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BowlineOne of the most useful knots you can know.

The Bowline forms a secure loop that will
not jam and is easy to tie and untie. The Bowline is most commonly used for forming a fixed loop, large or small at the end of a line. Tried and tested over centuries, this knot is reliable, strong and stable. Even after severe tension is applied it is easy to untie. However, because it does untie so easily it should not be trusted in a life or death situation such as mountain climbing. It is said to retain 60% of the strength of the line in which it is tied

Yosemite BowlineA Yosemite bowline is a very secure loop knot and is a version of the
Bowline with the free end wrapped around one leg of the loop and tucked back through the knot, commonly known as a "Yosemite finish." In addition to being more secure than a standard bowline, the Yosemite variant is also easier to untie after a load. Climbers often make use of the advantages it offers over other knots in using the knot as an alternative tie-in to the Figure Eight, and to secure heavy loads such as haul bags. The only downside to the Yosemite Bowline is that it is more difficult to visually inspect than the Figure Eight. It was a Yosemite Bowline that failed on Lynn Hill in France, causing her to careen 70 feet to the base of the climb. Be sure to practice the Bowline many times before trusting it with your life.

Figure EightThe figure eight follow through is one of the strongest knots. It forms a secure,
non-slip loop at the end of a rope. Also known as the Flemish Bend, this is the most widely used tiein knot by mountain climbers. The reason is that it is strong, secure and easy to visually inspect. Climbers often further secure it by tying a back up knot with the tag end. The knot can also be tied by tying a Figure Eight Knot with doubled line at the end of a rope (Step 1, but don’t come back through the bottom loop). It is faster but cannot be used if tying into a fixed object, so it is good to learn to tie this knot as the “Figure Eight Follow Through”. A single Figure Eight also makes a good “Stopper Knot” at the end of a rope (Step 1 with the single line but don’t come back up through the bottom loop).

Slippery Eight LoopThe Slippery Eight Loop Knot (HFP Slippery 8) is attributed to
Dave Poston. It has surprising security (though not for critical applications such as person support) for an adjustable loop. To make adjustments to the loop just bring the working end up to make a straight line through the knot and pull the loop side to make larger or the working end to make smaller. Set the working end back to its 90 degree angle from the knot to secure the loop.

Butterfly KnotForms secure loop(s) in the middle of a rope. It will accommodate a load in
any direction. Mountain climbers use the Butterfly Knot for tying-in the middle climber when traveling three to a rope. Also useful for making non-slip loops in the middle of a rope to attach carabiners to provide purchase points for a winch line – essential in canoe rescue work. It can take a load in any of the three directions, independently or together. The knot can also be used to isolate a damaged section of a rope.

The two loops can be worked to different sizes if needed.Bowline On A BightThis knot forms a bowline (secure loop) in the middle of a line. . Useful when you want a non-slip loop but a free end is not handy or to provide two loops in the end of a line. This knot can be used as a sling or as a seat or bosum’s chair in an emergency rescue situation.

The Honda Knot creates the most nearly-perfect circle of any knot. helps it slide freely along the rope it is tied around which is what makes it good for a lariat. Its round shape. especially when tied in stiff rope. .Honda KnotThis is the knot all cowboys use to form their lasso or lariat.

Running BowlineThe Running Bowline produces a noose or sliding loop. This can be useful for retrieving objects by throwing the open loop around them and the loop will tighten down on the object. as the standing line is pulled tight. . The knot does not bind against the standing line and can be easily undone.

It is technically a “slip noose” and is made using the fisherman’s Uni Knot with just one or two turns. .Slip KnotThis version of a slip knot is very quick and easy to tie.

. The two loops can be worked to different sizes if needed. Useful when you want a non-slip loop but a free end is not handy or to provide two loops in the end of a line.Bowline On A BightThis knot forms a bowline (secure loop) in the middle of a line. This knot can be used as a sling or as a seat or bosum’s chair in an emergency rescue situation.

. When tied in short lengths of rope. Rarely used in fishing. kayakers and canoeists use the knot to secure rope “grab handles” to their boats.Double Fisherman’sThis knot securely ties two ropes together or can be used to fasten the ends of a rope or cord to make a loop. the Double Fisherman’s is a good knot for tying two ropes together. Tying just one side of the knot is also used by mountain climbers to tie a “backup” knot with the tag (free) end of the primary knot. It is essentially two knots that slide together when tightened to form the finished knot.

For more security use the doubled version (Becket Bend) which is the same as the single version but with an extra coil around the standing loop. .Sheet BendThe Sheet Bend is a useful knot for tying two ropes together. It is suitable for most non-critical applications. It is important that the tag (free) ends of both ropes of the sheet bend be on the same side of the finished knot. even when rope sizes and materials differ greatly.

by making sure that both parts of the rope. It is important that this knot should not be used as a bend (for tying two ropes together). it is a good knot for securing non-critical items. Also known as the Reef Knot. Be sure to form the square knot and avoid tying a granny knot.Square KnotQuick and easy to tie. exit the knot together. the standing line and the free end. It is unsafe and can come apart. this knot was used for centuries by sailors for reefing sails and tying things aboard ship. . Not to be trusted to join two ropes together.

also known as the Ring Bend.Water KnotThe best knot to use when tying knots in webbing. Climbers most commonly use the Water Knot. . for tying webbing into loops. Make sure the tails exit from different sides of the knot and they should be at least three inches long to be able to be inspected for any slippage of the knot. Can be used to make slings and grab handles.

Carrick BendAn excellent knot to join two ropes. . It draws up tight under load and although it may lose its symmetrical shape. The tag ends may be seized to the standing lines for added security. remains secure. particularly large diameter ropes and hawsers.

use this version to tie your shoelaces (or string bikini) and never worry about having it come undone. Great for kid’s shoes. Unties with a simple tug on a free end.Better Bow KnotSimilar to the regular shoelaces knot. .

The reason is that it is strong. It forms a secure.Figure EightThe figure eight follow through is one of the strongest knots. so it is good to learn to tie this knot as the “Figure Eight Follow Through”. non-slip loop at the end of a rope. secure and easy to visually inspect. Also known as the Flemish Bend. It is faster but cannot be used if tying into a fixed object. this is the most widely used tiein knot by mountain climbers. Climbers often further secure it by tying a back up knot with the tag end. A single Figure Eight also makes a good “Stopper Knot” at the end of a rope (Step 1 with the single line but don’t come back up through the bottom loop). . but don’t come back through the bottom loop). The knot can also be tied by tying a Figure Eight Knot with doubled line at the end of a rope (Step 1.

.Heaving Line KnotThis knot adds bulk and weight to the end of a rope making it easier to throw the line.

the buntline hitch dates to the age of sail where it was used to secure buntline to the foot of the sails on square-rigged ships. It forms a very compact and reliable knot. neat and very reliable knot.Buntline HitchUse this knot to fasten items such as snaps and rings to rope or cord. repeated jerking tend to tighten it further rather than loosening it. Forms a small. Once set. Simple and effective. That the Buntline hitch was the preferred knot speaks to its security and reliability. It has gained in popularity in recent years due to its performance in slippery modern synthetic lines. .

However. A useful and easy to tie knot. Easy to tie and untie. the Clove Hitch is a good binding knot.Clove HitchA simple all-purpose hitch. . as a hitch it should be used with caution because it can slip or come undone if the object it is tied to rotates or if constant pressure is not maintained on the line.

without access to the end of the rope. the knot can be tied with a loop in the rope. When the end of the post is available.Pile HitchThe Pile Knot is a simple knot that is used to attach a rope to a post or other object. .

also called the Lanyard Hitch. is used to secure a rope to a post or other object including another rope. .Cow HitchThe Cow Hitch. It is about as reliable as a Clove Hitch. It is similar to a Clove Hitch except that the second half hitch is in the opposite direction. Lark’s Head and Lark’s Foot. which is to say it should not be trusted in critical applications.

Rolling HitchA very secure and easy to tie method of fastening a rope to a post. The knot holds firmly in the direction of standing line. The Rolling Hitch is much more secure than the similar clove hitch when tying a rope to a pole or other object. .

Learn the Cleat Hitch if you own a boat or even if you don’t. It is a quick and easy method of tying a rope to a cleat on a dock or boat that is also easy to untie.Cleat HitchThe Cleat Hitch is the best way to tie a boat to a dock. This knot ties and unties quickly and neatly. It is amazing how many boat owners do not know this easy and essential boating knot. You will impress everyone if you tie this knot when handed a rope at the dock! .

secure knot. The free end should be secured with seizing to the standing line for a permanent. One side of a Double Fisherman’s also makes a good backup knot to this and any knot. .Anchor BendThe Anchor Bend is the knot generally used to fasten a line to an anchor.

. It can be tied up tight to an object or anywhere along the length of the rope so you can reach and release it without getting off your horse or out of your boat.Mooring HitchA good temporary knot. Can be released quickly with a tug on the free end. The Mooring Hitch holds fast under load yet comes apart instantly with a pull of the tag end.

similar to the Mooring Hitch. . It will hold fast under load yet comes undone quickly with a firm pull on the free end.Slipped BuntlineThe Slipped Buntline is a quick release knot.

Useful for lines that may need adjustment. Campers like to use this knot to secure tent guy lines because the hitch slides freely. making adjustments to the line easy. yet jams under load. The Tautline Hitch is essentially a Rolling Hitch tied on the standing part of a tight line after it has been secured around a object. .Tautline HitchThis knot can be slipped to tighten or loosen a line. then holds fast under load.

or rope. Other names for this knot are the Strap Knot and Bale Sling Hitch. .Girth HitchThe Girth Hitch is a knot commonly tied with a sling of webbing. It is used to attach a sling or a loop made of webbing to a harness. although rope can also be used.

The resulting friction knot loop can then slide up the rope but grips when subjected to load. .Klemheist KnotThe Klemheist Knot is tied by making a Prusik Loop with line or rope that is no more than 1/2 the diameter of the main. static rope. It can also slide down a line by gripping the knot itself with no load applied.

Mountaineers use this knot to form footholds to help them climb a vertical rope.Prusik KnotUse the Prusil Knot to secure a loop to a tight line. It slides when not weighted along a tight rope but jams solidly upon loading. . The loop needs to be made in rope or cord that is at most half the diameter of the main line.

. It works best in large pear shaped carabiners and should only be used with a locking carabiner. because someone’s life is on the other end of the rope! This knot can cause kinks or twists in the rope. When belaying with the Munter Hitch be sure that the strand of rope carrying the load is next to the spine of the carabiner. Set this knot up correctly. This is an important knot for climbers to know.Munter HitchThe Munter Hitch provides a method for belaying and rappelling without a belay/rappel device.

. It is popular with arborists.Valdotain TresseThe “VT”. Valdotain Tresse Knot is a friction knot used to ascend and descend on ropes.

An alternative use for the Tautline is to tie it to a another rope or object where it can then be moved up or down that rope or object. This illustration shows how to tie the Taut line to an object. .Tautline Hitch to RopeThe Tautline Hitch is often used to tighten or loosen a line when it is wrapped around an object and then tied to its own standing line.

An alternative use for the Tautline is to tie it to a another rope or object where it can then be moved up or down that rope or object.Tautline Hitch to RopeThe Tautline Hitch is often used to tighten or loosen a line when it is wrapped around an object and then tied to its own standing line. This illustration shows how to tie the Tautline to an object. .

Probably the most useful hitch there is. Once the line is pull to the desired tension using the pulley effect of the loop in the middle of the line. It is used by truckers to secure heavy loads in place and works equally well tying canoes and other objects to the tops of cars. This combination of knots allows a line to be pulled very tight. the knot is secured with a couple half hitches around one or both lines . the Trucker’s Hitch allows a line to be pulled tight as a guitar string and secured.Trucker’s HitchUse the Trucker’s Hitch to cinch down a load.

Also known as the Miller’s Knot this knot is useful for securing the end of a sack or bundles of items. .Constrictor KnotA useful knot to tie up loose materials or the ends of bags. Simple to tie. it grips itself and will not work loose. The knot stays tied and grips itself so well that it is often impossible to untie.

Half HitchAlthough the half hitch is knot in its own right. it is rarely used alone as it is unsafe when used alone. Two half hitches can be use to tie a rope to a tree. It is often used in a supporting role. boat or any object. . for example to increase the security of a primary knot.

it grips itself and will not work loose.Constrictor KnotA useful knot to tie up loose materials or the ends of bags. The knot stays tied and grips itself so well that it is often impossible to untie. . Also known as the Miller’s Knot this knot is useful for securing the end of a sack or bundles of items. Simple to tie.

no matter how heavy the load and is easy to tie and untie. It does not jam or slip. It is best to complete the Timber Hitch with one or two half hitches near the hauling end to keep the load from twisting. .Timber HitchUse for securing a rope around a post or any cylindrical object.

Rolling BendThe Rolling Bend is similar to the Timber Hitch. . It is useful in moving logs. posts or other cylindrical objects.

Munter HitchThe Munter Hitch provides a method for belaying and rappelling without a belay/rappel device. because someone’s life is on the other end of the rope! This knot can cause kinks or twists in the rope. . Set this knot up correctly. It works best in large pear shaped carabiners and should only be used with a locking carabiner. This is an important knot for climbers to know. When belaying with the Munter Hitch be sure that the strand of rope carrying the load is next to the spine of the carabiner.

The Rolling Hitch is much more secure than the similar clove hitch when tying a rope to a pole or other obj ect. . The knot holds firmly in the direction of standing line.Rolling HitchA very secure and easy to tie method of fastening a rope to a post.