megan Harla, Logan
Kimmet, Shelby Koenig,
Lahanna Lehman, Adrianna
Miller, Bailey Miller,
Elisabeth Miller, Kayleigh
O’Connor, Tyler Ostendorf,
Heather Pohlman, Warren
Poling, Alex Redmon, Jesse
Stemen, Tyler Talboom and
Devin VanDyke.
Freshman
Nat han Al dr i ch,
Corbin Betz, Riley
Claypool, Kaitlyn Cress,
Tyler Dickrede, Damien
Dudgeon, Tristan Fetzer,
Ryan Goergens, Logan
Hami l t on, Mackenzi e
Harvey, Dylan Hicks,
Blake Kimmet, Samantha
Klint, Bryce Lindeman,
Austin Lucas, Tatiana
Olmeda, Zacaria Scirocco,
Anna Slonaker, Madison
Smith, Joshua Teman,
Kiersten Teman and
Desiree Wessel.
COLUMN
Announce you or your family member’s
birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
Complete the coupon below and return it to
The Delphos Herald newsroom,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
additions or to delete a name from the column.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
HAPPY BIRTHDAY COLUMN
Name
Address

Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Telephone (for verification)
Check one:
º
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º
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º
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6 – The Herald Thursday, November 29, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
Individuals
NFC
Week 12
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
A. Rodgers, GBY 379 252 2838 28 7
Griffin III, WAS 305 206 2504 16 4
Ale. Smith, SNF 217 152 1731 13 5
Brees, NOR 442 276 3333 31 11
M. Ryan, ATL 429 294 3425 21 13
Jo. Freeman, TAM 349 199 2761 21 7
R. Wilson, SEA 280 178 2051 17 8
Kolb, ARI 183 109 1169 8 3
Romo, DAL 456 302 3357 16 15
E. Manning, NYG 394 239 2890 15 11
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
A. Peterson, MIN 213 1236 5.80 74 7
M. Lynch, SEA 231 1051 4.55 77t 5
Do. Martin, TAM 218 1050 4.82 70t 9
Morris, WAS 208 982 4.72 39t 6
Gore, SNF 176 914 5.19 37 5
L. McCoy, PHL 177 750 4.24 34 2
Bradshaw, NYG 161 733 4.55 37 5
S. Jackson, STL 174 724 4.16 46 2
Forte, CHI 158 683 4.32 46 3
Griffin III, WAS 99 642 6.48 76t 6
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Witten, DAL 82 710 8.7 35 1
B. Marshall, CHI 81 1017 12.6 45 8
Ca. Johnson, DET 73 1257 17.2 53 4
Gonzalez, ATL 69 712 10.3 25 6
R. White, ATL 67 1003 15.0 59 4
D. Bryant, DAL 65 880 13.5 85t 6
Cruz, NYG 63 779 12.4 80t 8
Harvin, MIN 62 677 10.9 45 3
Cobb, GBY 58 613 10.6 39t 7
Colston, NOR 55 757 13.8 40 8
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Morstead, NOR 50 2517 70 50.3
McBriar, PHL 34 1633 64 48.0
J. Ryan, SEA 49 2336 73 47.7
Hekker, STL 49 2324 68 47.4
Bosher, ATL 38 1788 63 47.1
A. Lee, SNF 45 2104 66 46.8
Zastudil, ARI 73 3420 68 46.8
Weatherford, NYG 40 1869 68 46.7
Koenen, TAM 51 2288 64 44.9
Kluwe, MIN 49 2170 59 44.3
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Cobb, GBY 21 231 11.0 75t 1
Ginn Jr., SNF 25 265 10.6 38 0
Logan, DET 26 261 10.0 48 0
L. Washington, SEA 27 257 9.5 52 0
Sherels, MIN 21 185 8.8 77t 1
Da. Johnson, PHL 15 132 8.8 20 0
P. Peterson, ARI 39 329 8.4 26 0
D. Hester, CHI 26 207 8.0 44 0
Parrish, TAM 18 139 7.7 26 0
Franks, ATL 17 131 7.7 28 0
Kickoff
Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Harvin, MIN 16 574 35.9 105t 1
L. Washington, SEA 18 575 31.9 98t 1
Sproles, NOR 14 402 28.7 48 0
J. Rodgers, ATL 15 420 28.0 77 0
Cobb, GBY 30 783 26.1 46 0
D. Hester, CHI 18 459 25.5 38 0
W. Powell, ARI 16 406 25.4 65 0
D. Wilson, NYG 40 1011 25.3 66 0
Banks, WAS 21 507 24.1 55 0
B. Boykin, PHL 31 703 22.7 44 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Do. Martin, TAM 10 9 1 0 60
A. Brown, NYG 8 8 0 0 50
Cobb, GBY 8 0 7 1 48
Colston, NOR 8 0 8 0 48
Cruz, NYG 8 0 8 0 48
J. Graham, NOR 8 0 8 0 48
Jam. Jones, GBY 8 0 8 0 48
B. Marshall, CHI 8 0 8 0 48
V. Jackson, TAM 7 0 7 0 44
A. Peterson, MIN 7 7 0 0 44
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Tynes, NYG 30-30 29-32 50 117
M. Bryant, ATL 30-30 26-31 55 108
Walsh, MIN 22-22 24-26 55 94
Barth, TAM 32-32 20-25 57 92
Ja. Hanson, DET 28-28 21-24 53 91
Gould, CHI 29-29 20-24 54 89
Akers, SNF 31-31 19-27 63 88
D. Bailey, DAL 22-22 22-24 51 88
Henery, PHL 16-17 20-21 49 76
Zuerlein, STL 18-18 19-24 60 75
-----
AFC
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Brady, NWE 421 274 3299 24 3
P. Manning, DEN 409 277 3260 26 8
Roethlisberger, PIT 316 209 2287 17 4
Schaub, HOU 378 245 2855 19 9
Dalton, CIN 374 237 2769 23 11
P. Rivers, SND 376 251 2689 18 14
Flacco, BAL 392 236 2850 14 7
Fitzpatrick, BUF 356 219 2359 18 11
Locker, TEN 167 99 1164 7 4
C. Palmer, OAK 449 271 3181 18 12
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
A. Foster, HOU 269 1064 3.96 46 12
Chr. Johnson, TEN 191 942 4.93 83t 4
Ridley, NWE 206 939 4.56 41 8
J. Charles, KAN 195 928 4.76 91t 3
Spiller, BUF 123 830 6.75 56t 4
R. Rice, BAL 186 794 4.27 43 7
Green-Ellis, CIN 201 767 3.82 48 5
T.Richardson, CLE 209 755 3.61 32t 6
McGahee, DEN 167 731 4.38 31 4
Greene, NYJ 186 702 3.77 36 5
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Wayne, IND 84 1105 13.2 30t 3
Welker, NWE 80 961 12.0 59 3
And. Johnson, HOU 69 1058 15.3 60t 3
A.. Green, CIN 67 1022 15.3 73t 10
De. Thomas, DEN 61 1015 16.6 71t 6
Hartline, MIA 55 807 14.7 80t 1
Bess, MIA 55 715 13.0 39 1
B. Myers, OAK 55 591 10.7 29 3
Decker, DEN 54 685 12.7 55 8
R.Gronkowski, NWE 53 748 14.1 41 10
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Scifres, SND 52 2629 66 50.6
Fields, MIA 56 2827 67 50.5
Anger, JAC 64 3088 73 48.3
Kern, TEN 50 2416 71 48.3
Lechler, OAK 56 2706 68 48.3
McAfee, IND 44 2117 64 48.1
Huber, CIN 52 2450 69 47.1
B. Colquitt, DEN 46 2161 67 47.0
Koch, BAL 57 2681 58 47.0
Malone, NYJ 55 2567 61 46.7
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
McKelvin, BUF 18 375 20.8 88t 2
Edelman, NWE 15 238 15.9 68t 1
Ad. Jones, CIN 16 236 14.8 81t 1
M. Thigpen, MIA 19 259 13.6 72t 1
Cribbs, CLE 28 357 12.8 60 0
Hilton, IND 19 233 12.3 75t 1
Jac. Jones, BAL 22 242 11.0 63t 1
T. Holliday, DEN 19 204 10.7 76t 1
Arenas, KAN 29 281 9.7 27 0
T. Holliday, HOU 16 147 9.2 36 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Jac. Jones, BAL 18 644 35.8 108t 2
M. Thigpen, MIA 26 764 29.4 96t 1
McKnight, NYJ 28 796 28.4 100t 1
Cribbs, CLE 30 852 28.4 74 0
McKelvin, BUF 16 453 28.3 59 0
Goodman, SND 18 497 27.6 39 0
C. Rainey, PIT 27 715 26.5 68 0
D. Thompson, BAL 15 389 25.9 49 0
Br. Tate, CIN 22 566 25.7 45 0
D. McCourty, NWE 21 518 24.7 104t 1
Scoring Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
A. Foster, HOU 14 12 2 0 84
A.. Green, CIN 10 0 10 0 60
R. Gronkowski, NWE 10 0 10 0 60
Decker, DEN 8 0 8 0 48
Ridley, NWE 8 8 0 0 48
R. Rice, BAL 7 7 0 0 42
T. Richardson, CLE 7 6 1 0 42
To. Smith, BAL 7 0 7 0 42
H. Miller, PIT 6 0 6 0 38
O. Daniels, HOU 6 0 6 0 36
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NWE 48-48 21-26 53 111
S. Graham, HOU 37-37 20-25 51 97
Tucker, BAL 29-29 22-24 56 95
Janikowski, OAK 19-19 23-24 55 88
Suisham, PIT 22-22 21-22 52 85
Bironas, TEN 24-24 20-24 53 84
Nugent, CIN 33-33 17-21 55 84
M. Prater, DEN 36-36 16-20 53 84
Vinatieri, IND 21-21 21-28 53 84
P. Dawson, CLE 20-20 21-21 52 83
----
Team
TOTAL YARDAGE
AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
New England 4794 1581 3213
Houston 4343 1585 2758
Denver 4310 1148 3162
Indianapolis 4246 1191 3055
Cincinnati 3943 1253 2690
Oakland 3912 909 3003
Baltimore 3830 1118 2712
Buffalo 3813 1543 2270
Pittsburgh 3738 1117 2621
Kansas City 3698 1602 2096
Tennessee 3605 1176 2429
San Diego 3568 1094 2474
Miami 3534 1198 2336
N.Y. Jets 3418 1205 2213
Cleveland 3357 1030 2327
Jacksonville 3151 895 2256
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Pittsburgh 2829 1006 1823
Denver 3392 1086 2306
Houston 3517 962 2555
Cincinnati 3679 1277 2402
San Diego 3682 1006 2676
Kansas City 3806 1387 2419
N.Y. Jets 3895 1571 2324
Indianapolis 3905 1333 2572
Miami 3943 1064 2879
Cleveland 3983 1302 2681
Baltimore 4101 1413 2688
Oakland 4169 1443 2726
Buffalo 4186 1620 2566
New England 4292 1109 3183
Tennessee 4311 1428 2883
Jacksonville 4515 1496 3019
NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Detroit 4542 1105 3437
Atlanta 4245 971 3274
Washington 4234 1792 2442
New Orleans 4201 1006 3195
Dallas 4132 866 3266
N.Y. Giants 4064 1261 2803
San Francisco 4021 1797 2224
Tampa Bay 4019 1339 2680
Philadelphia 3928 1420 2508
Green Bay 3772 1108 2664
Carolina 3738 1188 2550
Minnesota 3667 1619 2048
St. Louis 3638 1296 2342
Seattle 3484 1520 1964
Chicago 3290 1341 1949
Arizona 3212 897 2315
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
San Francisco 3062 1002 2060
Chicago 3377 1066 2311
Seattle 3403 1195 2208
Arizona 3607 1366 2241
Dallas 3617 1208 2409
Minnesota 3703 1229 2474
St. Louis 3749 1225 2524
Detroit 3782 1346 2436
Atlanta 3794 1355 2439
Philadelphia 3801 1292 2509
Carolina 3818 1388 2430
Green Bay 3829 1142 2687
N.Y. Giants 4033 1254 2779
Washington 4296 981 3315
Tampa Bay 4368 897 3471
New Orleans 5003 1722 3281
AVERAGE PER GAME
AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
New England 435.8 143.7 292.1
Houston 394.8 144.1 250.7
Denver 391.8 104.4 287.5
Indianapolis 386.0 108.3 277.7
Cincinnati 358.5 113.9 244.5
Oakland 355.6 82.6 273.0
Baltimore 348.2 101.6 246.5
Buffalo 346.6 140.3 206.4
Pittsburgh 339.8 101.5 238.3
Kansas City 336.2 145.6 190.5
Tennessee 327.7 106.9 220.8
San Diego 324.4 99.5 224.9
Miami 321.3 108.9 212.4
N.Y. Jets 310.7 109.5 201.2
Cleveland 305.2 93.6 211.5
Jacksonville 286.5 81.4 205.1
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Pittsburgh 257.2 91.5 165.7
Denver 308.4 98.7 209.6
Houston 319.7 87.5 232.3
Cincinnati 334.5 116.1 218.4
San Diego 334.7 91.5 243.3
Kansas City 346.0 126.1 219.9
N.Y. Jets 354.1 142.8 211.3
Indianapolis 355.0 121.2 233.8
Miami 358.5 96.7 261.7
Cleveland 362.1 118.4 243.7
Baltimore 372.8 128.5 244.4
Oakland 379.0 131.2 247.8
Buffalo 380.5 147.3 233.3
New England 390.2 100.8 289.4
Tennessee 391.9 129.8 262.1
Jacksonville 410.5 136.0 274.5
NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Detroit 412.9 100.5 312.5
Atlanta 385.9 88.3 297.6
Washington 384.9 162.9 222.0
New Orleans 381.9 91.5 290.5
Dallas 375.6 78.7 296.9
N.Y. Giants 369.5 114.6 254.8
San Francisco 365.5 163.4 202.2
Tampa Bay 365.4 121.7 243.6
Philadelphia 357.1 129.1 228.0
Green Bay 342.9 100.7 242.2
Carolina 339.8 108.0 231.8
Minnesota 333.4 147.2 186.2
St. Louis 330.7 117.8 212.9
Seattle 316.7 138.2 178.5
Chicago 299.1 121.9 177.2
Arizona 292.0 81.5 210.5
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
San Francisco 278.4 91.1 187.3
Chicago 307.0 96.9 210.1
Seattle 309.4 108.6 200.7
Arizona 327.9 124.2 203.7
Dallas 328.8 109.8 219.0
Minnesota 336.6 111.7 224.9
St. Louis 340.8 111.4 229.5
Detroit 343.8 122.4 221.5
Atlanta 344.9 123.2 221.7
Philadelphia 345.5 117.5 228.1
Carolina 347.1 126.2 220.9
Green Bay 348.1 103.8 244.3
N.Y. Giants 366.6 114.0 252.6
Washington 390.5 89.2 301.4
Tampa Bay 397.1 81.5 315.5
New Orleans 454.8 156.5 298.3
NFL LEADERS
“Monday Night Football” was broadcast on ABC in 1970
for the very first time.
By BEN WALKER
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — The
most polarizing Hall of Fame
debate since Pete Rose will
now be decided by the base-
ball shrine’s voters:
Do Barry Bonds,
Roger Clemens and
Sammy Sosa belong
in Cooperstown
despite drug alle-
gations that tainted
their huge num-
bers?
In a month-long
election sure to
become a referendum on the
Steroids Era, the Hall bal-
lot was released Wednesday;
Bonds, Clemens and Sosa are
on it for the first time.
Bonds is the all-time home
run champion with 762 and
won a record seven MVP
awards. Clemens took home
a record seven Cy Young tro-
phies and is ninth with 354
victories. Sosa ranks eighth
on the homer chart with 609.
Yet for all their HRs, RBIs
and Ws, the shadow of PEDs
looms large.
“You could see for years that
this particular ballot was going
to be controversial and divisive
to an unprecedented extent,”
Larry Stone of The Seattle
Times wrote in an e-mail. “My
hope is that some clarity begins
to emerge over the Hall of
Fame status of those linked to
performance-enhancing drugs.
But I doubt it.”
More than 600 long-time
members of the Baseball
Writers’ Association of
America will vote on the
37-player ballot. Candidates
require 75 percent for induc-
tion and results will be
announced Jan. 9.
Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza
and Curt Schilling also are
among the 24 first-time eli-
gibles. Jack Morris, Jeff
Bagwell and Tim Raines are
the top holdover candidates.
If recent history is any indi-
cation, the odds are solidly
stacked against Bonds, Clemens
and Sosa. Mark McGwire and
Rafael Palmeiro both posted
Cooperstown-caliber stats, too,
but drug clouds doomed them
in Hall voting.
Some who favor Bonds
and Clemens claim the bulk of
their accomplishments came
before baseball got wrapped
up in drug scandals. They add
that PED use was so preva-
lent in the 1980s, 1990s and
early 2000s that it’s unfair
to exclude anyone because
so many who-did-and-who-
didn’t questions remain.
Many fans on the other
side say drug cheats — sus-
pected or otherwise — should
never be afforded the game’s
highest individual honor.
Either way, this election is
baseball’s newest hot button,
generating the most fervent
Hall arguments since Rose.
The discussion
about Rose was
moot, however —
the game’s career
hits leader agreed
to a lifetime ban
in 1989 after an
i n v e s t i g a t i o n
concluded he bet
on games while
managing the
Cincinnati Reds, barring him
from the BBWAA ballot.
The BBWAA election
rules allow voters to pick up
to 10 candidates. As for crite-
ria, this is the only instruction:
“Voting shall be based upon
the player’s record, playing
ability, integrity, sportsman-
ship, character and contribu-
tions to the team(s) on which
the player played.”
That leaves a lot of room
for interpretation.
Bonds, Clemens and Sosa
won’t get a vote from Mike
Klis of The Denver Post.
“Nay on all three. I think
in all three cases, their per-
formances were artificial-
ly enhanced. Especially
in the cases of Bonds and
Clemens, their production
went up abnormally late in
their careers,” he wrote in an
e-mail.
They’ll do better with Bob
Dutton of The Kansas City
Star.
“I plan to vote for all three.
I understand the steroid/PED
questions surrounding each
one and I’ve wrestled with
the implications,” he wrote
in an e-mail. “My view is
these guys played and post-
ed Hall of Fame-type num-
bers against the competition
of their time. That will be
my sole yardstick. If Major
League Baseball took no
action against a player during
his career for alleged or sus-
pected steroid/PED use, I’m
not going to do so in assess-
ing their career for the Hall
of Fame.”
San Jose Mercury News
columnist Mark Purdy will
reserve judgment.
“At the beginning of all
this, I made up my mind I had
to adopt a consistent policy on
the steroid social club. So my
policy has been, with the bril-
liance in the way they set up
the Hall of Fame vote where
these guys have a 15-year
window, I’m not going to vote
for any of those guys until I
get the best picture possible
of what was happening then,”
he wrote in an e-mail. “We
learn a little bit more each
year. We learned a lot during
the Bonds trial. We learned a
lot during the Clemens trial. I
don’t want to say I’m never
going to vote for any of them.
I want to wait until the end of
their eligibility window and
have my best idea of what
was really going on.”
Clemens was acquitted
this summer in federal court
on six counts that he lied and
obstructed Congress when he
denied using performance-
enhancing drugs.
Bonds was found guilty in
2011 by a federal court jury
on one count of obstruction of
justice, ruling he gave an eva-
sive answer in 2003 to a grand
jury looking into the distribu-
tion of illegal steroids. Bonds
is appealing the verdict.
McGwire is 10th on the
career home run list with 583
but has never received even
24 percent in his six Hall
tries. Big Mac has admitted
to using steroids and human
growth hormone.
Palmeiro is among only
four players with 500 homers
and 3,000 hits, yet has gotten
a high of just 12.6 percent
in two years on the ballot.
He drew a 10-day suspen-
sion in 2005 after a positive
test for PEDs and said the
result was due to a vitamin
vial given him by teammate
Miguel Tejada.
Biggio topped the 3,000-
hit mark — which always has
been considered an automatic
credential for Cooperstown
— and spent his entire career
with the Houston Astros.
Schilling was 216-146
and won three World Series
championships, including his
“bloody sock” performance
for the Boston Red Sox in
2004.
Upton headed to Braves; Pettitte
returns to Yanks: B.J. Upton is on his
way to Atlanta, while Andy Pettitte is
staying in pinstripes.
With the winter meetings only days
away, baseball’s offseason began to
heat up Wednesday with a pair of moves
involving potential closers: Ryan Madson
joined the Angels and Jonathan Broxton
stayed with the Reds.
Hours later, the Braves made big
news. Looking for a new centerfielder
and some right-handed pop, Atlanta
found both in Upton, who had 28 hom-
ers and 31 steals for Tampa Bay last
season. The fleet-footed free agent
agreed to a $75.25 million, 5-year con-
tract, a person familiar with the deal
said Wednesday night.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on condition of
anonymity because the deal had not
been completed. It was expected to be
announced today once Upton passes
his physical.
Upton’s score would be the biggest
free-agent contract of the offseason so
far and the largest in Braves’ history.
Pettitte, meanwhile, will return for
another season with the New York
Yankees.
Feeling strong at age 40, the veter-
an lefty completed a 1-year deal worth
$12 million, putting baseball’s biggest
postseason winner back in the Bronx.
The five-time World Series cham-
pion retired after the 2010 season to
spend more time at home but then
decided to come back this year — while
working as an instructor during spring
training — and signed a contract guar-
anteeing him $2.5 million.
Pettitte went 5-4 with a 2.87 ERA
in 12 starts. He missed almost three
months because of a broken lower left
leg, sustained when he was hit by a line
drive off the bat of Cleveland’s Casey
Kotchman on June 27.
The move means the AL East
champs are set to start 2013 with
the same rotation as last season:
CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, Pettitte,
Phil Hughes and Ivan Nova or David
Phelps.
Next up for general manager
Brian Cashman could be a contract
for 43-year-old closer Mariano Rivera,
determined to come back from a torn
knee ligament.
Madson is making a comeback
from Tommy John surgery and agreed
to a 1-year deal with the Los Angeles
Angels five days before the start of
baseball’s winter meetings in Nashville,
Tenn.
The long-time Philadelphia reliever
missed last season with Cincinnati,
which signed him in January after a
stellar performance in 2011 with the
Phillies. He had surgery in April on a
torn ligament in his right elbow.
Well ahead of schedule in his
recovery, Madson said he expects to
be the Angels’ closer. General manager
Jerry Dipoto agreed the veteran is likely
to supplant Ernesto Frieri when fully
healthy.
Broxton isn’t sure what role he’ll
have in Cincinnati after securing a $21
million, 3-year contract that gives the
NL Central champions a chance to
reconfigure their starting rotation.
The 2-time All-Star came to the
Reds last July in a trade with Kansas
City. He filled in as the closer when
Aroldis Chapman developed a tired
shoulder and had four saves in six
chances overall with a 2.82 ERA.
Now the Reds have the option of
turning Chapman into a starter, which
was the plan last season until Madson
blew out his elbow. The team has told
Chapman to prepare for next season as
a starter, although it hasn’t committed to
Broxton as the closer.
Broxton wanted a multi’year deal so
he could settle in one place. He didn’t
insist on assurances he’d be a closer.
The 28-year-old Upton hit .246 with
78 RBIs for the Rays last season. He
will replace free agent Michael Bourn
as the Braves’ centerfielder and should
provide much-needed power from the
right side.
Upton’s first full season with Tampa
Bay was 2007, when he hit a career-
best .300 with 24 homers and 22 sto-
len bases. His home run totals have
increased in each of the last three
seasons but he has hit below .250
with more than 150 strikeouts in four
straight years.
Bourn was the Braves’ leadoff hit-
ter but Upton is not expected to fill
that role.
Elsewhere, the Boston Red Sox
made a flurry of minor moves, trad-
ing right-handers Zach Stewart and
Sandy Rosario as well as third base-
man Danny Valencia.
Stewart was sent to Pittsburgh
and Rosario to Oakland for players to
be named. Valencia was shipped to
Baltimore for cash.
Athletics reliever Pat Neshek
agreed to a 1-year contract that avoided
salary arbitration, while Kansas City
traded right-hander Vin Mazzaro and
first baseman Clint Robinson to the
Pirates for minor-league pitchers Luis
Santos and Luis Rico.
The Chicago Cubs designated right-
hander Casey Coleman for assignment
to make roster room for newcomer
Scott Feldman, who agreed to a $6 mil-
lion, 1-year contract the previous day.
Feldman’s former team, the Texas
Rangers, acquired right-hander Cory
Burns from San Diego for a player to be
named or cash.
MLB union head: Drug test
announcements on deck: The head of
the baseball players’ union says there
have been talks with Major League
Baseball about increasing the sport’s
drug testing program.
Michael Weiner spoke Wednesday
after a meeting of the union’s executive
board and expected announcements
about the drug program “before long.”
Bonds, Clemens, Sosa on
Hall ballot for first time
No surprises for HOF ballot
We know for sure who is on the Hall
of Fame ballot for the Class of 2013 at
Cooperstown.
No real surprise that Barry Bonds,
Sammy Sosa and Roger Clemens are on
the ballot — all seriously suspected of
using steroids and other performance-
enhancers during their careers but also
denying such use.
They have some serious numbers but
I have written in the past about what I
think about these guys. Because of the
system as it was then — no drug testing,
etc. — they got away with it, in my most
humble — but correct! — opinion.
Or else these guys found the Fountain
of Youth to do what they did even at
ages when almost every other major-
leaguer throughout baseball’s illustri-
ous history was declining! At least one
voter publicly — and I imagine others
privately — agrees with me on that.
When even a guy like Mark McGwire,
who has been eligible for a while but
can’t get a quarter of the voters to pick
him, can now admit to using PEDs and
still be on the ballot — that’s all the
proof I need that he is guilty and knew
what he was doing was against the rules
— is troubling to me but he may not get
in because he was a 1-trick pony — all
he could do was bomb home runs.
Bonds is such a quandary especially
because he had Cooperstown-caliber
numbers before PEDs seemingly start-
ed to really take over. Sosa could do
more than hit for power even before
and Clemens recovered from early-
career arm woes to win a record 7 Cy
Youngs.
I understand that Clemens was recent-
ly acquitted for lying to and obstructing
Congress — and you know what I feel
about THAT whole fiasco! — but I
think the standard of proof is far more
stringent there, as it should be; he could
have gone to jail.
I like the attitude of one of the
BBWAA writers, Mark Purdy of the
San Jose Mercury News. Basically, he
has written that for now, he will not vote
for any of them until the facts become
clearer and he can get a better handle on
what really went on during their time
on the field.
Some voters will go in with a “never”
attitude and others will go in with a
“see-no-evil” one.
My guess is that all three of the
newbies will eventually get in when
the Steroids Era starts to fade from
memory.
It took this fiasco to get the powers-
that-be in Baseball to address this issue
and now, even more stringent — and
wide-ranging — tests are being con-
sidered.
Better late than never. The court of
public opinion won out in the long run.
Unfortunately, there are guys that
maybe will get elected this year or
down the road that will be overshad-
owed by all this.
Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza and
Curt Schilling are also among the 24
newbies, along with Bernie Williams,
Alan Trammell, Kenny Lofton, Don
Mattingly, etc. Jack Morris, Jeff
Bagwell and Tim Raines are the top
holdovers.
I think a legit case can be made for
all of them — and the ones I didn’t
mention — getting voted in but Raines
even had a cocaine problem early in
his career.
Every time this comes up, my mind
goes back to Pete Rose ...
Oh well, get ready for Baseball’s
version of the Silly Season as the votes
come in!
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
Mount St. Joseph hands
Bluffton 56-54 loss in
Sommer Center
By Keisha Holtsberry
Sports information assistant
BLUFFTON — On Wednesday,
the Bluffton University men’s bas-
ketball team fell to the College
of Mount St. Joseph in their first
Heartland Collegiate Athletic
Conference contest of the sea-
son.
The Beavers dipped to 1-3
overall and 0-1 in the HCAC,
while MSJ improved to 2-2 and
1-0 in the HCAC.
The Lions came out strong
and took an early lead just over
three minutes into the game,
going up by five (7-2) following
a Joel Scudder triple. Half a min-
ute later, the Beavers trimmed
the deficit to three with a layup
from junior Will Pope (Somerville/
Preble Shawnee).
Scudder drained a 3-pointer,
pushing the Mount lead to six
and the visitors kept control of the
scoreboard until the 6:53 mark
when Pope hit from in close, drew
the foul and made his free throw.
At the 4:11 mark, the Beavers
went up by four after senior Josh
Fisher (Rockford/Parkway) buried
a trifecta. The Lions responded
with a 10-0 run as they took a
30-26 lead into the break.
Pope opened the second half
with an old-fashioned 3-point play,
making it a 1-point game. The
Lions pushed their lead back to
six less than a minute later thanks
to a Ken Kunkel 3-pointer and a
deuce from David Mann.
By the 13:45 mark, the Lions’
lead was down to one point
after junior Dustin Kinn (Alvada/
New Riegel) scored four straight
points. Pope had the assists on
both of Kinn’s layups. For the next
COLLEGE ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 7
6 – The Herald Thursday, November 29, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
Individuals
NFC
Week 12
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
A. Rodgers, GBY 379 252 2838 28 7
Griffin III, WAS 305 206 2504 16 4
Ale. Smith, SNF 217 152 1731 13 5
Brees, NOR 442 276 3333 31 11
M. Ryan, ATL 429 294 3425 21 13
Jo. Freeman, TAM 349 199 2761 21 7
R. Wilson, SEA 280 178 2051 17 8
Kolb, ARI 183 109 1169 8 3
Romo, DAL 456 302 3357 16 15
E. Manning, NYG 394 239 2890 15 11
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
A. Peterson, MIN 213 1236 5.80 74 7
M. Lynch, SEA 231 1051 4.55 77t 5
Do. Martin, TAM 218 1050 4.82 70t 9
Morris, WAS 208 982 4.72 39t 6
Gore, SNF 176 914 5.19 37 5
L. McCoy, PHL 177 750 4.24 34 2
Bradshaw, NYG 161 733 4.55 37 5
S. Jackson, STL 174 724 4.16 46 2
Forte, CHI 158 683 4.32 46 3
Griffin III, WAS 99 642 6.48 76t 6
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Witten, DAL 82 710 8.7 35 1
B. Marshall, CHI 81 1017 12.6 45 8
Ca. Johnson, DET 73 1257 17.2 53 4
Gonzalez, ATL 69 712 10.3 25 6
R. White, ATL 67 1003 15.0 59 4
D. Bryant, DAL 65 880 13.5 85t 6
Cruz, NYG 63 779 12.4 80t 8
Harvin, MIN 62 677 10.9 45 3
Cobb, GBY 58 613 10.6 39t 7
Colston, NOR 55 757 13.8 40 8
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Morstead, NOR 50 2517 70 50.3
McBriar, PHL 34 1633 64 48.0
J. Ryan, SEA 49 2336 73 47.7
Hekker, STL 49 2324 68 47.4
Bosher, ATL 38 1788 63 47.1
A. Lee, SNF 45 2104 66 46.8
Zastudil, ARI 73 3420 68 46.8
Weatherford, NYG 40 1869 68 46.7
Koenen, TAM 51 2288 64 44.9
Kluwe, MIN 49 2170 59 44.3
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Cobb, GBY 21 231 11.0 75t 1
Ginn Jr., SNF 25 265 10.6 38 0
Logan, DET 26 261 10.0 48 0
L. Washington, SEA 27 257 9.5 52 0
Sherels, MIN 21 185 8.8 77t 1
Da. Johnson, PHL 15 132 8.8 20 0
P. Peterson, ARI 39 329 8.4 26 0
D. Hester, CHI 26 207 8.0 44 0
Parrish, TAM 18 139 7.7 26 0
Franks, ATL 17 131 7.7 28 0
Kickoff
Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Harvin, MIN 16 574 35.9 105t 1
L. Washington, SEA 18 575 31.9 98t 1
Sproles, NOR 14 402 28.7 48 0
J. Rodgers, ATL 15 420 28.0 77 0
Cobb, GBY 30 783 26.1 46 0
D. Hester, CHI 18 459 25.5 38 0
W. Powell, ARI 16 406 25.4 65 0
D. Wilson, NYG 40 1011 25.3 66 0
Banks, WAS 21 507 24.1 55 0
B. Boykin, PHL 31 703 22.7 44 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Do. Martin, TAM 10 9 1 0 60
A. Brown, NYG 8 8 0 0 50
Cobb, GBY 8 0 7 1 48
Colston, NOR 8 0 8 0 48
Cruz, NYG 8 0 8 0 48
J. Graham, NOR 8 0 8 0 48
Jam. Jones, GBY 8 0 8 0 48
B. Marshall, CHI 8 0 8 0 48
V. Jackson, TAM 7 0 7 0 44
A. Peterson, MIN 7 7 0 0 44
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Tynes, NYG 30-30 29-32 50 117
M. Bryant, ATL 30-30 26-31 55 108
Walsh, MIN 22-22 24-26 55 94
Barth, TAM 32-32 20-25 57 92
Ja. Hanson, DET 28-28 21-24 53 91
Gould, CHI 29-29 20-24 54 89
Akers, SNF 31-31 19-27 63 88
D. Bailey, DAL 22-22 22-24 51 88
Henery, PHL 16-17 20-21 49 76
Zuerlein, STL 18-18 19-24 60 75
-----
AFC
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Brady, NWE 421 274 3299 24 3
P. Manning, DEN 409 277 3260 26 8
Roethlisberger, PIT 316 209 2287 17 4
Schaub, HOU 378 245 2855 19 9
Dalton, CIN 374 237 2769 23 11
P. Rivers, SND 376 251 2689 18 14
Flacco, BAL 392 236 2850 14 7
Fitzpatrick, BUF 356 219 2359 18 11
Locker, TEN 167 99 1164 7 4
C. Palmer, OAK 449 271 3181 18 12
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
A. Foster, HOU 269 1064 3.96 46 12
Chr. Johnson, TEN 191 942 4.93 83t 4
Ridley, NWE 206 939 4.56 41 8
J. Charles, KAN 195 928 4.76 91t 3
Spiller, BUF 123 830 6.75 56t 4
R. Rice, BAL 186 794 4.27 43 7
Green-Ellis, CIN 201 767 3.82 48 5
T.Richardson, CLE 209 755 3.61 32t 6
McGahee, DEN 167 731 4.38 31 4
Greene, NYJ 186 702 3.77 36 5
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Wayne, IND 84 1105 13.2 30t 3
Welker, NWE 80 961 12.0 59 3
And. Johnson, HOU 69 1058 15.3 60t 3
A.. Green, CIN 67 1022 15.3 73t 10
De. Thomas, DEN 61 1015 16.6 71t 6
Hartline, MIA 55 807 14.7 80t 1
Bess, MIA 55 715 13.0 39 1
B. Myers, OAK 55 591 10.7 29 3
Decker, DEN 54 685 12.7 55 8
R.Gronkowski, NWE 53 748 14.1 41 10
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Scifres, SND 52 2629 66 50.6
Fields, MIA 56 2827 67 50.5
Anger, JAC 64 3088 73 48.3
Kern, TEN 50 2416 71 48.3
Lechler, OAK 56 2706 68 48.3
McAfee, IND 44 2117 64 48.1
Huber, CIN 52 2450 69 47.1
B. Colquitt, DEN 46 2161 67 47.0
Koch, BAL 57 2681 58 47.0
Malone, NYJ 55 2567 61 46.7
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
McKelvin, BUF 18 375 20.8 88t 2
Edelman, NWE 15 238 15.9 68t 1
Ad. Jones, CIN 16 236 14.8 81t 1
M. Thigpen, MIA 19 259 13.6 72t 1
Cribbs, CLE 28 357 12.8 60 0
Hilton, IND 19 233 12.3 75t 1
Jac. Jones, BAL 22 242 11.0 63t 1
T. Holliday, DEN 19 204 10.7 76t 1
Arenas, KAN 29 281 9.7 27 0
T. Holliday, HOU 16 147 9.2 36 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Jac. Jones, BAL 18 644 35.8 108t 2
M. Thigpen, MIA 26 764 29.4 96t 1
McKnight, NYJ 28 796 28.4 100t 1
Cribbs, CLE 30 852 28.4 74 0
McKelvin, BUF 16 453 28.3 59 0
Goodman, SND 18 497 27.6 39 0
C. Rainey, PIT 27 715 26.5 68 0
D. Thompson, BAL 15 389 25.9 49 0
Br. Tate, CIN 22 566 25.7 45 0
D. McCourty, NWE 21 518 24.7 104t 1
Scoring Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
A. Foster, HOU 14 12 2 0 84
A.. Green, CIN 10 0 10 0 60
R. Gronkowski, NWE 10 0 10 0 60
Decker, DEN 8 0 8 0 48
Ridley, NWE 8 8 0 0 48
R. Rice, BAL 7 7 0 0 42
T. Richardson, CLE 7 6 1 0 42
To. Smith, BAL 7 0 7 0 42
H. Miller, PIT 6 0 6 0 38
O. Daniels, HOU 6 0 6 0 36
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NWE 48-48 21-26 53 111
S. Graham, HOU 37-37 20-25 51 97
Tucker, BAL 29-29 22-24 56 95
Janikowski, OAK 19-19 23-24 55 88
Suisham, PIT 22-22 21-22 52 85
Bironas, TEN 24-24 20-24 53 84
Nugent, CIN 33-33 17-21 55 84
M. Prater, DEN 36-36 16-20 53 84
Vinatieri, IND 21-21 21-28 53 84
P. Dawson, CLE 20-20 21-21 52 83
----
Team
TOTAL YARDAGE
AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
New England 4794 1581 3213
Houston 4343 1585 2758
Denver 4310 1148 3162
Indianapolis 4246 1191 3055
Cincinnati 3943 1253 2690
Oakland 3912 909 3003
Baltimore 3830 1118 2712
Buffalo 3813 1543 2270
Pittsburgh 3738 1117 2621
Kansas City 3698 1602 2096
Tennessee 3605 1176 2429
San Diego 3568 1094 2474
Miami 3534 1198 2336
N.Y. Jets 3418 1205 2213
Cleveland 3357 1030 2327
Jacksonville 3151 895 2256
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Pittsburgh 2829 1006 1823
Denver 3392 1086 2306
Houston 3517 962 2555
Cincinnati 3679 1277 2402
San Diego 3682 1006 2676
Kansas City 3806 1387 2419
N.Y. Jets 3895 1571 2324
Indianapolis 3905 1333 2572
Miami 3943 1064 2879
Cleveland 3983 1302 2681
Baltimore 4101 1413 2688
Oakland 4169 1443 2726
Buffalo 4186 1620 2566
New England 4292 1109 3183
Tennessee 4311 1428 2883
Jacksonville 4515 1496 3019
NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Detroit 4542 1105 3437
Atlanta 4245 971 3274
Washington 4234 1792 2442
New Orleans 4201 1006 3195
Dallas 4132 866 3266
N.Y. Giants 4064 1261 2803
San Francisco 4021 1797 2224
Tampa Bay 4019 1339 2680
Philadelphia 3928 1420 2508
Green Bay 3772 1108 2664
Carolina 3738 1188 2550
Minnesota 3667 1619 2048
St. Louis 3638 1296 2342
Seattle 3484 1520 1964
Chicago 3290 1341 1949
Arizona 3212 897 2315
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
San Francisco 3062 1002 2060
Chicago 3377 1066 2311
Seattle 3403 1195 2208
Arizona 3607 1366 2241
Dallas 3617 1208 2409
Minnesota 3703 1229 2474
St. Louis 3749 1225 2524
Detroit 3782 1346 2436
Atlanta 3794 1355 2439
Philadelphia 3801 1292 2509
Carolina 3818 1388 2430
Green Bay 3829 1142 2687
N.Y. Giants 4033 1254 2779
Washington 4296 981 3315
Tampa Bay 4368 897 3471
New Orleans 5003 1722 3281
AVERAGE PER GAME
AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
New England 435.8 143.7 292.1
Houston 394.8 144.1 250.7
Denver 391.8 104.4 287.5
Indianapolis 386.0 108.3 277.7
Cincinnati 358.5 113.9 244.5
Oakland 355.6 82.6 273.0
Baltimore 348.2 101.6 246.5
Buffalo 346.6 140.3 206.4
Pittsburgh 339.8 101.5 238.3
Kansas City 336.2 145.6 190.5
Tennessee 327.7 106.9 220.8
San Diego 324.4 99.5 224.9
Miami 321.3 108.9 212.4
N.Y. Jets 310.7 109.5 201.2
Cleveland 305.2 93.6 211.5
Jacksonville 286.5 81.4 205.1
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Pittsburgh 257.2 91.5 165.7
Denver 308.4 98.7 209.6
Houston 319.7 87.5 232.3
Cincinnati 334.5 116.1 218.4
San Diego 334.7 91.5 243.3
Kansas City 346.0 126.1 219.9
N.Y. Jets 354.1 142.8 211.3
Indianapolis 355.0 121.2 233.8
Miami 358.5 96.7 261.7
Cleveland 362.1 118.4 243.7
Baltimore 372.8 128.5 244.4
Oakland 379.0 131.2 247.8
Buffalo 380.5 147.3 233.3
New England 390.2 100.8 289.4
Tennessee 391.9 129.8 262.1
Jacksonville 410.5 136.0 274.5
NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Detroit 412.9 100.5 312.5
Atlanta 385.9 88.3 297.6
Washington 384.9 162.9 222.0
New Orleans 381.9 91.5 290.5
Dallas 375.6 78.7 296.9
N.Y. Giants 369.5 114.6 254.8
San Francisco 365.5 163.4 202.2
Tampa Bay 365.4 121.7 243.6
Philadelphia 357.1 129.1 228.0
Green Bay 342.9 100.7 242.2
Carolina 339.8 108.0 231.8
Minnesota 333.4 147.2 186.2
St. Louis 330.7 117.8 212.9
Seattle 316.7 138.2 178.5
Chicago 299.1 121.9 177.2
Arizona 292.0 81.5 210.5
DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
San Francisco 278.4 91.1 187.3
Chicago 307.0 96.9 210.1
Seattle 309.4 108.6 200.7
Arizona 327.9 124.2 203.7
Dallas 328.8 109.8 219.0
Minnesota 336.6 111.7 224.9
St. Louis 340.8 111.4 229.5
Detroit 343.8 122.4 221.5
Atlanta 344.9 123.2 221.7
Philadelphia 345.5 117.5 228.1
Carolina 347.1 126.2 220.9
Green Bay 348.1 103.8 244.3
N.Y. Giants 366.6 114.0 252.6
Washington 390.5 89.2 301.4
Tampa Bay 397.1 81.5 315.5
New Orleans 454.8 156.5 298.3
NFL LEADERS
“Monday Night Football” was broadcast on ABC in 1970
for the very first time.
By BEN WALKER
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — The
most polarizing Hall of Fame
debate since Pete Rose will
now be decided by the base-
ball shrine’s voters:
Do Barry Bonds,
Roger Clemens and
Sammy Sosa belong
in Cooperstown
despite drug alle-
gations that tainted
their huge num-
bers?
In a month-long
election sure to
become a referendum on the
Steroids Era, the Hall bal-
lot was released Wednesday;
Bonds, Clemens and Sosa are
on it for the first time.
Bonds is the all-time home
run champion with 762 and
won a record seven MVP
awards. Clemens took home
a record seven Cy Young tro-
phies and is ninth with 354
victories. Sosa ranks eighth
on the homer chart with 609.
Yet for all their HRs, RBIs
and Ws, the shadow of PEDs
looms large.
“You could see for years that
this particular ballot was going
to be controversial and divisive
to an unprecedented extent,”
Larry Stone of The Seattle
Times wrote in an e-mail. “My
hope is that some clarity begins
to emerge over the Hall of
Fame status of those linked to
performance-enhancing drugs.
But I doubt it.”
More than 600 long-time
members of the Baseball
Writers’ Association of
America will vote on the
37-player ballot. Candidates
require 75 percent for induc-
tion and results will be
announced Jan. 9.
Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza
and Curt Schilling also are
among the 24 first-time eli-
gibles. Jack Morris, Jeff
Bagwell and Tim Raines are
the top holdover candidates.
If recent history is any indi-
cation, the odds are solidly
stacked against Bonds, Clemens
and Sosa. Mark McGwire and
Rafael Palmeiro both posted
Cooperstown-caliber stats, too,
but drug clouds doomed them
in Hall voting.
Some who favor Bonds
and Clemens claim the bulk of
their accomplishments came
before baseball got wrapped
up in drug scandals. They add
that PED use was so preva-
lent in the 1980s, 1990s and
early 2000s that it’s unfair
to exclude anyone because
so many who-did-and-who-
didn’t questions remain.
Many fans on the other
side say drug cheats — sus-
pected or otherwise — should
never be afforded the game’s
highest individual honor.
Either way, this election is
baseball’s newest hot button,
generating the most fervent
Hall arguments since Rose.
The discussion
about Rose was
moot, however —
the game’s career
hits leader agreed
to a lifetime ban
in 1989 after an
i n v e s t i g a t i o n
concluded he bet
on games while
managing the
Cincinnati Reds, barring him
from the BBWAA ballot.
The BBWAA election
rules allow voters to pick up
to 10 candidates. As for crite-
ria, this is the only instruction:
“Voting shall be based upon
the player’s record, playing
ability, integrity, sportsman-
ship, character and contribu-
tions to the team(s) on which
the player played.”
That leaves a lot of room
for interpretation.
Bonds, Clemens and Sosa
won’t get a vote from Mike
Klis of The Denver Post.
“Nay on all three. I think
in all three cases, their per-
formances were artificial-
ly enhanced. Especially
in the cases of Bonds and
Clemens, their production
went up abnormally late in
their careers,” he wrote in an
e-mail.
They’ll do better with Bob
Dutton of The Kansas City
Star.
“I plan to vote for all three.
I understand the steroid/PED
questions surrounding each
one and I’ve wrestled with
the implications,” he wrote
in an e-mail. “My view is
these guys played and post-
ed Hall of Fame-type num-
bers against the competition
of their time. That will be
my sole yardstick. If Major
League Baseball took no
action against a player during
his career for alleged or sus-
pected steroid/PED use, I’m
not going to do so in assess-
ing their career for the Hall
of Fame.”
San Jose Mercury News
columnist Mark Purdy will
reserve judgment.
“At the beginning of all
this, I made up my mind I had
to adopt a consistent policy on
the steroid social club. So my
policy has been, with the bril-
liance in the way they set up
the Hall of Fame vote where
these guys have a 15-year
window, I’m not going to vote
for any of those guys until I
get the best picture possible
of what was happening then,”
he wrote in an e-mail. “We
learn a little bit more each
year. We learned a lot during
the Bonds trial. We learned a
lot during the Clemens trial. I
don’t want to say I’m never
going to vote for any of them.
I want to wait until the end of
their eligibility window and
have my best idea of what
was really going on.”
Clemens was acquitted
this summer in federal court
on six counts that he lied and
obstructed Congress when he
denied using performance-
enhancing drugs.
Bonds was found guilty in
2011 by a federal court jury
on one count of obstruction of
justice, ruling he gave an eva-
sive answer in 2003 to a grand
jury looking into the distribu-
tion of illegal steroids. Bonds
is appealing the verdict.
McGwire is 10th on the
career home run list with 583
but has never received even
24 percent in his six Hall
tries. Big Mac has admitted
to using steroids and human
growth hormone.
Palmeiro is among only
four players with 500 homers
and 3,000 hits, yet has gotten
a high of just 12.6 percent
in two years on the ballot.
He drew a 10-day suspen-
sion in 2005 after a positive
test for PEDs and said the
result was due to a vitamin
vial given him by teammate
Miguel Tejada.
Biggio topped the 3,000-
hit mark — which always has
been considered an automatic
credential for Cooperstown
— and spent his entire career
with the Houston Astros.
Schilling was 216-146
and won three World Series
championships, including his
“bloody sock” performance
for the Boston Red Sox in
2004.
Upton headed to Braves; Pettitte
returns to Yanks: B.J. Upton is on his
way to Atlanta, while Andy Pettitte is
staying in pinstripes.
With the winter meetings only days
away, baseball’s offseason began to
heat up Wednesday with a pair of moves
involving potential closers: Ryan Madson
joined the Angels and Jonathan Broxton
stayed with the Reds.
Hours later, the Braves made big
news. Looking for a new centerfielder
and some right-handed pop, Atlanta
found both in Upton, who had 28 hom-
ers and 31 steals for Tampa Bay last
season. The fleet-footed free agent
agreed to a $75.25 million, 5-year con-
tract, a person familiar with the deal
said Wednesday night.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on condition of
anonymity because the deal had not
been completed. It was expected to be
announced today once Upton passes
his physical.
Upton’s score would be the biggest
free-agent contract of the offseason so
far and the largest in Braves’ history.
Pettitte, meanwhile, will return for
another season with the New York
Yankees.
Feeling strong at age 40, the veter-
an lefty completed a 1-year deal worth
$12 million, putting baseball’s biggest
postseason winner back in the Bronx.
The five-time World Series cham-
pion retired after the 2010 season to
spend more time at home but then
decided to come back this year — while
working as an instructor during spring
training — and signed a contract guar-
anteeing him $2.5 million.
Pettitte went 5-4 with a 2.87 ERA
in 12 starts. He missed almost three
months because of a broken lower left
leg, sustained when he was hit by a line
drive off the bat of Cleveland’s Casey
Kotchman on June 27.
The move means the AL East
champs are set to start 2013 with
the same rotation as last season:
CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, Pettitte,
Phil Hughes and Ivan Nova or David
Phelps.
Next up for general manager
Brian Cashman could be a contract
for 43-year-old closer Mariano Rivera,
determined to come back from a torn
knee ligament.
Madson is making a comeback
from Tommy John surgery and agreed
to a 1-year deal with the Los Angeles
Angels five days before the start of
baseball’s winter meetings in Nashville,
Tenn.
The long-time Philadelphia reliever
missed last season with Cincinnati,
which signed him in January after a
stellar performance in 2011 with the
Phillies. He had surgery in April on a
torn ligament in his right elbow.
Well ahead of schedule in his
recovery, Madson said he expects to
be the Angels’ closer. General manager
Jerry Dipoto agreed the veteran is likely
to supplant Ernesto Frieri when fully
healthy.
Broxton isn’t sure what role he’ll
have in Cincinnati after securing a $21
million, 3-year contract that gives the
NL Central champions a chance to
reconfigure their starting rotation.
The 2-time All-Star came to the
Reds last July in a trade with Kansas
City. He filled in as the closer when
Aroldis Chapman developed a tired
shoulder and had four saves in six
chances overall with a 2.82 ERA.
Now the Reds have the option of
turning Chapman into a starter, which
was the plan last season until Madson
blew out his elbow. The team has told
Chapman to prepare for next season as
a starter, although it hasn’t committed to
Broxton as the closer.
Broxton wanted a multi’year deal so
he could settle in one place. He didn’t
insist on assurances he’d be a closer.
The 28-year-old Upton hit .246 with
78 RBIs for the Rays last season. He
will replace free agent Michael Bourn
as the Braves’ centerfielder and should
provide much-needed power from the
right side.
Upton’s first full season with Tampa
Bay was 2007, when he hit a career-
best .300 with 24 homers and 22 sto-
len bases. His home run totals have
increased in each of the last three
seasons but he has hit below .250
with more than 150 strikeouts in four
straight years.
Bourn was the Braves’ leadoff hit-
ter but Upton is not expected to fill
that role.
Elsewhere, the Boston Red Sox
made a flurry of minor moves, trad-
ing right-handers Zach Stewart and
Sandy Rosario as well as third base-
man Danny Valencia.
Stewart was sent to Pittsburgh
and Rosario to Oakland for players to
be named. Valencia was shipped to
Baltimore for cash.
Athletics reliever Pat Neshek
agreed to a 1-year contract that avoided
salary arbitration, while Kansas City
traded right-hander Vin Mazzaro and
first baseman Clint Robinson to the
Pirates for minor-league pitchers Luis
Santos and Luis Rico.
The Chicago Cubs designated right-
hander Casey Coleman for assignment
to make roster room for newcomer
Scott Feldman, who agreed to a $6 mil-
lion, 1-year contract the previous day.
Feldman’s former team, the Texas
Rangers, acquired right-hander Cory
Burns from San Diego for a player to be
named or cash.
MLB union head: Drug test
announcements on deck: The head of
the baseball players’ union says there
have been talks with Major League
Baseball about increasing the sport’s
drug testing program.
Michael Weiner spoke Wednesday
after a meeting of the union’s executive
board and expected announcements
about the drug program “before long.”
Bonds, Clemens, Sosa on
Hall ballot for first time
No surprises for HOF ballot
We know for sure who is on the Hall
of Fame ballot for the Class of 2013 at
Cooperstown.
No real surprise that Barry Bonds,
Sammy Sosa and Roger Clemens are on
the ballot — all seriously suspected of
using steroids and other performance-
enhancers during their careers but also
denying such use.
They have some serious numbers but
I have written in the past about what I
think about these guys. Because of the
system as it was then — no drug testing,
etc. — they got away with it, in my most
humble — but correct! — opinion.
Or else these guys found the Fountain
of Youth to do what they did even at
ages when almost every other major-
leaguer throughout baseball’s illustri-
ous history was declining! At least one
voter publicly — and I imagine others
privately — agrees with me on that.
When even a guy like Mark McGwire,
who has been eligible for a while but
can’t get a quarter of the voters to pick
him, can now admit to using PEDs and
still be on the ballot — that’s all the
proof I need that he is guilty and knew
what he was doing was against the rules
— is troubling to me but he may not get
in because he was a 1-trick pony — all
he could do was bomb home runs.
Bonds is such a quandary especially
because he had Cooperstown-caliber
numbers before PEDs seemingly start-
ed to really take over. Sosa could do
more than hit for power even before
and Clemens recovered from early-
career arm woes to win a record 7 Cy
Youngs.
I understand that Clemens was recent-
ly acquitted for lying to and obstructing
Congress — and you know what I feel
about THAT whole fiasco! — but I
think the standard of proof is far more
stringent there, as it should be; he could
have gone to jail.
I like the attitude of one of the
BBWAA writers, Mark Purdy of the
San Jose Mercury News. Basically, he
has written that for now, he will not vote
for any of them until the facts become
clearer and he can get a better handle on
what really went on during their time
on the field.
Some voters will go in with a “never”
attitude and others will go in with a
“see-no-evil” one.
My guess is that all three of the
newbies will eventually get in when
the Steroids Era starts to fade from
memory.
It took this fiasco to get the powers-
that-be in Baseball to address this issue
and now, even more stringent — and
wide-ranging — tests are being con-
sidered.
Better late than never. The court of
public opinion won out in the long run.
Unfortunately, there are guys that
maybe will get elected this year or
down the road that will be overshad-
owed by all this.
Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza and
Curt Schilling are also among the 24
newbies, along with Bernie Williams,
Alan Trammell, Kenny Lofton, Don
Mattingly, etc. Jack Morris, Jeff
Bagwell and Tim Raines are the top
holdovers.
I think a legit case can be made for
all of them — and the ones I didn’t
mention — getting voted in but Raines
even had a cocaine problem early in
his career.
Every time this comes up, my mind
goes back to Pete Rose ...
Oh well, get ready for Baseball’s
version of the Silly Season as the votes
come in!
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
Mount St. Joseph hands
Bluffton 56-54 loss in
Sommer Center
By Keisha Holtsberry
Sports information assistant
BLUFFTON — On Wednesday,
the Bluffton University men’s bas-
ketball team fell to the College
of Mount St. Joseph in their first
Heartland Collegiate Athletic
Conference contest of the sea-
son.
The Beavers dipped to 1-3
overall and 0-1 in the HCAC,
while MSJ improved to 2-2 and
1-0 in the HCAC.
The Lions came out strong
and took an early lead just over
three minutes into the game,
going up by five (7-2) following
a Joel Scudder triple. Half a min-
ute later, the Beavers trimmed
the deficit to three with a layup
from junior Will Pope (Somerville/
Preble Shawnee).
Scudder drained a 3-pointer,
pushing the Mount lead to six
and the visitors kept control of the
scoreboard until the 6:53 mark
when Pope hit from in close, drew
the foul and made his free throw.
At the 4:11 mark, the Beavers
went up by four after senior Josh
Fisher (Rockford/Parkway) buried
a trifecta. The Lions responded
with a 10-0 run as they took a
30-26 lead into the break.
Pope opened the second half
with an old-fashioned 3-point play,
making it a 1-point game. The
Lions pushed their lead back to
six less than a minute later thanks
to a Ken Kunkel 3-pointer and a
deuce from David Mann.
By the 13:45 mark, the Lions’
lead was down to one point
after junior Dustin Kinn (Alvada/
New Riegel) scored four straight
points. Pope had the assists on
both of Kinn’s layups. For the next
COLLEGE ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 7
1
The Delphos Herald is looking for
interested applicants who enjoy
attending local sporting events and would like
to cover them for the Delphos Herald.
We welcome all applicants.
We can work with your schedule!
Contact: Jim Metcalfe
419-695-0015,
Extension 133
or by email at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
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IN SPORTS?
WOULD YOU LIKE
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SOME EXTRA CASH?
Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
St. John’s Cross Country recently held its annual season-ending awards banquet.
Receiving the following awards are, front from left, Curtis Pohlman, freshman
numerals, 1st-year varsity letter and number 1 boys runner; Anthony Hale, 2nd-year
varsity letter; and Anna Mueller, freshman numerals, 1st-year varsity letter and
number 2 girls runner; Back row, Teresa Pohlman, senior trophy, captain’s pin, 2nd-
year varsity letter, Academic All-MAC and most improved runner; Megan Joseph,
captain’s pin, 3rd-year varsity letter, Academic All-MAC and number 1 girls runner;
Aaron Hellman, captain’s pin, 3rd-year varsity letter, Academic All-MAC and num-
ber 2 boys runner; and Todd Rode, senior trophy, captain’s pin, 4th-year varsity let-
ter, Academic All-MAC and the Coach’s Award. (Photo submitted/Delphos Herald)
Blue Jay runners
The Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 8 3 0 .727 407 244
Miami 5 6 0 .455 211 226
N.Y. Jets 4 7 0 .364 221 290
Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 243 319
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 10 1 0 .909 327 211
Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 230 273
Tennessee 4 7 0 .364 238 335
Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 188 308
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 9 2 0 .818 283 219
Pittsburgh 6 5 0 .545 231 210
Cincinnati 6 5 0 .545 282 247
Cleveland 3 8 0 .273 209 248
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 8 3 0 .727 318 221
San Diego 4 7 0 .364 245 237
Oakland 3 8 0 .273 218 356
Kansas City 1 10 0 .091 161 301
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 305 226
Washington 5 6 0 .455 295 285
Dallas 5 6 0 .455 242 262
Philadelphia 3 8 0 .273 184 282
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 10 1 0 .909 294 216
Tampa Bay 6 5 0 .545 310 254
New Orleans 5 6 0 .455 308 304
Carolina 3 8 0 .273 214 265
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 8 3 0 .727 277 175
Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 273 245
Minnesota 6 5 0 .545 248 249
Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267 280
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 8 2 1 .773 276 155
Seattle 6 5 0 .545 219 185
St. Louis 4 6 1 .409 205 254
Arizona 4 7 0 .364 180 227
———
Today’s Game
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday’s Game
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
By JOEDY McCREARY
The Associated Press
DURHAM, N.C. — No.
4 Ohio State looked plen-
ty capable of accomplish-
ing something no non-ACC
team could do in more than
a decade: Beat Duke on its
home court.
Then, all of a sudden,
things went wrong for the
Buckeyes.
An untimely
cold spell and
an inability to
stop No. 2 Duke
down the stretch
sent the Buckeyes
to a 73-68 loss
Wednesday night.
Deshaun Thomas scored 16
points to lead Ohio State (4-1)
and Aaron Craft scored 11 on
3-of-15 shooting. His jumper
with about 3:15 remaining
was the Buckeyes’ last until a
dunk by Evan Ravenel in the
final seconds.
Ohio State — a 52-percent
shooting team — hit just 33.8
percent from the field in this
one.
“If you had told me we
were going to shoot 34 per-
cent, I would have said we got
ran out of the gym tonight,”
coach Thad Matta said.
The Buckeyes also had no
way to slow Duke freshman
Rasheed Sulaimon in the sec-
ond half. He scored all 17 of
his points after halftime.
Mason Plumlee had 21
points and a career-high-
tying 17 rebounds and Ryan
Kelly added 15 points and
hit 3-pointers on consecutive
trips downcourt early during
the 20-7 run that put the Blue
Devils (7-0) ahead to stay and
sent them to their third win
over a top-5 team this month.
Shannon Scott pulled the
Buckeyes within 66-64 with a
free throw with 28.9 seconds
left but had a critical turnover
on the next trip down; Quinn
Cook sealed it by hitting six
free throws in the final 27.3
seconds.
Cook finished with 12
points for Duke, which shot
58 percent in the second half
— Sulaimon was 7-of-10 in
the final 20 minutes — to
remain unbeaten at home in
the made-for-TV ACC-Big
Ten Challenge and preserve
its school-record winning
streak at home against non-
conference opponents.
The Blue Devils — who
beat then-No. 3 Kentucky
in Atlanta and then-No. 2
Louisville in the Bahamas —
won their 97th straight against
non-ACC visitors to Cameron
Indoor Stadium.
But for much of the way,
nothing came easy for them.
They were outrebounded
40-37, couldn’t get anything
going on the offensive glass,
struggled to keep up with
Ohio State’s quick ball move-
ment and couldn’t find their
touch.
“When you play the
schedule that we’ve played,
this is not Xbox or fantasy
stuff where these guys are
healthy” all the time, Duke
coach Mike Krzyzewski said.
“He just played three games
(in the Battle 4 Atlantis), get
back Sunday afternoon and
go out and play these guys
on Wednesday — that’s an
effort. That’s a hell of an
effort and for a freshman, he
got knocked back, and at half-
time, I thought he responded
... and gave us a verve.”
Not to mention a spark, by
hitting the first in a series of
three straight 3-pointers that
swung the game.
Sulaimon buried one from
the key to pull the Blue Devils
within 51-50 with about 6 1/2
minutes left. Kelly then hit 3s
on consecutive trips down the
court, including one in Amir
Williams’ face that put Duke
ahead to stay, 56-53 — its
first lead since the 14-minute
mark of the first half.
Plumlee followed up
Cook’s missed layup with
a dunk that made it 58-54
with 4 minutes left and sent
the rowdy Cameron crowd
into ear-splitting madness.
Sulaimon capped the run with
a fast-break dunk that put
Duke up 66-58 with just over
a minute to play.
Lenzelle Smith Jr. had 11
points for Ohio State.
No. 9 ARIZONA 93, NORTHERN
ARIZONA 50
TUCSON, Ariz. — Mark Lyons
scored 18 points and Nick
Johnson had 10 points
and seven assists for
Arizona.
The Wildcats (4-0)
overwhel med the
Lumberjacks from the
get-go, showing no signs
of rust after an 8-day
break. The Wildcats
built an 18-point lead
in the first half and shut
down Northern Arizona in the second
for their 29th straight win over the
Lumberjacks (2-4).
Arizona shot 58 percent, made
12-of-21 from 3-point range and had
22 assists on 30 field goals to kick
off a stretch of four games in 11
days. Solomon Hill had 17 points,
Brandon Ashley grabbed 11 rebounds
and Johnson added four steals for the
Wildcats.
Dewayne Russell had 13 points
and Blake Hamilton 11 for Northern
Arizona, winless in 24 all-time games
against ranked opponents.
BOISE ST. 83, No. 11 Creighton
70
OMAHA, Neb. — Derrick Marks
scored a career-high 35 points, includ-
ing 18 straight in the second half, to
lead Boise State to the upset.
The Broncos (5-1) beat a ranked
opponent for the first time in four sea-
sons and beat one on the road for the
first time since March 2005. Creighton
(6-1) hadn’t lost a regular-season
November home game since 1989.
Anthony Drmic had 17 points
and Jeff Elorriaga added 12 for the
Broncos.
Doug McDermott led Creighton
with 21 points.
Creighton got within five points
in the last 3 minutes of the game
but Drmic scored twice and Marks
made four free throws to seal the
Broncos’ first win over a ranked oppo-
nent since they beat Utah State in
February 2009.
The Broncos had come into the
game having lost 18 of 19 on the road
against ranked teams, with the lone
win against Nevada in March 2005.
Marks scored 28 points in the
second half.
MIAMI 67, No. 13 Michigan St.
59
CORAL GABLES, Fla. — Senior
Trey McKinney Jones scored a
career-high 18 points and Miami held
Michigan State without a field goal for
a 5 1/2-minute stretch in the second
half.
McKinney Jones went 5-for-7 from
3-point range, including a basket that
capped a 14-2 run to start the second
half that put them ahead 41-33. The
lead grew to 57-45 and Miami (4-1)
went 8-for-8 from the free throw line
over the final 2:11 to seal the victory.
Keith Appling had 15 points for the
Spartans (5-2), who lost for the first
time since the season opener against
Connecticut.
No. 22 ILLINOIS 75, GEORGIA
TECH 62
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Joseph
Bertrand made 3-pointers on consecu-
tive possessions and scored every
point in a 10-0 run for Illinois in the
ACC-Big Ten Challenge.
Illinois (8-0) took charge behind
Bertrand, who also scored on a drives
in the decisive surge to lift the Illini
from a 58-54 deficit late in the second
half.
The Illini finished the game on a
21-4 run.
Bertrand, a redshirt junior, scored
12 of his 15 points in the second half.
Brandon Paul also scored 15 points
for the Illini while forward Tyler Griffey
and guard D.J. Richardson had 14
points apiece.
Kammeon Holsey led Georgia
Tech (4-2) with 14 points while Jason
Morris and Mfon Udofia scored 10
points apiece.
No. 24 UNLV 85, UC IRVINE 57
LAS VEGAS — Freshman Anthony
Bennett and junior Mike Moser scored
19 points apiece to lead UNLV.
Using tenacious defense, the
Rebels held UC Irvine scoreless dur-
ing a crucial 5 minutes of the second
half, long enough to widen their lead to
20 points and take the Anteaters out of
the game. UNLV outscored UC Irvine
51-31 in the second half to pull away
for the easy win.
Katin Reinhardt added 13 points
for the Rebels (4-1).
UC Irvine (3-4) scored just 21
points over the final 14:59 of the game
— nine of which came from the free
throw line.
Daman Starring had 18 points
and Adam Folker added 12 for the
Anteaters.
No. 25 NEW MEXICO 76,
MERCER 58
ALBUQUERQUE — Alex Kirk
had 16 points and 13 rebounds and
Cameron Bairstow added a career-
high 16 points for New Mexico.
It was Kirk’s second straight dou-
ble-double for the Lobos (7-0).
Travis Smith scored 16 points to
lead the Bears (3-4).
Bairstow and Tony Snell combined
for 14 points in a 17-2 New Mexico run
that put the Lobos up 19-5. Mercer
was never able to get closer than eight
points the rest of the way.
Women’s
No. 2 CONNECTICUT 101,
COLGATE 41
HARTFORD, Conn. — Brianna
Banks scored a career-high 20 points
and Stefanie Dolson added 18 as No.
2 Connecticut beat Colgate 101-41
on Wednesday, keeping the Huskies
undefeated in November for the eighth
consecutive year.
Banks hit four of her five shots
from 3-point range for UConn (6-0).
Kelly Faris also had 17 points, to go
along with five rebounds and five
assists.
Jhazmine Lynch led Colgate (2-4)
with nine points.
NO. 4 DUKE 71, MICHIGAN 54
ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Chelsea
Gray and Elizabeth Williams scored
19 points each to lead the Blue Devils
over the Wolverines in the Big Ten-
ACC Challenge.
Alexis Jones added nine points for
the Blue Devils (5-0), who did not have
at least three double-digit scorers for
the first time this season.
Jenny Ryan tied a career high with
18 points and Kate Thompson added
10 for Michigan (5-2). Leading scorer
Rachel Sheffer was held scoreless for
the first 16 minutes and finished with
eight points.
NO. 7 LOUISVILLE 76, EASTERN
KENTUCKY 42
LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Sisters Jude
and Shoni Schimmel scored 12 points
each to lead the Cardinals over the
Lady Colonels.
Monique Reid added 11 points as
all 11 players scored for the Cardinals
(8-0), who started slow before over-
whelming the Lady Colonels.
Jade Barber had 11 points and 10
rebounds to lead Eastern Kentucky
(3-3); Jalisa Bryant added 10 points.
NO. 8 GEORGIA 83, FURMAN
47
ATHENS, Ga. — Khaalidah Miller
scored 17 points and the Lady Bulldog
defeated the Paladins.
Miller, who also had six rebounds,
was one of three guards to score in
double figures for Georgia (8-0).
Jasmine James added 15 points
and four assists. Erika Ford added
14 points and six rebounds. Forward
Anne Marie Armstrong scored 12 for
Georgia.
Brittany Hodges led Furman (3-2)
with 15 points and Teshia Griswold
added 14.
NO. 9 KENTUCKY 92, MIAMI
(OHIO) 53
LEXINGTON, Ky. — Bernisha
Pinkett had career highs of 21 points
and 10 rebounds, A’dia Mathies added
14 points and the Wildcats rolled past
the RedHawks.
DeNesha Stallworth scored 12
points and had eight rebounds for
Kentucky (5-1), which won its 25th
straight home game. Bria Goss also
had 12 points.
Kentucky ended up holding Miami
(3-3) to 33-percent shooting while forc-
ing 22 turnovers leading to 29 points.
Courtney Osborn scored a game-high
25 points for the RedHawks.
NO. 11 MARYLAND 90, NO. 21
NEBRASKA 71
LINCOLN, Neb. — Alyssa Thomas
scored 25 points and Tianna Hawkins
scored 21 to lead the Terps over
the Cornhuskers in the ACC-Big Ten
Challenge.
Hawkins also grabbed 12
rebounds while Thomas had eight
assists and six steals for the Terrapins
(4-1). Laurin Mincy scored 16 points
for Maryland.
Lindsey Moore led the Cornhuskers
(5-2) with 17 points and five steals.
NO. 14 PURDUE 85, GEORGIA
TECH 73
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — KK
Houser scored 19 points, hitting all 10
of her free-throw attempts, and added
10 assists to help the Boilermakers
beat the Yellow Jackets.
Drey Mingo had 16 points,
Courtney Moses scored 15 and
April Wilson added 12 points for the
Boilermakers (6-1) in a game that was
part of the ACC/Big Ten Challenge.
Tyaunna Marshall led all scorers
with 26 points for the Yellow Jackets
(3-3).
NO. 22 NORTH CAROLINA 57,
NO. 15 OHIO STATE 54
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Xylina
McDaniel, Waltiea Rolle and Tierra
Ruffin-Pratt scored 11 points apiece
to lead the Tar Heels against the
Buckeyes.
Tayler Hill scored 24 points for the
Buckeyes (4-2).
Hill’s jumper pushed Ohio State
ahead 54-51 with 1:26 left but
McDaniel made a jumper and Ruffin-
Pratt made two to hand the Tar Heels
(7-0) the victory.
NO. 16 TENNESSEE 88, MIDDLE
TENNESSEE 81, OT
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Bashaara
Graves recorded a double-double and
reserve guard Kamiko Williams made
several huge plays down the stretch
and the Lady Vols erased an 11-point,
second-half deficit in an overtime vic-
tory over the Blue Raiders.
Middle Tennessee (4-2) had forced
overtime on Icelyn Elie’s 3-pointer with
1.8 seconds left in regulation. Elie led
the Blue Raiders with 21 points.
After trailing all night, Tennessee
finally took its first lead at 64-63
when Williams got a steal and made
a 10-footer with 4:26 left. Williams
added a 3-pointer in the final minute of
regulation and made a steal and drew
a charge in overtime.
Meghan Simmons scored 19
points for Tennessee (5-1). Graves
had 15 points and 12 rebounds.
NO. 18 OKLAHOMA STATE 90,
TEXAS STATE 55
STILLWATER, Okla. — Toni Young
scored 24 points and pulled down 19
rebounds and No. 18 Oklahoma State
pulled away in the second half for a
rout of Texas State.
Liz Donohoe scored 22 points and
had six rebounds. Tiffany Bias added
12 points and five steals. Kendra
Suttles had 10 points.
Texas State was hot early and led
with 6 minutes to go in the first half.
Oklahoma State (5-0) then went on an
18-6 run and led 38-31 at halftime.
Erin Peoples and Ashley Ezeh
had 16 points apiece for Texas State
(3-2).
NO. 20 KANSAS 101,
GRAMBLING STATE 47
LAWRENCE, Kan. — Chelsea
Gardner had 26 points and 10
rebounds and Asia Boyd added 15
points and 10 rebounds to lead the
Jayhawks to a victory against the
Tigers.
All 11 players who saw action
scored for the Jayhawks, who are 6-0
for a third straight season.
Cierra Ceazer scored 14 points
and Joanna Miller 12 for the Tigers
(0-6).
NO. 23 DAYTON 95, WRIGHT
STATE 73
FAIRBORN — Ally Malott and
Samantha Mackay each had 20 points
and the Flyers earned a win over the
Raiders.
The win moves the Flyers to 7-0,
the program’s best start since moving
to Division I in 1984-85.
Ivory James led Wright State (2-5)
with 22 points.
No. 4 Ohio State fades
against No. 2 Duke, 73-68
(Continued from Page 6)
13 minutes, the Bluffton defi-
cit fluctuated between two and
seven points until junior Josh
Johnson (Ottawa-Glandorf) hit a
deep three to pull Bluffton within
one with 18 seconds to play.
The Lions made two foul
shots and were back up by three
with 18 seconds still left on the
clock. With 12 seconds to play,
senior Tyler Neal (Bluffton) got
to the rack and drew the foul as
his shot nearly went down. His
makes at the line made the score
55-54 in favor of MSJ. The Lions
put in one more foul shot with
11 seconds left before Johnson’s
attempt at the game-winner rat-
tled out.
The home team hit 18-of-48
(37.5 percent), while the Lions
made 17-of-45 (37.8 percent).
Bluffton finished 5-for-15 (33.3
percent) from behind the arc,
while the Lions went 10-of-26
(38.5 percent). Bluffton pulled
down six more rebounds than
MSJ (34-28). The visitors fin-
ished with 11 turnovers, while the
Beavers coughed it up 14 times.
Bluffton was led by Pope, who
connected for 16 points on 6-of-
12 shooting from the field. Fisher
and Kinn added 10 and nine
points, respectively. Johnson
ripped down a game-high seven
boards with Pope and Neal pull-
ing down six rebounds apiece.
The Beavers return to action
on Saturday when they travel
to Franklin College. The contest
with the Grizzlies is slated for 4
p.m. following the women’s game
at Franklin.
------
Jackets roll Alma on
career nights from
Hicks, Frizell, Wooley
DEFIANCE — The Defiance
College men’s basketball team
extended its home winning streak
in non-conference action to 15-
traight and improved to 5-0 in
home openers under head coach
Kyle Brumett with a 76-60 vic-
tory against Alma on Wednesday
night inside the Karl H. Weaner
Community Center.
The Jackets used the long
ball to fuel the attack all night
long, connecting on 10-of-24 tries
from 3-point territory to keep the
Scots at bay. Back-to-back tri-
ples from Drew Frizell and Travis
Schomaeker opened up an early
21-14 lead for Defiance and it
would not look back, despite
Alma closing the half on a 10-2
spurt to draw to within 39-37.
DC wasted no time putting
the game away in the second
half, using a 15-0 rally out of
the intermission to break open
a 54-37 lead at the 14:00 mark.
Another trey from Frizell capped
the eventual 20-2 run to open
the half and pushed the Defiance
lead to 59-39.
The Jackets cruised from
there, never allowing Alma any
closer than 13 points the rest of
the evening and completing the
76-60 non-conference win.
Defiance complimented the
long-range assault with a 32-18
edge in the paint and a 40-37
advantage on the glass. The
Purple and Gold also flexed its
defensive muscle by limiting AC
to 24.0-percent shooting in the
second half and only 35.1 percent
in the game. DC notched seven
steals, while holding an opponent
under the 70-point barrier for the
third time in four outings this
season.
Ryan Hicks turned in another
stellar performance, recording his
third collegiate double-double by
hauling in 10 rebounds to go with
a career-high 20 points and three
steals.
Frizell joined Hicks by setting
his own personal best with 17
points on 5-of-9 shooting from
beyond the arc and Wade Wooley
turned in the finest showing of
his young collegiate career with
seven points and a career-high
11 boards.
Logan Wolfrum added 16
points to continue his climb up the
all-time scoring charts at Defiance
College, surpassing C.J. Johnson
(2004-08) and Nick Sales (2006-
10) and moving into 16th place in
DC history with 1,387 points.
Defiance (2-2) will look to
extend its current 2-game win-
ning streak when it opens the
Heartland Collegiate Athletic
Conference portion of its
schedule on Saturday at Rose-
Hulman.
Roundup
The Associated Press
BOSTON — Joe Johnson
scored 18 points, Andray Blatche
had 17 points and 13 rebounds and
the Brooklyn Nets beat the Boston
Celtics 95-83 on Wednesday night
after Rajon Rondo was ejected
following a fight.
The Celtics point guard was
tossed after he shoved Kris
Humphries to retaliate for the
Nets forward’s hard foul against
Kevin Garnett. Humphries and
Brooklyn forward Gerald Wallace
were also ejected for their roles in
the second-quarter skirmish.
Garnett had 16 points and 10
rebounds and Paul Pierce added
14 points for Boston. Rondo
had three assists before he was
kicked out, ending his streak at 37
games with double-digit assists.
That is tied for second-longest in
NBA history.
The Nets led by 21 in the sec-
ond half and never less than nine
in the fourth quarter.
WIZARDS 84, TRAIL
BLAZERS 82
WASHINGTON — Washington
earned its first victory after starting
the season with 12 straight loss-
es, getting 19 points from Jordan
Crawford to beat Portland.
Washington survived a score-
less 6:47 in the fourth when
Crawford hit on a 3-pointer with
2:06 to play and the Wizards final-
ly took the 84-82 lead on Emeka
Okafor’s two free throws with 39.1
seconds remaining.
Damian Lillard was called
for traveling with 28 seconds
left. After Nene was called for
an offensive foul, J.J. Hickson
missed a jumper with 2.8 seconds
to play. The Wizards lost the ball
with 0.2 seconds to go but held on
to end the skid.
Nine teams started the sea-
son 0-13 and the Wizards were
tired of the ridicule they’d been
subjected to as they crept toward
the Nets’ NBA record-worst start
of 0-18.
THUNDER 120, ROCKETS
98
OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin
Durant matched his season high
with 37 points and Oklahoma City
beat Houston in James Harden’s
first game back at Chesapeake
Energy Arena since being traded
by the Thunder before the sea-
son.
Harden scored 17 points but
was limited to 3-for-16 shooting.
He had six shots blocked by the
Thunder.
Patrick Patterson scored 27
points and Omer Asik had 17
points and 12 rebounds to lead
the way for the Rockets, who
began the day by attending the
funeral of coach Kevin McHale’s
daughter in Minnesota.
Harden missed his first nine
shots; by the time he made one,
the Rockets were down by double
digits in the second half. They
never got closer than 10 after
that.
BULLS 101, MAVERICKS 78
CHICAGO — Luol Deng had
22 points and six rebounds to lead
Chicago over Dallas.
Five players scored at least
11 points to help the Bulls (7-7)
beat the Mavericks for the fourth
straight time. Nate Robinson
added 14 points and six assists
and fellow reserve Jimmy Butler
scored a career-high 13, including
9-of-10 shooting from the line.
Joakim Noah chipped in 13
points, 10 rebounds, five assists
and three blocks as Chicago
avoided its first 3-game losing
streak at the United Center since
dropping five straight in March
2010.
Shawn Marion scored 18
points for Dallas, which shot just
35 percent to lose for the eighth
time in 11 games. The Mavericks
(7-9) dropped to 2-6 on the road.
GRIZZLIES 103, RAPTORS
82
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Marreese
Speights had 18 points and 12
rebounds to help Memphis beat
Toronto for its third straight win.
Marc Gasol and Zach
Randolph finished with 17 points
apiece, while Randolph added 13
rebounds and six assists. Mike
Conley had 16 points, going 4-of-
5 on 3-pointers, and Rudy Gay
added 14 as the Grizzlies main-
tained the best record in the NBA
(11-2).
DeMar DeRozan led the
Raptors with 16 points, while Kyle
Lowry and Jose Calderon scored
12 apiece. Linas Kleiza added 11
points.
The Raptors played without
Andrea Bargnani, their second-
leading scorer, who sat out after
hurting his left ankle in Tuesday
night’s loss at Houston.
KNICKS 102, BUCKS 88
MILWAUKEE — Carmelo
Anthony scored 29 points to lead
New York past Milwaukee.
Anthony, who sat out the
fourth quarter, also grabbed eight
rebounds in 30 minutes. The sec-
ond-leading scorer in the NBA has
scored at least 29 points in his last
four games. Steve Novak added
19 points and Tyson Chandler
chipped in with 17 points and
eight rebounds for the Knicks.
Jason Kidd missed his second
game in a row for New York with
lower back spasms.
Milwaukee’s Brandon Jennings
and Beno Udrih each scored 18
points.
CLI PPERS 101,
TIMBERWOLVES 95
LOS ANGELES — Chris Paul
had 23 points and 11 assists and
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8 – The Herald Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
AGRIBUSINESS
Senior members of the
Elida FFA parliamentary
procedure team participat-
ed in the sub-district FFA
contest at Delphos recently.
The team placed first out of
six local schools. Members
are, front from left, Sarah
McCleary, Halle Strayer,
Bridget Sevitz and Jessica
Troyer; and back, Sawyer
Baker, Trent Long, Jeremy
Pierce and Kyle Nichols.
The contest test student
knowledge on parliamen-
tary rules and the students
perform a demonstration in
which six of twenty three
parliamentary abilities must
be demonstrated. The team
qualified for the District 4
contest at Clyde High School
on Wednesday.

The Elida FFA
Greenhand Team also
placed first in their career
development event at the
sub-district parliamentary
procedure contest. Team
members are, front from
left, Stormie Mayle, Megan
Tracy and Brent Sevitz; and
back, Oliver Fessler, Robert
Wortman, Torey Carroll
and Kris Mullins. Absent
from picture Deeanna
Young. The Elida FFA also
had a beginning parliamen-
tary procedure team which
placed fourth in their con-
test. Members were Chris
Fox, Miranda Goodman,
Keith Murphy, Sydney
Sexton, Jacob Simmons,
Luke Simmons and Shawn
White.
The four ‘R’s
By James J. Hoorman
assistant professor
OSU-Extension
The 4R’s concept is being
promoted by Ohio State
University extension and
other government agencies.
The concept means using
the right fertilizer source at
the right rate, right time and
the right place (Fertilizer
Institute). The goal is to keep
the nutrients on the land
and not in the air or water
while increasing agricultural
production and profitability.
That requires matching nutri-
ents applied with nutrients
taken up by the plants while
minimizing losses. For more
information on this concept,
visit the Fertilizer Institute
website at nutrientsteward-
ship.com.
Using the right fertilizer
rate starts with knowing your
crop nutrient requirements.
The right rate should be based
on soil and tissue tests taken
from an accredited labora-
tory and should be based on
Tri-state agronomic fertilizer
guidelines. Soil tests should
be taken a minimum of every
3-5 years. A study of agri-
cultural testing laboratories
found that while a majority
were testing and reporting
nutrient levels correctly; their
guidelines for the amount of
fertilizer to apply were vastly
different. So in many cases,
fertilizer was being recom-
mended when it was not
needed (Mullen and Dayton,
2011). Farmers need to keep
good fertilizer records to see
how their soil tests change
over time.
The right fertilizer source
means adjusting for the puri-
ty and the solubility of the
product. Many companies are
using products like Avail or
Jumpstart with P fertilizer.
These products increase the
solubility, making them more
plant-available but also easier
to lose. With fewer impu-
rities, the fertilizer nutrient
content increases. Plants
take up soluble nutrients but
unfortunately that increases
the chance of surface water
runoff.
Putting fertilizer in the
right place means either
injecting or incorporating the
fertilizer into the soil. If the
fertilizer is surface-applied, it
should be applied to a grow-
ing crop. This will require
some changes in the way it
is applied. Farmers typically
apply phosphorus (P) and
potassium (K) broadcast in
the fall before planting crops
in the spring. While some
starter fertilizer is applied on
corn in row in the spring, the
majority of P and K fertil-
izer is broadcast in the fall.
Current recommendations
are to either incorporate the
fertilizer or apply it to a live
crop like a cover crop to
minimize surface runoff.
Utilizing no-till and cover
crops will allow the fertilizer
to soak into the soil when it
rains or be absorbed before
runoff occurs.
Applying fertilizer at the
right time means not applying
fertilizer or manure to frozen
or snow-covered soil. The
recommendation is to apply
fertilizer or manure to grow-
ing crops or when the crops
will need the nutrients to min-
imize losses. Incorporating or
banding fertilizer at planting
time is the preferred meth-
od. Do not apply before a
projected heavy rainfall or
precipitation event like melt-
ing snow. Frozen and snow-
covered applications have
the greatest risk of off-site
movement whether manure
or commercial fertilizer
(LaBarge, 2012). About 90
percent of the nutrients are
lost each year during major
rainfall events (2 inch rains
or greater) or during snow
melt (Sharpley, 2012).
What other practices can
farmers do to minimize
P losses? Farmers should
continue to utilize proper
best management practices
like soil conservation. Avoid
plowing and tilling the soil
and utilize no-till or mini-
mum till with at least
30-percent residue cover.
Protecting the soil with resi-
due increases water infiltra-
tion and allows the nutrients
to contact the soil particles
where it may be absorbed
and available for plant
uptake. Using cover crops
will improve soil health and
nutrient retention and recy-
cling. Most major and minor
soil nutrients are tied up in
an organic form and are less
susceptible to runoff. Filter
strips, grass waterways,
buffers, and wetlands are
encouraged to treat and filter
out nutrients before it reach-
es our rivers and lakes.
Other practices that farm-
ers can adopt include repair-
ing and fixing broken tile
lines quickly before the soil
erodes and nutrients are lost.
Surface inlets should be pro-
tected with a plastic cover
to prevent surface runoff. A
majority of the nutrients are
in the top 1-2 inches of top-
soil. When the soil erodes,
the sediment that is lost is
composed of the richest soil,
the soil organic matter which
tends to float and to be eas-
ily transported to surface
water. Concentrated surface
runoff should be treated if
possible before entering a
stream. Nitrogen and phos-
phorus bioreactors situated in
tile outlets have been shown
to reduce nutrient losses
by 70-90 percent (Brown,
2011). Controlled drainage
structures which hold back
the water during the winter
have shown similar results
(Brown, 2011).
Results from the 2012
Ohio Corn Performance Test
are now available on line at:
http://www.ag.ohio-state.
edu/~perf/ and The 2012 Ohio
Soybean Performance Trial
Results as a printable (pdf)
file of results in now avail-
able at: http://hostedweb.
cfaes.ohio-state.edu/perf/
Elida FFA
Parliamentary
Procedure
teams do well
The Associated Press
(Subject to change)
Today’s Game
EAST
Louisville at Rutgers, 7:30 p.m.
———
Friday’s Games
MIDWEST
MAC Championship, N. Illinois vs.
Kent St. at Detroit, 7 p.m.
FAR WEST
Pac-12 Championship, UCLA at
Stanford, 8 p.m.
———
Saturday’s Games
EAST
San Diego at Marist, Noon; Kansas
at West Virginia, 2:30 p.m.; Cincinnati
at UConn, 3:30 p.m.
SOUTH
Louisiana-Lafayette at FAU, 3 p.m.;
SEC Championship, Alabama vs.
Georgia at Atlanta, 4 p.m.; Pittsburgh
at South Florida, 7 p.m.; ACC
Championship, Georgia Tech vs. Florida
State at Charlotte, N.C., 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Texas at Kansas St., 8 p.m.; Big Ten
Championship, Nebraska vs. Wisconsin
at Indianapolis, 8:15 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
C-USA Championship, UCF at
Tulsa, Noon; Oklahoma St. at Baylor,
Noon; Oklahoma at TCU, Noon; Middle
Tennessee at Arkansas St., 3 p.m.; New
Mexico St. at Texas St., 4 p.m.
FAR WEST
Nicholls St. at Oregon St., 2:30 p.m.;
Boise St. at Nevada, 3:30 p.m.; South
Alabama at Hawaii, 11 p.m.
FCS Playoffs
Second Round
New Hampshire at Wofford, 2 p.m.;
Central Arkansas at Georgia Southern, 2
p.m.; Coastal Carolina at Old Dominion,
2 p.m.; Illinois St. at Appalachian St., 2
p.m.; Cal Poly at Sam Houston St., 4
p.m.; South Dakota St. at North Dakota
St., 4 p.m.; Wagner at E. Washington,
6 p.m.; Stony Brook at Montana St.,
7 p.m.
———
Saturday, Dec. 8
EAST
Army vs. Navy at Philadelphia, 3
p.m.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
SCHEDULE
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Brooklyn 10 4 .714 —
New York 10 4 .714 —
Philadelphia 9 6 .600 1 1/2
Boston 8 7 .533 2 1/2
Toronto 3 13 .188 8
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 10 3 .769 —
Atlanta 9 4 .692 1
Charlotte 7 7 .500 3 1/2
Orlando 5 9 .357 5 1/2
Washington 1 12 .077 9
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 7 6 .538 —
Chicago 7 7 .500 1/2
Indiana 7 8 .467 1
Detroit 5 11 .313 3 1/2
Cleveland 3 12 .200 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 11 2 .846 1/2
San Antonio 13 3 .813 —
Houston 7 8 .467 5 1/2
Dallas 7 9 .438 6
New Orleans 4 10 .286 8
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 12 4 .750 —
Utah 9 7 .563 3
Denver 8 7 .533 3 1/2
Minnesota 6 8 .429 5
Portland 6 9 .400 5 1/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 9 6 .600 —
Golden State 8 6 .571 1/2
L.A. Lakers 7 8 .467 2
Phoenix 7 9 .438 2 1/2
Sacramento 4 10 .286 4 1/2
———
Wednesday’s Results
San Antonio 110, Orlando 89
Washington 84, Portland 82
Brooklyn 95, Boston 83
Atlanta 94, Charlotte 91
Detroit 117, Phoenix 77
Chicago 101, Dallas 78
Memphis 103, Toronto 82
Utah 96, New Orleans 84
Oklahoma City 120, Houston 98
New York 102, Milwaukee 88
L.A. Clippers 101, Minnesota 95
Today’s Games
San Antonio at Miami, 8 p.m.
Denver at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Portland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Utah at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
(Continued from Page 8)
Los Angeles welcomed
Chauncey Billups back to the lineup
for the first time this season.
Billups had seven points and
three assists in 19 minutes as the
Clippers ended a 4-game losing
streak. The 5-time All-Star, begin-
ning his 16th NBA season, was
sidelined for more than nine months
after tearing his left Achilles’ tendon
on Feb. 6 in a 107-102 victory at
Orlando. Blake Griffin had 18 points
and six rebounds.
Kevin Love had 19 points and
12 rebounds for Minnesota and
is averaging 23.0 points and 15.6
boards in five games since return-
ing from a broken right hand he
sustained in the preseason.
PISTONS 117, SUNS 77
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. —
Brandon Knight and Charlie
Villanueva scored 19 points apiece
and Detroit routed Phoenix to win
back-to-back games for the first
time this season.
Detroit is 5-3 since opening 0-8.
The Pistons led 55-44 at halftime
and then broke the game open
when the Suns came unglued in
the third quarter. Phoenix picked
up four technical fouls in the third
and trailed by as many as 44 in
the fourth.
Rodney Stuckey added 18
points for Detroit. Kyle Singler and
Tayshaun Prince contributed 12
each.
Luis Scola scored 11 points for
the Suns.
HAWKS 94, BOBCATS 91
ATLANTA — Al Horford scored
17 points and hit two clinching
free throws to help Atlanta beat
Charlotte for its sixth straight vic-
tory.
Josh Smith and Lou Williams
also had 17 points apiece for the
Hawks.
Ben Gordon finished with 26
points and Ramon Sessions had 18
to lead Charlotte.
Gordon’s straightaway 3-pointer
with 29.1 seconds remaining cut
Atlanta’s lead to 92-91. The Bobcats
got the ball back but Sessions’
inbounds pass from the left side-
line was ruled a turnover after the
officials watched replays and con-
cluded neither Gordon nor Smith
touched the ball, which bounced
out of bounds on the other side of
the court with 5.2 seconds to go.
SPURS 110, MAGIC 89
ORLANDO, Fla. — Manu
Ginobili had 20 points, Gary Neal
scored 19 and San Antonio raced
past Orlando for its fifth straight
win.
Tim Duncan added 15 points
in 27 minutes and Tony Parker
chipped in 14 points and eight
assists. The Spurs also posted
their eighth consecutive victory on
the road and have now beaten
the Magic in five of their last six
meetings.
Arron Afflalo led the Magic
with 16 points, followed by Jameer
Nelson with 14. The Magic struggled
from the field, connecting on just
two of their 15 3-point attempts.
JAZZ 96, HORNETS 84
NEW ORLEANS — Al Jefferson
had 19 points, Marvin Williams
scored 16 before leaving with con-
cussion symptoms and Utah won
its second straight game by defeat-
ing New Orleans.
Paul Millsap scored nine of
his 16 points during a dominant
third quarter for Utah and Gordon
Hayward had 13 of his 15 points in
the fourth quarter to help the Jazz
overcome one last New Orleans
surge.
Robin Lopez and Greivis
Vasquez each scored 18 points for
New Orleans. Brian Roberts added
11 points but the Hornets struggled
from 3-point range, going 5-of-21.
Utah was a disciplined 6-of-11
from deep.
NBA
The Associated Press
GOLF
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. —
In a proposal that would affect
golf’s major champions as well
as amateurs at local clubs, the
guardians of the 600-year-old
sport want to write a new rule
that would outlaw a putting stroke
they fear is taking too much skill
out of the game.
The U.S. Golf Association and
the Royal & Ancient Golf Club
announced they are not banning
the belly putter or the longer
“broom-handle” putters — only
the way they are used. The pro-
posed rule would prohibit golfers
at all levels from anchoring a club
against their bodies while making
a stroke.
The rule would not take effect
until 2016.
PRO BASKETBALL
CHICAGO — The short-
handed Dallas Mavericks will
sign 16-year veteran point guard
Derek Fisher today, coach Rick
Carlisle announced after team’s
101-78 loss to Chicago.
The move is contingent on
Fisher passing a physical.
PRO FOOTBALL
SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Colin
Kaepernick has earned himself a
third straight start at quarterback
for the San Francisco 49ers.
Coach Jim Harbaugh
made the announcement that
Kaepernick would go Sunday at
St. Louis over Alex Smith after
the second-year pro led the NFC
West-leading Niners (8-2-1) to
victories in the past two games,
his first two NFL starts.
Harbaugh is still leaving open
every possibility, saying it could
be a week-to-week decision.
ALLEN PARK, Mich. —
Detroit Lions defensive tack-
le Ndamukong Suh was fined
$30,000 by the NFL but says
he didn’t kick Houston Texans
quarterback Matt Schaub on
purpose.
Suh spoke to reporters for the
first time since his left cleat con-
nected with Schaub’s groin area
in Detroit’s loss to Houston last
Thursday.
NEW YORK — More NFL
players are testing positive for
amphetamines, a class of sub-
stances that includes the ADHD
drug Adderall.
Since the start of last season,
more than 10 players suspended
for failing drug tests have publicly
blamed it on taking the stimulant.
And while the league doesn’t
identify the substance when a
player is penalized, senior vice
president Adolpho Birch acknowl-
edges that the number of posi-
tives for amphetamines has
increased.
Because the type of drug isn’t
disclosed under the NFL’s agree-
ment with the union, nothing pre-
vents a player from claiming he
took Adderall when, in fact, he
tested positive for a steroid or
another stimulant. The tests don’t
differentiate between Adderall
and other amphetamines, Birch
added, but he does believe
Adderall abuse is on the rise in
the league.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Les Miles has a new 7-year
contract at LSU that also will
result in a pay raise for one of
the most successful coaches in
the history of the Tigers’ football
program.
The new contract runs through
2019, which amounts to a 2-year
extension. LSU athletic director
Joe Alleva said financial details
were still being worked out and
will be released after LSU plays
in a still-undecided bowl game to
close out this season.
A person familiar with the con-
tract told the Associated Press
that Miles’ new annual pay would
be in the range of $4.3 million, on
condition of anonymity because
financial details of Miles’ deal
were not released.
Miles’ previous contract paid
about $3.75 million annually
through 2017.
NEW HAVEN, Conn. —
Kansas State QB Collin Klein,
Texas A&M QB Johnny Manziel
and Notre Dame LB Manti Te’o
are among the five finalists for
the Walter Camp player of the
year award.
Oregon RB Kenjon Barner and
Southern California WR Marqise
Lee are the other finalists. The
award will be presented Dec. 6.
COLLEGES
The Atlantic Coast Conference
announced that its presidents and
chancellors unanimously voted to
add Louisville as the replacement
for Maryland.
ACC Commissioner John
Swofford said Louisville was the
best fit for the league following
Maryland’s announcement last
week that it would join the Big
Ten in 2014.
SPORTS BRIEFS
1
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Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant: fnancial indepen-
dence and providing for family. Striking a balance between saving
for goals, such as education and retirement, and allocating
money for daily expenses can be challenging. But you can do it.
Learn how you can redefne your savings approach
toward education and retirement. Call or visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660

Few things are as stressful as worrying about work. Because
it’s easy to feel like things are out of control, it’s essential to
consider any fnancial decision carefully. This is especially true
when it comes to your retirement savings.
Edward Jones can help. We’ll start by getting to know your
goals. Then we’ll sort through your current situation and work
with you face to face to develop a strategy that can help you
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Keep Your Retirement
on Solid Ground –
Even If Things at Work Are
Up in the Air.
To make sense of your retirement savings alternatives,
call or visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
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Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
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Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Herald — 9 www.delphosherald.com
Almost everyone we know
has packed up and gone south
for the winter. The ones who
haven’t left yet will be gone
soon. Our friends who live
south of us are leaving to go
even farther south. I have
never been to Belize or Costa
Rica or the Cayman Islands,
but I constantly hear people
say they are going back for
the fourth or fifth time because
they liked it so much. They
also have much more money
and time.
Where did I go wrong?
Once again, I will probably
have to spend the whole winter
in my own house in my own
town. How is it that Sue and I
never spend the winter in Baja
California or Montserrat?
This year I am determined
to get out of town, if not for
the whole winter, at least for a
few weeks.
“How about Mexico?” I
asked Sue.
“Fine,” she said, “if our
beheading is free. I don’t want
to pay extra for that. Make sure
it’s part of our all-inclusive
vacation package. I forget:
How do you say, ‘Please,
don’t kill me,’ in Spanish? I
only took one year of it in high
school. Do you use the polite
form of ‘you’ or the familiar?”
“If you don’t want to go,
you could just say ‘no’ like a
normal person,” I said. “I’m
sure there are plenty of places
in Mexico that are just as safe
as it is here. Cancun, Cabo,
San Miguel de Allende ...”
“No doubt. Let’s do it. I’ve
been meaning to lose some
weight, and I hear amoebic
dysentery is just the thing
for that. The pounds just fall
away.”
“The Johnsons go to
Oaxaca, and they always have
a wonderful time.”
“Yes, they do. She told me
they never drink the water.”
“What do they drink?”
“Tequila. It’s why they have
such a wonderful time. They’re
stewed 24 hours a day.”
“OK, fine,” I said. “We
won’t go to Mexico. What
about Greece? The islands
are nice and warm, full of
history.”
“Good idea! Are you sure
you can find us a hotel close
to a violent anti-government
demonstration? I hear they’re
very relaxing, like being at a
spa where they club you with
a thick stick. You book it while
I learn the words for ‘tear gas’
and ‘Molotov cocktail.’”
“How about a cruise? You
can drink the water, beheadings
are pretty rare and the food is
great. There’s dancing, live
shows, rock climbing ...”
“... seasickness, retching,
puking, dry heaves,” she
finished.
“We could go to one of those
towns that hate children.”
Sue perked up. “Don’t toy
with me. Is there really such a
place?”
“Sure, hundreds of them.”
“What country do we have
to go to?”
“This one. They’re all over
the U.S.”
“And people say we don’t do
anything right in this country,”
she said. “Are you telling me
there are towns right here in
the USA with signs out front
that say, ‘You have to be this
tall to live here’?”
“No, because some of
the residents are actually
shrinking. They’re for people
like us. No one under age 55
can live there.”
“Is that legal?”
“Sure. As long as they
keep out all children of all
races, religions and sexual
orientations.”
“How’s the beheading
situation?”
“Very rare. Most drug
kingpins don’t live to be 55.”
“It does sound like a little bit
of heaven on Earth. What’s the
hitch?”
“You have to like living with
a bunch of old people.”
“I do that already. What else
you got?”
I was running out of ideas.
“We could go to a movie.”
“Didn’t we go to one last
year?”
“I think it was two years
ago.”
“What’s playing?”
“‘The Beheading’ at 2, 4 and
6 o’clock.”
“Nah, let’s stay home. We’ll
do something next year.”
(Jim Mullen’s newest book
is called “Kill Me, Elmo:
The Holiday Depression Fun
Book.” You can reach him at
JimMullenBooks.com.
Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
Jim Mullen
Te
Village
Idiot
Some years, you just want to stay home

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Close of business November 28, 2012
St✩r G✩zing
Kim Kardashian divorce
inches toward trial
By ANTHONY
McCARTNEY
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — Kim
Kardashian’s divorce attor-
ney told a judge Wednesday
that the reality star wants to
move on with her life but is
“handcuffed” to her estranged
husband because the case is
not yet ready for trial.
Superior Court Judge
Stephen Moloney told attor-
neys for Kardashian and
NBA player Kris Humphries
to return to court in mid-
February to set a trial date to
either dissolve or annul the
couple’s 72-day marriage.
He didn’t set a deadline
for depositions and other
pre-trial investigation to be
completed, but indicated a
trial could be held early next
year if it is ready by Feb.
15.
Humphries, a power for-
ward for the Brooklyn Nets,
is seeking an annulment based
on fraud, but his attorney says
he needs more time to col-
lect documents from compa-
nies that handle Kardashian’s
reality shows.
Kardashian is seeking a
traditional divorce and her
attorney Laura Wasser has
cited both the marriage’s
short duration and a prenup-
tial agreement as reasons
for why it should be quickly
resolved.
“I don’t think his client
has a fraud case,” Wasser
said in court of Humphries’
attorney. “I think there’s a
fishing expedition going on
here.”
Humphries’ attorney
Marshall Waller said he need-
ed to be sure he had docu-
ments from E! Entertainment
and NBC Universal before
deciding the scope of his
case, but that he was narrow-
ing it down.
“I do understand the desire
to get this case moved,”
Waller said. “There’s nothing
in particular about this case
that makes it more important
than anybody else.”
Wasser however said that
unlike in a regular divorce
proceeding, Kardashian can-
not have her marriage dis-
solved and resolve other
issues later. “Ms. Kardashian
is now handcuffed to Mr.
Humphries,” she said.
Kardashian filed for divorce
more than a year ago, citing
irreconcilable differences just
weeks after the couple’s star-
studded and televised wed-
ding. Humphries later filed
for an annulment, claiming
the marriage was based on
fraud but he has yet to lay out
any specific evidence for his
claim.
Wasser says Kardashian’s
mother, Kris Jenner, and cur-
rent boyfriend, Kanye West,
have been deposed in the
case.
Kardashian, 32, has not
yet been deposed in the
case. She is the star of the
E! Entertainment Television
series “Keeping Up with the
Kardashians.”
Rapper PSY wants Tom Cruise
to go ‘Gangnam Style’
By JOCELYN GECKER
The Associated Press
BANGKOK — The
South Korean rapper behind
YouTube’s most-viewed
video ever has set what might
be a “Mission: Impossible”
for himself.
Asked which celebri-
ty he would like to see go
“Gangnam Style,” the singer
PSY told The Associated
Press: “Tom Cruise!”
Surrounded by screaming
fans, he then chuckled at the
idea of the American movie
star doing his now famous
horse-riding dance.
PSY’s comments
Wednesday in Bangkok were
his first public remarks since
his viral smash video —
with 842 million views and
counting — surpassed Justin
Bieber’s “Baby,” which until
Saturday held the record with
803 million views.
“It’s amazing,” PSY told
a news conference, saying
he never set out to become
an international star. “I made
this video just for Korea,
actually. And when I released
this song — wow.”
The video has spawned
hundreds of parodies and
tribute videos and earned him
a spotlight alongside a variety
of superstars.
Earlier this month,
Madonna invited PSY onstage
and they danced to his song at
one of her New York City
concerts. MC Hammer intro-
duced the Korean star at the
American Music Awards as,
“My Homeboy PSY!”
Even President Barack
Obama is talking about
him. Asked on Election Day
if he could do the dance,
Obama replied: “I think I
can do that move,” but then
concluded he might “do it
privately for Michelle,” the
first lady.
PSY was in Thailand to
give a free concert Wednesday
night organized as a trib-
ute to the country’s revered
King Bhumibol Adulyadej,
who turns 85 next month. He
paid respects to the king at a
Bangkok shopping mall, sign-
ing his name in an autograph
book placed beside a giant
poster of the king. He then
gave an outdoor news confer-
ence, as screaming fans per-
formed the “Gangnam Style”
dance.
Determined not to be a
one-hit wonder, PSY said he
plans to release a worldwide
album in March with dance
moves that he thinks his inter-
national fans will like.
“I think I have plenty of
dance moves left,” he said,
in his trademark sunglasses
and dark suit. “But I’m really
concerned about the (next)
music video.”
“How can I beat ‘Gangnam
Style’?” he asked, smiling.
“How can I beat 850 million
views?”
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10 – The Herald Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
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ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
AMISH
CARPENTERS
All types of construction
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
260-585-4368
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Construction
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Is Your Ad
Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
SPORTS
CURRENT EVENTS
TECHNOLOGY
COMICS
and more…
All Rolled
Into One!
Subscribe to the Delphos Herald newspaper
and get our online edition for free!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015
COUPONS
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
CARRIER WANTED
2 Routes Available
in Delphos:
OPEN IMMEDIATELY
Carolyn Dr.
N. Main St.,
N. Washington St.,
N. Franklin St.
No Collecting
Call the Delphos Herald
Circulation Department at
419-695-0015 ext. 126
DEVELOPMENT AND
Restorati on Company
looking for experienced
carpenters with tools.
Competitive wages. Call
567-712-7384
Crane Operator
Lima company
seeking experienced
hydraulic crane
operator
Qualifications:
*5 years hydraulic
crane experience,
certified preferred
*self directed
*reliable
*valid CDL driver’s
license
Apply to box 180
c/o The Delphos
Herald
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
equal opportunity employer
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
Benefits available. 99% no
touch freight! We will treat
you with respect! PLEASE
CALL 419-222-1630
080

Help Wanted
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
FIREPLACE SURROUND
Just add insert. Medium
oak finish. H50xW56xD23
Very good condition. $90.
Call 419-286-2412
SEALY POSTUREPEDIC,
Queen adjustable air mat-
tress and box springs.
New in 2009, pristine con-
dition. $600 OBO. Call
419-236-8228 after 4pm.
340

Garage Sales
HUGE VINTAGE
JEWELRY SALE.
2 days only!
Well over 20,000 pieces.
Great jewelry for gift buy-
ing at $2 each. Saturday
Dec. 1, 10am-8pm, Sun-
day Dec. 2, 9am-3pm. St.
Augustine’s Church, 210
E. Clinton St., Napoleon,
OH. Don’t miss this sale!
INDOOR GARAGE SALE
114 N. Main St., Delphos
Next to Thrift Shop.
Saturday, Dec 1st, 9-4
Christmas decorations,
antiques, desk chairs,
toys, bunk bed, electric
fireplace, Play Stations,
curio.
340

Garage Sales
MOVING SALE - Delphos
Everything Goes!
SAT-SUN 8a-5:30p. Like
new, very clean furnish-
ings. Don’t miss this one!
Ulm’s II 227 W. Clime St.,
Lot 37. Last row by the
Canal/Red Tent.
LIMITED TIME $29.99/mo
Unlimited Talk & Text,
Free Activation, 2 months
free with additional lines.
Van Wert Wireless the
Alltel Store, 1198 West-
wood Drive Suite B, Van
Wert, OH 419-238-3101
590

House For Rent
2 BEDROOM, 1Bath
house available soon. No
pets. Call 419-692-3951
SMALL 2 Bedroom House
for Rent. Washer/Dryer,
stove, refrigerator. No
Pets and No Smoking.
419-695-6841
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BEDROOM upstairs
apartment. Stove and re-
frigerator. $300/mo. Call
419-996-9870
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951.
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
999

Legals
PUBLIC MEETING
A public meeting will be
held at 7:00pm on Monday
December 10, 2012 at the
Office of Marion Township
5405 Kiggins Rd., Del -
phos, OH 45833 to dis -
cuss any issues of the
re-hi re of Robert C.
Kimmet for Fiscal Officer.
The regular meeting will
follow.
11/29/12
501

Misc. for Sale
Is Your Ad
Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
Auctions Ritchie Bros.
Unreserved Public
Auction 8am Thursday
Dec. 6 Columbus,
Featuring pickups,
loaders, excavators
and other trucks and
heavy equipment. Call
855-331-5732 or visit
rbauction.com.
Business Services
REACH 2 MILLION
N E W S P A P E R
READERS with one
ad placement. ONLY
$295.00. Ohio's best
community newspapers.
Call Kathy at AdOhio
Statewide Classified
Network, 614-486-
6677, or E-MAIL at:
kmccutcheon@adohio.
net or check out our
website at: www.adohio.
net.
Business Services
REACH OVER 1
MILLION OHIO ADULTS
with one ad placement.
Only $975.00. Ask
your local newspaper
about our 2X2 Display
Network or 2x4 Display
Network Only $1860.
or Call Kathy at
614-486-6677/E-mai l
kmccutcheon@adohio.
net. or check out our
website: www.adohio.
net
You got the drive, We
Have the Direction" OTR
Drivers. APU Equipped
Pre-Pass EZ-pass.
Passenger Policy.
Newer Equipment.
100% No touch. 1-800-
528-7825.
Help Wanted Ready
Mix Truck Drivers In
Pittsburgh, PA. Must
Have CDL and good
driving Record. Great
pay and benefits.
Phone: Greg (618)305-
5887 or Email: greg@
otsgetsit.com
Help Wanted Create
A Long Lasting Career
At Averitt! CDL-
A Drivers & Recent
Grads - Great Benefts.
Weekly Hometime,
Paid Training. Apply
Now! 888-362-8608
AVERITTcareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Help Wanted Driver:
CDL-A Van & Flatbed
*New Pay Package!
*Very New Trucks
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Days *Great Miles, Pay
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*Start Immediately!
CDL Graduates
Needed! 877-917-2266
drivewithwestern.com

Help Wanted Knight
Refrigerated CDL-A
Truck Drivers Needed.
Get Paid Daily or
Weekly, Consistent
Miles, Pay Incentive
& Benefits! Become
a Knight of the Road.
EOE 855-876-6079.
Help Wanted Gordon
Trucking CDL-A Drivers
Needed! Up to $3,000
Sign On Bonus. Dry,
OTR, Regional.
Benefts, 401K, EOE.
No East Coast. Call 7
days/wk! TeamGTI.com
866-954-8836
Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT.
Job Guaranteed after
FREE 3 week CDL-A
Training. Live within 100
mile radius of Wauseon,
Ohio 1-800-621-4878.
Also, Hiring Drivers!
Help Wanted Drivers -
CDL-A NO GIMMICKS!
just great pay, Miles,
hometime & benefts.
50c/ Mile for Hazmat
Teams! Solos start @
36c/mile. 1 yr. exp.
req'd. 800-942-2104
Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.
Drive4Total.com.
Manufactured Homes
for Sale DISPLAY
MODEL CLOSEOUT
NEW Doubl ewi de
Home. Vinyl Shingle,
Thermopane windows,
Appliance & more.
Incl udes Del i very
and Set up. ONLY
$39,855
1-800-686-1763 www.
williamsburgsquare.com
Misc. Attend College
Online from Home.
Medical, Business,
Cri mi nal Justi ce,
Hospitality. Job
Placement Assistance.
Computer Available.
Financial Aid if Qualifed.
SCHEV authorized.
1-877-295-1667. www.
CenturaOnline.com.
Misc. Airlines Are
Hiring - Train for hands
on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualifed
- Job Placement
assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance.
1-877-676-3836.
School s/ I nst r uct i on
TIRED OF LIVING
PAYCHECK TO
PAYCHECK? There's
great earning potential
as Professional Truck
Driver! The average
Professional Truck
Driver earns over
$700/wk*! 16-Day
CDL Training @
Roadmaster! Approved
for Veterans Training.
CALL TODAY! 1-614-
962-6406 Roadmaster
Drivers School of Ohio,
Inc. 4060 Perimeter
Dr., Columbus, Ohio
43228 *DOL/BLS 2012
OHIO SCAN NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Sonnet cousin
4 Rani’s servant
8 Finish last
12 Dandy
13 Pew locale
14 Dr. Frankenstein’s gofer
15 More weird
17 Get closer
18 Enjoy a rose
19 Ocean waters
20 Meadow
22 Groaner, maybe
23 Verdi opera
26 Harden bricks
28 Empty space
31 Donkey’s comment
32 Box score column
33 TV brand
34 Outlaw
35 Draw a bead on
36 Coral formation
37 Literary miscellany
38 Swell, as a river
39 Sunrise locale
40 Not good
41 -- Antonio
43 Talkative
46 Bordered
50 Enthralled
51 Best boxing tickets
54 Where poi is served
55 LP player (hyph.)
56 Razor brand
57 Get paid
58 Fixes a squeak
59 Mouse alert
DOWN
1 Bake- -- (cooking contests)
2 Student’s quarters
3 Fencing weapon
4 Leg bone
5 -- tai
6 Blvd.
7 That woman
8 Natural fabric
9 Type of arch
10 Lather
11 Fouls up
16 Ease
19 Fitting
21 Very hesitant
22 Starts the pump
23 “Fernando” band
24 OPEC country
25 Elcar of “MacGyver”
27 Nile wader
28 Fringe --
29 Treats a sprain
30 Ride the rapids
36 Pulls apart
38 Starfsh arm
40 Air rife (2 wds.)
42 Patronage
43 Peril at sea
44 What Juan rinses with
45 Wild tusker
47 Mocking comment
48 Pop singer -- Adams
49 Knock fat
51 Letter after pi
52 Big Ben numeral
53 Gridiron org.
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Estate of Beverly
A. Stant to Wayne A.
Howell, Wayne Howell,
inlots 202, 203, 204, 205,
Willshire Township.
Marilyn H. Brandt
Living Trust to Raymond
G. Eickholt, Carol A.
Eickholt, portion of
section 29, Pleasant
Township.
Cory Bryan, Lori
Bryan to Carole J.
Smith, portion of section
18, Liberty Township.
Susan M. Masquez,
William S. Vasquez to
William S. Vasquez Joint
Trust, Susan M. Vasquez
Joint Trust, inlot 975,
Delphos.
Gregory A. Hesseling,
Gregg Hesseling,
Brenda S. Hesseling to
Gregory A. Hesseling
Revocable Trust, Brenda
S. Hesseling Revocable
Trust, portion of sections
18, 7, Washington
Township.
Robert G. Mefferd,
Eunice D. Mefferd to
Eunice D. Mefferd,
portion of section 7,
Union Township.
Robert R. Welch,
Jacqueline M. Heizman,
Jacqueline M. Welch,
Jacqueline Welch to K
& M Tire Inc., portion
of section 6, Ridge
Township.
Dennis R. Brown to
Granite Ridge Builders,
portion of section 32,
Pleasant Township.
Martin D. Burchfield,
Susan J. Burchfield to
Wolfrum Real LLC,
portion of inlots 15, 16,
Van Wert.
Ruth E. Zirkle to Ryan
J. Lindemann, Sarah
M. Lindemann, portion
of section 19, Ridge
Township.
Estate of W. Lowell
Nolan to Florence R.
Nolan, portion of section
29, York Township.
William J. Nomina,
Karen S. Nomina to
Michael Ryan Nomina,
inlot 800, Delphos.
FJSB Bancshares Inc.
to Alierza Ziakam, inlot
4359, Van Wert.
Raymond L. Eller,
Joyce L. Eller, Janis A.
Owens to Jeremiah R.
Eller, Brandi M. Eller,
Len R. Eller, Kimberly K.
Eller, portion of section
31, Liberty Township.
Bryan L. Lewis,
Debbie L. Lewis to
N.P. Dodge Jr., Trustee,
portion of section 22,
Ridge Township.
N.P. Dodge Jr., Tustee
to Jessica Pannkuk,
Jennifer Pannkuk, portion
of section 22, Ridge
Township.
Denise Fast, Denise
Flynn, Denise Fast-
Flynn, Denise Flynn
Fast to Denise Flynn
Fast Special Needs Trust,
portion of section 3,
Union Township.
Answer to Puzzle
Dear Sara: During the winter,
my carpet gives static shocks. Is
there any way to stop this? My
cat thanks you. -- Jill, New York
Dear Jill: To avoid static
electricity, you can add moisture
to the air by using a humidifier,
boiling water or simmering
potpourri on the stove. You
can also try bringing in some
houseplants, or spraying the
carpet with a 4-to-1 mixture of
water and fabric softener.
Dear Sara: My kids take off
their clothes in the bathroom
when they shower. Their dirty
clothes never make it to the
hamper in their bedroom. I’m
tired of nagging every single day.
How do you get kids to put their
clothes into a hamper and not
leave them on the floor? -- Gina,
California
Dear Gina: If possible, put the
hamper in the bathroom or a more
accessible place. Otherwise,
try waiting to do their laundry
rather than gathering it off the
floor ASAP for them again and
again. Let it pile up. They need
a consequence for their actions,
and when they run out of nicely
laundered clothes, they’ll catch
on quickly. Let them know if
they don’t use the hamper, they
can wash their own clothes. I do
understand it’s often easier to
simply pick it up, but they won’t
learn anything other than that you
would never let them go without
their favorite clean clothes.
You can also let kids know
that using a hamper is a family
rule that everyone follows, and
explain the reasons: It saves
laundry-sorting time, keeps
the house from looking messy
and helps them care for their
belongings. Reward them for
using the hamper. It doesn’t
have to be anything big -- a
sticker, a fun treat, an extra story
at bedtime, etc. Occasionally,
they might still slip and need a
reminder, but do not allow them
to slip twice or they can end
up going right back to leaving
them on the floor all over again.
Hold them accountable for their
actions.

(Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.frugalvillage.
com), a website that offers
practical, money-saving strategies
for everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City,
MO, 64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage.com.)
Distributed by Universal UClick for UFS
Avoid static electricity during winter
SARA NOEL
Frugal
Living
Ask Mr. Know-it-all
Wayne had a death-defying movie career
By Gary Clothier
Q: You have settled several
lunchroom discussions in the
past; now I have one for you.
How many onscreen deaths did
actor John Wayne endure? --
E.M., Millbrook, Ala.
A: Of the more than 200 films
he made, John Wayne dies in
only eight: “Central Airport”
(1933), “Reap the Wild Wind”
(1942), “The Fighting Seabees”
(1944), “Wake of the Red Witch”
(1948), “Sands of Iwo Jima”
(1949), “The Alamo” (1960),
“The Cowboys” (1972) and “The
Shootist” (1976). He is shown
dead at the beginning of “The
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance”
(1962); the movie is a flashback
of his life. His fate in “The Sea
Chase” (1955) is undetermined;
he may have died when his ship
sank, or he and Lana Turner may
have made it to shore.
Q: Although I’m not a big fan
of The Rolling Stones, the song
“Angie” is one of my favorites.
Who is Angie? -- L.U., High
Springs, Fla.
A: First, let me tell you
about the song.
Written by Mick
Jagger and Keith
Richards, “Angie”
describes the end
of a romance.
Some say it is
about David
Bowie’s ex-wife
Angela Bowie,
who had an affair
with Jagger during
her marriage.
Jagger has said
that Richards
wrote the title of
the song and that
it was probably
named after his
daughter, Angela
Richards (1972-).
“Angie” features
prominently on the band’s 1973
album, “Goats Head Soup.”
Q: Where is the oldest winery
in the United States? -- K.M.O.,
Miami Beach, Fla.
A: Although several wineries
lay claim to the title, it is generally
believed to be the Brotherhood
Winery in Washingtonville, N.Y.
Established in 1839, the winery
continued to operate during
Prohibition (1920-1933) by
producing sacramental wine for
the Catholic Church.
Q: More than 10 years ago,
I saw a movie starring Denzel
Washington and Ed Asner, I
think. Anyway, the name of
the movie was “It’s a Heart
Condition.” Denzel dies, and Ed
gets his heart. No one can see
Denzel except the man who has
his heart. I found it amusing, but
no one seems to remember this
movie but me. Does the film still
exist? I’ve searched everywhere.
I’m beginning to think I dreamed
it all. -- M.A., Shillington, Pa.
A: “Heart Condition” (1990)
stars Denzel Washington as
sleazy but lovable ambulance-
chasing lawyer Napoleon Stone.
Bob Hoskins is also featured as
police sergeant Jack Moony, a
crazed and manic cop. After the
lawyer is gunned down, Moony’s
out-of-control lifestyle catches up
with him, and he suffers a heart
attack. When Moony recovers in
the hospital, he discovers he has
Stone’s heart. Stone appears to
Moony and presses him to solve
his murder. Negatively received
by moviegoers and critics, the
film is available in both DVD
and VHS. You can check out
Amazon.com or other outlets.

Send your questions to Mr.
Know-It-All at AskMrKIA@
gmail.com or c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas
City, MO 64106.
Mick
Jagger
Keith
Richards
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday Evening November 29, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Last Resort Grey's Anatomy Scandal Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Big Bang Two Men Person of Interest Elementary Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC 30 Rock All Night Office Parks Rock Center Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX The X Factor Glee Local
ION House House Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
Cable Channels
A & E The First 48 The First 48 Panic 9-1-1 Panic 9-1-1 The First 48
AMC Fargo Casino
ANIM Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic
BET Apollo Live Hip Hop Awar. The Game The Game Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/Atl. Real Housewives Real Housewives Happens Real Housewives Top Chef
CMT Reba Reba Ron White's Comedy Salute to t Ron White: They Call
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Accepted Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Daily Colbert Key Tosh.0
DISC Moonshiners Moonshiners Ghost Town Gold Moonshiners Ghost Town Gold
DISN Jessie Spy Kids Dog Phineas Good Luck ANT Farm Wizards Wizards
E! The Soup Love You Kardas Kardas Miami Kardas Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN College Football SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Basketball College Basketball Boxing Boxing NFL Live
FAM Aladdin Happy Feet The 700 Club The Christmas List
FOOD Sugar Dome Sweet Genius Sweet Genius The Next Iron Chef Sweet Genius
FX Iron Man Sunny League Biased BrandX With Sunny
HGTV Buying and Selling Extreme Homes Hunters Hunt Intl Extreme Homes Extreme Homes
HIST Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens
LIFE Project Runway Project Runway Abby's Dance Project Runway Project Runway
MTV Jersey Shore Jersey Shore Jersey Shore Jersey Jersey Shore Jersey
NICK A Fairly Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends
SCI Dungeons-Drgn Dungeons & Dragons Age of the Dragons
SPIKE iMPACT Wrestling Tattoo Tattoo MMA Academy The Keeper
TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Office Office
TCM The Iron Petticoat Silk Stockings
TLC Say Yes Say Yes Four Weddings Bride TBA Four Weddings Bride TBA
TNT NBA Basketball NBA Basketball
TOON MAD Regular King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Childrens Delocated
TRAV Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum The Dead Files Mysteries-Museum
TV LAND Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King The King of Queens
USA NCIS NCIS Burn Notice NCIS Law & Order: SVU
VH1 Couples Therapy 100 Greatest 100 Greatest 100 Greatest 100 Greatest
WGN How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO Harry Potter-Azkaban Safe House Cathouse: Menage
MAX Mercury Firestorm Rise of Apes
SHOW Apollo 18 Goon Old Porn Reality Old Porn Next Stop
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Herald – 11
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Hubby needs
transparency from
cheating wife
Dear Annie: A few
months ago, I discovered
that my wife was having
an affair with her boss. She
works for a small company
that requires long hours and
some traveling.
When I confronted her,
she didn’t deny it. When
I asked her why, she said
it was all the long hours,
traveling and a little drink-
ing that made it
happen. She took
full responsibili-
ty. She claims she
doesn’t love him,
it was a mistake
and it will never
happen again.
I confronted
her boss, who is
also married with
grown kids and
gr a ndc hi l dr e n.
He, too, said it
was a mistake
and that in his 30
years in business, nothing
like that had ever happened
before. He said he loves
his wife and family and
feels terrible, and acknowl-
edged that sleeping with
an employee is unethical
and immoral. He insisted
he would do everything he
could to rebuild my trust.
I chose to forgive both of
them, but for months now I
have not been able to enjoy
my life. My wife continues
to work for this company,
and all the conditions that
existed before are still there.
My wife doesn’t understand
why I am so suspicious or
why I don’t want her to
travel with him. They both
reassure me that nothing is
going on, but it’s hard to
believe. They are constantly
on the phone, sending emails
or texting. She insists it is
all work related, but all of
her electronic devices have
codes, and she refuses to let
me see anything.
Am I being played for a
fool? I’ve been in therapy
and will continue. While it’s
helping me deal with my
feelings and moods, the ther-
apist can’t tell me whether
or not to stay with my wife.
What do you think? — Need
Some Help, Please
Dear Need: Ideally, your
wife would quit her job or
at least refuse to travel with
this man. But if the job is a
necessity, she needs to be
completely transparent in all
dealings with her boss. You
should be able to look at her
text messages and emails
and even listen to her phone
conversations. If she insists
on keeping things from you,
it means she has something
to hide. Sorry.
Dear Annie: I am asex-
ual, which means I am not
interested in sex and am not
sexually attracted to men or
women.
I am tired of having to
explain myself to every-
one, tired of people judging
me and tired of defending
myself. Why does every-
one feel the need to tell
me it’s “just a phase,” or
that I am “only trying to be
different”? I am 22, and I
know who I am. Why can’t
people accept me? — Tired
in Maine
Dear Tired: You really
aren’t required to discuss
your sexual preferences
or feelings with
anyone. These
things are per-
sonal and don’t
require justifica-
tion. Please con-
tact the Asexuality
Visibility and
Education Network
at asexuality.org
for support and
assistance.
Dear Annie:
May I say a few
things to “Unhappy
Gr a n d mo t h e r , ”
whose son died two months
ago and her daughter-in-law
is already dating?
The loss of a child is
very different from that of
a spouse. Many people get
involved in relationships
right away, and some remar-
ry within a year. For some
widows and widowers, it
is a need not to be alone.
Others marry again because
they want to recapture the
happiness they felt. Some
might remarry because a
child has so much grief that
they want to fill that space
and help the child heal.
I lost my husband when
our son was 3 years old and
started dating six months
later. Please don’t allow
your grief to get in the way
of your daughter-in-law’s
happiness or ruin your
relationship with her. She
means no disrespect to your
son. Her love for him will
always be there. Consider it
an honor that she is trying to
find someone as special as
he was.— Been Down that
Road Myself
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2012
Don’t let it upset you if it appears
that you’re doing all the giving
without taking anything in return
in coming months. There will be an
eventual reversal, and you’ll end up
sitting pretty.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Success is possible in a joint
endeavor if you and the other party
lean on each other for support. It’s
a case where neither one is able to
successfully handle things alone, but
together, you’ll do quite well.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- You might appear to not quite
know what you want or where you’re
going, but in reality, you’ll simply be
searching for someone with a unique
idea for you to get hold of.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Focus on anything you can do that
could benefit group endeavors. Some
of your greatest successes are likely to
come from working on humanitarian
pursuits.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
A winning attitude will be reflected
in all your pursuits, endeavors
and relationships. Conversely, a
pessimistic frame of mind will cloud
your entire life.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- You’re well equipped to
handle changes or any unexpected
adjustments, even those you had
nothing to do with. You won’t mind,
even if they only benefit others.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Don’t hesitate to adjust an agreement
that isn’t benefiting as many people
as you thought it would. You can
accomplish your aims with a few
minor tweaks.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
You’re in an excellent cycle, in which
the promised rewards are likely to
turn out to be much larger than anyone
thought. Obviously, it pays to always
do your best.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- When you choose to use it, your
ability to get along with everybody
is one of your greatest assets. It isn’t
likely you’ll be bored with anyone’s
company during this present cycle.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You’re
an especially strong finisher, so give
as much attention as possible to an
important matter that you’re anxious
to conclude. You should be able to
make things turn out the way you
want.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
There is a strong possibility that you
could meet someone new with whom
you’ll have much in common. It’ll
be a relationship that will only grow
stronger with time.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- An
opportunity to enhance your material
security could drop in your lap, but
you must be smart enough to spot it.
Don’t let it go just because you think
it’s too good to be true.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
You might have to handle a difficult
assignment similar to one that you
previously managed quite well. Don’t
be afraid to employ tactics that worked
well in the past.

COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature
Syndicate, Inc.
12 – The Herald Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
Marilyn Monroe, in The Seven Year Itch (1955), asked
on screen, “Hey, did you ever try dunking a potato chip in
Champagne? It’s really crazy.”
Japanese farmers developed a square watermelon. The
square shape makes melons easier to store and ship. They’re
formed on the vine by being inserted into cube-shaped
tempered-glass boxes.
Today’s questions:
According to ufologists, what is a close encounter of the
fourth kind?
What three film stars wore fake noses in their Oscar-
winning lead performances?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
German lesson:
Hello - Hallo (hal-lo)
Good morning - Guten Morgan (goot-en mor-gen)
Good afternoon - Guten Tag (goot-en targ)
Good night - Gute Nacht (goot-er naxht)
Goodbye - Auf Wiedersehen (owf vee-der-zay-en)
NJ spruce lights up as Rockefeller Center tree
BY DEEPTI HAJELA
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — An 80-foot Norway
spruce that made it through Superstorm Sandy
was transformed into a beacon of shimmer-
ing glory Wednesday when New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg and others turned
its lights on at Rockefeller Center.
Thousands of onlookers crowded behind
barricades on the streets that surrounded the
center during the traditional tree-lighting cer-
emony for the Christmas holiday season. A
video screen projected an image of the tree
for those who did not have a direct line of
sight.
“It makes me want to sing and dance,” said
Zuri Young, who came several hours early
with her boyfriend to watch the lighting for
the first time.
“I’ve heard a lot about it. I was kind of sick
of staying home and watching it on televi-
sion,” the 19-year-old nursing student from
Queens said.
Illuminated by more than 30,000 lights,
the tree from the Mount Olive, N.J., home
of Joe Balku was topped by a Swarovski
star. The 10-ton tree had been at the home-
stead for years, measuring about 22-feet
tall in 1973 when Balku bought the house.
Wednesday, its girth reached about 50 feet
in diameter.
“It’s an experience that I cannot get back
home,” said Freyja Shairp, a 22-year-old from
Sidney, Australia, who is working in the U.S.
temporarily. She said she hadn’t planned to
come, but was in the neighborhood.
Standing next to her was Donna
D’Agostino, 48, and her 17-year-old daugh-
ter. She said she lived in New York City her
whole life and decided this was the year she
was going to see the lighting.
“It’s a bucket list item,” said D’Agostino.
“I think it starts the whole season.”
Balku lost power and other trees during
the Oct. 29 storm at his residence about
an hour outside of Manhattan. The spruce
survived, and Erik Pauze, the head gardener
at Tishman Speyer, one of the owners of
Rockefeller Center, picked out the tree. He
said he found it by accident when he got lost
while returning to the city on a tree hunting
expedition.
“It wasn’t even on our list. It was a good
find,” Pauze said.
Pauze said workers prepared for Superstorm
Sandy by bracing the tree with cables to secure
and protect it. It was moved in November.
Officials turned on the lights just before
9 p.m. Wednesday in the 80th annual cel-
ebration. Prior to that, the tree-lighting event
include performances from Rod Stewart,
CeeLo Green, Scotty McCreery, Il Volo,
Victoria Justice, Brooke White, Mariah
Carey, Trace Adkins and Tony Bennett, along
with appearances by Billy Crystal and Bette
Midler.
The tradition of a Christmas tree at
Rockefeller Center started in 1931, when
workers building the center put up the first
one. No tree was put up the following year,
and in 1933, the first tree-lighting ceremony
took place.
People will be able to view the tree until
Jan. 7. After its stint in the spotlight, it will be
turned into lumber for Habitat for Humanity.
Officer: Suicide led to wariness about Manning
NJ Gov. Christie’s focus:
Rebuilding, re-election
BY ANGELA DELLI SANTI
The Associated Press
MIDDLETOWN, N.J. — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie
plans to spend the next year leading efforts to rebuild his home
state after Superstorm Sandy — and running for re-election.
Christie announced his intention to seek a second term
Monday, after telling his campaign treasurer to file papers so
he can begin hiring campaign staff, selecting a headquarters and
raising money toward his re-election. A formal announcement is
expected in January.
“It would be wrong for me to leave now. I don’t want to leave
now,” Christie, 50, said Monday. “We have a job to do. That job
won’t be finished by next year.”
“The public needs to know that I’m in this for the long haul,
that the person who has helped to lead them through the initial
crisis wants to help lead them through the rebuilding and resto-
ration of our state,” he said at a news briefing at a fire house in
Middletown, where he had come to thank first responders and
volunteers.
The gubernatorial election is a year from now. The governor
said he talked it over with his wife and four children, ages 9 to
19, over the weekend, and the decision that he should run was
unanimous.
So far, no one has stepped forward to challenge him as gover-
nor. Several Democrats, most prominently Newark Mayor Cory
Booker, have been thinking aloud about running for their party’s
nomination. Christie said he hadn’t spoken with Booker other
than by text in about 10 days and he didn’t know the mayor’s
political intentions.
One recent public opinion poll ranked Booker as the Democrat
who could come closest to beating the Republican governor.
But a new poll released Tuesday shows six out of 10 regis-
tered voters now support a second term for Christie, up 15 points
since September.
The Rutgers-Eagleton poll also found the number of voters
opposed to Christie’s re-election declined from nearly half in
September to about a third now.
Christie wins every hypothetical head-to-head matchup mea-
sured in the poll, including against Booker, who the poll has
losing 34-53 percent with 13 percent choosing neither.
Christie carried the Democratic-leaning state by 86,000 votes
in 2009, an upset win over Democratic incumbent Jon Corzine.
Christie, who has become a national figure during his first
term, is riding an unprecedented wave of popularity because of
how he handled the storm, which he said Friday had caused more
than $29 billion in damage in New Jersey. Even Democrats have
applauded his hands-on response. He appeared on “Saturday
Night Live” in his trademark fleece pullover this month to lam-
poon his own nationally televised storm briefings.
About the only criticism directed his way since Superstorm
Sandy attacked the coast in late October has come from fellow
Republicans who have lambasted him for embracing President
Barack Obama as the two toured New Jersey’s ravaged coast-
line six days before the presidential election. Some even blame
Christie for tipping a close election to the president.
Christie was the first governor to endorse Mitt Romney; he
raised $18.2 million for the GOP nominee and crisscrossed the
country as an in-demand surrogate for Republican candidates.
Some are still questioning his party loyalty, however, as they did
after Christie delivered the keynote address at the party’s nomi-
nating convention in Tampa. Critics saw that August speech as
too much about Christie and not enough about Romney.
BY DAVID DISHNEAU
The Associated Press
FORT MEADE, Md. — An Army pri-
vate accused of sending reams of classified
U.S. documents to the secret-spilling web-
site WikiLeaks was kept in tight pretrial
confinement partly because another pris-
oner had recently committed suicide, the
former security chief at the Quantico, Va.,
Marine Corps base testified Wednesday.
Marine Col. Robert Oltman appeared
as a witness on the second day of a pretrial
hearing for Pfc. Bradley Manning, who is
seeking dismissal of all charges, claim-
ing his confinement in the Quantico brig
amounted to illegal punishment.
Oltman and others have testified that
psychiatrists who examined Manning at
Quantico repeatedly recommended that his
conditions be eased. But Oltman, whose
command included the brig, said he was
skeptical about at least one of those rec-
ommendations because another detainee
had killed himself in December 2009 after
his custody status was reduced based upon
the advice of the same doctor, Navy Capt.
William Hocter, the psychiatrist assigned
to the brig.
“He didn’t have the strongest credibility
with me with regards to his recommenda-
tions,” Oltman said under questioning by
civilian defense attorney David Coombs.
Oltman said repeatedly that he pre-
ferred to “err on the side of caution” on
Manning’s confinement.
Manning was held at Quantico for nine
months, from July 2010 to April 2011,
when he was moved to Fort Leavenworth,
Kansas. Throughout his time at Quantico,
he was designated a “maximum custody”
detainee and considered at risk of either
suicide or harming himself or others. He
was locked up alone for at least 23 hours
a day, forced to sleep naked for several
nights and required to stand naked at atten-
tion one morning, his lawyers assert.
At Fort Leavenworth, Manning was
re-evaluated and given a medium-security
classification.
Oltman said he told Hocter in January
2011 that Manning would remain on “pre-
vention of injury” status unless senior
officers decided otherwise.
Oltman acknowledged he told Hocter:
“Nothing’s going to change. He won’t be
able to hurt himself. He’s not going to be
able to get away, and our way of ensuring
this is that he will remain on this status
indefinitely.”
On cross-examination by prosecutor
Maj. Ashden Fein, Oltman said that nei-
ther he nor any senior officers ever made
decisions regarding Manning’s custody
classification. Oltman said those decisions
were made by the brig commander, a
position that during Manning’s confine-
ment was held by Chief Warrant Officer 4
James Averhart and then by Chief Warrant
Officer 2 Denise Barnes.
Hocter testified later in the day that he
considered Manning a suicide risk when
the soldier first arrived at Quantico from
Kuwait. Eight days later, seeing no sui-
cidal tendencies, Hocter recommended an
easing to “prevention-of-injury” status and
the brig commander agreed. The change
meant jailers would check on Manning
every 15 minutes instead of every five.
But for the next four months, nearly until
Hocter deployed to Afghanistan, jailers
rejected his weekly recommendations
for further easing Manning’s restrictions,
Hocter said.
“It was just clear to me they had made
up their minds on a certain course of
action and that my recommendations had
no impact,” he said.
Hocter said the long period of solitary
confinement hurt Manning’s physical and
mental health, making him more irritable
and anxious, and less cooperative.
One of the security measures was the
removal of Manning’s underwear at night,
starting March 2, 2011, after he told a
guard that if he wanted to kill himself, he
could hang himself with the waistband.
Coombs suggested Manning was com-
menting on the absurdity of his situation.
Coombs produced an email in which
Quantico’s chief legal officer at the time,
Lt. Col. Christopher Greer, made light of
the underwear episode with a Dr. Seuss
parody: “I can wear them in a box. I can
wear them with a fox. I can wear them in
the day. I can wear them so I say. But I
can’t wear them at night. My comments
gave the staff a fright,” Coombs read.
Oltman acknowledged that he respond-
ed to the email with the signature, “Sam I
am,” another Dr. Seuss reference.
“Was it funny to you that Pfc. Manning
was being stripped at night?” Coombs
asked.
“No, it was not, it was a very serious
issue,” Oltman said.
At least a dozen supporters of the
24-year-old Army private attended the
second day of what is expected to be a
six-day hearing.
Manning faces possible life imprison-
ment if convicted of aiding the enemy,
the most serious of the 22 charges that he
faces.
He is accused of sending hundreds
of thousands of classified Iraq and
Afghanistan war logs and more than
250,000 diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks
while he was working as an intelligence
analyst in Baghdad in 2009 and 2010.
The materials Manning is suspected
of leaking include sensitive reports on
foreign governments and leaders and a
2007 video clip of a U.S. helicopter crew
gunning down 11 men later found to have
included a Reuters news photographer
and his driver. The video garnered world-
wide attention. The Pentagon concluded
the troops acted appropriately during the
attack, having mistaken the camera equip-
ment for weapons.
The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH — Add seven swans, six geese and five
golden rings to the list of Christmas gifts that cost more than
they did a year ago.
And if you get all 364 items repeated throughout “The
Twelve Days of Christmas” carol, you’ll pay 6.1 percent more
this year, according to the annual Christmas Price Index com-
piled by PNC Wealth Management.
That comes to $107,300.
“The rise is larger than expected considering the modest
economic growth we’ve had,” said Jim Dunigan, managing
executive of investments for PNC. He noted the government’s
Consumer Price Index has risen just 2 percent in the 12 months
before September.
Thrifty shoppers may find some reasons for cheer. Six
items mentioned in the song haven’t gone up in price: maids-
a-milking, ladies dancing, lords-a-leaping, calling birds, turtle
doves and the partridge. The eight maids-a-milking still cost
just $58 because the minimum wage hasn’t risen.
Twelve drummers drumming ($2,775.50) and eleven pip-
ers piping ($2,562) might also be considered relative bargains
compared to seven swans, which will set you back $7,000.
Nine ladies dancing will cost you $6,294.03.
Dunigan said the 2011 drought caused the prices of some
birds to soar, partly because of corn and other feed costs.
“The geese were up 29.6 percent, and swans were up 11
percent,” Dunigan said, adding that none of the gifts in the
song went down in price this year.
The price of a pear tree is $189.99, an 11.8 percent jump
from last year’s $169.99. Five gold rings jumped 16.3 percent
this year, to $750, and three French hens are now $165, instead
of $150.
The $15 partridge is the cheapest item, and swans the most
expensive, at $1,000 each.
Last-minute shoppers who turn to the Internet will pay a
bit more for the gifts. Buying one set of the core items in each
verse costs $24,431 in traditional stores this year, but $40,440
online. Part of that difference is the extra expense of shipping
live birds, Dunigan said, adding that Internet costs rose 1.5
percent compared to last year.
PNC Financial Services Group Inc. checks jewelry stores,
dance companies, pet stores and other sources to compile the
list. Some of its sources this year include the National Aviary
in Pittsburgh and the Philadelphia-based Pennsylvania Ballet
Company.
For more information visit pncchristmaspriceindex.com.
All items in ‘12 Days of
Christmas’ now top $107K
Real
(Continued from page 1)
an understanding of what I’ll
be facing.”
Fort Jennings eighth-grader
Conner Stechschulte’s inten-
tions of becoming a police
or sheriff patrol officer, with
a wife and one child, would
yield him a budget of $3,558.
“This [Real Money, Real
World program] will be bene-
ficial when I am on my own,”
Stechschulte reflected on the
experience. “It will help me
budget my money.”
The booths were structured
to encompass normal monthly
expenditures like clothing,
food, utilities and car owner-
ship. Depending on the size
of the family, it is estimated
that a husband and wife with
a budget of less than $44,500
per year will spend $70 a
month on clothing and $30-
$60 more if they have a child.
Purchasing a small car would
cost $495 per month and
includes fuel, maintenance
costs and insurance. Buying
a small pickup would cost
considerably more at $806 per
month. A family — husband,
wife and young child — own-
ing a home would have util-
ity bills running upwards of
$345 per month and grocery
expenses ranging from $500-
$580.
Putnam County Deputy
Sheriff Dave Roney was on
hand to patrol the booth activ-
ities.
“I’m here to ‘ticket’ the
students when they purchase
an auto from a booth, forget
about buying insurance and
then drive away to another
booth. I pull them over, give
them a ticket and hope they
learn the importance of driv-
ing with insurance,” Roney
said.
Pam Hickey, Family
Consumer Sciences teacher at
Ottoville Elementary, tries to
instill one of the most impor-
tant financial habits an indi-
vidual can practice.
“The most important line
item of any budget is P.Y.F.
(Pay Yourself First),” Hickey
spoke adamantly. “I teach my
students to deposit 5 percent
of their income into savings
before any other expenses are
paid.”
The curriculum is com-
prised of six lessons, includ-
ing How Occupation Affects
Income; Deductions-What
You See is Not What You Get;
How to Use Checking and
Savings Accounts; Making
Choices - Preparing for the
Simulation; Real Money, Real
World Simulation; and What
Did You Learn?
Throughout the duration of
the program, students assume
the role of a young adult who
is the sole income provider
for a family. They choose
an occupation and receive a
monthly salary where students
learn to subtract savings, taxes
and health insurance amounts
from their income. The amount
of money left over is what they
have to spend during the sim-
ulation activity. The simula-
tion involves community vol-
unteers who represent actual
businesses in the community.
These volunteers set up and
staff booths representing real-
life businesses. By visiting the
appropriate booths, students
spend their salaries on items
typically found in a monthly
budget including housing,
utilities, groceries, insurance,
childcare and transporta-
tion. Throughout the activity,
students keep track of their
finances and attempt to com-
plete the simulation with a
positive balance. During the
post-simulation lesson, stu-
dents reflect on their experi-
ence and what they learned by
completing a self-assessment.
Many Ohio students have
graduated without minimal
formal education in finance.
In 2009, the State Board of
Education approved the
requirements of Amended
Substitute House Bill 1 (Am.
Sub. HB 1), which calls for
the development of academic
content standards in financial
literacy and entrepreneur-
ship in grades 7-8. Amended
Substitute Senate Bill 311
(the Ohio Core legislation)
requires that schools begin
teaching economics and finan-
cial literacy to all high school
students before the Class of
2014 graduates.
For more information, visit
realmoneyrealworld.osu.edu.
Freshman Jessica Young discusses car insurance with
community members representing the car industry.

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