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In ancient Rome

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the Circus was what they called the fast track. In Britain, the Circus is the confluence of divergent paths or avenues. In America, the Circus means fun. Welcome to the Circus.

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Academic Catalog

2012-2013

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The MISSION of

The CREATIVE CIRCUS

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This catalog is an official publication of The Creative Circus and is subject to revisions at any time. The school reserves the right to change, withdraw or supplement this catalog as it deems necessary or appropriate in its policies and operating procedures, curricula, class schedules, course content, training, equipment, tuition and fees, faculty and staff without any notice at any time. Students are individually responsible for being aware of information contained in the school catalog and any amendments thereto. Failure to read and comply with school regulations will not exempt students from penalties that they may incur. Students are advised to read and fully understand the rules, regulations and policies stated herein and to retain this catalog for use as a reference.

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP
The Creative Circus is an independent, coeducational, postsecondary institution, and is a whollyowned subsidiary of The Creative Circus, Inc. (CCI). The school, through CCI, is owned and operated by Delta Educational Systems, Inc., a Virginia corporation, with headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Delta is a wholly owned subsidiary of Delta Career Education, formerly Gryphon Colleges Corporation, and a Delaware corporation. Delta Career Education Corporations majority stockholder is GryphonPartners II, L.P. The address of the principal corporate office is 4525 Columbus Street, Suite 101, Virginia Beach, VA 23462-6701, telephone number 757.497.2334 and fax number 757.497.8331. The electronic contact information of the principal corporate office is found at www.deltaed.com. The e-mail address is inquiries@deltaed.com. The affairs of the college are managed by the governing board and the Executive Director.

The mission of The Creative Circus is to graduate the best-prepared, most avidly sought-after creatives in the industry.

HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES
Founded in 1995 in Atlanta, Georgia, The Creative Circus is an accredited, two-year portfolio-building educational program for the creative side of the advertising, development, design and photography industries. The Creative Circus seeks to train and develop talent to fill industry need. In addition to advertisements, design pieces, websites and images, Circus students develop concepts for full-scale branding, brand extensions, product development, interactive design and innovative technology applications. At the end of the two-year program, Creative Circus graduates earn a certificate and are armed with experience and an exemplary portfolio that shows industry employers what they know and how they think. The Creative Circus is the first step to a career as a working creative.

ACCREDITATION
The Creative Circus has been accredited by The Council on Occupational Education (COE) since 1996. As applied by the commission, COE has a self-regulatory process by which the commission recognizes educational institutions that have been found to meet or exceed stated standards applicable to occupational education institutions and/or programs (quality-assessment). The Creative Circus is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien (M-1) students.

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TABLE of

PEOPLE

CONTENTS

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PEOPLE

FACULTY AND STAFF
The faculty and staff of The Creative Circus are at the school for the same reasons our students are: the thrill of creating as well as providing the industry with great design, new media, photography and advertising. Circus instructors are working professionals who make themselves available to teach in order to share their experience and professionalism with the next generation. Teaching at The Circus is fun and creatively satisfying for the teachers as well as the students. Circus instructors emphasize learning by doing, maximizing hands-on experience and one-on-one collaboration. In a field as rapidly changing as ours, the course content must necessarily change and evolve constantly, as must the instructor’s knowledge. Since most instructors at The Creative Circus are working professionals, Circus students have the advantage of working with teachers who are earning their living actually doing what they are teaching. Many staff members, like the instructors, have enjoyed successful careers in advertising, development, design, illustration and photography. Others have strong ties to education and school administration. Together, they bring to The Circus an integrated team dedicated to Circus students and their ultimate success.

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DATES AND HOURS

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FACILITIES

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ADMISSIONS

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FINANCIAL SERVICES

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CANCELLATIONS, WITHDRAWAL

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STUDENT SERVICES

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Chad Altemose/Interactive Design and Interactive Development Program Director Dan Balser/Art Director and Copywriting Program Director Janie Belden/Director of Education Shannon Cobourn/Associate Campus Director Shontaeya Dixon/Financial Services Director Catherine Guyette/Career Services Assistant David Haan/Executive Campus Director Kathryn Harmon/Admissions Representative Kim Kurtz/Director of Career Services Beth Linder/Student Services Manager Ron Moore/Design Program Director Andrew Phelps/Business Office Manager Nicole Rej/Registrar Carolann Robinson/Director of Admissions Jon Quattlebaum/Facilities Manager Greg Strelecki/Image Program Director Mekenzie Zimmerman/Admissions Assistant; Receptionist

Program Directors/Full-Time Faculty
Chad Altemose/BS (Journalism), University of Florida - Interactive Design and Interactive Development Programs Director Dan Balser/BS (Business), Indiana University; Copywriting Diploma - Art Director and Copywriting Programs Director Ron Moore/BS (Architecture), Georgia Tech; Design Diploma - Design Program Director Greg Strelecki/BFA, Art Center College of Design - Image Program Director

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CODE OF CONDUCT

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ACADEMIC RESOURCES,

CHANGES IN STATUS __10 OR SCHEDULE
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ATTENDANCE STANDARDS

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ACADEMIC STANDARDS

Adjunct Faculty
Kevin Ames/Boise State College Alisan Atvur/University of Georgia - B.A. Honors Independent Studies Rochelle Augsburg, NYU - B.P.A. Marketing Robert Barrineau/Florida State University B.S. Communication Tyler Burghardt/Furman University - B.S. Computer Science Mike Colletta/Creative Circus Certificate Photography

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POST GRADUATION

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CAREER SERVICES

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TUITION AND FEES

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Adjunct Faculty (cont’d)
Bryan Condra/Indiana University - B.A. Fine Arts/Creative Circus Certificate Graphic Design James Cook/Georgia State University - B.A. Photography James Crawford/University of Florida - B.S. Psychology/University of South Florida B.F.A. Fine Art Laura Dengler/Agnes Scott College - B.A. Psychology/Creative Circus Certificate Daniel Fields/Georgia Perimeter College Colleen Finn/Virginia Tech - B.S. Architecture/ Creative Circus Certificate Graphic Design Beryl Firestone/University of Florida - B.S. Journalism/Creative Circus Certificate Graphic Design Jason Fobart/Baylor University/Creative Circus Photography Sylvia Gaffney/David Lipscomb University - B.A. Fine Arts/David Lipscomb University Teachers Certificate /Middle Tennessee State Georgia State University /Portfolio Center Art Direction Craig Geiger/Virginia Tech - B.A. Liberal Arts Lisa Geubtner/Penn State University - B.A Communication/Portfolio Center - Art Direction Andrew Hamilton/Emory University - B.A. Philosophy/University of S. Carolina/Creative Circus Certificate Graphic Design Don Hardy/Delta State University - B.F.A. Communication Art Barry Klipp/Hallmark Institute of Photography/ Portfolio Center Jon Koon/Georgia Tech - B.S. Computer Science Paul Korel/University of Central Florida - B.A. Business /Creative Circus Certificate Copywriting Robert Lee/Columbus College of Art and Design B.F.A. Illustration Seth Lemoine/Georgia Tech - B.S. Computer Science Jaci Lund/Michigan State - B.A. Communication/ Creative Circus Certificate Graphic Design Heather Lunenfeld/Oxford College of Emory University - A.A. Liberal Studies/Emory University - B.A. English Oglethorpe University Certificate Secondary School Teaching/ Creative Circus Certificate Copywriting Jen Mageau/Winthrop University - B.A. Mass Communication/Creative Circus Certificate Art Direction Christina Gulotta Maloney/University of New Orleans - B.A. Design/SCAD - M.F.A. Broadcast Design Jennifer Padgett/UNC Chapel Hill - B.A. Journalism David Ranney/Auburn University - B.F.A. Graphic Design Martha Sandberg/University of Florida - B.A. Graphic Design Roger Sawhill/Portfolio Center - Graphic Design Daniel Secrest/ITT Technical Institute - A.A.S Design/Multimedia/The Art Institute of Colorado - B.A. Interactive Media Amanda Thomas/Western Washington UniversityB.A. Business Administration/Creative Circus Certificate Design Gary Weiss/Georgia State University - B.V.A. Art History/Art Center College of Design/ Creative Circus Certificate Copywriting Torrence Wilson/Columbia College - B.A. Film/Video Mick Winters/Virginia Commonwealth University B.S. Busines Marketing/Northern Virginia Community College

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OPERATION
DATES AND HOURS OF OPERATION

DATES and HOURS of

Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday, from 9:30 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. and any other times as needed. School facilities and equipment are available for student use at posted times on student entry doors. Policies and procedures concerning use of the facilities and equipment are discussed with new students at orientation, printed in the student handbook and are posted in the lab areas. Administrative offices are open the following days and hours: • Monday through Thursday from 8:30 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. • Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. • Saturdays, by appointment. Students have secured key card access to the campus during regular business hours (above) or through the student entrance during the following days and times: • Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M to 11:00 P.M. • Saturday and Sunday from 3:00 P.M. to 11:00 P.M. Exceptions to these days and times are breaks between quarters when students have access only during regular business hours and the week before panel reviews when students have secured access for 24 hours. Holidays Observed school holidays when the school is closed are Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Thursday and Friday, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. School Closing If the institution is closed due to inclement weather or for any other reason determined by the Campus Director, announcements will be made via 11Alive.com, and WXIA-TV Channel 11. In addition, a notice will appear on our website.

Corporate Officers
Joseph A. Kennedy III/Vice Chairman Alan Sussna/President and Chief Executive Officer Kevin Smith/Secretary and Treasurer

Governing Board
R. David Andrews/Chairman - San Francisco, CA Joseph A. Kennedy III/Vice Chairman - Virginia Beach, VA William E. Lynn/Board Member - San Francisco, CA Nicholas A. Orum/Board Member - San Francisco, CA John M. Rogers/Board Member - San Francisco, CA Alan Sussna/Board Member - Virginia Beach, VA

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SCHOOL CALENDAR 2012 - 2013

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FACILITIES
Winter Quarter • Registration - New Students • Classes Begin • End of Drop/Add Period • Registration - Current Students • Quarter Ends • Spring Break Spring Quarter • Registration - New Students • Classes Begin • Good Friday Holiday • End of Drop/Add Period • Memorial Day • Registration - Current Students • Quarter Ends • Summer Break Summer Quarter • Independence Day Observed • Registration - New Students • Classes Begin • End of Drop/Add Period • Labor Day • Registration - Current Students • Quarter Ends • Fall Break Fall Quarter • Registration - New Students • Classes Begin • End of Drop/Add Period • Thanksgiving Recess • Registration - Current Students • Quarter Ends • Winter Break • Christmas Holiday Observed • New Years Day Observed

2012
1/5 1/9 1/13 3/6-3/7 3/23 3/26-4/8 4/5 4/9 4/6 4/13 5/28 6/5-6/6 6/22 6/25-7/8 7/4 7/5 7/9 7/13 9/3 9/4-9/5 9/21 9/24-10/7 10/4 10/8 10/12 11/22-11/25 12/4-12/5 12/21 12/24-1/6 12/24-12/25 1/2

2013
1/3 1/7 1/11 3/5-3/7 3/22 3/25-4/7 4/4 4/8 3/29 4/12 5/27 6/4-6/5 6/21 6/24-7/7 7/4 7/3 7/8 7/12 9/2 9/3-9/4 9/20 9/23-10/6 10/3 10/7 10/11 11/28-12/1 12/3-12/4 12/20 12/23-1/5 12/24-12/25 1/1

FACILITIES AT THE CREATIVE CIRCUS
The Creative Circus is conveniently and centrally located at 812 Lambert Drive on a quiet cul de sac in Atlanta between its Midtown and Buckhead neighborhoods. Our building is a colorfully converted warehouse. Our four dedicated computer labs each have high definition projection systems. Our high-speed network is also wireless for access by student laptops and mobile devices. We have two high-capacity laser printers/scanners (color and black/white). Our large theater features built-in audio visual capability for the latest in multi-media presentation. Our photography studios include several small individual studios plus a large daylight studio and a large dark studio with a cyclorama wall in addition to our dark room for processing film. We are a dog friendly environment (with a doggie day care across the street). The school has an outdoor deck and picnic tables in front of the building. Parking is on our own property with some covered spaces available. There is a ventilated spray mount area, a student cafeteria with booths, refrigerator, microwaves and vending machines and ten restrooms. Concepting and lounging areas are located throughout the school. We have a small library stocked with industry publications. In addition to the two gallery exhibit areas, most of the wall space in the school is used to showcase student and graduate work. We have created a safe environment that nurtures the creative process. Parking Available parking is available to students on a first come basis. Street parking is also available. Parking spots marked RESERVED are not to be used by students. Snack Area/Student Lounge Vending machines, soda machines, coffee-maker, microwave, refrigerator, tables and chairs are available for student use. Media Services The school maintains a library/resource center of industry-related resources and research materials for use by all students. Because the curricula offered by the school generally represent rapidlychanging technologies and creative approaches and because the learning objectives of these curricula are not achieved principally through historical research, the library holdings at The Creative Circus are concentrated in current trade-based hard copy and periodical materials. The four computer labs are available to use for research, as well as, free WIFI access to all students and staff. Care of Facilities Smoking, eating and drinking are prohibited in the computer classrooms. The Creative Circus provides a student lounge for eating and drinking. We maintain a smoke-free environment.

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Canines Canines are allowed on premises (this means inside and outside the school building) with some necessary limitations. Each quarter, pet owners must provide the following to the Director of Education: Shot records from the Veterinarian. Proof that the dog has been spayed or neutered (if not already on file). Upon approval, students are allowed to bring their canine to The Creative Circus. Failure to abide by any of the following rules will result in revocation of canine privileges: All dogs must be on a leash and in the presence of their owner. If the dog has an accident, it is the owner’s responsibility to clean up the mess. If the dog is a habitual offender, as determined by the Director of Education, we reserve the right to revoke the canine from coming back to school until the dog is house-trained. All dogs must behave in an appropriate manner while at The Circus. No rough-housing with other dogs, barking or concerning behavior towards other dogs or humans. The Director of Education reserves the right to ban any dog from The Creative Circus for any reason. Recycling and Shredding The Circus has locations for secure, private document shredding. Locked shredding bins are located by the student entry, near the campus printers located outside room 68, the front office outside room 58 and within the office of the Director of Education (room 70). Campus Safety and Security Every attempt is made to provide students a safe environment. Entry to the facility is allowed only by proximity access card. Each student, faculty and staff member is issued one access card for entry into the facility at posted times. Visitors to The Circus must check in at the reception desk upon arrival and surrender their driver’s license for an access pass which will be returned upon leaving the premises. All visitors must be accompanied by a current faculty or staff member at all times. Crime Awareness Students are to report to the Campus Director, or in his/her absence to the Associate Director or Facilities Manager any criminal activities taking place on the premises or in the parking lot of The Creative Circus. This includes any school-sponsored function. Such actions will then be reported to the proper authorities at the Circus. Loss of Personal Property The school does not assume responsibility for the loss of books or other personal property. However, all instructors and students are requested to give the Receptionist all articles found so that the owner may claim them. Emergencies Any accidents requiring medical attention should be reported immediately to an instructor or staff member, and an accident/illness report should be filed immediately. If an emergency is of a serious nature, dial 911. First aid kits are located in each of the kitchen areas, the printer area and the Director of Education’s office. Heart defibrillators are on-site and staff has been trained to administer CPR in the case of emergencies. If transport via ambulance is required,the student is responsible for the cost of services.

Management Operating Procedures > CrisisCreative Circus has outlined policies and procedures for all forms of emergencies and crisis The situations which are detailed in the Student Handbook. The entire document is on file with the facilities manager. Emergency Evacuation Plan In the event of real, threatened or impending danger, students should evacuate the building by the nearest possible exit. Emergency routes are posted throughout the building. During emergencies, students should not take the time to collect personal belongings. Health Services The Creative Circus has no health services located at the school. However, hospitals, clinics and physicians are located nearby. Students with communicable diseases may be prohibited from registering for classes when health records indicate that his/her attendance would be detrimental to the health and safety of the students or other persons with whom the student may come in contact. Students who have significant health problems or limitations may be required to submit a report of medical examination prior to initial registration and are encouraged to inform his/her instructors at the beginning of each quarter. The school seeks to assist students who have special health problems or limitations in the attainment of his/her educational goals. Services are provided in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. It is the policies of the school to have all facilities comply with the requirements of the state and local building codes, the Board of Health and fire department regulations. Children on Campus Children are not permitted to accompany a student to class or to be left unattended in the building or on the school property. If a child is left unattended,the Director of Education or other administrator should be notified. The Campus Director should then locate the parent and inform him/her of the policy. If a student brings a child to class, the instructor will inform the student of the policy and ask him/her to remove the child from the classroom. The school assumes no liability for injuries incurred by minors while on campus.

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4. Enrollment Agreement: Indicates the tuition agreement with The Creative Circus and an estimate
of total costs. This agreement allows a student to participate in our lock-in tuition policy to secure a tuition rate up to a year ahead and to maintain that rate as long as the student remains in good full-time academic standing. Should a student drop to part-time or withdraw, or be on academic probation, the former tuition rate is lost and the student will be charged at the most current cost per credit hour.

ADMISSIONS
Equal Education Opportunity Creative talent is not, and never has been, a function of gender, race, color, national origin, age, economic conditions, sexual orientation or disability. The Creative Circus is committed to the idea that everyone deserves an equal opportunity to develop talent. The Creative Circus reaffirms its policy of administering its educational programs and related supporting services and benefits in a manner which does not discriminate regarding recruitment, hiring, promotion and all other terms and conditions of employment because of an applicant, student, or prospective student’s race, color, creed or religion, sex, national origin, age, physical or mental handicap or other factors which cannot lawfully be the basis for provision of such services. Further, The Creative Circus commits itself to a program of Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity. The Creative Circus is obligated and adheres to the provisions of Section 493A, Title IV, Higher Education Act of 1965, United States Code, Veterans Benefits, Title IX, Educational Amendments of 1972, Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1973 as amended. Inquiries concerning the application of these laws and their implementing regulations may be referred to the Campus Director. Requirements of Admission • Interview and recommendation • Application and Application Fee • Essay • Enrollment Agreement • Successful passing of criminal background check • 10-15 samples of work • Proof of high school completion or GED • Transcript(s) from previous post-secondary schools • Reference Form Admissions Procedure 1. Admissions Interview: Call or e-mail to arrange an appointment to visit the school. An admissions interview (preferably face-to-face, but by telephone if necessary) will provide full information about our programs, start dates, how we work with graduates and school requirements. Admissions interviews take place with an Admissions Representative who will evaluate a candidates interest in our programs and his or her dedication to the field of study. While work ethic and potential for success cannot be formally measured, these qualities are essential to success and will be discussed at the time of the admissions interview. Our goal is to enroll students who will be graduates and who will contribute to the creative industry. At the completion of the admissions interview, should both the prospective student and the Admissions Representative feel that the student has a significant chance of success from the course of study; the Admissions Representative will give the student a recommendation to apply and will work closely with the prospect to ensure all application materials are submitted in a timely manner. Prospective students who do not receive a recommendation from an Admissions Representative may appeal to the Director of Admissions.

5. Background Checks: Students applying for admission will be required to undergo a background check. The background check process is an automated process that identifies any enrolling students that, per policy, may not be eligible for enrollment due to that students criminal record. Eligibility will vary by program, based on standard hiring practices in specific career fields; however, violent criminal convictions bar enrollment in any program. The background check is completed by a third party. This third-party organization may contact a student or prospective student in the event that further information is required to determine eligibility. If a prospective student is found to be ineligible for enrollment based on a history of criminal activity, the third-party will contact the prospective student. Any questions regarding specific findings should be addressed to the third-party. The Creative Circus will not have specific information about the prospective students history, but will be informed by the third party that the prospective student is or is not eligible for enrollment in the specific program the student has selected. All students are required to disclose to The Creative Circus any criminal convictions they receive while enrolled in any The Creative Circus program. Depending on the nature of that conviction, students may be dismissed from the program. 6. 10-15 Samples of Work: All students must submit an application portfolio containing 10-15 samples of work. These samples need not be slick or polished and can take several forms. Their purpose is to indicate whether the applicant has the originality, creative potential and intellect to succeed in the rigorous Circus program. Prospective students with questions on what kind of work and how to submit work should contact Admissions. Applicants who would like their samples returned must enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope at the time they are submitted. Work is submitted to the appropriate Program Director for review and final recommendation on acceptance to The Creative Circus including any opportunity for advanced placement. 7. Proof of high school completion or GED: All students must have successfully completed high school
or have passed a high school equivalency (GED) test. Applicants must present evidence of graduation from a high school that is state-approved, accredited by a regional accrediting association, or accredited by CITA (Commission on International and Trans-regional Accreditation.) For non-high school graduates, evidence of the GED equivalency must be submitted. Only applicants who show a passion for the field and innate talent, and whose background points to enthusiasm to learn, will be accepted. Each applicant must submit an Attestation Form indicating the high school from which he or she graduated or the GED testing center where the equivalency test was administered.

8. Transcripts Official: Final transcripts from any previous post-secondary schools attended are required
prior to matriculation at The Creative Circus. Transcripts can be mailed directly to The Creative Circus (attention Admissions) from the registrar’s office at a student’s former institution. Any fees associated with obtaining these records are the responsibility of the student.

9. Reference Form: All applicants must provide references to The Creative Circus at the time of application. 10. Notification: When all requirements for admissions have been fulfilled, the applicant will be notified regarding his or her admissions status. Any questions regarding acceptance should be directed to the applicant’s Admissions Representative.

2. Application: An application may be obtained from an Admissions Representative. A $100 application
fee is due at the time an application is submitted. Candidates for admission who submit an application without a previous successful interview will be contacted to schedule an interview.

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3. An Essay: 150 words addressing the following question is required: How will you participate and contribute to your own education in order to be a successful student and graduate of The Creative Circus?

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Admission Policies
International Students The Creative Circus is authorized under U.S. Federal Law, Immigration & Nationality Act, Sec. 101(a), (5), (F) to enroll non-immigrant alien students from other countries. Students living abroad should submit certified proof of high school graduation (translated into English), college transcript, application fee in U.S. dollars and required immigration documentation. Copywriting students should submit most or all of their samples in English. All students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Circus Admissions Representatives can provide additional information regarding the M-1 Visa required. Part-Time Enrollment An application may be submitted for an individual subject by meeting with an Admissions Representative to determine which class(es) might be open for this student. Tuition charges for such courses or programs are based on the total number of credit hours scheduled. Financial aid may not be available to part-time students depending on the total number of credit hours. Many courses require prerequisites and may not be available to part-time students. Transfer of Credits Coursework at The Circus is talent/skill-development oriented. There is a procedure in place (Advanced Placement) which outlines the process by which a student coming to The Circus from another portfolio finishing school might be evaluated and placed in a quarter beyond first quarter. Advanced Placement Should a student wish to be considered for advanced placement, he or she must request the Program Director to review samples and make a determination regarding quarter placement. Advanced placement is strongly discouraged and rarely granted to incoming students. The Program Director will complete the Enrollment Review Form, noting the quarter into which the student has been provisionally accepted. The Program Director will provide written explanation that justifies advanced placement. A student receiving advanced placement does not transfer any credit for previous training. Should a student fail to meet The Creative Circus criteria required of the quarter into which they were advanced placed, the Academic Team reserves the right to disqualify the advanced placement status. Re-Entry Students Students who have withdrawn from The Creative Circus in good academic standing who wish to be readmitted within one year of their last date of attendance should contact the Director of Education to update their applications. If the application for re-admission is for a different curriculum, the standard requirements for a change of program will apply. If tuition has increased since the previous enrollment date, the student will incur the increase in tuition. Students who have withdrawn while on academic probation or who have been suspended or dismissed for lack of academic progress, nonattendance, or misconduct must reapply through the Director of Education’s office. Approval for re-entry for the same curriculum on an alternate selection will be based on the Program Director’s evaluation of the applicant’s program to which the applicant is reapplying, and the applicants career objectives. Prior tuition balances and student loan status must be reconciled before re-admission application forms will be processed. A re-admissions fee is required and the student is not required to re-submit copies of documents already on file. Students granted re-admission may have course load restrictions, specific grade and attendance requirements and/or required counseling sessions in order to remain enrolled at The Creative Circus. Applicants with Existing Conditions or Disabilities Acceptance to The Creative Circus is not in any way associated with an applicant’s disability status. The Creative Circus requires advanced notice, however,of any disabilities that may affect a student’s ability to complete a program or where reasonable arrangements can be made, where appropriate.

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FINANCIAL
SERVICES
Student Financial Assistance Recognizing that students may require assistance with financing their education, the institution makes every effort to provide financial aid to those who qualify. How To Apply for Federal Aid: To apply for financial assistance, a student must complete, in addition to any school forms, a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). All forms are available from the school’s Financial Aid Office. The FAFSA application can be found at www.fafsa.gov. Financial Aid Requirements Student financial aid applicants must satisfy certain requirements in order to receive financial aid. These requirements include, but are not limited to: 1. Fulfillment of all admission requirements. 2. Submission of all documentation requested by The Creative Circus, or lenders or both. 3. Maintaining satisfactory academic progress in accordance with Circus policy. 4. Maintaining regular, verifiable attendance. 5. Completion of aid-specific requirements, such as entrance loan counseling. In addition, all who receive student loans must attend exit loan counseling before leaving school. Verification Policy If selected for verification of data submitted in a grant or loan application, a signed copy of both the student’s and the parent’s federal income tax returns,including schedules and W-2 forms, must be sent to the financial aid office within thirty (30) days. If the required documentation is not submitted within thirty days, the student will not be considered for a Pell Grant or Federal Student Loans. The financial aid office will notify the student if an award has changed due to verification. Satisfactory Progress for Continuation of Financial Aid Federal regulations require that students receiving financial aid must progress satisfactorily toward completion of their educational credential. The institution has established Standards of Satisfactory Progress. Included in this standard is a maximum time-frame within which the student must complete his or her educational objective. The progress of financial aid recipients is evaluated according to these published standards. Students failing to maintain satisfactory progress lose eligibility for financial assistance. See Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress in this catalog.

> Resources
Federal Grant Programs: To receive a federal grant, a student must be enrolled in an eligible program and must not previously have received a Bachelor’s degree from any institution. Also, he or she must be a U.S. citizen or in the U.S. for other than a temporary purpose with intentions to become a U.S. citizen or be a permanent resident of the Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands. To apply for these grant programs, a student must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and submit it to the institution. Information submitted in this form is forwarded via electronic processes to the U.S. Department of Education, which determines eligibility. An eligibility document is returned to the school electronically which is used to make a final award determination.

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The Federal Pell Grant Program: This program provides federal grants for students who show need for assistance in attending from the FAFSA. A student’s award varies depending upon his/ her classification as half time, three-quarter-time or full-time. The Pell Grant is intended to be the proof of a financial aid package and may be combined with other forms of aid in order to meet the full cost of education. The Federal Pell Grant is a need-based grant and, unlike a loan, in most cases does not have to be repaid. The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): Program provides aid to students who have exceptional financial need. To receive an FSEOG a student must complete the aforementioned FAFSA application. The amount of the grant award is subject to availability of funds. In accordance with federal regulations, priority is given to Pell eligible students. Like the Pell Grant, an FSEOG is a grant and in most cases does not have to be repaid. Work Study Programs The Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP) provides funds to employ students with a demonstrated financial need. The position will be, to the greatest extent possible, in a situation comparable to the area of study in which the student is enrolled. Students are paid an hourly rate at least equal to the federal minimum wage and may be awarded up to a maximum of 20 hours per week. Applications for Work-Study should be made to the Financial Aid Office. To be eligible for Work-Study, a student must be enrolled for at least 12 credit hours and be a citizen or legal resident of the United States. Students holding a bachelors degree are eligible to participate in the FWSP. Loan Programs The Federal Direct Student Loan program provides qualified students with Federal Stafford Loans and their parents with Federal PLUS loans, both of which are long-term, low-interest loans for postsecondary educational expenses. Under these programs the student borrows for college expenses and, in the case of a student borrower, repays the loan after leaving school. The repayment period begins six months after the student drops below half-time enrollment, and the borrower may take up to ten years to repay the loan. Parental loans generally require repayment to begin 60 days after the final disbursement of the loan but can be deferred as well. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office. • • • Federal Stafford Loan: For more information on the details and criteria of the Federal Student Stafford Loan, contact the Student Financial Services office. Federal Parent PLUS Loan: For more information on the details and criteria of the Federal Parent PLUS Loan, contact the Student Financial Services office. Private Loans: The school can assist credit-worthy students and/or their parents in applying for private educational loans with a national educational loan provider.

Veteran Educational Benefits Veterans and eligible persons using veterans benefits are measured academically based on the satisfactory progress thresholds defined in Standards of Satisfactory Progress (SAP) policy as are all students attending the school. Students receiving these benefits who do not meet the Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements will be placed on Financial Aid Warning or Financial Aid Probation or academically suspended. Veteran’s benefits will be suspended for any students who are academically suspended from the school. Refer to the SAP policy section for details of this policy. The Creative Circus offers a 10% discount for the following qualified military personnel: • All active duty, guard and reservists utilizing Military Tuition Assistance • All veterans utilizing the Post 911-Gi Bill (chapter 33) • All veterans utilizing the Montgomery GI Bill (chapter 30) and paying cash for tuition and fees • All veterans utilizing vocational rehabilitation Scholarship Programs The Creative Circus maintains data on several private scholarship programs made available to students at the college from time to time. Students interested in the eligibility requirements and application deadlines for such funds should seek additional information from their Admissions representative. Some scholarships received by Circus Students are The One Club, Leo Burnett, DDB Needham (minority), AAAA (minority), Patrick Kelley, The Norm Grey Foundation, The Richards Group, McGarrah-Jessee scholarships.

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CANCELLATION, WITHDRAWAL and
REFUND POLICY
to completion Creative in > Students finding it necessary to withdraw priordue an applicant should notify Therefunded Circus 45 writing of their intent to withdraw. Any monies or student will be within days of the date of cancellation, withdrawal or termination. A withdrawal is considered to have occurred on the earlier of the following dates: a) the date the student officially notifies the school of their intent to withdraw, or b) the point at which the student fails to meet the published attendance policies as outlined in the school catalog. All charges and refunds are calculated using the student’s last date of recorded attendance. Cancellation Prior to Class Start In the event the school does not accept the enrollment, full refund of all monies will be made to the applicant. An applicant may cancel his/her enrollment at any time before the commencement of classes. All monies paid by an applicant will be refunded if requested in writing within five (5) calendar days after signing the enrollment agreement. A request for cancellation, which is not made in writing, shall be confirmed by the student in writing within an additional period of five (5) calendar days. The school may retain the registration fee after five (5) calendar days or after ten (10) calendar days absent written confirmation. An applicant subsequently requesting cancellation of enrollment prior to the class starting date shall be entitled to a refund of all monies paid. All monies due the applicant will be refunded within 30 days from cancellation. An applicant subsequently requesting cancellation of enrollment prior to the class starting date shall be entitled to a refund of all monies paid minus the application fee that is nonrefundable. All monies due the applicant will be refunded within 30 days from cancellation. Other Cancellation Students who have not visited the school’s facility prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three (3) calendar days following either the regularly scheduled orientation procedures or following a tour of the school’s facilities and inspection of the equipment. Withdrawals Students who withdraw or are terminated prior to completion will be refunded all unearned tuition and fees. All monies due the student shall be refunded within forty-five (45) days from the withdrawal date. (The earlier of the date (a) The Creative Circus establishes the withdrawal or (b) upon notification from the student.) All charges and refunds are calculated using the student’s last date of recorded attendance. The Creative Circus is required to comply with the federal regulations for the determination of the return of Title IV funds on behalf of a student. The Creative Circus must continue to comply with the state or institutional refund policy in determining the amount of unearned tuition. In addition to federal student financial assistance, a student’s financial aid package is likely to include other non-federal funding which may also be required to be refunded when a student withdraws or is terminated. Under the statute and the regulations, these non-federal funds must be returned according to either the institution’s state refund policy, or an institutional refund policy approved by the institution’s accrediting agency, if there is no state policy. Note: The Creative Circus uses the State of Georgia Refund Policy as approved by the Non-Public Post secondary Education Commission of the State of Georgia. Upon a student’s withdrawal or termination from the institute, the Return of Title IV funds calculation will be computed prior to the calculation set forth in the refund policy. Return of Title IV Funds All institutions participating in the Student Financial Aid Programs are required to use a statutory schedule to determine the amount of Title IV funds a student has earned when he or she ceases attendance based on the period the student was in attendance.The Amendments, in general, require that if a recipient of Title IV funds withdraws or is terminated from a school during a payment period or a period of enrollment in which the recipient began attendance, the institute must calculate the amount

of Title IV funds the student did not earn and those funds must be returned, up through the 60% point in each payment period or period of enrollment, a pro rate type schedule is used to determine how much Title IV funds the student earned at the time of withdrawal. After the 60% point in the payment period or period of enrollment, a student has earned 100% of the Title IV funds. The percentage of the payment period or period of enrollment completed is determined by: • The total number of calendar days in the payment period or period of enrollment for which the assistance is awarded divided into the number of calendar days completed in that period as of the day the student withdrew. • Scheduled breaks of at least five consecutive days are excluded from the total number of calendar days in a payment period or period of enrollment (denominator) and the number of calendar days completed in that period (numerator). • Days in which a student was on an approved leave of absence are also not included in the calendar days of the payment period or period of enrollment. Return of Unearned Title IV Funds The school must return the lesser of the amount of Title IV funds the student does not earn, or the amount of institutional costs that the student incurred for the payment period or period of enrollment multiplied by the percentage of funds that was not earned. The student (or parent, if a Federal PLUS loan) must return or repay, as appropriate: • Any Title IV loan funds in accordance with the terms of the loan, and • The remaining unearned Title IV grants (not to exceed 50% of the grant) as an overpayment of the grant. Examples of the Return of Title IV calculation are available upon request in the Financial Aid Office. of Georgia Refund > Statestudent enrolls andPolicy or discontinues after the term has begun but prior to completion of If a withdraws the term, the following minimum refunds apply. If a student withdraws prior to the end of a quarter, the remaining amount the college may retain is calculated as follows: • 5% for instructional time zero to 5% • 10% for instructional time over 5% but not more than 10% • 25% for instructional time over 10% but not more than 25% • 50% for instructional time over 25% but not more than 50% • 100% for instructional time over 50% All charges and refunds are calculated using the student’s last date of recorded attendance. For refund computations, a term is 12 weeks. Examples of the state refund policy are available upon request in the Financial Aid Office. Order of Return of Student Financial Aid Program Funds Title IV funds credited to outstanding loan balances for the payment period or period of enrollment for which a return of funds is required must be returned in the following order: 1. Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program 2. Subsidized Stafford Loan Program 3. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford loans (other than PLUS loans) 4. Subsidized Direct Stafford loans 5. Federal Perkins Loan Program 6. Federal PLUS loans 7. Federal Direct PLUS loans If funds remain after repaying all loan amounts, those remaining funds must be credited in the following order: 1. Federal Pell Grants for the payment period for which a return of funds is required 2. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) for which a return of funds is required 3. Other assistance under this Title for which a return of funds is required. Students will be notified of any refunds due to a lender on their behalf through the mailed exit interview material. Refunds to any of the Title IV or state programs will be paid within 45 days from the withdrawal/termination date.

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STUDENT
SERVICES
Orientation The Creative Circus provides a student orientation program each quarter for all new students. The program acquaints new students with the faculty, administrators, and academic life of the school. An agenda is designed that provides the opportunity for information on academic matters, registering of the student and answering questions. All new students are required to participate in the orientation program. Student Shows and Industry Competitions Throughout the year, students at The Creative Circus will have opportunities to enter a variety of student shows to earn recognition and awards for their hard work. The school financially sponsors many student entries. Any student whose entry was sponsored by The Circus and wins gold in a major out-of-town awards show may opt to attend the award ceremony to receive his or her award personally. The student will be responsible for his or her expenses, including but not limited to food, lodging, transportation and entertainment. Housing The Creative Circus does not offer school-sponsored housing. The Student Services manager, however, provides information regarding housing opportunities in the general vicinity of the school for both incoming and continuing students. Students wishing to be placed on a potential roommate list should contact the Student Services Manager.

CONDUCT
is informal and fun, everyone is expected to behave in > Even though the atmosphere at The Circussubject to disciplinary action and/or referral for prosecution:a respectful manner. The following conduct is • • • • • • • • Cheating, plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty. This includes the use of licensed images without permission. Students will also abide by the Fair Use Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. 107. Knowingly furnishing false information to the institution or alteration or use of school documents or instruments of identification with intent to defraud. Intentional disruption or obstruction of teaching, administration, disciplinary proceedings, or other school activities. Physical, electronic (cyber-bullying), verbal abuse or harassment of any person on institutional premises or during school-sponsored or supervised functions. Theft of school property or theft of personal property of a member of the school community on or off institutional premises; damages to the school property or property of a member of the school community on institutional premises. Failure to comply with directions of school officials acting in performance of their duties. Participation in all forms of illegal gambling. Any participation in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance. Possession or use of drugs, including alcohol, on school property could be cause for dismissal.

CODE of

Inappropriate Behavior Students agree to conduct themselves within the limits of acceptable behavior that will enable the school to recommend the graduate to prospective employers as a courteous, considerate, and well-mannered individual. Behavior that is inappropriate, distracting or offensive to other students, faculty or staff will be investigated and may result in suspension or dismissal. Weapons Weapons of any kind are prohibited anywhere on the college premises and at all school-sponsored activities. Weapons are considered to be items determined by the administration that could cause permanent and/or temporary harm to the individual or to other students and include, but are not limited to, firearms, stun guns, knives, etc., as well as ANY ITEMS deemed by the administration to be physically or emotionally detrimental to an individual, other students, the community or the school. Any student, staff, or faculty member possessing a weapon will be subject to dismissal from the school or termination of employment. Dress Code Students are expected to be neat, clean, and dressed consistently with the type of apparel that reflects industry acceptability. If the student does not adhere to these practices in the judgment of The Circus administration, suspension or termination may result. Bullying Policy The Circus expects all students, faculty and staff to abide by the golden rule: do unto others as you would have done unto you. Bullying is a form of emotional, verbal or cyber abuse and is not tolerated at The Creative Circus. In the event that a student feels that he or she has been a target of bullying in any form, a written and dated complaint should be submitted to the administration. The incident(s) will be investigated and appropriate disciplinary measures may be taken which may include, but are not limited to, counseling, suspension or dismissal.

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Sexual Harassment Policy Sexual harassment or aggravation consisting of, but not limited to, inappropriate language, touch or behavior on the part of another student or member of the school faculty or staff is strictly forbidden and any complaints of such will be investigated. Students who feel they have been sexually harassed should submit a written and dated complaint to the administration. Pending the outcome of the investigation, appropriate disciplinary measures will be taken which may include counseling, suspension or dismissal of the student. Drug-Free Policy Unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession or use of a controlled substance on the school’s grounds is prohibited. Attending classes or school functions while under the influence of drugs or alcohol is also prohibited. Any student violating this policy will be subject to disciplinary action which may include dismissal. Disciplinary Policies and Procedures Instructors are expected to ensure the progress of a class by not permitting the continued presence of any student whose behavior in any way could adversely affect the class. The administration will investigate any disciplinary complaints which may include any of the following: cheating, disruptive behavior, plagiarism, any violation of conduct as stated in the catalog and any other actions that the instructor, students, faculty or staff do not consider proper conduct for a student on any school grounds or in a school-sanctioned event. Alleged violation of student regulations or other student misconduct shall be referred to the Director of Education in writing. Penalties administered for such actions may include severe reprimand, disciplinary probation or suspension, which may or may not be recorded in the student’s permanent record. In all cases in which disciplinary suspension or dismissal could result, the student will be notified by email and certified mail of the nature of the charges and grounds against him/her and the time and date of the hearing. The notice shall also inform the student of his/her right to appear at the hearings, to face the accuser(s), and to present applicable evidence on his/her behalf.

Grievance Procedure When a grievance occurs, the student should first attempt to resolve the situation with the person whose action is in question. If a student is unable to or does not wish to do so, s/he may choose to discuss the issue with the Director of Education. If further action seems necessary, a student may follow the formal complaint and appeal process outlined below: Step 1 : The student may file in writing, within three (3) working days of the incident, a dispute with the immediate supervisor of the party against whom the complaint is being filed. The following information should be included: • A statement of the specifics involving the grievance • The date of the occurrence • A listing of policies and procedures involved • The names of the individual(s) affected • The interpretation or remedy sought The Director of Education will investigate the complaint and may conduct a conference with all involved parties in an attempt to resolve the grievance. The student will receive a written response from the Director of Education within ten (10) working days of receipt of the student’s grievance with notification to the Campus Director. Step 2 : If the grievance remains unresolved, it may be appealed within five (5) working days to the Campus Director. The Campus Director may take whatever steps are deemed necessary to resolve the matter. The Campus Director or Campus Director’s representative will render a decision that is final and binding upon all parties. If any grievance is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction within thirty (30) days, the student may forward the grievance to: Georgia Non Public Post-Secondary Education Commission 2082 East Exchange Place Suite 220 Tucker, Georgia 30084 Local: 770-414-3300 Fax: 770-414-3309 Council on Occupational Education 7840 Roswell Road Building 300 Suite 325 Atlanta, GA 30350 Local: 770-396-3896 Toll-Free: 800-917-2081 Fax: 770-396-3790

T following a > inhe Director of Education,the followingthorough hearing on the case, shall make a final determination accordance with one of actions:
• • • • • Dismissal from the school Disciplinary suspension for a specified period of time Disciplinary probation Administrative reprimand Removal of the charges against the student

Such actions may or may not be recorded on the student’s permanent record. Decisions of the Director of Education may be appealed to the Campus Director whose decision is final.

The exclusive remedy for any dispute, controversy or claim arising out of or relating to the enrollment agreement, or breach thereof, no matter how pleaded or styled, will be submitted to arbitration in accordance with the commercial rules of the American Arbitration Association, and judgment upon the award rendered by the arbitrator may be entered in any court having jurisdiction.

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ACADEMIC RESOURCES, POLICIES, and

• • • • • •

PROCEDURES
ADMINISTRATIVE PREROGATIVE
The Circus reserves the right at any time to make changes as it deems necessary or desirable in its policies and operating procedures, to modify its tuition rates, to add to or to withdraw members from its faculty and staff, to rearrange its courses and programs as teaching policies render it desirable, and to withdraw or re-sequence subjects, courses and programs as needed. In an effort to reflect the everchanging market landscape, The Circus may, on occasion, conduct experimental classes. If students are enrolled in such an experimental class, please be aware that the work may or may not produce a book-worthy piece but is designed to offer relevant skills or experience.

School security records. Employment records for school employees who are not current students. Records compiled or maintained by physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists or other recognized professionals or paraprofessionals acting or assisting in such capacities for treatment purposes, and which are available only to persons providing the treatment. Authorized representatives of the U.S. Government state and local authorities where required, and accrediting agencies. Appropriate persons or agencies in the event of a health or safety emergency. Records requested through court order or subpoena.

The school also reserves the right to release to police agencies and/or crime victims any records or information pertinent to a crime which occurred on campus, including the details of and disciplinary action taken against the alleged perpetrator of the crime. The student has the right to file a complaint concerning alleged failures by the school to comply with the requirements of FERPA at the following U.S. Department of Education office: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901 Additional information on FERPA is available from the Registrar’s office. Student Classification Student Classification is extremely important. First, student financial accounts are affected by full/ part-time designation with regard to tuition charged and financial aid eligibility. Additionally, the classification will affect students registration priority. Full-time students are given first priority of class availability. Therefore, course availability for part-time students may be limited. • Full-time Student - A full-time student is a student scheduled for 12 or more credit hours. • Part-time Student - A part-time student is a student scheduled for less than 12 hours. Program Length All programs are two years, which are eight quarters, or 88 weeks to complete the programs of study at The Circus. Students enroll for the complete program and pay tuition on a quarterly basis. Full tuition is due at the time of quarterly registration unless other arrangements have been made. Class Schedule The Creative Circus class schedule is based on eight terms of approximately ten to twelve weeks of instruction or the equivalent thereof including holidays but excluding vacation periods. Classes begin in January, April, July, and October. There is usually a short break period between each quarter. The school is closed on most legal holidays, including Thanksgiving and Christmas. The school offers its programs through both day and evening classes. Classes are offered quarterly based on academic sequence and student class population. Classes are conducted Monday through Thursday from 9:30 A.M. -12:30 P.M., 1:30 P.M. - 4:30 P.M. and 6:30 P.M. - 9:30 P.M. Some disciplines may require classes to be scheduled on Fridays or weekends. Individual schedules will vary by student and quarter.

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The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) All students shall have the right to inspect and review their educational records, to request corrections or deletions and to limit disclosure of the records in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (also referred to as the Buckley Amendment). All students are required to fill out a form at orientation indicating individuals to whom the school may disclose student records. The Director of Education oversees the educational records. Students may request to view their records by writing to the Director of Education or his/her designee and identifying the record(s) they wish to review. Such review will be allowed during regular school office hours under appropriate supervision and within 45 days of the date the request is received by the school. A student may request the school to amend his/her educational records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his/her right to privacy. Grades and course evaluations, however, can be challenged only on the grounds that they are improperly recorded. The student should write to the Director of Education and identify the part of the record he/she wants changed and specify why it is inaccurate. The Director of Education, together with other involved school personnel,will review the written request and confer with the student to make a determination. If the student is not satisfied with the result of the conference, the school will notify the student of his/her right to a formal grievance hearing. Within 45 days of the hearing,the student will be provided with a written decision, which will be considered final. Written documentation of the hearing and of the decision will be included as part of the student’s permanent record. The following are exemptions to FERPA: • Financial records submitted by a student’s parent(s). • Grades and access to student education records to parents who certify that the student is financially dependent. • A school official who has a legitimate educational interest and needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. A school official is a person employed by the school in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research or support staff position or a person or company with whom the school has contracted, such as an attorney, auditor, collection agent, employment agency or loan management agency, or a person serving on the Board of Governors, or a student serving on an official committee or assisting another school official in performing his/her tasks. • Confidential letters of recommendation received by the school prior to January 1, 1975. For such letters received after December 31, 1974, the Act permits students to waive their right to access if the letters are related to admissions, employment, or honors.

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Class Size At The Creative Circus, we believe that creative students gain the most knowledge by keeping classes between 9 and 14 students. Smaller class sizes allow instructors to provide focus on the students creative abilities and determine areas that may be in need of additional mentoring. Credit Hour Definition At The Creative Circus, thirty-three (33) contact hours (11 lecture/22 Laboratory) with appropriate outside homework hours of at least eight (8) equals 1.65 credit hours. A class hour is an instructional period of fifty (50) minutes of instruction in a sixty (60) minute time frame or the equivalent thereof. In addition to the class grades, there is the Creative Comprehensive Lab (CCL), which equates to 5.5 Credit Hours. Total credit hours to complete program for graduation is 96.8. Creative Comprehensive Lab (CCL) The CCL grade is a combination of the 3 items listed below: 1. Project Work: It is expected that each student spends a minimum of 40 hours per week on class assignments, homework and collaboration to mirror the industry. Students will track this time quarterly. Each student turns this trackery sheet into the Registrar at the end of each quarter. 2. Forum: Students are required to attend forums during which an industry professional speaks on relevant topics. These lectures are typically 1-1.5 hours and occur weekly or bi-weekly each quarter. Grad quarter students may have an opportunity to interview with the forum speaker. 3. Panel Review: At the end of each quarter, students present their work to a panel of instructors who critique the quality of the work and the progress the student has made through the quarter. Change in Student Status Any change in student name, address, telephone number, email address, employment, marital status, discipline, scheduling, etc., should be reported to the Registrar via the Change of Status form to ensure that the permanent student record is updated. Collaboration One of the attributes of The Creative Circus is the collaboration of students working together in teams. Everything that is created as class projects is jointly owned by the student(s) and the institution. Any work created as class projects may be used by the school as promotional materials.

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CHANGE in STATUS or
SCHEDULE
REGISTRATION
Continuing students are required to register each quarter for classes offered during the upcoming quarter. Registration for returning students will be held by week nine of each quarter. Notices will be posted announcing the dates and times for returning student registration. All students must complete all registration forms to be considered as registered for the following quarter. Late fees are assessed for registrations received after the published deadline date. Drop/Add Period The drop/add period is the time frame in which students may make adjustment to their schedules without being penalized academically. The drop/add period is the first week in which classes are held in an eleven-week term. If a student registers and during the drop/add period, the total number of classes the student has registered for changes the student’s status (full or part-time), the student’s paperwork will be changed to reflect the registration changes and the tuition will be adjusted accordingly. If a student drops a class after the drop/add period, but does not withdraw from school,the student will be liable for all tuition charged based on his/her schedule at the end of the drop/add period. Program Changes Permission must be obtained from the Program Directors and Director of Education for a change in program of study or schedule. The administration may waive or alter specific course requirements within any program. In each instance, the administration will consider previous experience, developed skills, and special aptitudes as well as instructor evaluation. When such changes are approved, a written record of these changes, dated and signed, will be put in the student’s file and recorded. If a student is to transfer to a different program of study, it is recommended that they make that decision within the first two quarters of attendance at The Circus. Depending on the program, any program change will be evaluated based what classes transfer from discipline to discipline. If the course is a required course in the new discipline, it counts as credit toward required credit hours. If they do not transfer, as required courses, the courses could possibly count as elective credit hours. A student is unable to transfer programs in the middle of a current quarter, in which they are enrolled as a student at The Creative Circus. See Change of Major/Educational Objective under Academic Standards for information on grading policies as they relate to program changes. Withdrawal Students desiring to withdraw from The Circus or an individual course should contact the Director of Education to obtain the required procedure and forms to initiate the official withdrawal. The date of this notification to the DOE will constitute the student’s last date of attendance regardless of the last date the student attended class. Students who withdraw from a course (within six weeks from the date classes begin) will receive a grade of W. Students withdrawing after mid-term who have maintained passing work will receive a grade of WP. Students withdrawing after mid-term who have not maintained passing work will receive a grade of WF which is computed as a failing grade. WSP and WP spare not computed in the student’s GPA but are calculated as a course attempted for purposes of determining satisfactory academic progress. Students who receive Federal Stafford Loans must schedule an exit interview with the Financial Aid

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Director before they leave school either by graduation or withdrawal.

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Suspension or Dismissal All students are expected to maintain a satisfactory level of academic achievement, to conduct themselves as responsible adults, and to attend classes regularly. The Circus reserves the right to suspend or dismiss any student who: • Fails to maintain satisfactory academic progress as outlined in standards of satisfactory progress. • Exhibits conduct which is found by the administration to be detrimental to the individual, other students, the community or the school. • Fails to meet agreed upon financial obligations to the school. Waiver of Prerequisites Under special circumstances a student may be permitted to waive a prerequisite and take a course out of sequence. Approval to waive a prerequisite shall be the responsibility of the Program Head and the Director of Education. “Waiver,” as used here, simply means a change in the order in which the courses will be taken. The student must complete all courses required in the curriculum. Substitution of Courses The Creative Circus reserves the right to substitute a course of equivalent weight and value for a prescribed course when, in the opinion of the administration, it will aid the student in achieving vocational objectives.

ATTENDANCE
STANDARDS

The Creative Circus is committed to the principle that class attendance is an essential part of its

educational programs and in its goal to prepare all students for the responsibilities of their chosen career fields. Regular class attendance is mandatory in all classes and attendance is recorded for every regularly scheduled class. All absences, late arrivals and early departures are recorded and become a part of the student’s permanent record. No distinction is made between excused and unexcused absences. Failure to comply with the attendance policy can result in reduction of the final grade, course failure, suspension, or dismissal. Externship and clinic courses and programs which are considered clock hour programs for Title IV purposes, have their own specific attendance criteria and may require make-up of all hours missed.

student has course instructors > When a that student’sreached 20forpercent absenteeismIf in isany class, his/her the student is unablewill evaluate potential academic success. it determined that to pass the class, and does not have extenuating circumstances, he/she may be dropped from the class. If the student is currently passing the class, the student will be counseled on his/her absenteeism and academic and attendance guidelines will be set for the student to continue in class. student is responsible for material covered daily class for which he/she is > Theinstance does absence fromallclass relieve the studentin eachthe responsibility for the registered. In no from performance of any part of the class work. The student is responsible for initiating any request to make-up work missed because of class absence. The decision as to the specific type of assistance to give the student with makeup work will be announced at the beginning of the term by the instructor. Makeup of missed classes does not erase an absence from a student’s record. There are no leaves of absence. If a student is absent from all classes for 11 or more calendar days, the student will be withdrawn from school. (16) days, > If the studentofhas been absent between eleven (11) andifsixteen are extremethe student may meet with the Director Education and request reinstatement there mitigating circumstances that warrant the reinstatement. Students who have missed in excess of sixteen (16) calendar days will not be reinstated. Allowable Number of Absences In the event of illness or emergency, it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with their instructors and The Director of Education before class begins to discuss the situation and to gather assignments so the student may be prepared for the next class session. It is up to the class instructor’s discretion as to whether an absence is deemed excused or unexcused. Students are limited two (2) consecutive absences per class per quarter or three (3) totals per class per quarter. A third consecutive absence or four or more absences in a class in one quarter will equate to an F in the class. Tardiness or Early Departure All late arrivals and early departures are recorded and become a part of the student’s permanent record. Accumulation of four late arrivals or early departures counts as one absence. Absence from a class that meets for a double session counts as two absences.

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ATTENDANCE PROBATION
Any student who is absent for seven (7) days in any quarter will either be placed on attendance probation or terminated from the school unless documentation of mitigating circumstances has been provided to the Director of Education and Program Director. Attendance probation means that the student is placed on notice by the school that additional absences during the quarter may result in: • Dismissal From the School • Federal financial aid or scholarships suspended for the following quarter • Ineligibility to register for classes the following quarter

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STANDARDS
GRADING SYSTEM

ACADEMIC

Appeal Process for Attendance Probation
If the student is allowed to enroll for the next quarter, attendance probation and federal financial aid eligibility and scholarships will extend until the end of that quarter. If the student continues to abuse the attendance policy (in the absence of mitigating circumstances) during that quarter, the school has no recourse but to terminate the student. Re-admission will not be allowed until four quarters have elapsed, unless specifically approved by the Program Director and Director of Education. The school will only consider early re-admission upon receipt of a written appeal by the student at least 60 days prior to the beginning of the returning quarter under consideration. The institution will respond to the written appeal within seven days of its receipt.

Grades are one measure of a student’s ability to meet employment standards in the fields for which he/ she is preparing. Upon the completion of each term, the student is given a letter grade in each class. Reports showing the final grade in each course, the quarter summary and cumulative grade point averages are furnished to each student at the end of each quarter. Class participation, homework, projects, attendance, and panel reviews are considered in arriving at final grades. Every course for which a student officially registers will appear on the student’s official transcript unless the student cancels his/her enrollment prior to the commencement of classes or prior to the end of the drop/add period. All course centered on a student’s official transcript are assigned a letter-grade evaluation. Grade Point Average The grade-point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the quality point equivalent for each grade by the quarter credit hours given for that course, adding the products and then dividing the sum by the credit hours attempted during the term. Satisfactory Academic Progress A student must meet the following standards of academic achievement and successful course completion while enrolled at The Creative Circus. SAP applies to all students, full- or part-time status, and periods of enrollment regardless of whether or not the student receives financial aid. Student enrollment status is determined at the end of the drop/add period. All courses in a program must be successfully completed with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in order for a student to graduate from the program. Permanent records are maintained for every student indicating courses completed and grades earned. A student is in good standing at the institution when allowed to enroll for the next term as a regular student during any given enrollment period. Credits earned are credits for which the student receives a passing grade at the end of the module or term. For clock hour programs, the clock hours attempted are the clock hours attended for courses in which the student is enrolled after the drop/add period and for which a grade has been entered. Clock-hours earned are the clock hours attended for courses in which the student is enrolled after the drop/add period and for which a passing grade has been entered. The student’s progress will be evaluated at the end of each term or module. SAP is also specifically evaluated following the completion of the each academic year or at 50% of the normal program length if the program is one academic year or less. For programs measured in credit hours (for financial aid purposes), this evaluation point will occur at the end of the term or module corresponding to the period during which the academic year is reached. For programs measured in clock-hours (for financial aid purposes), this evaluation point will occur at the end of the term or module where a student has actually attended scheduled classes for an hourly total corresponding to an academic year. Missing scheduled classes may delay the evaluation point beyond the original projection. The required performance thresholds for academic year evaluation points are identical to the thresholds applied for the end of any other term or module period. If a student is currently on an academic plan designed to reestablish SAP and reaches an academic year evaluation point, the academic plan is reviewed to ensure that the student is continuing to meet the plan. The plan may be restructured at that time.

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Definition of Mitigating Circumstances Mitigating circumstances in so far as absences are defined as jury duty, military or reserve duty, death or illness in the immediate family, personal injury and other rare occurrences, such as inclement weather, nuclear war, etc., as determined by the Director of Education. Last Chance Before Dismissal Please note that attendance probation will continue and financial aid will be suspended until the end of the re-enrolled quarter. During this last-chance quarter, the student is not allowed to miss more than three classes. Financial aid will be restored and attendance probation will be lifted if the student is absent no more than three classes during the quarter. The school will dismiss the student if more than three classes are missed during the last-chance quarter. This dismissal is permanent and without recourse or appeal. Make-Up Work Policy Students are accountable for all work missed during periods of absence. Students are responsible for contacting their instructors about any make-up of class work. All make-up is at the sole discretion of the instructor. Make-up of missed classes does not erase an absence from a student’s record. Reinstatement of Financial Aid A student’s financial aid may be re-instated only if he/she meets the standard above or wins an appeal.

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Evaluation Points All academic SAP reviews begin on the date the student enters the school and are cumulative in nature. SAP is determined by measuring the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and the student’s rate of progress toward completion of course credits or clock hours attempted in the academic program (pace). The calculated CGPA and pace are compared against thresholds to determine whether or not the student meets SAP (at or above threshold) for credits attempted are those credits for which the student is enrolled at the end of the drop/add period of an academic period. Satisfactory Progress Thresholds Students must meet the following qualitative and quantitative standards: • Cumulative grade point average (CGPA) (qualitative standard) = 2.0 or above • Pace (quantitative standard) = 66 2/3% or above • At the end of any measurement period, if a student’s CGPA is below 2.0 or a student’s pace is below 66 2/3%, the student’s academic progress is considered to be unsatisfactory. Maximum Timeframe/Maximum Program Length A student must complete an academic program in no more than one and one-half (1.5) times the published normal program length. A student cannot exceed the Maximum Timeframe and still receive his or her original credential unless an appeal is made and upheld as described elsewhere in this section. To determine the maximum timeframe for programs measured in credit hours (for financial aid purposes), take the published number of credit hours necessary to graduate and multiply by 1.5. Example: 96 Published Program Credits x 1.5 Maximum Timeframe 144 Maximum Attempted Credits Permitted to Complete Program The maximum timeframe for programs measured in clock-hours (for financial aid purposes) will vary, depending on a student’s status as a full- or part-time student. The maximum time frame will have both a clock hour limit and a calendar time limit.For all programs and all enrollment statuses the clock hour limit is 1.5 times the published length of the program in clock-hours. For calendar time limits, the program listing in the catalog will list separate program lengths in weeks for full-time students and for part-time students. In a clock hour program, a full-time student is a student scheduled for at least 24 clock hours per week. To determine the maximum timeframe for programs measured in clock hours (for financial aid purposes), take the appropriate (full- or part-time) published length of the program in weeks and multiply by 1.5. Fractions of a week should be rounded up to the next whole week. Example: 48 Published Program Length x 1.5 Maximum Timeframe 72 Maximum Weeks permitted to Complete Program Clock Hours Or: 1200 Published Clock Hours X 1.5 Maximum Timeframe 1800 Maximum Clock Hours Attempted Permitted to Complete the Program

f, the Maximum Timeframe, > Ihe at anytime, a student cannot complete his or her program oftostudy withinand will be dismissed from or she is immediately considered mathematically unable continue his or her program of study. This action may be appealed by following the appeal procedure outlined elsewhere in this section. Unsatisfactory Academic Progress Students not meeting SAP are subject to dismissal from their program of study and are ineligible to receive financial aid, except under special circumstances. When a student’s progress is evaluated as prescribed and his or her academic performance is below either of the thresholds required to maintain SAP, the student’s academic progress will be projected to determine if and when it would be possible for the student to reestablish SAP. Letter Grade Hour A B C F WF I Definition 90-100% 80-89% 70-79% Below 69% Withdraw Failing Incomplete Quality Points per quarter 4 3 2 0 0 0

The following grades are used on grade reports and are calculated in a student’s maximum timeframe for course completion requirements and also count as credits attempted for pace calculations, but they are not used in the determination of a student’s grade-point average: Letter Grade Hour R W WP S U P TI Definition Repeated Course Withdrawal before mid-term Withdrawal passing after m-t Satisfactory (A,B,C) Unsatisfactory (F) Passing Examination Transferred grade before term Quality Points per quarter Not Applicable NA NA NA NA NA NA

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Letter Grade Hour A1 B1 C1 F1 W1 WP1 S1 U1 Definition A transferred in B transferred in C transferred in F transferred in W transferred in WP transferred in S transferred in U transferred in Quality Points per quarter 4 3 2 0 Not Applicable NA NA NA

PROFICIENCY TESTS
The P grade is assigned when credit is granted by proficiency or challenge examination. Grades of P count as credits attempted and earned for the purposes of calculating the pace of progress. Grades of P are not used in calculating CGPA. Repeated Courses F, U, W, WP, and WF grades require repeating and are retained on the transcript. Repeated courses will appear on the transcript with the new letter grade earned and the previous attempts of the course will be assigned a grade of R to indicate Repeated. The new grade will replace the original grade for the purposes of calculating the CGPA. Courses which have been repeated (grades of R) will count as credits attempted for the purposes of calculating pace. Students in non-term credit hour programs or clock hour programs may not receive financial aid for repeated courses. Students in term-based credit hour programs may receive financial aid to repeat failed courses. Other than Foundations courses, which can only be repeated a single time, there is no fixed limit to the number of times a particular course may be repeated as long as a student is making satisfactory academic progress. As of July 1, 2011, a student’s enrollment status in a term-based, credit hour program for Title IV purposes may include coursework being repeated that was previously taken in the program, but may not include more than one repetition of a specific, previously passed course. The original grade will be replaced with an R and the repeated grade will be used in calculating the CGPA. All attempts count in the pace of the program. Transfer Credits Transfer credits are entered as grades of T1 which are not computed in a student’s qualitative grade point average. Transfer credits are counted as credits attempted and earned for the purposes of calculating a student’s pace of progress in the program. See also Advanced Standing by Transfer Credit in this catalog.

with additional locations. These grades are used on grade reports and count as credits attempted for both pace and (potentially) CGPA.

Pass Grades The grade of Pass given when a student is making satisfactory progress, but for a valid reason, is unable to complete the quarter’s work. The student must have completed 75% of the class work assigned. The student must initiate an arrangement with his/her instructor to make up the required work prior to the end of the second week of the succeeding quarter. If not completed within this timeframe, the grade will be converted to an F. Pass grades count as credit hours attempted but not completed. When the Pass converted to a letter grade, it will then be computed as credit hours completed. When the Pass is converted to a letter grade, it will be computed as credit hours completed. This occurs by the teacher requesting a grade change. Incomplete Grades The grade of Incomplete (I) is given only when the student is making satisfactory progress in a class, but for valid reason is unable to complete all the work in the class by the time the class ends. The student must have successfully completed a minimum of 75% of the class work assigned at the time the Incomplete is requested. Students must initiate arrangements with instructors and receive approval of the Director of Education to make up the required work before the end of the first week of the succeeding module/term. At that time the grade will be calculated based on the work submitted and will replace the Incomplete. Incomplete grades count as credits/hours attempted but not completed. When the Incomplete is converted to a letter grade, it will be computed as credits/hours completed or failed, depending on the grade assigned. Course Withdrawals The W grade is assigned to class withdrawals after the drop/add period and before the mid-term date. Withdrawals during the drop/add period of the term/module will not appear on the student’s transcript. After the mid-term, course withdrawals are recorded as WP (Withdrawal Passing) or WF (Withdrawal Failing). If extenuating circumstances warrant other consideration, an appeal may be made through the Academic Review Committee, as described elsewhere in this catalog. W, WP, and WF grades count as credits attempted but not earned for the purposes of calculating the pace in academic progress. WF grades count as credits attempted but not earned for the purposes of calculating CGPA until they are repeated. Grades of W and WP are not used in calculating CGPA. Pass/Fail Courses Grades of S and U are assigned to classes that do not fulfill graduation requirements such as foundations courses that are graded on a pass/fail basis. Foundations courses may not be repeated more than one time.

Students who transfer between campuses of an institution that have a main campus with additional locations will have all applicable coursework transferred, both successful and unsuccessful. Grades will be entered as A1, B1, C1, F1, W1, WF1, WP1, S1 or U1, indicating such a transfer. These grades will be used in calculating both qualitative grade point average and pace of progress as defined in the Standards of Academic Progress policy.
Audited Courses Audited courses are assigned a grade of AU. Audited courses do not count as credits attempted or credits earned for any purposes and do not have any effect on calculations of pace or GPA. Change of Major/Educational Objective When a student transfers to a new program, the total program length of the new program is used as a basis for determining normal program length and maximum program length/maximum timeframe. All previously attempted coursework that is applicable in the new program is carried forward into the new program, whether it was completed successfully or not (i.e., including grades of F, WF, WP or W), for the purposes of calculating both qualitative (CGPA) and quantitative (pace) academic progress. Coursework brought forward is applied to these progress calculations as described in the Standards of Academic Progress policy. Existing academic year boundaries are preserved, based on the previously applicable coursework that is transferred into the new program. If satisfactory academic progress cannot be established at the outset of the program transfer, the transfer will not be approved. The following table summarizes the effect of specific grades on the calculations of pace and CGPA:

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GRADE

COUNTS AS CREDITS ATTEMPTED FOR PACE YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES NO

COUNTS AS CREDITS ATTEMPTED FOR GPA YES YES YES YES* NO NO NO NO YES* NO YES YES YES YES* NO NO YES* NO NO YES NO NO NO

COUNTS AS CREDITS EARNED YES YES YES NO YES NO NO NO NO YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO YES NO NO YES NO NO

QUALITY POINTS PER CREDIT 4 3 2 0 NA NA NA NA 0 NA 4 3 2 0 NA NA 0 NA NA 0 NA NA NA

FINANCIAL AID WARNING
If a students progress, measured at the end of a payment period, is determined to be unsatisfactory and a projection indicates that it is possible to reestablish SAP by the end of the subsequent payment period, the school may place the student on Financial Aid Warning status for one payment period. The student will be advised of the performance necessary to reestablish SAP. A student on Financial Aid Warning is still eligible to receive financial aid. If, at the end of the payment period during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is above both thresholds for SAP the student is removed from Financial Aid Warning status. If, at the end of the payment period during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA, the student is no longer eligible to receive financial aid and no longer eligible to remain in school. This decision is subject to appeal by the student as defined below. Appeals of Adverse Determinations Students who are ineligible to receive financial aid and are academically ineligible to continue due to unsatisfactory academic progress are advised immediately following the determination. Students may submit a written appeal to the Academic Review Committee. This appeal must be filed within five (5) business days of notification of the decision and must, at a minimum, explain in writing the circumstances that led to their unsatisfactory academic performance and also explain why they feel that these circumstances will not be a factor going forward. The Academic Review Committee will consider all information including potential mitigating circumstances provided by the student such as illness or other personal medical issues, family situations, financial obligations or other circumstances presented by the student. The Academic Review Committee will uphold or deny the appeal within five (5) business days following receipt of the appeal from the student. A student who has been dismissed due to unsatisfactory academic progress must have an appeal upheld prior to the drop/add date in any term in order to attend classes in that particular term. If an appeal is denied, the student will remain dismissed and ineligible to receive financial aid. There is no limit to the number of appeals that a student may make. If the appeal is upheld, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation status for one payment period, an academic plan will be created for the student, and the student will be considered eligible to receive financial aid. The academic plan must be structured so that a student reestablishes SAP prior to exceeding the Maximum Timeframe. The student’s performance against the academic plan will be analyzed at the end of each payment period. If, at the end of a payment period, the student’s performance is consistent with the terms of the academic plan, the student remains eligible to receive financial aid and may continue in school for the subsequent payment period. If, at the end of a payment period, the student’s performance is unsatisfactory, the student will be dismissed from his or her program of study. Students on academic plans will be advised at the end of each payment period to ensure that they understand their performance during this time and how it compares against the plan. A student may reestablish satisfactory academic progress at anytime if s/he successfully completes a payment period with a CGPA at or above 2.0 and apace at or above 66 2 /3 %. Students who reestablish satisfatory academic progress are advised that they no longer need to be on an academic plan and remain eligible to receive financial aid.

A B C F S U W WP WF T1 A1 B1 C1 F1 W1 WP1 WF1 S1 U1 I P R AU

* Until course is retaken to successful completion, at which point, these credits no longer count as credits attempted for the purposes of calculating CGPA.

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status at the beginning and end of any given payment period. STATUS AT BEGINNING OF PAYMENT PERIOD SATISFACTORY SAP SATISFACTORY SAP FINANCIAL AID WARNING FINANCIAL AID WARNING FINANCIAL AID PROBATION FINANCIAL AID PROBATION FINANCIAL AID PROBATION ON ACADEMIC PLAN ON ACADEMIC PLAN ON ACADEMIC PLAN STATUS AT END OF PAYMENT PERIOD SATISFACTORY SAP UNSATISFACTORY SAP SATISFACTORY SAP UNSATISFACTORY SAP SATISFACTORY SAP UNSATISFACTORY SAP MAKING ACADEMIC PLAN UNSATISFACTORY SAP NOT MAKING ACADEMIC PLAN MAKING ACADEMIC PLAN FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBLE? YES NO* YES NO YES YES ELIGIBLE FOR APPEAL? NA YES* NA YES NA NA

Academic Probation When a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) falls below a 2.0 or his or her progress falls below 65% completion rate (credits earned) of credits attended, the student will be placed on Academic Probation and notified by the Director of Education. Students on academic probation remain eligible for financial aid and are considered to be making satisfactory academic progress for both academic and financial aid eligibility. Students may move out of the status of Academic Probation if, at the next evaluation point, the CGPA and course completion percentage exceeds the probationary levels on the Standards of Progress Tables. Failure to do so will result in the student not being able to continue as a regular student and being academically suspended. A student may be placed on Academic probation for two consecutive quarters to allow sufficient opportunity for the student to meet the standards of satisfactory Academic Progress. A student may also be placed on Academic probation if he or she does not meet benchmarks as determined by the Department Head and the Director of Education. Disruptive behavior may also result in Academic Probation and/or Suspension. Academic Suspension At the end of the second quarter on Academic probation, if the student fails to meet the standards of Satisfactory Academic progress, he or she may be suspended from further attendance. When a student fails to meet the criteria required to be released from Academic probation, the student becomes ineligible for financial aid. Reinstatement as a regular student following a period of Academic Suspension will require approval of the Program Director and the Director of Education.

NO

NO R PROGRAM DISMISSAL NA NO R PROGRAM DISMISSAL NA

YES

NOT MAKING ACADEMIC NO PLAN SATISFACTORY SAP YES

* In some cases, a student may automatically be placed on Financial Aid Warning in this situation. Students in Financial Aid Warning status are eligible for financial aid and appeals are not necessary for students in this status. See Financial Aid Warning for more details.

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POST

GRADUATION
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To graduate from any program, a student must: • Industry-ready Portfolio as evaluated by the Grade Committee • Maintain a minimum CGPA of 2.0 while enrolled • Satisfactorily complete all current curriculum requirements or their equivalent • Fulfill all financial obligations to the institution • Complete minimum clock hour/credit hour requirements after consideration of transfer credits or advanced placement.

Transcripts A full and complete record of every course for which a student registers is maintained on a Student Record and Transcript Form. The record of all credits attempted and earned is posted to this form concurrent with the issuance of quarterly grade reports to students. A sealed and dated copy of this form represents an Official Transcript. Challenges or changes of these entries must occur within seven days. One Unofficial Transcript will be provided at no charge to the student upon request. Official Transcripts provided to any institution or agency designated by the student will incur a charge of $10.00 each. Students who have not satisfied their financial obligations to the school are not eligible to receive or request transcripts. Written authorization by the student is required for The Circus to release an Official Transcript. Permanent records are maintained for every student indicating courses completed and grades earned. A student is in good standing at the institution when allowed to enroll for the ensuing quarter as a regular student, whether or not on Academic Probation, during enrollment period. Graduation Ceremony In an effort to recognize and commend students for achievements and completion of program requirements, graduation ceremonies are held quarterly for successful candidates. Students are presented with certificates at this time and given the opportunity to present some of their work to their family and friends.

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The Graduate Committee is comprised of the student’s Program Director, the Executive Creative Director, the Career Services Director and a representative of the industry. This committee will review and evaluate the portfolios of all prospective graduates. The Portfolio Review is part of each programs graduate portfolio review course. Students who do not meet the requirements have two options to complete their portfolio for a rereview by the Graduation Committee. Status is changed to drop and there is a specified time given to the student to complete their portfolio and re-submit to the Graduation Committee for review. Student enrolls in a 9th quarter to complete their portfolio. At the end of this quarter the student’s portfolios are resubmitted to the Graduation Committee for review. Once the portfolio is deemed industry-ready by the Graduation Committee and approved, the student’s status is changed to Graduate. At this time, the student is eligible for gainful employment. Early Graduation Policy Occasionally, students become employed in their field of study prior to their scheduled graduation date and still wish to be considered a graduate of the school. Although this is not a common occurrence, since the student will not meet all of the graduation requirements, special approval is required. Students, who secure employment in the industry and wish to be changed to Graduate status prior to his or her scheduled graduation date, must submit the Early Grad/Exempt from Grad Class form to the Director of Education. The Program Director must review the request, review the student’s portfolio/grades to date, and sign the Early Grad/Exempt from Grad Class worksheet for approval. The Campus Director and the Director of Education will determine whether the change of status is approved. The basic criteria for the final determination will be a review of the initial request; review of the Program Director recommendation, and the student either completing the sixth quarter of the program or at least 75% of program credit hours. If approval is granted, the student will receive a Certificate dated as of the graduation date of the quarter in which the request was made. If the student seeks graduation status, because of employment, between two quarters, and meets all the graduation requirements, the student’s graduation date will be the graduation date of the previous quarter (corresponding with the student’s Last Day of Attendance). If the student wishes to participate in the graduation ceremonies, he/she will have the opportunity to participate in the quarter following the approval. If approval is denied,the student will have the option to be considered a withdrawal, a completer (non-grad) or remain in school until the regularly scheduled graduation date, as stipulated by the current policies and procedures.

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CAREER

SERVICES
ASSISTANCE TO GRADUATES
The Creative Circus offers assistance to graduates seeking employment opportunities. The school does not promise employment and cannot be held responsible if a student fails to find employment. Students may seek counsel of this department as long as they are enrolled in good standing and/or are considered a Graduate. Some of the services provided by the Career Services Department include, but are not limited to: • Personal placement counseling • Contact lists of employers throughout the U.S. • Follow-up Surveys • Graduate industry Portfolio Reviews • Mentor assignments in 5th quarter • One-on-one interviews with forum speakers Students are encouraged to maintain contact with the Director of Career Services to notify the office of any change in address or status. Once employment is secured, the graduate must provide statistical data on the job and salary range to the Career Services Director. Maintaining close communication with the Career Services Department regarding employment updates is essential to the continuing success of The Circus placement efforts. Students with outstanding balances, who withdraw prior to completion, who fail to participate in required career services activities, or do not have a finished portfolio and deemed a graduate, waive all future rights to career services assistance. Requirements During a Job Search The Grad Handbook, received by all graduate quarter students, contains all of the requirements for graduation as well as a list of items to be generated for a job search. Advance copies of this handbook can be obtained from the Program Directors or the Career Services Director. Graduate websites are kept on file and posted on line. Meeting with the Director of Career Services, prior to graduation for a graduate exit interview, is required. Placement assistance is only available to The Circus graduates. The portfolios of 8th quarter students that are not industry ready will not be able to utilize the assistance of the Career Services Department. Once the student has resubmitted their portfolio for re-review and it has been approved by the Graduation Committee, the student will be considered a graduate and now eligible for the services provided by the Career Services Office.

TUITION
effective May students have the benefit lock> The following costs are budget tuition17, 2011.AsEnrollingan enrolled student does of our tuitioncancel in policy to help them costs. long as not defer or and remains enrolled in good academic standing as a continuous, full-time student, he or she will not incur a tuition increase while enrolled in school. Application Fee • $100 One-time, non-refundable fee due at the time of application. Late Registration Fee • Students who register after the published registration period has closed must pay a late registration fee of $50. Full Time Student Tuition Fees • $455 Tuition per credit hour • $1,835.17 Tuition per month • $5,505.50 Tuition per quarter (12.1 credit hours/no lab fee) • $16,516.50 Tuition per academic year (3 quarters/no lab fee) • $44,044.00 Tuition full 8 quarters $45,044.00 Estimated total tuition + lab fee Lab Fee • $125 Quarterly fee Textbooks, Supplies and Equipment The school maintains a list of materials needed during the program, but supplies will vary widely among programs and projects. This list is given to the student during the admission process or the first day of class. • $500-$800 quarterly supply fees vary by program, class, and project. Housing • $300-$1200 monthly. Costs vary by location and number of roommates. Late Payment Fees • Students who fail to make a tuition payment by the contracted dates will be assessed a fee of up to $15 per late payment. Transcript Fee One transcript will be made available to each student at no charge. • A $10 charge is made for each additional transcript that is requested. Official transcripts for work completed will not be issued until all obligations to The Circus have been met. Photocopies and Color Prints • Photocopies and Color Prints are charged through a print card, which may be bought from the receptionist for $20.

and FEES

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The CREATIVE CIRCUS

The MISSION of

The mission of The Creative Circus is to graduate the best-prepared, most avidly sought-after creatives in the industry.

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EDUCATIONAL
PROGRAMS
ART DIRECTION PROGRAM OBJECTIVE View Curriculum on Page 5

The Art Direction program is focused on preparing each student for a creative career in communication arts. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, color theory, typography, layout design, mastery of design software, corporate branding and media (both traditional and emerging). Upon graduation, students have mastery of the process of creating original, compelling brand communication, and they have portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure the best art direction jobs in the advertising and commercial communication arts field.

COPYWRITING PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

View Curriculum on Page 7

The Copywriting program is focused on preparing each student for a career in communication arts. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, basics of headline and long copy writing, basic page design and typography, competency of design software, branding and media (both traditional and emerging). Upon graduation, students have mastery of the process of creating original, strategic,compelling brand communication, and they have portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure the best writing jobs in the advertising and commercial communication arts field.

GRAPHIC DESIGN PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

View Curriculum on Page 9

The Graphic Design Program is focused on providing the best possible training in the thinking, art, craft and technology for the design field. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, color theory, typography, layout design, mastery of design software, branding, dimensional and experiential design and media (both traditional and emerging). The department works closely with the student during his/her tenure at The Circus to develop a portfolio and to offer all possible assistance in helping them secure employment in the best possible position. Upon graduation, students have mastery of the process of creating original, compelling brand communication, and they have portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure a job in the commercial communication arts field.

IMAGE (PHOTOGRAPHY) PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

View Curriculum on Page 11

The Image Program is focused on providing balanced and versatile training in the art,craft and technology necessary for working in the field of Commercial Photography. The program stresses Strategic Thinking, Digital Workflow, Image Manipulation, Team Collaboration, and Professional Practices. The Image Department works closely with the student during his/her tenure at The Circus to develop a unique portfolio that represents their area of specialization, and to offer all possible assistance in helping them secure employment. Upon graduation, students have a clear understanding of the production process, the marketplace and its expectations, and possess portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure a job in the Commercial Photography field.

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INTERACTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

View Curriculum on Page 13

The Interactive Development program focuses on preparing students for a successful career in the digital communications industry. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, programming languages and logic, art production, animation and other skills necessary for successful web development. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, programming logic, creative use of technology and the daily processes required to produce engaging and innovative interactive media. Upon graduation students have a mastery of the primary languages of the web and can produce engaging interactive media taking advantage of new standards and trends online. Upon graduation students have a mastery of the primary languages of the web and the processes and skills required to produce successful creative media. Students will have unique portfolios showcasing their technical skills and their abilities to work with creative teams to produce successful projects.

INTERACTIVE DESIGN PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

View Curriculum on Page 15

The Interactive Design program prepares students for successful careers in the digital communications industry. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, design fundamentals, art production, animation and other skills necessary for successful web and interactive media designers. Students explore creative uses of technology and learn the daily processes required to design and produce engaging and innovative interactive media. Upon graduation students have a mastery of the design and production skills required to produce engaging interactive media taking advantage of new standards and trends online. Students will have unique portfolios showcasing their creative and technical skills and their abilities to work with creative teams to design successful projects.

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This catalog is an official publication of The Creative Circus and is subject to revisions at any time. The school reserves the right to change, withdraw or supplement this catalog as it deems necessary or appropriate in its policies and operating procedures, curricula, class schedules, course content, training, equipment, tuition and fees, faculty and staff without any notice at any time. Students are individually responsible for being aware of information contained in the school catalog and any amendments thereto. Failure to read and comply with school regulations will not exempt students from penalties that they may incur. Students are advised to read and fully understand the rules, regulations and policies stated herein and to retain this catalog for use as a reference.

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ART DIRECTION
CURRICULUM

1st QUARTER
GE102 VS101 VS102 VS203 CCL100 Intro to Creative Thinking Typography 1 Intro to Graphic Design Production Methodologies Creative Comprehensive Lab

2nd QUARTER
CG904 TM210 VS201 VS202 CCL200 Intro to Graphic Programs Intro to Creative Teams Typography 2 Color Theory Creative Comprehensive Lab

3rd QUARTER
GE101 TM301 TM311 VS301 CCL300 Strategy 1 Creative Team 3 Advertising Concepts 1 Typography 3 Creative Comprehensive Lab

4th QUARTER
CG925 DS606 TM410 TM411 CCL400 Digital 1 Branding Creative Team 4 Advertising Concepts 2 Creative Comprehensive Lab

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5th QUARTER
AD401 DS520 TM510 TM511 CCL500 Layout 1 Brand Extension Creative Team 5 Advertising Concept 3 Creative Comprehensive Lab

6th QUARTER
AD501 TM610 TM 611 XXX CCL600 Layout 2 Creative Team 6: Alt Marketing Advertising Concepts 4 Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

7th QUARTER
TM601 DS104 TM710 TM711 CCL700 Interdisciplinary Teams 1 Trademarks Creative Teams 7 Advertising Concepts 5 Creative Comprehensive Lab

8th QUARTER
GR801 TM814 GR804 XXX CCL800 Graduate Portfolio Review Concepting for the Portfolio Perfecting Portfolio Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

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COPYWRITING
CURRICULUM

1st QUARTER
CW101 CW104 GE102 VS203 CCL100 Intro to Copywriting Art Direction for Copywriting Intro to Creative Thinking Production Methodologies Creative Comprehensive Lab

2nd QUARTER
CG904 CW201 CW203 TM210 CCL200 Intro to Graphic Programs Developing Your Voice Writing for Radio Intro to Creative Team Creative Comprehensive Lab

3rd QUARTER
CW106 CW301 TM310 TM311 CCL300 Headlines Copy 1 Creative Team 3 Ad Concepts 1 Creative Comprehensive Lab

4th QUARTER
CG925 TM410 TM411 CW601 CCL400 Digital 1 Creative Team 4 Advertising Concepts 2 Writing Long Copy Creative Comprehensive Lab

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5th QUARTER
CW720 DS520 TM510 TM511 CCL500 Copycrafting 1 Brand Extension Creative Team 5 Advertising Concepts 3 Creative Comprehensive Lab

6th QUARTER
TM601 TM610 TM611 XXX CCL600 Interdisciplinary Teams I Creative Team 6: Alt Marketing Advertising Concepts 4 Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

7th QUARTER
DS706B TM710 TM711 XXX CCL700 Cultural Media Creative Team 7 Advertising Concepts 5 Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

8th QUARTER
CW805 GR801 XXX XXX CCL800 Professional Developing for Copy Graduate Portfolio Review Elective Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

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GRAPHIC DESIGN
CURRICULUM

1st QUARTER
CG102 GE102 VS101 VS102 CCL100 Intro to Graphic Programs/Production Methodologies Intro to Creative Thinking Typography Intro to Graphic Design Creative Comprehensive Lab

2nd QUARTER
GE101 VS201 VS202 XXX CCL200 Strategy Typography 2 Color Theory Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

3rd QUARTER
DS104 CG913 VS301 VS401 CCL300 Trademarks Photoshop 2 Typography 3 Design Concepts Creative Comprehensive Lab

4th QUARTER
CG921 CG925 DS403 DS606 CCL400 Web Design 1 Digital 1 Package Design Branding Creative Comprehensive Lab

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5th QUARTER
DS506 DS520 DS200 XXX CCL500 Publication Design Brand Extensions Information Architecture Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

6th QUARTER
GE976 DS301 VS302 XXX CCL600 Books, Boxes and Portfolios Illustration for Design Advanced Color Theory Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

7th QUARTER
DS706B DS803 TM601 XXX CCL700 Cultural Media Creative Sequential Design Interdisciplinary Team 1 Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

8th QUARTER
DS505 DS705 GR801 XXX CCL800 Corporate Identity Professional Practices Graduate Portfolio/Job Prep Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

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IMAGE

CURRICULUM

1st QUARTER
IM100 IM110 IM120 IM130 CCL100 Basic Lighting Digital Photography Digital Color Management Boot Camp Creative Comprehensive Lab

2nd QUARTER
IM200 IM120 VS202 IM220 CCL200 Advanced Lighting Digital Photography 2 Color Theory Visual Thinking for Photography Creative Comprehensive Lab

3rd QUARTER
IM410 IM310 IM350 XXX CCL300 Competition for Image Introduction to Portraiture Equipment and Tools Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

4th QUARTER
IM340 IM420 IM430 GE920 CCL400 Documentary Photography Fashion and Beauty Interiors and Exteriors Film/Video/TV Production Creative Comprehensive Lab

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5th QUARTER
DV304 IM510 IM730 XXX CCL500 Introduction to Video Editing Tabletop/Still Life Photography Business Marketing Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

6th QUARTER
TM601 DV303 IM520 IM620 CCL600 Interdisciplinary Teams 2 Motion Graphics Basic Corporate Photography Styling Creative Comprehensive Lab

7th QUARTER
IM640 TM701 IM830 XXX CCL700 Weddings Interdisciplinary Teams 3 Assisting Workshop Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

8th QUARTER
GR803 IM810 IM820 IM840 CCL800 Advanced Specialized Study Graduate Portfolio Development Individual Projects 2 Directed Studies 1 Creative Comprehensive Lab

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INTERACTIVE DEVELOPMENT
CURRICULUM

1st QUARTER
DV100 DV101 DV107 DV200 CCL100 Web Development Strategy for Interactive Media Illustrator/Photoshop for the Web Information Architecture Creative Comprehensive Lab

2nd QUARTER
DV130 DV101 DV202 DV203 CCL200 Web Production Studio Web Development and Implementation Intermediate Web Animation 2 User Experience Creative Comprehensive Lab

3rd QUARTER
CG925 TM220 DV301 TM810 CCL300 Digital 1 Creative Team 2/Web Ad Studio Web Development and Implementation Advanced Introduction to Programming DV311/Teams Creative Comprehensive Lab

4th QUARTER
DV304B DV330 DV401 DV411 CCL400 Intro to Video Editing Interactive Studio 1 Web Development Web Development Studio Creative Comprehensive Lab

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5th QUARTER
DV302 DV303 DV430 DV501 CCL500 Web Animation Intermediate Motion Graphics Basics Interactive Studio 2 Web Development 5 Creative Comprehensive Lab

6th QUARTER
DV402 DV500 DV530 XXX CCL600 Web Animation Advanced Object Oriented Programming Interactive Studio 3 Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

7th QUARTER
DV421 DV502 DV620 XXX CCL700 Application Development Rich Media Development 4 Mobile Application Studio Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

8th QUARTER
DV190 DV191 XXX XXX CCL800 Professional Practices Graduate Studio Elective Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

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INTERACTIVE DESIGN

CURRICULUM

1st QUARTER
DV100 DV200B ID100 ID110 CCL100 Web Development Planning Successful ID Projects Intro to Design/Color Theory Survey of Technologies Creative Comprehensive Lab

2nd QUARTER
DV201B DV107 ID200 ID210 CCL200 Web Development Illustrator/Photoshop for the Web Type for Interactive Designers User Experience Design Creative Comprehensive Lab

3rd QUARTER
DV202B CG925 DS104 CG921B CCL300 Rich Media Development 1 Trends Trademarks Web Design 1 Creative Comprehensive Lab

4th QUARTER
DV304B GE101 ID300 ID400 CCL400 Video Editing Strategy Motion Typography Interactive Design 1 Creative Comprehensive Lab

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5th QUARTER
TM420 ID500 DS606 DV303 CCL500 Teams 4 Interactive Design 2 Branding Motion Graphics 1 Creative Comprehensive Lab

6th QUARTER
DS706 DV403B ID600 ID610 CCL600 Advanced Branding Motion Graphics 2 Digital Publications Design for Mobile Creative Comprehensive Lab

7th QUARTER
DS520 DS706B TM750 XXX CCL700 Brand Extensions Cultural Media Mobile App Teams Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

8th QUARTER
DS805 DS701 DS705 XXX CCL800 Graduate Portfolio Review Independent Study 1 Professional Practices Elective Creative Comprehensive Lab

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AD401 Layout 1 Basic awareness of spatial relationships of headlines, photos, body copy, logos, and white space. AD501 Layout 2 The course focus is on more intricate layouts. Multi-visual, run-around typography, mixed media, multi-page layouts, brochures. CCL100 Creative Comprehensive Lab Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter-to-quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student’s evolving portfolio. Student’s attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. CG102 Intro to Graphic Programs/Production Methodologies Introduction to standard Adobe software. This hands-on course offers the student knowledge of how to prepare his or her work for printing and reproduction. The course covers various printing methods, inks, papers and press prep methods. CG903 Photoshop 1 This course introduces the student to the standard industry software for image manipulation. The student learns the basics of utilizing program capabilities such as scanning, photo retouching, color correcting, subject rearrangement and other image editing functions. CG904 Intro to Graphic Programs Introduction to standard Adobe software. CG913 Photoshop 2 Introduction to the standard industry software for image manipulation. CG916 Photoshop 3 This course gives students the opportunity to hone their Photoshop skills. Encouraging the students to review previous techniques as they continue to polish their projects for their grad books. CG921 Web Design 1 This class is an introduction to concepting for the interactive environment: the structure, principles and creative processes associated with concepting effective new media. CG925 Digital 1 This seminar course will introduce students to the concepts behind using new media and trend spotting in advertising. CG931 Web Production Sometimes a character is a mascot and is just the thing a project, brand, package or digital experience needs. This class explores the beginnings and development of these particular personalities and applies them to real-world assignments. This course will utilize both in-class and out-of-class learning activities to achieve course objectives.

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CW101 Intro to Copywriting This introductory course will allow the student to begin to learn the rudimentary techniques of advertising headline and body copywriting, the economy of words and thought peculiar to this type of writing and the necessity of creative thinking in written expression. CW104 Art Direction for Copywriting Taught by an art director, this course will familiarize copywriters with special skills, techniques, constraints and freedoms facing those who will be their career partners in the professional world. CW106 Headlines Marrying concept with design principles in order to create a cohesive, communicative end product. CW201 Developing Your Voice The professional advertising writer must have a distinctly personal style in the way she or he approaches a problem, whether conceptual or written. This course will encourage the student to overcome inhibitions and prejudices in order to allow her or him to gain experience and confidence in the value or her or his intrinsic talent and ability to tell stories with audio and video. CW203 Writing for Radio The professional advertising writer must have a distinctly personal style in the way she or he approaches a problem, whether conceptual or written. This course will encourage the student to overcome inhibitions and prejudices in order to allow her or him to gain experience and confidence in the value or her or his intrinsic talent and ability. CW301 Copy 1 This is not about building a book: it is about building the skills to build a book and draw attention to your work: style, emotion, grammar, rhythm, meaning, rewriting; in short, writing right. CW501 Advanced Radio Students will master all aspects of how to record & produce radio commercials. Regular field trips will be taken for students to work alongside an audio engineer and be put in charge of directing the entire recording session. Each student will produce at least 1 radio spot during this course. CW601 Writing Long Copy Students will learn to craft longer content, both for online use and offline. Interaction is stressed, but so is compelling use of language to tell a selling story. CW720 Copycrafting 1 The advanced copywriting student will break down and improve his/her copy, word by word, for possible portfolio pieces. CW805 Professional Developing for Copy Focus on and learn professional best practices, self- promotion and career development. DS104 Trademarks Through research, in-class concepting and outside assignments, students learn that a logo is an advertisement, expression, visual representation and synopsis of the subject matter in a simple wordless statement.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
DS301 Illustration for Design Creating and completing original art for various media, formats, functions and problems with an emphasis on hand skills and mixed media. DS403 Package Design Pushing the idea of packaging and how a product and package can work together to make it more desirable. DS504 Advanced Trademarks This course continues to develop the student’s skill such that he or she has a variety of visual solutions for any given identity problem. DS505 Corporate Identity Exploration of the conceptual and technical understanding of a corporate ID as a system of communication. DS506 Publication Design Introduction to magazine design by developing a publication that speaks to a specific audience. DS520 Brand Extension Students from varied disciplines will come together in this course to concept and develop another dimension of an existing brand in an effort to enhance the client’s opportunities for revenue. DS606 Branding Explore brand identity and how to consider the logo, trademark, messaging and voice on a holistic level. DS701 Independent Study 1 This course allows students to receive individualized feedback on book pieces. Group critique as well as one-on-one instructor consultation. DS705 Professional Practices Focus on and learn professional best practices, self- promotion and career development. DS706B Cultural Media This class combines three creative disciplines in creating a CSR campaign for a company. Two projects will be completed by each team. DS801 Independent Study 2 This course allows advanced students to receive individualized feedback on book pieces. Group critique as well as one-on-one instructor consultation. DS803 Creative Sequential Design Student explores who they ar e or what they love in a set of deliverables that reflect and expression of themselves. DV100 Web Development This course will focus on the various roles and responsibilities of those working on a web site development team. Having a general understanding of their similarities, roles, and responsibilities is critical to the successful deployment of a project. Students will learn to take their designs and scaffold them so their designs can be prepped for further development for the web. Web Development essentials i.e.; FTP, version control, professionalism, xhtml, css.

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DV101 Web Development and Implementation Intermediate CSS Development and Liquid Layout i.e.: JavaScript, Jquery. DV101 Strategy for Interactive Media Introduces students to the basics of developing a creative strategy based on sound business principles, realistic budgets and focused demographics. DV107 Illustrator/Photoshop for the Web Creating vector based assets for the web. DV130 Web Production Studio This class covers file preparation and basic production processes including studio, agency, freelance and client-side daily process and habits overview. DV190 Professional Practices This course gives an overview of professional practices for interactive designers and developers including daily process techniques, communication with other team members, freelance processes and other important subjects for creatives beginning their careers. DV191 Graduate Studio This is a portfolio review for interactive designers and developers during which students focus on preparing their portfolios and other assets necessary for building a successful career. DV201B Web Development 2 More advanced CSS Development and Liquid Layout i.e.; JavaScript, jquery. DV202 Web Animation 2 Learn the fundamentals for creating timeline animations for the web using AdobeFlash. This course will utilize both in-class and out-of-class learning activities to achieve course objectives. DV203 User Experience Covers information architecture, usability, user-focused design and experience design principles with the goal of building an understanding of how to think about, plan and organize interactive media content and projects. Using relevant programs to create motion graphics for the web. i.e.; action script 3, tweenmax. DV200 Information Architecture A site’s information architecture specification typically evolves into a site map, which may or may not be published online and is accessible to the public. It’s important to have a clear understanding of how to absorb, manage and leverage an IA. Functional wireframe development & persona and use case authoring/development. DV301 Web Development and Implementation Advanced Client-side scripting has revolutionized our experience with the web. Client-side scripting is primarily responsible for the birth of Web 2.0, paving the way for a new breed of web sites. This course will peel back the layers and reveal what makes a web site tick. i.e.; PHP, MySQL.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
DV302 Web Animation Intermediate Students will dive into object oriented action script and move away from timelines. i.e.; AS3 . DV303 Motion Graphics Basics Students will learn how to import and manipulate video. Apply basic animation and effects and learn to leverage cameras for realistic perspectives. i.e.; after effects, animation. DV304B Intro to Video Editing This is an introduction to creating and preparing video content for digital media. This course will utilize both in-class and out-of-class learning activities to achieve course objectives. DV330 Interactive Studio 1 Design and build microsites and traditional web sites following professional interactive studio processes and working in teams. DV401 Web Development Working with dynamic content i.e.; PHP, MySQL, application development, environment provisioning, data modeling. DV402 Web Animation Advanced Provides students with an opportunity of working with particle systems. Creating effects based on user interaction i.e.; AS3, Flex DV403B Motion Graphics 2 Intermediate motion graphics using Adobe After Effects. DV411 Web Development Studio This course reinforces materials learned in DV410 Web Development 4 by applying them through current real-world projects and goes further in-depth into whole project process focusing on the role of the developer. DV421 Application Development This course gives an overview of application development languages and introduces Flash application development to students via Adobe AIR. This course continues building students’ Actionscript knowledge and gives an overview of AIR-specific classes. This class can support projects in intermediate Actionscript and Mobile AppStudio. DV430 Interactive Studio 2 Design and build deliverables and prototypes for integrated media campaigns that include sites, ads, apps and other interactive media. DV501 Web Development 5 This course introduces students to server-side scripting languages and common server scripting functions with PHP.

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DV500 Object Oriented Programming This will serve as a precursor to more complex object oriented languages allowing the student to work efficiently in some of the industry standard architectures such as MVC and Cairngorm i.e.; C sharp, iPhone, iPad, dev, PHP. DV502 Rich Media Development 4 This course continues building Actionscript knowledge covering more standard classes necessary for building modern rich media interactive experiences. Dynamic content and layouts via externalized data are explored in this class. DV530 Interactive Studio 3 Design and build deliverables and prototypes for inventive digital media that include hardware integration, environmental installations and exploration of new interaction patterns and behaviors. DV620 Mobile Application Studio Invent and program a game changing mobile app with an integrated creative team. DV705 Web 2.0 Centric Development Students continue learning advanced Actionscript project tools and MXML development. DV706 Cloud Computing This will serve as a precursor to more complex object oriented languages. Allow the student to work efficiently in some of the industry standard architectures such as MVCand Cairngorm i.e.; C sharp, iPhone, ipad dev, PHP DV800 Project Management and Professional Practices This course covers how to manage a project as well as dealing with clients, contracts and other businessrelated aspects to industry work and freelance projects. GE101 Strategy 1 Introduction to the basics of developing a creative strategy based on sound business principles, realistic budgets, and focused demographics. GE102 Intro to Creative Thinking Emphasis on the daily necessity for original thinking and writing in the creative field. GE222 Basic Layout This course combines skills students have learned in previous quarters into one project (concepting, design and execution of a functional board game). Designers can work alone, however partnership with a copywriter is preferred. GE920 Film/Video/TV Production This course will allow Image students to learn to concept and execute for motion photography. GE976 Books, Boxes and Portfolios Students will learn how to think and work quickly. Students can and are encouraged to fix and develop their projects further but their grades are set for each week and will not be changed.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
GR801 Graduate Portfolio Review This class will focus on the job search, final portfolio with in-depth portfolio critiques, web-site, PDF electronic portfolio and traditional portfolio preparation. The contact, the interview, salaries, negotiations, working with recruiters, professionalism and presentation will be covered. There will also be portfolio review by guest reviewers. GR803 Advanced Specialized Study This course allows advanced students to receive individualized feedback on book pieces, group critique as well as one-on-one instructor consultation. GR804 Perfecting Portfolio This class will focus on final portfolio with in-depth portfolio critiques, website, PDF electronic portfolio and traditional portfolio preparation. This course will utilize both in-class and out-of-class learning activities to achieve course objectives. GR807 Advanced Specialized Study This course allows advanced students to receive individualized feedback on book pieces, group critique as well as one-on-one instructor consultation. IM100 Basic Lighting Light is one half of photography. To control the light one must be exposed to its properties and its variations. Daylight and tungsten light will be discussed and practiced through class assignments and demonstrations. Placement, intensity, metering and exposing of light are the basic controls a photographer must master. IM110 Digital Photography Begins the process of working with electronic digital cameras, digital work flow and Photoshop software. IM120 Digital Color Management Included in the advanced format is a concentration and application of a digital workflow; from digital still capture through, and including electronic output, archiving and management. IM120 Digital Photography 2 Furthers the processes and skills learned in Digital Photography 1 by addressing the selection process, masking, basic color correction, film scanning, advanced Photoshop, file managing and archiving. IM130 Boot Camp Boot Camp is basic digital photography class that deals with camera and lens operations. The information includes the camera settings of both shutter speed and aperture, and how, when combined, produces a correctly exposed digital file. Lens discussions involve focal length, depth of field properties, and focusing techniques. IM200 Advanced Lighting Students will continue studies in lighting principles introduced in Basic Lighting. Topics include lighting ratios, characteristics, additive and subtractive methods, color balancing and mixed lighting.

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IM220 Visual Thinking for Photography A class devoted to stretching the creative, conceptual muscles of photographers in the imagining, development and production of a compelling image or an image that’s more than just a pretty picture. IM310 Introduction to Portraiture This course provides the technical information needed to become proficient in a variety of fields where the subjects are people. Broad, short, Rembrandt, split; beauty and butterfly lighting are some of the basics covered here. Posing and body language will also be discussed. IM330 Introduction to View Camera This completely manual system of photography dates back to some of the earliest cameras, yet it remains in the forefront for precise technical high quality image-making in commercial, architectural and fine art image. The flexibilities and limitations of the view camera, field camera and press camera are covered in detail to introduce the student to the possibilities opened up by this demanding instrument. IM340 Documentary Photography Capturing the essence of people, places and events is the main thrust of the material presented in this course. The photo documentarian works with socially significant issues through the language of photography. Subject matter may be the environment, travel or the human condition. This course deals with photographs as a series of images as well as single images. Class topics include equipment, films, processes, researching and finding markets, obtaining releases and a variety of other related ideas and information. IM350 Equipment and Tools New equipment will be presented on a weekly basis including, but not limited to the following: cameras, lenses, lights and light modifiers, digital capture and processing tools, and grip/location gear. IM410 Competition for Image By creating and exploring various photographic techniques, students will executes specific conceptual assignments while meeting required production timelines. Personal expressionism and unique photographic styles are encouraged. IM420 Fashion and Beauty Clothing, accessories, model portfolios and performers are a few of the subjects in the fashion and glamour field. This course covers finding and working with models, lighting and posing techniques, film/digital equipment, model releases and other information required to work successfully in this fast paced and competitive field. IM430 Interiors and Exteriors Styling, composition, and lighting are important factors in showcasing living and working spaces. Balancing mixed light, choosing appropriate props, and determining the ideal cam¬era location can define the vision of an architect, interior designer or space planner. This type of photography can be used in editorial magazines or commercial brochures. IM510 Tabletop/Still Life Photography Students will continue studies in lighting principles. Topics include lighting ratios, characteristics, additive and subtractive methods, color balancing and mixed lighting.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
IM520 Corporate Photography Annual reports, quarterly reports and corporate public relations are but a few of the areas in which the corporate industrial photographer works. Learning the skills that make it possible to photograph not only the executive portrait, but the material stored in the warehouse, the new goods coming off the assembly line and the worker in the environment of industry are the lessons delivered in this informative course. IM620 Styling Styling improves the level of visual taste and sophistication through coordinating the various elements (people, clothing, food, objects, background, etc.) and designing them for photographic production. Introduction to prop houses and various sources necessary to produce styled photographs will be covered. Image research from publications illustrating current photographic styles is also emphasized. Group critiques will allow evaluation of how well student knowledge and skills have been demonstrated. IM640 Weddings Wedding photography is part portraiture and part photojournalism. This course covers the basics from scheduling the event to the final portfolio presentation and will include posing, lighting basics, the use of filters, and the importance of storytelling. IM810 Graduate Portfolio Development Emphasis will be placed on polishing presentation, developing and expanding local network contacts and refining the skill of self-assessment, self-promotion and marketing. IM820 Individual Projects 2 Established for the focused student to further expand his/her final graduate portfolio. The student must provide a pre-determined number of concepts and present these ideas to the department head for approval. Once approved, the student must meet and maintain a production schedule for the balance of the quarter. IM830 Assisting Workshop Each student is assigned to a working commercial photography studio. The student and studio must commit to a full eight-hour work day a week, for ten weeks. The student will perform as an assistant, take direction from the photographer, complete requested tasks, and learn through observation and participation the day-to-day operations of a photography business. At the end of the quarter the studio will be contacted for a performance review of the student and a final grade will follow on certain aspects specific to the completion of the graduate book. IM840 Directed Studies 1 This class is designed for the ever-changing needs and opportunities for The Creative Circus student. This class will enable The Circus to address needs outside the normal curriculum and be adaptive to special situations for its students. These situations may include a special guest instructor from the creative industry, a special project, large or small in scope, submit¬ted to The Circus for student participation, and/or working professional critique. TM210 Intro to Creative Teams This course introduces the student to the basic work structure in which he or she will work through the remainder of both school and professional careers. Teamed with a partner, the student will be exposed to the techniques of joint brainstorming, concept development and execution of ideas through thumbnails or comps.

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TM211 Creative Workspace Students learn to develop a creative work plan and other planning and strategy documents important to the creative process. TM220 Creative Team 2/Web Ad Studio Design and build banners focusing on standards and covering primary types of rich ads. This class mixes designers and developers for the purpose of cranking out a lot of banners. TM301 Creative Team 3 Working with a partner of another discipline, the student will concept several print advertising campaigns during the course of this class. The objective of the course is to begin to develop professional-level samples of the student’s work for their final portfolio. TM310 Presenting Your Concepts Graduate quarter class. Required for all 8th quarter students to learn how to sell their work, sell themselves and perfect the skills of presenting in an interview or a client pitch. TM311 Advertising Concepts 1 Students will develop advertising concepts to be presented weekly in class. This course will stress not only the value of the concepts but also the manner in which they are presented, including voice, vocabulary, conviction, cogency and ease. TM410 Creative Team 4 Working with a partner, students will be required to develop original advertising campaigns for common, workaday consumer products advancing skills learned in TM310 and TM411. TM411 Advertising Concepts 2 Working with a partner, the student will carry forward the concepting of print advertising campaigns. The objective is to develop further professional-level samples of the student’s work for his or her final portfolio. TM510 Creative Team 5 Another round of concepting, creating and executing with a partner, preferably a new partner with whom the student has never worked with before and always with new products and approaches. TM511 Advertising Concept 3 The student, working with her or his partner, will begin to create some of the final forms of campaigns that will form the core of the student’s work for his or her final portfolio. TM601 Interdisciplinary Teams 1 This course collaborates art directors or designers, writer and photographer in a creative team of two or more persons to create an original campaign or poster. The photography samples may be produced on location or in the studio. TM610 Creative Team 6: Alt Marketing The student will be exposed to the radical, innovative, unconventional and sometimes startling approaches to advertising which have come to be called guerrilla marketing. Working with a partner, the student will create full advertising strategies and campaigns in which original guerrilla marketing ideas and executions are integral components. This course will utilize both in-class and out-of-class learning activities to achieve course objectives.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
TM 611 Advertising Concepts 4 Working in teams, the students will concept and execute a series of print campaigns. TM701 Interdisciplinary Teams 3 This course explores the creative working relationship between a graphic designer and photographer. Their creative marriage serves a slightly different audience than the advertising/photography team. Finished samples may include a movie poster, product brochure or an editorial magazine spread. TM710 Creative Team 7 With a partner, students will be required to develop original advertising campaigns, workaday consumer products. This course will untilize both in-class and out of class learning activities to achieve course objectives. IM730 Business Marketing Working on a practical level, the student will produce a kit of essential business practice forms as well as a marketing strategy to help identify and contact potential clients. The portfolio will be examined and critiqued to best refine the photographic voice for the general marketplace. TM711 Advertising Concepts 5 In this final quarter of Advertising Concepts, the student will create advertising campaigns, across all media, which may be expected to represent the student’s talent and abilities in the job market through their final portfolio. TM810 Introduction to Programming DV311/Teams Introduces students to basic programming concepts using a variety of languages with a focus on core fundamental, programming logic and structure. TM814 Concepting for the Portfolio The student will be expected to review his or her own portfolio and to work with the instructor in this class to reinforce strengths and fill gaps in what will become the student’s graduate portfolio. All assignments in this class will be tailored to the student’s individual need. VS101 Typography Introduction to type as symbols, individual letter forms, shape and space. VS102 Intro to Graphic Design Develop a basic understanding of design principles and vocabulary for creative visual thinking. VS201 Typography 2 Continues to look into applied typography and its design. VS202 Color Theory An exploratory course concerned with color as the soul of design, with history and social structure being primary elements. The course introduces in-class exercises to prove applicable color theories and outside assignments to implement the principles as they apply to specific creative works.

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VS203 Production Methodologies This hands-on course offers the student knowledge of how to prepare his or her work for printing and reproduction. The course covers various printing methods, inks, papers and press prep methods. VS301 Typography 3 Advanced course giving a detailed examination of letter forms and extensive development of multi-page and book design skills VS302 Advanced Color Theory An exploratory course concerned with color as the soul of design, with history and social structure being primary elements. The course introduces in-class exercises to prove applicable color theories and outside assignments to implement the principles as they apply to specific creative works. VS401 Design Concepts Marrying concept with design principles in order to create a cohesive, communicative end product.

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