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TIMELINE

1894 Orville Gibson of Kalamazoo, MI, invents the archtop guitar and mandolin 1902 The Gibson company formed 1921 Gibson invents the adjustable truss rod – still the industry standard – and the height adjustable bridge 1935 Gibson’s first electric model, the E-150 Hawaiian lap steel 1936 First standard Gibson electric, the ES-150 (“ES” stands for Electric Spanish) 1939 First cutaway Gibsons – Super 400 Premier and L-5 Premier 1946 The P-90 single-coil pickup debuts 1949 First three-pickup guitar, the Gibson ES-5 1949 First guitar with a “Florentine” pointed cutaway, the Gibson ES-175 1952 Gibson’s first solidbody electric, the Les Paul Model 1954 Les Paul Custom “Black Beauty” and Les Paul Junior officially introduced 1954 Tune-o-matic bridge, designed by Gibson president Ted McCarty, introduced on Les Paul Custom 1955 Les Paul Special introduced 1957 Double-coil “humbucking” pickup debuts, invented by Gibson’s Seth Lover 1958 First cherry sunburst finish on Les Paul Model, name changed to Les Paul Standard 1958 Explorer, Flying V and Moderne introduced, designed by Ted McCarty 1958 First semi-hollowbody electric guitar, the ES-335, invented by Ted McCarty 1959 Les Paul Special gets double-cutaway body 1961 Les Paul line changes to SG body shape 1963 SG model name is official, Les Paul name dropped 1963 Firebird guitars and Thunderbird basses introduced 1968 Les Paul Standard and Custom reintroduced 1974 Gibson opens a plant in Nashville to make Les Pauls 1982 First solidbody acoustic, the Gibson Chet Atkins CE 1984 Gibson closes Kalamazoo plant, moves headquarters to Nashville 1986 Current owners Henry Juszkiewicz and Dave Berryman acquire Gibson 2002 Gibson introduces world’s first digital guitar

A RETAIL SALES GUIDE FOR

FEATURES FACTS ADVANTAGES

ELECTRIC

GIBSON
GUITARS
SOLIDBODY

slinky feel 5 Allows for heavier-gauge strings AD Beefier tone 5 Frets spaced slightly closer together AD Easier to do the Chuck Berry rhythm part (on E chord) FEATURE 5 Fact AD Advantage TUNE-O-MATIC BRIDGE INVENTED BY LEGENDARY GIBSON PRESIDENT TED MCCARTY IN 1954 5 Adjustable saddles AD Fine-tune intonation for each individual string. Sales tips are organized by feature. more sustain AD Adjust upward for less string pressure = “slinky” or “spongy” feel when bending strings . is the advantage to the player.75" SCALE 5 Less string tension required to tune up AD Smooth.WELCOME TO GIBSON USA’S RETAIL SALES GUIDE. designated by 5. for any string gauge or action height PICKUPS 5 Gibson invented the double-coil humbucking pickup AD Still setting the standard followed by other makers 5 Overall height-adjustable AD Easy adjustment to raise or lower action AD No individual string adjustment necessary to conform to fingerboard radius 5 Many choices of magnets and coil-winding configurations AD Smooth to edgy tone. never equaled 5 2-wire or 4-wire AD Vintage wiring or modern (with coil-split capability) 5 Tight fit between polepieces and hand-machined baseplate AD No lost vibrations. designated by AD. minimizes feedback STOPBAR TAILPIECE INVENTED BY GIBSON IN 1953 5 Separate from bridge AD Does not transfer bridge vibrations to body. Under each fact. A QUICK AND CONCISE REFERENCE OF SALES TIPS. Under each feature are the facts or specs of that feature. 24. better sustain 5 Height-adjustable AD Adjust downward to increase string pressure on saddles = less slippage. and everything in between 5 Industry standard AD Copied by other makers.

USED BY GIBSON ON ALL MODELS SINCE 1894 5 Repairable AD Scratches and dings can be touched up. no expansion. 5 Porous nature AD Does not “seal” wood in an airtight shell as poly does. lets wood breathe = better tone 5 Dries to a thinner coat than poly ANGLED HEADSTOCK 5 Strings cross nut at an angle of up to 17 degrees. shrinkage or warping AD Strings stay in nut slots (no buzz) AD No need for “string trees” or “string guides” to compensate for bad headstock design 5 All wood has same moisture content AD After leaving plant.SET NECK (EXCEPT “NECK-THRU” FIREBIRD MODELS) 5 Glued neck joint – not bolted or screwed – for maximum contact between neck and body AD Neck and body function as single unit = better tone. increasing string pressure AD No loss of vibration of strings between nut and tuners = better sustain AD Less interference with natural vibration of instrument = purer tone EQUILIBRIUM MOISTURE CONTENT 5 Wood is dried to a point of “equilibrium”– determined by the temperature and humidity of the factory – where the moisture content does not change during the manufacturing process AD Tight-fitting joints. BUT MAKES A GUITAR LOOK BETTER. A poly finish can NOT be touched up. exposing fret ends) AD Smooth neck. guitar responds evenly to temperature and humidity changes . better sustain BINDING VERY LABOR INTENSIVE. no cut hands LACQUER FINISH NITROCELLULOSE LACQUER (MULTIPLE COATS ON MOST MODELS) INSTEAD OF POLYURETHANE USED BY MOST GUITAR MANUFACTURERS. AND… 5 Protects edges AD Fewer dings in areas most susceptible to damage 5 No air space in neck cavity AD No loose or misaligned neck = no “shimmy” or tuning problems 5 Neck binding installed over fret ends (most makers install frets after binding.

7 9.4 5.8˚ C 30˚ F 1.5 21 24.4 4.1 23.2 7.5 18.1 3 3.5 6.5 2.5 6.2 16 15.8 26.4 4. slightly underwound vintage specs.2 1.1 12. same range as ’57 Classic “unmatched” bobbin windings.2 4 4.9 1.4 9.9 24.9 5.3 13.7 5.PICKUPS RELATIVE OUTPUT MAGNET ’BURSTBUCKER PRO (NECK) ’BURSTBUCKER PRO (BRIDGE) ’BURSTBUCKER TYPE 1 ’BURSTBUCKER TYPE 2 ’BURSTBUCKER TYPE 3 ’57 CLASSIC ’57 CLASSIC PLUS TONY IOMMI ANGUS YOUNG DIRTY FINGERS 490R 490T 498T 500T 496R MINI HUMBUCKER P-90 P-94R P-94T PICKUPS Alnico II Alnico V ceramic ceramic Alnico V Alnico II Alnico II Alnico II Alnico V Alnico II cutting sound neck and bridge.5 10.6 3.3 13.6 1.2 10.7 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% 55% 60% 65% 70% 75% 80% 85% 90% 95% 98% RH 1.6 19.6 15.7 4.8 24.” If “below 7%” gets down to 6.4 2. USA’s highest output hot sound. and the wood will not be stable.5 20. wood reaches the equilibrium level at 8.9 8.3 7 7.6 3.3 4.9 8.5 10.4 2.4 25.7 12.6 5.5 7.8 6.3 3.6 5.2 12.7˚ C 110˚ F 43.5 4.7 8.4 6.4 5.9 8.4 18.9 17.3 11.5 12.1 9.3 26 ( R H = R E L AT I V E H U M I D I T Y % ) .1˚ C “We dry wood to below 7% moisture content. hotter magnet classic design. upper-mid boost DESCRIPTION 490 498 496 500 Angus Young ’57 Classic ’BurstBucker 1 ’BurstBucker 2 ’BurstBucker Pro Mini humbucker EQUILIBRIUM MOISTURE CONTENT TABLE 40˚ F 4.3 26.5 22.3 20.9 8.3 26.8 16.2 18.3 3.3 26.7 20.7 9.4 8.4 2.8 6.6 3.6 5.9 4.2 8.2 9.1 9.3 12.9 1.7 11.4 14.5 14.5 18.2 2. is a meaningless statement.6 6.7 15.4˚ C 50˚ F 10.6 22 24.1 22.9 14. we maintain humidity at 45%.2 14.5 14.1 11 10.3 12.7 7.6 8.3 1.6 14.5 10.1 5.9 7 6.3 7.” as some guitarmakers claim.1 6.3 7.4 18.7 9.2 6.9 1.9 6.3 7.4 13.1 7. GREEN – At Gibson USA.6 4.1 2.7 7.6 11.9 9.4 2.3 5.8 7.9 23.1 6.4 11.6 23.9 16.4 16.5 3.9 16. YELLOW – “We dry below 7%. neck position classic design.5 13.2 13.6 14.7 4.8 7.7 10.2 19. with a humidity level of 25%. At a temperature of 70 degrees.5 3.1 8.9 25.9 12. Any lower or higher.3˚ C 120˚ F 48.7 17. Wood should be dried to a level of “equilibrium” – where it neither gains nor loses moisture content – and that level depends on the temperature and humidity of the facility.1 12 11.1 7.7 9.0˚ C 60˚ F 15. RED – A guitar maker in a dry climate.1 17 19.6 3.2 12.3 8. like BB 1 and 2 with hotter magnet “unmatched” bobbin windings.9 10.5 21 24.3 26. 1.9 9.3 5.7 4.2 6.2˚ C 100˚ F 37.6 26.3 11.5 6.2 5 5.2 10 11 12 13.7 16. matched bobbin windings high output super hot.6˚ C 90˚ F 32.2 2.7 11.5 2.2 17.4 11.1 7.3 13.5 8.5% moisture content. then this guitarmaker needs to keep his plant at 35% humidity with a temperature of 100 degrees.2 3.3 1.4 20.9 16.4 9. needs to dry wood even farther – below 6% – to reach equilibrium.3 1.5 8.1˚ C 80˚ F 26.5 10.1 2.5%.4 14.5˚ C 70˚ F 21.3 13.8 10.6 7.