www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 95
POLITICAL TURMOIL
WORLD PAGE 30
CITIGROUP TO
CUT 11,000 JOBS
BUSINESS PAGE 10
OBAMA COULD RISK
GOING OVER ‘CLIFF’
NATION PAGE 8
ISLAMISTS BATTLE OPPONENTS AS EGYPT CRISIS GROWS
Gold,
Jewelry,
Diamonds
Sliver & Coins
WE BUY
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
652-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Officials in the Belmont-
Redwood Shores Elementary
School District are making plans to
be more fiscally conservative in
coming years, which means a range
of possible budget changes includ-
ing increased class sizes and fur-
lough days.
Tonight, the Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary School District
Board of Trustees will get a budget
update when it discusses the first
interim fiscal solvency report. In
addition, the board will discuss the
existing parcel taxes and the possi-
bility of either extending them or
going out for another tax measure.
Board President Brian Matthews
said the district is facing some
tough decisions. The district’s
Budget Advisory Committee has
recommended no deficit spending
going forward. As a result, there
could be some big changes, he said.
On the table are raising class sizes
from 25 students to 30 in the
younger grades and up to 12 fur-
lough days, Matthews said. Such
items require negotiations and could
change depending on the support of
the fundraising efforts of the dis-
trict’s education foundation,
School-Force.
Last year, the district deficit spent
more than $850,000.
The district is projected to meet
the financial requirements for the
current and two following school
years, according to the first interim
report by interim Co-
Superintendent Nellie Hungerford.
It anticipates continued enrollment
growth in the coming school years
which will result in the hiring of
Budget talk tops Belmont-Redwood Shores meeting
School officials discuss fiscal conservatism, possible changes including class size and furlough days
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A woman who lost a finger while
protecting her golden doodle from
attack by a German shepherd at a
Menlo Park dog park is suing the
canine’s owner who she claims was
talking on a cellphone rather than
supervising the off-leash animal.
Angela Otera’s suit filed in San
Mateo County Superior Court on
Tuesday seeks damages from Laurie
Furman and German Shepherd
Rescue of Northern California for
injuries to her and the dog, Ollie,
and for acting grossly negligent.
Otera lost part of her right middle
finger in the November incident in
which Ollie, the golden doodle
belonging to her daughter and son-
in-law, suffered deep puncture
wounds to his neck that needed
immediate medical attention, the
suit stated.
The suit names Furman, owner of
the German shepherd named Dylan,
or Dillon, and the Alameda-based
dog rescue group from which he
was obtained in early October.
A month later, on Nov. 6, both
women were in the off-leash dog
Lawsuit brought against owner, German
Shepherd Rescue of Northern California
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Shelly Masur, who lost her bid for
county supervisor in the November
election, actually received more
votes than her winning opponent in
the Fourth District she had hoped to
represent.
Election results show Masur
had most votes in District Four
Tally certified in supervisor election won by Slocum
Dog maims
woman in
park attack
Shelly Masur,Warren Slocum
See ATTACK, Page 22
See TALLY, Page 20
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A new app called Parker can help motorists find parking in San Mateo and San Carlos starting this week.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Finding parking in downtown San
Mateo or San Carlos can be a drag
for busy motorists but a new app
called Parker can make the chore a
bit easier.
Developed by a company called
Streetline, in partnership with
Cisco, the free app uses sensors
embedded in the street to provide
real-time parking availability in the
downtown area.
Streetline unveiled the technology
this week in San Francisco, San
Mateo and San Carlos after it has
been in place at least 18 months in
Parking gets easier
App helps motorists find an available spot downtown
See PARKING, Page 22
See BUDGET, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Writer-director
Judd Apatow is 45.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1922
The Anglo-Irish Treaty, which estab-
lished the Irish Free State, came into
force one year to the day after it was
signed in London.
“Do not wait to strike till the
iron is hot; but make it hot by striking.”
— William Butler Yeats, Nobel Prize-winning poet (1865-1939)
Transportation
Secretary Ray
LaHood is 67.
Actress Lindsay
Price is 36.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
An art patron is reflected in an Untitled piece by Anish Kapoor at Art Basel in Miami Beach, Fla.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in
the upper 50s. Northwest winds 10 to
20 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 40s. Northeast
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
upper 50s. North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night...Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper
40s.
Sunday through Wednesday: Mostly clear. Highs
in the lower 60s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous
George, No. 8, in first place;Winning Spirit, No. 9,
in second place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:48.19.
(Answers tomorrow)
EAGLE CRAMP STEREO POISON
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The rock climber saw these when he went to buy
new climbing equipment — STEEP PRICES
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ADDEZ
ROYIV
ORPCEP
MUSOFA
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
A
Answer
here:
8 9 1
3 19 24 32 43 44
Mega number
Dec. 4 Mega Millions
3 16 17 33 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 5 0 7
Daily Four
4 2 4
Daily three evening
In 1790, Congress moved to Philadelphia from New York.
In 1884, Army engineers completed construction of the
Washington Monument by setting an aluminum capstone atop
the obelisk.
In 1889, Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the
Confederate States of America, died in New Orleans.
In 1907, the worst mining disaster in U.S. history occurred as
362 men and boys died in a coal mine explosion in Monongah,
W.Va.
In 1917, some 2,000 people died when an explosives-laden
French cargo ship collided with a Norwegian vessel at the har-
bor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, setting off a blast that devastated
the city.
In 1942, comedian Fred Allen premiered “Allen’s Alley,” a
recurring sketch on his CBS radio show spoofing small town
America.
In 1947, Everglades National Park in Florida was dedicated by
President Harry S. Truman.
In 1957, America’s first attempt at putting a satellite into orbit
failed as Vanguard TV3 rose about four feet off a Cape
Canaveral launch pad before crashing down and exploding.
In 1962, 37 coal miners were killed in an explosion at the
Robena No. 3 Mine operated by U.S. Steel in Carmichaels, Pa.
In 1971, the original Auto-Train, which carried rail passengers
and their motor vehicles from Lorton, Va., to Sanford, Fla.,
went into operation. (Although the privately owned line went
out of business in 1981, Amtrak revived the service in 1983.)
In 1982, 11 soldiers and 6 civilians were killed when an Irish
National Liberation Army bomb exploded at a pub in
Ballykelly, Northern Ireland.
In 1989, 14 women were shot to death at the University of
Montreal’s school of engineering by a man who then took his
own life.
Jazz musician Dave Brubeck is 92. Comedy performer David
Ossman is 76. Actor Patrick Bauchau is 74. Country singer Helen
Cornelius is 71. Actor James Naughton is 67. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Frankie Beverly (Maze) is 66. Former Sen. Don Nickles,
R-Okla., is 64. Actress JoBeth Williams is 64. Actor Tom Hulce
is 59. Actor Kin Shriner is 59. Actor Wil Shriner is 59. Actor
Miles Chapin is 58. Rock musician Rick Buckler (The Jam) is
57. Comedian Steven Wright is 57. Country singer Bill Lloyd is
57. Singer Tish Hinojosa is 57. Rock musician Peter Buck
(R.E.M.) is 56. Rock musician David Lovering (Pixies) is 51.
Residents put ribbon
on burned-out house
PENN HILLS, Pa. — Some residents
of a Pittsburgh suburb have gift-
wrapped something they hope will be
gone by Christmas: a charred and aban-
doned house that burned nine months
ago.
Amy Davis tells WPXI-TV that resi-
dents put a big red bow on the house
next door to hers, so Penn Hills officials
will get moving on tearing it down. The
house burned in March.
Residents say it’s unsafe and an eye-
sore, and that they fear it could harm
their property values.
Davis says gift-wrapping the house
“was done in jest to bring light to a sit-
uation where there’s no humor at all.”
She says the fire frightened her and
caused $8,000 worth of damage to her
100-year-old home.
Municipal code enforcement officer
John McCafferty tells the TV station he
just got approval to tear down the home.
Maine police: Man says
prostitute owes 10 minutes
OLD ORCHARD BEACH, Maine —
Police in Maine say a man called them
to complain a prostitute hadn’t given
him his money’s worth — so they
arrested him.
Police say New Hampshire resident
Scott Pipher was arrested this week.
The 34-year-old is charged with engag-
ing a prostitute.
New Hampshire’s The Portsmouth
Herald newspaper reported Wednesday
the police investigation started in the
spring.
Old Orchard Beach, Maine, police
say Pipher called them March 25 to
complain a woman he’d hired “shorted
him by 10 minutes.”
Police say their investigation also led
to the arrests of two women believed to
be prostitutes contacted by Pipher
through a website.
Pipher is scheduled to be arraigned in
Maine District Court in Biddeford next
week. Telephone calls to numbers listed
for him in Portsmouth, N.H., have gone
unanswered.
Woman thanks cop
with $1K, but he can’t keep it
GUILDERLAND, N.Y. — New York
State Police are trying to find the
woman who handed an on-duty trooper
a holiday card with $1,000 cash inside.
Under New York law, members of the
state police can’t accept such gifts.
So state police officials are seeking
the public’s help in finding the woman
who gave the money to Trooper
Christopher Maniscalco in the Albany
suburb of Guilderland on Sunday. They
say they want the woman to tell them
where she would like the donation to
go.
Police say the woman told
Maniscalco she had seen him doing a
good job and wanted to say Merry
Christmas and thank you. Officials say
it wasn’t until after his shift ended that
the trooper opened the card and saw the
money.
Nativity scene Jesus
returned, replacement swiped
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. — A baby
Jesus figure taken from a Pennsylvania
church’s Nativity scene last year was
found cradled in the arms of a nearby
statue, just hours before the replacement
statue was swiped.
The vintage figurine was taken last
year from outside Chambersburg’s
Central Presbyterian Church. It was
found Sunday in the arms of a bronze
Civil War soldier statue across the town
square.
A local business had replaced the
Jesus statue when the Nativity scene
was set up a couple weeks ago. The
Chambersburg Public Opinion reports
that replacement statue was swiped
sometime after services on Sunday.
Congregant Buffy Super calls the stat-
ue’s return a “Christmas miracle.”
Another says the church will have to
considering securing the statue to deter
theft.
11 15 17 30 37 11
Mega number
Dec. 5 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
FOSTER CITY
ID theft. A woman reported an unknown per-
son opened utility accounts in her name on
Beach Park Boulevard before 2:19 p.m. on
Tuesday, Dec. 4.
Civil case. A person reported never receiving
an item after an online purchase on Trinidad
Lane before 11:27 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4.
Arrest. A man was arrested for driving without
a license on Edgewater Boulevard before 1:39
a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4.
Burglary. A man stole a 12-pack of wine val-
ued at $800 from Safeway on East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 6:37 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 3.
Petty theft. A person riding a bicycle that
resembled the one used in the film “E.T.” was
seen stealing a package from a home on Juno
Lane before 6:27 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 3.
SAN CARLOS
Ticket. A woman was cited for driving with a
suspended license on El Camino Real and F
Street before 10 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 23.
Burglary. A burglary occurred on the 1100
block of Industrial Road before 12:43 p.m. on
Friday, Nov. 23.
Arrest. A man was arrested for obstructing an
officer and resisting arrest on the 1700 block of
El Camino Real before 11:49 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 21.
Grand theft. A vehicle was stolen on the 900
block of Terminal Way before 5:08 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 21.
Police reports
Clean getaway
A washing machine was stolen from a
carport on the 1100 block of Carmelita
Avenue in Burlingame before 11:50 a.m.
on Monday, Nov. 19.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Peninsula Museum of Art in Belmont is
moving out of the historic Manor House at
Twin Pines Park for a more expansive space in
Burlingame.
The new digs will also house the Peninsula
Art Institute, which will be comprised of
many artists who formerly called the 1870 Art
Center on Ralston Avenue in Belmont home,
Ruth Waters, the museum’s acting executive
director told the Daily Journal yesterday.
If all goes well, the new museum and insti-
tute should open to the public Feb. 23, Waters
said.
Artists with the institute will open their stu-
dios twice a year to the
public and art classes will
be offered throughout the
year. Painters, sculptors,
photographers and other
artists will call the new
institute home. The insti-
tute’s mission is to provide
a supportive working envi-
ronment for creative pro-
fessionals in the visual arts
and to be a cultural resource for the commu-
nity, Waters said.
The museum will feature exhibition gal-
leries, art education facilities, a reference
library, museum shop, community meeting
room, a permanent collection and artists’
working studios.
The Barrett Community Center previously
housed 1870 Art Center but the city of
Belmont terminated the lease earlier this year
after lengthy negotiations failed.
The museum moved into the Manor House
in 2003 but, in February, it will be located at
1777 California Drive in Burlingame, just
south of Trousdale Drive near the Millbrae
border.
Waters has been affiliated with the arts com-
munity in Belmont since 1977 but is excited
about the new opportunity in Burlingame, she
said.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Art museum has new home
Ruth Waters
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A paralegal who prosecutors say made a
habit of impersonating a very-real attorney
appeared in court yesterday in his own case,
pleading not guilty to 13 felonies connected
to a San Mateo County appeal for which he
was reportedly paid more than $1,000 by a
man trying to withdraw a plea.
John Hedderman, 52, will stand trial
March 4 on the charges which include sever-
al counts of practicing law without a license,
grand theft, false impersonation and threats.
Meanwhile, he remains free from custody on
$50,000 bail.
Hedderman was once a licensed attorney in
California but resigned in 2001 with charges
pending after several incidents of ineligibili-
ty to practice law.
However, prosecutors
say in February he repre-
sented himself as an attor-
ney named Donald Welch
when he met client Ruben
Bisceglia in Southern
California who wanted
help withdrawing a plea
of no contest to possess-
ing stolen property in San
Mateo County.
Hedderman worked as a paralegal for the real
Welch who practices in Southern California.
Bisceglia reportedly paid Hedderman more
than $1,000 in fees for three appearances in
San Mateo County Superior Court between
March and August 2012.
When a San Mateo County prosecutor
attempted to contact the real Welch, authori-
ties learned of the alleged local misrepresen-
tation and that he was convicted of 12
felonies in Orange County for falsely repre-
senting himself as an attorney.
Hedderman stipulated to misconduct in
four cases including failure to perform com-
petently, refund unearned fees and commu-
nicate with clients and pay court-ordered
sanctions or cooperate with the bar’s investi-
gation, according to the State Bar of
California.
Hedderman faces between seven and eight
years incarceration if convicted.
Fake attorney pleads not guilty
John
Hedderman
4
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Decoy finds businesses
selling alcohol to minors
Four businesses could face criminal
and administrative action from the
California Department of Alcoholic
Beverage Control after a minor decoy
operation conducted recently in
Pacifica and San Bruno.
During a minor decoy operation, a
someone under 21 is sent into a
licensed ABC business to attempt to
purchase an alcoholic beverage. If the
employee of the business allows the
decoy to purchase alcohol, that person
is arrested.
In addition to criminal charges being
pressed against the employee for sell-
ing the alcoholic beverage, the busi-
ness will face administrative action
against their alcohol license by ABC.
The recent effort was funded through a
grant from the 21 COAST Task Force
by the California Department of
Alcoholic Beverage Control.
Four businesses sold alcohol to
minors during the operation: Arco,
1799 El Camino Real, San Bruno;
Quick Mart, 2480 Skyline Blvd.,
Pacifica; Ernie’s Liquors, 757 Hickey
Blvd., Pacifica; and Quick Stop: 575
Crespi Drive, Pacifica.
Sequoia district prevails
in discrimination case
A jury sided with the Sequoia Union
High School District Tuesday in a 2010
discrimination lawsuit from a teacher.
In October 2010, Manuel Delagado
filed a lawsuit against Sequoia claim-
ing discrimination, failure to accom-
modate his requests or engage in good
faith in accordance to rules under the
California Fair Employment and
Housing Act. This week a jury came
back with a verdict for Sequoia.
Delgado’s claim stemmed from
August 2008 when the computer class-
es he taught were assigned to another
teacher, according to the lawsuit. Then
Delgado was assigned to teach classes
outside of his teaching credential.
Delgado followed by getting the
required math credential. In August
2009, he was assigned five classes —
three algebra and two working on the
California High School Exit Exam
preparation English course. The fol-
lowing month, Delgado requested and
was denied a self evaluation for the
school year.
After that, Delgado’s requests for
changes in work accommodations due
to stress and anxiety were not granted.
A formal request was submitted in
March 2010 to the district office but
was not granted.
The district found his request to be
insufficient to require a change,
according to the lawsuit. Numerous
requests for these accommodations and
denials followed through early August
2010.
Delgado was requesting general
damages as well as numerous requests
for injunctive relief.
Local briefs
Services today for
former supervisor
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Funeral services will be held tonight and Friday for former San
Mateo County supervisor Mike Nevin who died last weekend
from esophageal cancer at the age of 68.
Nevin, who most recently served as exec-
utive director of the San Mateo County
Service League, was well-known as a
Peninsula elected official, San Francisco
police inspector and advocate for those in
need. A rosary and vigil service will be 7
p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6 at St. Anne’s Church,
850 Judah St., San Francisco.
The funeral will be 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 7
at St. Ignatius Church, 650 Parker Ave., San
Francisco. The church is located on the University of San
Francisco campus which has limited parking so attendees are
encouraged to carpool and leave early.
The family requests donations to the Service League of San
Mateo County, 727 Middlefield Road, Redwood City, CA 94063
or www.serviceleague.org. Information on St. Ignatius Church
including directions is available at stignatiussf.org.
Mike Nevin
5
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
advertisement
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associated
with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily
Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it fnds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be acting in vio-
lation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name &photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the Daily Journal,
Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarifcation (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s fromall liability, claims, or actions
of any kind whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros,
Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE EIGHTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week FOURTEEN
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 12/7/12
Chicago Minnesota
NY Jets Jacksonville
Dallas Cincinnati
San Diego Pittsburgh
Tennessee Indianapolis
St. Louis Buffalo
Kansas City Cleveland
Philadelphia Tampa Bay
Baltimore Washington
Atlanta Carolina
Miami San Francisco
New Orleans NY Giants
Arizona Seattle
Detroit Green Bay
Houston New England
TIEBREAKER: Houston @ New England __________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest
is free to play. Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop off by 12/7/12 to:
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
CITY
GOVERNMENT
• Rick Kowalczyk
was named mayor of
Half Moon Bay at the
City Council’s
Tuesday night meet-
ing and John Muller
was named vice mayor. Kowalczyk takes the
gavel from outgoing mayor Allan Alifano.
• The San Mateo Planning Commission
will hold a public hearing for the Carey
School on plans to make first-story modifica-
tions and second-story additions of approxi-
mately 9,409 square feet to existing buildings
on the school’s campus at 2103 Alameda de
las Pulgas. The school is also seeking to add
more students and staff to the campus. The
school currently has 249 students and 47 fac-
ulty members and staff. At the same meeting,
the commission will hold a public hearing for
the Nueva High School on plans to develop
a new campus at the Bay Meadows Phase II
development at South Delaware Street and
28th Avenue. The project is approximately
134,345 square feet with a parking garage of
approximately 39,300 square feet. The
Planning Commission meets 7:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Dec. 11, City Hall, 330 W. 20th
Ave., San Mateo.
EDUCATION
• The San Mateo-Foster City
Elementary School District is developing a
five-year technology plan to be approved by
the board in June. The goal is to provide
blended learning opportunities through a pro-
gram that allows students to work with
tablets. The program is anticipated to cost up
to $30 million over 15 years through a tech-
nology endowment. The board will hear
details of the start of the plan during its meet-
ing 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6 at the District
Office, 1170 Chess Drive, Foster City.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A former San Mateo man was sentenced to
20 years in prison yesterday for molesting his
two stepdaughters over several years while the
family lived in the city.
Robert Sparhawk, 48, pleaded no contest in
October to three counts of child molestation to
avoid a trial that could have sent him to prison
for life. On Wednesday, Sparhawk received a
20-year term agreed upon as part of the nego-
tiated plea deal. He must serve 85 percent
before being parole eligible and register as a
sex offender. Restitution to the victims will be
determined at a later date.
Sparhawk reportedly abused the 12- and 11-
year-old daughters of his new wife between
2003 and 2007 but the incidents were not
reported until 2011 after the family had moved
to Palo Alto.
The children did not tell their mother
because they did not want to disrupt her happy
marriage, according to prosecutors.
One girl eventually told a friend who con-
tacted authorities and Sparhawk admitted the
molestation during a phone call set up by law
enforcement, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Sparhawk has been in custody without bail
since his arrest.
Stepdad gets 20 years
prison for molestation
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown per-
suaded Californians to back his November tax
initiative, and now they are rewarding him
with a record high job-approval rating along
with new faith in the state’s fiscal future,
according to a poll released Wednesday from
the Public Policy Institute of California.
The poll finds Brown’s job approval has hit
48 percent after the passage of Proposition
30, the initiative that raised the statewide
sales tax by a quarter cent and raised income
tax rates for people who make more than
$250,000 a year. The Democratic governor’s
approval rating is up from 42 percent in
October and a low of 34 percent in February
and March of 2011.
Nearly half of
Californians surveyed by
PPIC said they feel better
about the state’s budget
situation because of
Proposition 30. That rate
of optimism mirrors the
sentiment before the
recession hit California.
Twenty-three percent said
the passage of Proposition
30 has made them more
pessimistic about the budget, and 28 percent
said it has not changed their views.
Californians are even giving the state
Legislature improved grades, sending law-
makers’ job approval rating to 34 percent
among all adults, surpassing 30 percent for
the first time since January 2008.
Renewed hope in state
buoys Gov. Jerry Brown
Jerry Brown
6
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
Jack D’Asaro
Jack D’Asaro, born Nov. 30, 1926, died at
Stanford Hospital Nov. 30, 2012.
He was a resident of San Mateo.
Husband of Marie D’Asaro. Father of
Antonina Haggerty and Mary Holliday.
Grandfather of Ryan Molyneaux, Karen
Haggerty and John Haggerty. Son of the late
Antonina and Mariano D’Asaro. Also sur-
vived by many loving nieces, nephews and
cousins.
Jack was a member of Unione’s Siciliana,
Peninsula Social Men’s Club, Carpenter’s
Local No. 22 and the Alaska Fisherman’s
Association. Jack was a prolific gardener,
adventurer, traveler, faithful dad, grandfather
and husband.
“Jack was a man of shining integrity. A
fun, kind, humorous, chivalrous man. A great
cook and hospitable to all he knew.He was
bold yet tender and humble. A wonderful
role model to his family. A great storyteller
with his wonderful signature voice. He faced
his illness with a brave heart. Jack always
faced his obstacles and confronted them. He
will always be remembered and respected as
a wonderful, husband, father and grandfa-
ther.”
Friends are invited to visit 3 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 6 and to attend a 7 p.m. vigil at Sneider
& Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home,
977 El Camino Real in San Mateo. A funeral
mass will be 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 7 at St.
Mark’s Catholic Church, 325 Marine View
Ave. in Belmont. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in memory of Jack D’Asaro, to
AML Research. Mail to: Stanford University,
326 Galvez St., Stanford, CA 94305.
Barbara Yolanda Fabela
Barbara Yolanda Fabela, born Sept. 19,
1948, died suddenly Nov.
22, 2012.
She was a native of San
Francisco, born and
raised, and a member of
the Latter Day Saints on
Gough and Pacific streets
in San Francisco.
She comes from a large
and well-known proud
San Francisco family.
Her parents were Juan Ybarra Fabela and
Maria Verboonen. She was the 14th of 15
children.
She loved to cook and made green enchi-
ladas and more dishes. Priscilla Roberson
was her sister, helper and confidant.
Services will be held and notified.
Contributions can be made to a charity of
your choice. Letters can be sent to 120
Grandview Ave., San Francisco, CA 94114.
Obituaries
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Pedestrians crossing El Camino Real at a
crosswalk that doesn’t happen to be at a light
can have a challenging time, particularly in
Millbrae where the state highway is six lanes.
Recently, the city has ramped up efforts to
patrol the area and increase drivers’ awareness
of the pedestrians in hopes of creating safer
conditions.
Lt. Ed Barberini, chief of police services for
the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office
Millbrae Bureau, said the department hasn’t
had any major incidents recently but wanted
to raise awareness.
“We have noticed if there is an area to
improve safety and awareness, [pedestrian
crossing on El Camino Real] is one of them,”
he said.
Millbrae has been putting signs out on El
Camino Real and moving them to different
locations. There has also been extra enforce-
ment.
The pedestrian crosswalk safety program
along El Camino Real will continue through
Friday, Dec. 21. During the increased efforts,
there will be signs posted, the use of social
media reminding people of the effort, verbal
warnings to motorists and pedestrians and
citations issued when appropriate. A pedestri-
an decoy program is tentatively scheduled to
be held Friday, Dec. 21 after the warnings
effort is implemented.
“We’re not trying to trap people. We write
enough tickets,” said Barberini. “Although
there will be tickets, we simply want everyone
to be safe — behind the wheel and on the
street.”
Although the program is for two weeks,
Millbrae police continually work with the
city’s traffic engineering department and
Caltrans to monitor pedestrian and motorist
safety along El Camino Real.
Millbrae is getting a new traffic light at the
intersection of Victoria Avenue and El Camino
Real shortly. Getting that approved and set up
took nearly 10 years, said City Engineer Khee
Lim. There is also talks of possibly adding a
light to the Millwood Drive intersection, he
said.
Millbrae focuses on pedestrian safety on El Camino
By Christina Hoag
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — California’s $2.1 billion
adult education system is a disjointed hodge-
podge of courses, fees and faculty and should
be overhauled to make it consistent and
focused statewide, the state Legislative
Analyst’s Office said in a report released
Wednesday.
The 28-page document termed adult educa-
tion as “a program adrift” and recommended
that the state Legislature take steps to make it
more coherent and accountable to taxpayers
and students.
About 300 adult education programs serv-
ing an estimated 1.5 million people exist in
the state, largely provided by local school dis-
tricts and the state’s 112 community colleges.
Among the subjects taught: English as a sec-
ond language, remedial reading, writing and
math, high school equivalency, U.S. citizen-
ship, vocational training, effective parenting,
fitness classes and enrichment courses for sen-
ior citizens such as ceramics.
That mission is too broad, the legislative
analyst said. The purpose should be narrowed
to those courses that help adults integrate into
society and the workforce and classes such as
senior citizen enrichment and fitness classes
should be dropped.
The investigation found discrepancies
between course fees, entrance requirements
and faculty standards between community
colleges and school districts. Lawmakers
should adopt one policy for all adult education
programs, including standardized courses
similar to the state university systems, the
report recommended.
The report also found that some colleges
mix adult education students who do not earn
credit in classes with degree-seeking students,
and some give college credit for adult ed
classes such as elementary algebra, a ninth-
grade high school course.
Report: Adult education needs restructuring
By Charles J. Gans
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
You don’t have to be a jazz aficionado to
recognize “Take Five,” the smoky instrumen-
tal by the Dave Brubeck Quartet that instant-
ly evokes swinging bachelor pads, hi-fi sys-
tems and cool nightclubs of the 1950s and
’60s.
“Take Five” was a musical milestone — a
deceptively complex jazz composition that
managed to crack the Billboard singles chart
and introduce a new, adventurous sound to
millions of listeners.
In a career that spanned almost all of
American jazz since World War II, Brubeck’s
celebrated quartet combined exotic, challeng-
ing tempos with classical influences to create
lasting standards.
The pianist and composer behind the group,
Brubeck died Wednesday of heart failure at a
hospital in Norwalk,
Conn. He was a day shy of
his 92nd birthday.
Brubeck believed that
jazz presented the best
face of America to the
world.
“Jazz is about freedom
within discipline,” he said
in a 2005 interview with
the Associated Press.
“Usually a dictatorship like in Russia and
Germany will prevent jazz from being played
because it just seemed to represent freedom,
democracy and the United States.
“Many people don’t understand how disci-
plined you have to be to play jazz. ... And that
is really the idea of democracy — freedom
within the Constitution or discipline. You
don’t just get out there and do anything you
want.”
The common thread that ran through
Brubeck’s work was breaking down the barri-
ers between musical genres — particularly
jazz and classical music. He was inspired by
his mother, a classical pianist, and later by his
composition teacher, the French composer
Darius Mihaud, who encouraged his interest
in jazz and advised him to “keep your ears
open” as he traveled the world.
“When you hear Bach or Mozart, you hear
perfection,” Brubeck said in 2005.
“Remember that Bach, Mozart and Beethoven
were great improvisers. I can hear that in their
music.”
Brubeck was always fascinated by the
rhythms of everyday life. In a discussion with
biographer Doug Ramsey, he recalled the
rhythms he heard while working as a boy on
cattle drives at the northern California ranch
managed by his father.
The first time he heard polyrhythms — the
use of two rhythms at the same time — was on
horseback.
Jazz legend Dave Brubeck dies
Dave Brubeck
7
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION 8
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Timing
BELT
Special
$199 +up
30K/60K/90K
Service
Mon-Fri 8am-5pm
Sat: 9am-1pm
(650) 342-6342
635 South Claremont St. San Mateo, CA 94402
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It may be just a
bluff or a bargaining ploy, but the White
House is signaling that President Barack
Obama is willing to let the country go
over the “fiscal cliff,” a hard-line negoti-
ating strategy aimed at winning conces-
sions from Republicans on taxes.
If Washington really does fail to avert
the looming series of tax hikes and
spending cuts, the White House will por-
tray Republicans as the culprits for
insisting on protecting tax cuts for the
wealthy, an effort the administration is
laying the groundwork for now.
“This is a choice of the Republican
Party,” said Dan Pfeiffer, White House
communications director. “If they are
willing to do higher rates on the wealthy,
there’s a lot we can talk about. And if
they are not, then they’ll push us over the
cliff.”
But going over the cliff also would be
full of risk for a president fresh off re-
election and facing at least two more
years of divided government.
Ending the year without a deal could
roil financial markets and dent consumer
confidence just as the economy is
strengthening. It could make it harder
for Obama to get Republican help on his
second-term priorities like overhauling
the immigration system and the nation’s
tax code, or in getting potential Cabinet
replacements confirmed.
And it would signal to the country that
the president’s campaign prediction that
the GOP “fever” would break following
his re-election was a pipe dream.
House Speaker John Boehner says
Obama is playing a risky game. “If the
president really wants to avoid sending
the economy over the fiscal cliff, he has
done nothing to demonstrate it,” the
speaker said.
But Treasury Secretary Timothy
Geithner appeared to signal that the
administration might do just that — go
past the cliff if necessary.
In an interview Wednesday with
CNBC, Geithner was asked if the
administration was prepared to go over
the fiscal cliff if taxes do not increase on
the wealthy. “Oh, absolutely,” he said.
“There’s no prospect in an agreement
that doesn’t involve those rates going up
on the top 2 percent of the wealthiest of
Americans,” Geithner added.
He also said the administration was
also prepared to walk away from a deal
that did not include raising the debt ceil-
ing.
“We are not prepared to have the
American economy held hostage to peri-
odic threats ... to default on our obliga-
tions,” Geithner said.
Obama could risk going over ‘cliff’
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — For the first time in days, President
Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner spoke by
phone Wednesday about the “fiscal
cliff” that threatens to knock the econo-
my into recession, raising the prospect
of fresh negotiations to prevent tax
increases and spending cuts set to kick
in with the new year.
Officials provided no details of the
conversation, which came on the same
day the president, hewing to a hard line,
publicly warned congressional
Republicans not to inject the threat of a
government default into the already complex issue.
“It’s not a game I will play,” Obama told a group of busi-
ness leaders as Republicans struggled to find their footing
in talks with a recently re-elected president and unified
congressional Democrats.
Among the Republicans, Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma
became the latest to break ranks and say he could support
Obama’s demand for an increase in tax rates at upper
incomes as part of a comprehensive plan to cut federal
deficits.
Across the Capitol, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor
said Republicans want to “sit down with the president. We
want to talk specifics.” He noted that the GOP had made a
compromise offer earlier in the week and the White House
had rejected it.
President,Boehner discuss
economy over the phone
REUTERS
Barack Obama speaks at the 2012 Tribal Nations Conference at the Department of
Interior in Washington, D.C.
John Boehner
By Alicia A. Calwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Homeland Security
Department paid for an underwater robot in a
Midwest city with no major rivers or lakes
nearby, a hog catcher in rural Texas and a fish
tank in a small Texas town, according to a new
congressional report highlighting what it
described as wasteful spending of tax money
intended for counterterrorism purposes.
Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., said in his 54-
page report that while much of the spending for
the department’s Urban Area Security Initiative
appeared to be allowed under the program’s
rules, it was still inappropriate in an age of
budget austerity and as the federal government
faces a $16 trillion national debt.
“Every dollar misspent in the name of secu-
rity weakens our already precarious economic
condition, indebts us to foreign nations, and
shackles the future of our children and grand-
children,” Coburn said.
The report focused on UASI spending in the
last few years in Arizona, California, Colorado,
Indiana, Louisiana, Minnesota, Ohio,
Oklahoma and the National Capitol Region,
which includes Washington and parts of
Maryland and Virginia. Among the projects
Coburn found questionable were:
• $21 for a fish tank in Seguin, Texas, a
small town outside of San Antonio.
• $98,000 for an underwater robot in
Columbus, Ohio, where there are no major
rivers and few lakes nearby.
• $24,000 for a “latrine on wheels” in Fort
Worth, Texas.
• A “BearCat” armored vehicle bought with
a $285,933 grant in Keene, N.H., a small New
England town that is home to an annual pump-
kin festival that draws up to 70,000 people.
• $250,000 for security upgrades, including
$9,000 in signage, at Lucas Oil Stadium in
Indianapolis.
DHS grant spending questioned amid budget woes
OPINION 9
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
— Los Angeles Times
I
n a bid to cut the state’s health care bills,
the Brown administration will begin
shuttering the Healthy Families insur-
ance program for low-income children on Jan.
1. More than 850,000 kids will be shifted over
the course of the year into HMOs that partici-
pate in Medi-Cal, California’s version of the
federally subsidized Medicaid program. It
may be too late now for the Legislature to res-
cue Healthy Families from its untimely and
potentially disruptive end, even though law-
makers are heading to Sacramento on Monday
to begin a special session devoted to health-
care issues. But state lawmakers and federal
Medicaid officials should do as much as they
can to ensure that these children’s parents
won’t be left scrambling desperately to find a
doctor or a dentist when their kids need one.
Healthy Families provides insurance to chil-
dren in families too poor to afford private cov-
erage but not quite poor enough to qualify for
Medi-Cal, which is available to those whose
earnings don’t exceed the federal poverty line
($19,000 for a family of three in 2012). The
program receives more generous federal subsi-
dies than Medi-Cal, yet it’s more expensive
for the state because it offers doctors, dentists
and hospitals higher rates than Medi-Cal pays.
Those higher payments lead more providers to
participate in Healthy Families, making it eas-
ier for the children it covers to obtain care.
Despite the success of Healthy Families,
Gov. Jerry Brown persuaded the Legislature
earlier this year to end it and cover its benefi-
ciaries through Medi-Cal’s managed-care pro-
gram instead. The goal was to save an estimat-
ed $13 million in the first half of 2013 and
potentially even more in the future, narrowing
the state’s budget gap. The change also prom-
ised two potential benefits for low-income
families: Medi-Cal covers some healthcare
costs that Healthy Families doesn’t, and its
premiums and co-pays are lower.
Many children’s advocates in the state, how-
ever, say that the easier access to doctors in
Healthy Families trumps Medi-Cal’s superior
coverage and lower out-of-pocket costs. In
some rural areas, new Medi-Cal patients may
have to leave the county to find certain types
of providers. That’s too much to ask of fami-
lies who are barely scraping by, particularly if
their children have chronic diseases or mental
health issues. Imagine being a single mother
with a full-time job, no car and a 10-year-old
daughter who needs dialysis, but the only
provider willing to treat her is 30 miles away.
With the 2010 federal healthcare law about
to force tumultuous changes in the industry,
now is an especially bad time to eliminate
Healthy Families. In little more than a year,
millions more low-income Californians will
become eligible for Medi-Cal if the state
extends it to those earning up to 133 percent
of the poverty line, as provided by the new
law. That expansion would put even more
strain on an overburdened program. At the
same time, new subsidies for private health
insurance will become available for low- and
moderate-income families. Besides, the can-
cellation of the program will not improve the
state’s finances any time soon. Upset about the
program’s demise, Republicans blocked the
renewal of a tax on managed-care plans that
had helped pay for it, costing the state nearly
$200 million annually.
Ideally, lawmakers would move swiftly to
preserve Healthy Families and the correspon-
ding tax for at least one more year. That
would allow low-income children and their
parents to move together into new insurance
coverage in 2014, whether it be through Medi-
Cal or heavily subsidized private plans. The
prospects of such an 11th-hour rescue are
slim, however; the state has already sent
notices to many Healthy Families beneficiaries
telling them that their coverage is changing
Jan. 1.
If Healthy Families can’t be saved, it’s
imperative that federal officials withhold
approval of the state’s plan until the state
shows that the program’s beneficiaries will
continue to have the same access to care as
before. Although some Healthy Families par-
ticipants are covered by insurers that also offer
Medi-Cal HMOs, many others will have to be
placed with new insurers. And just because an
insurer offers a Medi-Cal HMO, that doesn’t
mean its network of providers can handle an
influx of new patients.
The state plans to shift Healthy Families
recipients into Medi-Cal in four phases, start-
ing in January with those who can move to
Medi-Cal HMOs run by the same insurers and
served by the same networks of doctors that
serve them today. Soon after, though, the state
will have to deal with children whose current
doctors, dentists or therapists don’t participate
in Medi-Cal. Meanwhile, children newly eligi-
ble for coverage will go straight into Medi-Cal
HMOs, even in areas where access to care is
in doubt.
State officials say kids whose HMOs can’t
meet their needs will be allowed to seek care
from out-of-network providers. That’s predi-
cated on the risky assumption, however, that
these families will be able to find any
providers in their communities willing to treat
patients at Medi-Cal’s low rates.
The federal Department of Health and
Human Services and state lawmakers should-
n’t hesitate to slam the brakes on the transition
if the state cannot preserve kids’ access to
care. And as Senate President Pro Tem Darrell
Steinberg, D-Sacramento, has suggested, the
administration needs a way to monitor the per-
formance of Medi-Cal HMOs after they’ve
started adding former Healthy Families benefi-
ciaries to see if problems emerge. That moni-
toring capability should be in place in a coun-
ty before Healthy Families is terminated there.
The Brown administration seems deter-
mined to phase out Healthy Families as rapid-
ly as it can. Making sure low-income kids
have access to the healthcare they need, how-
ever, is more important than maximizing the
potential savings to state government. If the
state must bring Healthy Families to a prema-
ture end, lawmakers in Sacramento and regu-
lators in Washington should keep a close eye
on the process to make sure no children are
pushed into a coverage abyss.
7-Eleven controversy in San Mateo
Editor,
Thank you to Daily Journal reporter Bill
Silverfarb for keeping our neighborhood and
our fellow San Mateo neighborhoods informed
as to the goings on in the 7-Eleven/San Mateo
Heights controversy.
While there are a lot of details already
known, apparently there may still be some pos-
sible shady ones to be uncovered. As responsi-
ble journalists like you do your thing, residents
of this neighborhood, like me, feel that we
may have a David’s chance against this multi-
billion-dollar corporate Goliath who appears
unconcerned about how it impacts our quiet
neighborhood (aside from keeping us well-
stocked with Big Gulps and cigarettes). While
7-Eleven claims that they stand to lose $8 mil-
lion (at this point) if the permit is revoked, the
truth is that they were informed by the city of
San Mateo almost three months ago that they
should consider stopping any further changes
to the property until the controversy is cleared
up. They didn’t. It seems to me that in the
same way Goliath cursed with disdain toward
David, perhaps 7-Eleven has done the same.
Again, thanks for keeping San Mateo
informed.
Peter Martin
San Mateo
‘Cliff-hanging’ Congress
Editor,
The newly-elected Congress faces a moun-
tain of unresolved issues knowing that any leg-
islation it passes to solve them must hurdle an
already “cliff-hanging” budget that lacks funds
to meet the challenges ahead.
Republicans want to make deep budget cuts
across the board but offer no solutions for the
financial disaster it would bring to millions of
retired seniors, the working poor and handi-
capped.
Democrats want to save those same millions
from losing their financial and health care ben-
efits they earned during their years in the
workforce and were promised to receive dur-
ing their retirement years.
The results from the 2012 election clearly
indicate that voters expect members of
Congress in both sides of the aisle to make
compromises on “all” issues, not just one.
The time is now for both parties to put the
“working harness” on the “symbolic” elephant
and donkey and get them moving to put the
nation on the road toward economic recovery.
Jack Rogers
San Mateo
Keeping California’s kids healthy
Other voices
A library worth
checking out
I
f libraries were comparable to highly-
ranked restaurants, the Redwood City
facility would be the French Laundry,
Alinea and El Bulli all rolled into one.
Fortunately for patrons of the Redwood City
branch, they need neither a reservation two
months out or a tall stack of hundreds as
bribery for a seat inside.
The Redwood City Library announced this
week it is the recipient of a five-star rating from
the Library Journal Index of Public Library
Service, making it one of only two statewide
with such high marks
and the top-rated of
any size for the
entirety of California.
That’s right; not
one of the libraries,
but “the” library.
Take a bow,
Redwood City!
Not to knock any
of San Mateo
County’s other
libraries, but
Redwood City is in
pretty sparse compa-
ny locally, according to the journal.
The San Mateo County Library made the
cut with four stars which is certainly nothing
to sneeze at but five stars? Now that’s really
saying something.
Frankly, I’m not sure exactly what the
Library Journal Index of Public Library
Service is but in an announcement by
Redwood City Library Director Dave Genesy
he calls it the premier national rating system.
Who am I to quibble with that?
The rating is pretty awesome for several rea-
sons, primarily the proof that people still read
actual books. Sure, many folks probably look
to the library for lots of other needs — a
parental breather during children’s reading
hour, pilfering of free WiFi, perusing a cornu-
copia of magazines to keep up on the latest
Robert Pattinson and Kirsten Stewart scandal,
the downloading of e-books onto readers and
movies onto tablets. Did you know the library
offers an e-reader “petting zoo” to give the
devices a try? And Wii gaming? This is not the
library of my youth. But somehow, actual
bound books are still the backbone of a brick-
and-mortar library.
In all fairness, books themselves aren’t the
only reason for the five-star ranking. The score
also includes per capita measures of how many
things are borrowed, how many people visit,
the types of programs, public Internet use and
attendance at events. Taken together, this means
the people in Redwood City must really like
their library. Heck, they must love their library.
Now the challenge for the Redwood City
Library is maintaining. The biggest problem
with being the best is remaining the best.
On the other hand, the county’s other
libraries have the challenge of netting those
stars. The journal concedes its own ratings
have nothing to do with quality, excellence or
service to the community. Those intangibles
are near impossible to put a price on.
That said, there are a few things the other
branches might consider doing to drum up
attention. Hot librarians, for one. Sure, it’s a
cliché. It may also perk up those attendance
levels. Extra credit if those librarians can find
new and inventive ways to tell loud patrons to
“Ssssh!”
A new cataloging system is also a nice
touch. Dewey Decimal is so yesterday. Let’s
go with straight alphabetical. Or colored
spines. Number of pages. You get the idea.
Then again, vintage is pretty popular.
Perhaps a return to microfiche, just for old
times sake? Doing so could also increase the
number of library visits because patrons will
need that much more time to figure out how
to actually use microfiche. Same goes with
card catalogs and encyclopedias — hey, what
are those?
Or, gimmicks aside, maybe those who
haven’t checked out any of the county’s
libraries lately should give them a whirl. Stars
are fantastic but a personal visit is probably
the best, and certainly the most personal, way
to see how they stack up.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached
by email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by
phone (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you
think of this column? Send a letter to the editor:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those
who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis
and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state,
national and world news, we seek to provide our readers
with the highest quality information resource in San
Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and
we choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Blanca Frasier
Charles Gould Gale Green
Jeff Palter Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Kore Chan Elizabeth Cortes
JD Crayne Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Brian Grabianowski
Ashley Hansen Erin Hurley
Melanie Lindow Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Sally Schilling
Kris Skarston Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not
be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number where
we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred: letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are
those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent
the views of the Daily Journal staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors. If you question the
accuracy of any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,034.49 +0.64% 10-Yr Bond 1.591 -1.06%
Nasdaq2,973.70 -0.77% Oil (per barrel) 87.91
S&P 500 1,409.28 +0.16% Gold 1,693.70
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stocks closed higher
Wednesday, their first gain of the week,
as bank shares rose and comments by
President Barack Obama made investors
optimistic that a quick deal could be
made to avoid the “fiscal cliff.”
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
82.71 points to end at 13,034.49. It had
been up as much as 137. The Standard
and Poor’s 500 closed up 2.23 points to
1,409.28. The Nasdaq composite was
down 22.99 points to 2,973.70, held
back by a slump in Apple.
Citigroup jumped $2.17, or 6.3 per-
cent, to $36.46 after the bank said it
plans to eliminate more than 11,000
jobs, or about 4 percent of its workforce,
to cut expenses and improve efficiency.
Travelers surged $3.47, or 4.9 percent, to
$74 after it announced plans to resume
stock buybacks. Travelers temporarily
suspended repurchases following
Superstorm Sandy while it assessed its
exposure to damage claims.
“We can probably solve this in about a
week, it’s not that tough,” Obama said in
lunchtime remarks to the Business
Roundtable in Washington. The com-
ments, made just before noon, helped
push the market higher, said Quincy
Crosby, a market strategist at Prudential
Financial.
Stocks have largely traded sideways
for two weeks as investors wait for
developments from Washington on cru-
cial budget talks to avoid the “fiscal
cliff,” a series of sharp government
spending cuts and tax increases sched-
uled to start Jan. 1 unless an agreement
is reached to cut the budget deficit.
Economists say that the measures, if
implemented, could push the U.S. back
into recession.
Apple was among the decliners,
falling $37.05, or 6.4 percent, to
$538.79. Stifel Financial analyst Aaron
Rakers said the drop was in part due to
comments from AT&T Mobility chief
executive officer Ralph de La Vega,
which suggested that smartphone activa-
tions this quarter were lagging the same
period a year ago. The stock has now
dropped 23 percent since closing at a
record $702.10 in September.
Stocks are still up on the year, after the
Federal Reserve extended its bond-buy-
ing program in September, offsetting
concern that the European debt crisis
was set to spread. The Dow has gained 7
percent and S&P 500 has advanced 12
percent.
“The market will hold on to its gains
for the year. Given the uncertainty I
don’t see any compelling reasons for an
increase,” said Brian Gendreau, a market
strategist with Cetera Financial Group, a
Los Angeles-based broker. “But that
could change in a blink. If there’s better-
than-expected news from these negotia-
tions, the market could pop.”
A Chinese government pledge to
maintain policies intended to strengthen
the world’s second-largest economy
helped raise optimism about global
growth. China’s Shanghai Composite
Index jumped 2.9 percent to 2,031.91.
Hong Kong’s Hang Seng ended 2.2 per-
cent higher at 22,270.91.
A private survey showed Wednesday
that U.S. businesses added fewer work-
ers in November, in part because
Superstorm Sandy shut down factories,
retail stores, and other companies.
Payroll processor ADP said employers
added 118,000 jobs last month. That’s
below October’s total of 157,000, which
was revised lower. Investors will also
look to the monthly jobs report from the
Labor Department Friday for more
information about how the economy is
doing.
Stocks gain on ‘cliff’ hope
Wall Street
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Citigroup said
Wednesday that it will cut 11,000 jobs, a
bold early move by new CEO Michael
Corbat.
The cuts amount to about 4 percent of
Citi’s workforce. The bulk of them,
about 6,200 jobs, will come from Citi’s
consumer banking unit, which handles
everyday functions like branches and
checking accounts.
Citi said that it will sell or scale back
consumer operations in Pakistan,
Paraguay, Romania, Turkey and
Uruguay and focus on 150 cities around
the world “that have the highest growth
potential in consumer banking.”
The bank, the third-largest in the
country by assets, did not say how many
jobs it will cut in the United States.
About 1,900 job cuts will come from
the institutional clients group, which
includes the investment bank. The com-
pany will also cut jobs in technology and
operations by using more automation
and moving jobs to “lower-cost loca-
tions.”
Investors appeared to like the move.
They sent Citi stock up $2.17, or 6.3 per-
cent, to close at $36.46 Wednesday.
Job cuts are a familiar template in a
banking industry still under the long
shadow of the 2008 financial crisis.
Banks are searching for ways to make
money as new regulations crimp some of
their former revenue streams, like trad-
ing for their own profit or marketing
credit cards to college students.
Customers are still nervous about bor-
rowing money in an uncertain economy.
And they are still filing lawsuits over
industry practices like risky mortgage
lending that helped cause the crisis.
Citi fared worse than others. It nearly
collapsed, had to take two taxpayer-
funded bailout loans, and became the
poster child for banks that had grown too
big and disorderly.
Citigroup to cut 11,000 jobs
Starbucks to open 1,500 more cafes in the U.S.
NEW YORK — Another Starbucks may soon pop up
around the corner, with the world’s biggest coffee company
planning to add at least 1,500 cafes in the U.S. over the next
five years.
The plan, which would boost the number of Starbucks
cafes in the country by about 13 percent, was announced at
the company’s investor day in New York Wednesday. Taking
into account Canada and South America, the company plans
to add a total of 3,000 new cafes in its broader Americas
region.
Worldwide, the company says it will have more than
20,000 cafes by 2014, up from its current count of about
18,000. Much of that growth will come from China, which
the company says will surpass Canada as its second-biggest
market.
Although Starbucks has been intensifying its growth over-
seas and building its packaged-goods business back at home,
the majority of its revenue still comes from its more than
11,100 cafes in the United States.
Amazon launches Kindle content service for kids
NEW YORK — Amazon is launching a subscription serv-
ice for children’s games, videos and books aimed at getting
more kids to use its Kindle Fire tablet devices.
Amazon.com Inc. announced Wednesday that the Kindle
FreeTime Unlimited service will be available in the next few
weeks as part of an automatic software update.
Amazon said subscribers will have access to “thousands”
of pieces of content, though the company did not give a spe-
cific number. Kids will be able to watch, play and read any
of the content available to them as many times as they want.
Parents can set time limits, however.
The service, aimed at kids aged 3 to 8, will cost $4.99 per
month for one child. It’ll cost $2.99 per child for members
of Amazon Prime, the company’s premium shipping service.
Amazon Prime costs $79 per year for free shipping of mer-
chandise purchased in the company’s online store.
Business briefs
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We are so confident that our Personalized Martial Arts Instruction will
immediately change your life, we are making you an offer you simply
can’t refuse- FREE 30 DAY TEST DRIVE!!
1100 Park Place, suite 50 • San Mateo, CA 94403
650.286.0105 • www.zultimate.com
$
$
Westmoor got a game-high 24 points from
Wai Min in the win over the Wildcats. Errol
Fernandez went for 21, while Eric Liang and
John Mayuga each scored 14.
And before you say S.I. was not a full
strength because a handful of players are still
playing football, keep this in mind: the last time
these two teams met was 2009, when the
Wildcats put a whipping on the Rams, 61-20.
Min and Fernandez, both seniors, are three-
year varsity players and the leaders on this team.
They are joined by a core of players from last
year’s 8-17 squad, including Liang, Mayuga,
Derek Duong and Cameron Cook.
It won’t be easy for the Rams, however, as
they will likely battle El Camino for the PAL’s
North Division title. The Colts are coming off a
Bay Division championship and an appearance
in the CCS Division III championship game,
where they lost to Sacred Heart Cathedral, 71-
53.
The Colts also return a couple of key pieces
in swingman Michael Smith and point guard
Elijah White. It’s still early, but Smith is averag-
ing 27 points per game following a 34-point
performance against California-San Ramon.
White is averaging 18 points per game so far.
Half Moon Bay could also factor in the title
mix. The Cougars are also coming off a CCS
championship appearance and are off to a 3-0
start this season. The Cougars have five players
averaging nearly six points a game, led by
Corey Cilia’s 18 points per contest. Rico Nuno
is averaging 11.
In the South, Burlingame appears to again be
the team to beat, regardless of an offseason
coaching change. The Panthers play arguably
the toughest non-league schedule of any team in
the PAL and will face four of the seven WCAL
teams in the next month. Despite a 1-2 start,
their losses have come to Riordan and Righetti.
Mills, the loss to Bellarmine not withstanding,
is also off to a good start to the 2012-13 cam-
paign with a 2-1 record. The Vikings picked up
two solid wins in the Cupertino tournament,
beating Homestead and Mountain View.
Based on Mills’ loss to Bellarmine, does that
mean the Vikings are in for a rough time this
season? Not at all. Mills will still be in the mix
for a league title, will have their shot in the PAL
tournament and always stand a good chance of
advancing to at least the semifinals of CCS.
They have that capability every year.
But if a PAL team manages to beat a WCAL
squad, it gets peoples’ attention and ratchets up
expectations. Westmoor is now on the radar and
no one will overlook the Rams the rest of the
season.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — He was adopted as a
newborn, has a fully grown pet tortoise named
Sammy, and sports 10 or 11 tattoos by his own
count covering much of his upper body.
Colin Kaepernick is finding out fast that just
about everything becomes fair game — and
very much public — when you’re a starting
quarterback in the NFL. Personal, profession-
al and otherwise. Since the second-year pro
took over as San Francisco’s starter three
games ago, further details of his life have
emerged.
“I get tattoos because I like them, not for
anybody else,” Kaepernick said when asked if
he understands the intrigue of a tattooed quar-
terback. “I don’t know. I don’t worry about
that.”
Kaepernick said Wednesday he understands
there are pressures on and off the field with his
job, but prefers to move forward this week
from a disappointing loss at St. Louis and get
ready for Sunday’s home game against the
Miami Dolphins.
Kaepernick accepts the added attention and
scrutiny that comes his way, along with the
successes.
“That’s something that I don’t worry about,”
he said. “I’m here to play football. I don’t pay
attention to what the media’s writing or what
people are saying. I’m here to play, and go out
and perform on Sundays.”
And Kaepernick knows he had better help
the Niners (8-3-1) bounce back from a 16-13
overtime loss on the road to the Rams —
because coach Jim Harbaugh still will only go
as far as to say Kaepernick is the starter again
this week, nothing beyond there. The reigning
NFL coach of the year hasn’t ruled out return-
ing to Alex Smith before season’s end.
“It’s a situation, whatever Coach Harbaugh
chooses, that’s the guy we’re rolling with,” left
tackle Joe Staley said. “We’re all worried
about getting W’s, we’re worried about doing
our jobs to the best of our ability. We don’t
have time to worry about favorites.
Kaepernick’s our guy. We support him 100
percent. That’s how it is.”
Harbaugh again accepted blame Wednesday
for an errant pitch in the fourth quarter that
was fumbled by Kaepernick deep in 49ers ter-
ritory and that allowed St. Louis to tie the
game with a touchdown and two-point conver-
sion.
Harbaugh said Kaepernick still can learn as
much from plays that go awry as from those
that work. Even Rams coach Jeff Fisher won-
dered afterward why San Francisco called
such a risky play in that situation.
“The play we called in the huddle was a
loser, and we didn’t have an audible for that
play,” Harbaugh said. “The way it turned out,
that’s a low-hanging fruit, ‘What the heck are
they doing?’ You learn from it. It feels like
somebody reached into your chest and stom-
ach and started pulling the innards out without
using any anesthesia.”
Not that Harbaugh actually called that one
— that was offensive coordinator Greg Roman
— but he did relay the call to Kaepernick
through the headset and took full responsibili-
ty for it.
Kaepernick isn’t blaming anybody. He will
be the first one to acknowledge he has plenty
of flaws to go with his big, playmaking arm.
Now, Kaepernick is back to work getting
ready for what has turned into a key game with
the Dolphins considering Seattle won at
Chicago in overtime Sunday to put pressure on
the NFC West-leading Niners. San Francisco
plays at the Seahawks (7-5) on Dec. 23.
“Can’t make mistakes. That’s the biggest
thing,” Kaepernick said of what he took from
Sunday. “For the most part I felt my reads
were good, got through progressions well.
That’s something I want to continue to do
going forward.”
There haven’t been many miscues so far.
Kaepernick took over as starter in the second
half of San Francisco’s first game with the
Rams, a 24-24 tie on Nov. 11, after Smith suf-
fered a first-half concussion and the 2011 sec-
ond-round draft pick has kept the job even
after Smith was medically cleared to return.
Kaepernick is 69 for 106 for 888 yards and
three touchdowns with one interception and a
96.7 passer rating.
“We’ve got faith and trust in Colin in the
way he’s played,” Harbaugh said. “Therefore,
another start this week.”
As starter, Kaepernick being scrutinized
“I’m here to play
football. I don’t
pay attention to
what the media is
writing or what
people are saying.
I’m here to play.”
Colin
Kaepernick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Klay Thompson
scored 19 of his 27 points in the third quarter, and
the Golden State Warriors pulled away to beat the
Detroit Pistons 104-97 on Wednesday night.
The Warriors, starting a seven-game road trip
against the Eastern Conference, snapped Detroit’s
five-game winning streak at home. Golden State
has won two straight games in Detroit after losing
25 of 29.
Stephen Curry finished with 22 points and 10
assists, his fourth straight 20-10 game, while
David Lee added 20 points and 11 rebounds for
the Warriors.
Tayshaun Prince was the only Pistons starter to
reach double figures, but four reserves scored at
least 10, including 17 from Rodney Stuckey and
15 points and 12 rebounds from Andre
Drummond.
Golden State looked as if it would take control
early, jumping out to a 19-7 lead, but neither team
could shoot well enough to hang on to any sus-
tained advantage in the first half. The Warriors hit
35 percent from the floor, but that was better than
Detroit’s 33.9 percent and enough to take a 40-38
advantage into the intermission.
The Warriors, though, scored 27 points in the
first eight minutes of the third. Thompson scored
14 points in the burst, and Curry added nine.
Thompson kept it going, finishing the period by
blocking Greg Monroe’s jumper from behind,
then hitting a 3-pointer to give Golden State a 79-
61 advantage going into the fourth.
Two dunks by Drummond got Detroit within
83-72, but Thompson answered with a long
jumper. Detroit appeared out of the game, but the
Pistons hit seven straight shots to pull within 98-95
with a minute to play. Golden State, though, put
the game away from the free throw line.
Detroit intentionally fouled Andris Biedrins late
in the third quarter. He missed the first shot badly,
made the second and was immediately taken out
of the game. Biedrins didn’t play in the fourth
quarter, but the Warriors did the same thing to
Drummond late in the game.
Warriors
get past
Pistons
Warriors 104, Pistons 97
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 9 3 0 .750 430 260
N.Y. Jets 5 7 0 .417 228 296
Buffalo 5 7 0 .417 277 337
Miami 5 7 0 .417 227 249
South
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Houston 11 1 0 .917 351 221
Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 265 306
Tennessee 4 8 0 .333 248 359
Jacksonville 2 10 0 .167 206 342
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 9 3 0 .750 303 242
Pittsburgh 7 5 0 .583 254 230
Cincinnati 7 5 0 .583 302 260
Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 229 265
West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 9 3 0 .750 349 244
San Diego 4 8 0 .333 258 257
Oakland 3 9 0 .250 235 376
Kansas City 2 10 0 .167 188 322
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 7 5 0 .583 321 243
Washington 6 6 0 .500 312 301
Dallas 6 6 0 .500 280 295
Philadelphia 3 9 0 .250 217 320
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Atlanta 11 1 0 .917 317 229
Tampa Bay 6 6 0 .500 333 285
New Orleans 5 7 0 .417 321 327
Carolina 3 9 0 .250 235 292
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 8 4 0 .667 296 259
Chicago 8 4 0 .667 294 198
Minnesota 6 6 0 .500 262 272
Detroit 4 8 0 .333 300 315
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 8 3 1 .708 289 171
Seattle 7 5 0 .583 242 202
St. Louis 5 6 1 .458 221 267
Arizona 4 8 0 .333 186 234
Thursday, Dec. 6
Denver at Oakland, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 9
Chicago at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Washington, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Dallas at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Miami at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 1:25 p.m.
New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 1:25 p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 10
Houston at New England,5:30 p.m.
NFL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 13 4 .765 —
Brooklyn 11 6 .647 2
Philadelphia 10 8 .5563 1/2
Boston 10 8 .5563 1/2
Toronto 4 14 .2229 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 12 4 .750 —
Atlanta 10 5 .667 1 1/2
Charlotte 7 10 .412 5 1/2
Orlando 7 11 .389 6
Washington 2 13 .133 9 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 9 8 .529 —
Indiana 10 9 .526 —
Milwaukee 8 9 .471 1
Detroit 6 14 .300 4 1/2
Cleveland 4 15 .211 6
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 13 3 .813 1/2
San Antonio 15 4 .789 —
Houston 9 8 .529 5
Dallas 8 9 .471 6
New Orleans 5 12 .294 9
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 15 4 .789 —
Utah 10 10 .500 5 1/2
Denver 9 10 .474 6
Minnesota 8 9 .471 6
Portland 8 11 .421 7
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 11 6 .647 —
Golden State 11 7 .611 1/2
L.A. Lakers 9 10 .474 3
Phoenix 7 12 .368 5
Sacramento 4 12 .250 6 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
New York 100, Charlotte 98
Indiana 99, Portland 92
Boston 104, Minnesota 94
Golden State 104, Detroit 97
L.A. Lakers 103, New Orleans 87
Atlanta 108, Denver 104
Chicago 95, Cleveland 85
San Antonio 110, Milwaukee 99
Utah 87, Orlando 81
Toronto at Sacramento, late
Dallas at L.A. Clippers, late
Thursday’sGames
New York at Miami, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Boston at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Denver at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Golden State at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
featherweight title and Pacquiao
came out and floored Marquez in the
first round. Marquez got up only to
go down two more times in the
round, yet somehow managed to end
the round on his feet.
Marquez would not only survive,
but come back to dominate the later
part of the fight. He salvaged a draw
on the judge’s scorecards, the first of
three decisions he felt unjustly
favored Pacquiao.
They met again at 130 pounds in
2008 and the fight was almost as
close. Pacquiao won one scorecard,
Marquez the other, while the third
judge favored Pacquiao by one point,
giving him a split-decision win.
Then they fought last year at 144
pounds and Pacquiao won a majority
decision that angered both Marquez
and the crowd at the MGM Grand
arena, which booed heavily when it
was announced.
“Everybody knows what happened
the last few fights,” Marquez said. “I
want to be more aggressive this time,
but with intelligence, because Manny
is a very dangerous fighter.”
That Pacquiao is facing Marquez
for a fourth time instead of fighting a
rematch with Bradley, who was
awarded a decision over Pacquiao in
June that was roundly dismissed by
most in boxing, speaks both to the
economics of boxing and the fact the
undefeated Bradley doesn’t have
much of a following.
Marquez brings the Hispanic audi-
ence, which should translate into
higher pay-per-view sales, and he
also brings a well-earned reputation
as the one fighter who can solve
Pacquaio’s somewhat unorthodox
style. He might be an aging fighter at
39, but Pacquiao also has been show-
ing the signs of his 17-year career in
professional boxing.
And while Pacquiao is widely
acclaimed as one of the great offen-
sive fighters of his era, Marquez
might be one of the best counter-
punchers. All three of their fights
have had tremendous action, and
there’s no reason to believe the fourth
fight will be any different.
That’s especially true if Pacquiao
— who renounced his drinking and
partying ways after having marital
problems last year — trained as hard
for this fight as he and Roach say.
“I think he has the fire underneath
him that he used to have,” Roach
said. “He had four knockdowns in
training camp, which were his first
since the (Miguel) Cotto fight. He
wasn’t so compassionate in sparring
this time.”
The fight will be at 147 pounds, a
full 22 pounds heavier than the box-
ers were in 2004. Marquez, in partic-
ular, appears to have bulked up, lead-
ing Roach to question how natural his
weight gain really was.
Marquez wore a bulky coat while
meeting with reporters Wednesday as
if he were trying to conceal his
physique.
“Maybe I’m bigger, but I need to
be fast, and I need to be quick to win
this fight,” Marquez said.
Continued from page 11
FIGHT
Bears had a 34-37 record in
Tedford’s final 5 1/2 years, leading
to his dismissal.
Dykes, the son of former Texas
Tech coach Spike Dykes, is known
as an offensive mastermind, who
runs a spread system that he honed
as coordinator under Mike Leach at
Texas Tech. Dykes later spent three
seasons as offensive coordinator at
Arizona under Mike Stoops before
becoming head coach at Louisiana
Tech before the 2010 season. He
also coached two years as an assis-
tant at Kentucky.
Dykes coached one of the nation’s
most prolific offenses at Louisiana
Tech this year with the Bulldogs
leading the nation with 51.5 points
per contest and ranking second with
577.9 yards per game.
They opened 9-1, losing only 59-
57 to Texas A&M, and were in posi-
tion possibly to make it into a BCS
bowl. But Louisiana Tech lost the
final two games of the regular sea-
son to Utah State and San Jose State
and now won’t even play in any
bowl.
La Tech was offered a spot in the
Independence Bowl last Saturday
but wanted to wait before accepting
in case they got a better bid. The
Independence Bowl invited Ohio
instead and the Bulldogs were left
out when Northern Illinois got into
the Orange Bowl, knocking
Oklahoma out of the BCS.
Oklahoma State (7-5) then filled
the Big 12’s final spot in the Heart
of Dallas Bowl against Purdue,
while Iowa State (6-6) landed in the
Liberty Bowl to play C-USA cham-
pion Tulsa as an at-large pick and
the Bulldogs were left out.
“We want to thank him and his
family for the past three years and
wish them the best in the future,”
Louisiana Tech athletic director
Bruce Van De Velde said in a state-
ment. “We will move meticulously
and expeditiously in our search for
our next head coach.”
There was no immediate word on
the terms of Dykes’ contract. Cal
still owes Tedford $6.9 million over
the final three years of his deal,
although Barbour had said the sides
Continued from page 11
CAL
Lionel Messi carted
off with bruised knee
BARCELONA, Spain — Lionel Messi, gri-
macing in pain, was taken off the field on a
cart with bone bruise to his left knee as
Barcelona was held to a 0-0 tie by Benfica in
a Champions League match on Wednesday
night.
With Barcelona already assured of advanc-
ing to the second round, Messi entered as a
reserve in the 58th minute.
Messi’s left knee collided with the right
hand of Benfica’s Artur as he ran onto Gerard
Pique’s long pass and tried to round the goal-
keeper in the 85th minute. Messi took a left-
footed shot from an angle, then fell to the field
in pain. He rolled onto his back and held the
knee, then was loaded onto a cart.
“It’s a bruise, which doctors have been hav-
ing a look at,” Barcelona coach Tito Vilanova
said. “We now have to wait for the results of
tests, but the feeling is that it isn’t more seri-
ous than a knock.”
Sports brief
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
the ball well at all,” Harames said. “I was very
happy with the execution. Maybe it convinces
them that defense wins games.”
Burlingame had to rely on that defense the
rest of the way. The Panthers pushed their lead
back up to as many as eight points in the third
quarter with Loew leading the charge. But
heading into the fourth period, there probably
wasn’t a Burlingame fan too comfortable with
just an eight-point advantage.
Los Altos cut that lead in half midway
through the fourth quarter and a minute left in
the game, Conrad Rogers hit a shot to make it
48-46 Burlingame. On the ensuing Panther
possession, Mikel Floro-Cruz was sent to the
free throw line where he made one of two
shots to give his team a 49-46 lead.
And after Los Altos’ equalizing attempt fell
short, Burlingame could breathe a sigh of
relief. The Panthers will take on Valley
Christian-San Jose in the semifinals tonight.
“If we’re good enough, then we’ll go ahead
and win it,” Harames said. “At this point, it’s
learning about where we’re at. [Thursday]
against Valley Christian we find out more.
And if we get by that game, then we’ll play
another good team on Friday night. It’s a
learning experience, but there is always that
factor of, four straight championships. That’s
a factor.”
Valley Christian 71, San Mateo 27
Speaking of Valley Christian, the Warriors
shut out San Mateo in the fourth quarter,
adding to a lead that was already 27 points, to
defeat the Bearcats 71-27 in the Lions Club
Tournament’s opening game.
Valley Christian’s Jay Macintyre led all
scorers with 21 points. San Mateo had only
one player in double digits.
The Warriors jumped out to an 18-6 lead
behind a 9-0 to start the game. But San Mateo
showed signs of respectability against the
West Catholic Athletic League foe. In the sec-
ond quarter, San Mateo was only outscored by
three points.
The second half belonged to the Warriors.
San Mateo shot 23 percent from the floor and
turned the ball over five straight times to start
the fourth quarter as Valley Christian pulled
away.
The Bearcats will try to bounce back
against Los Altos at 3:30 p.m. today.
Continued from page 11
BGAME
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo-Atherton head basketball coach Mike
Molieri posed a very simple question to his
troops prior to their opening round game against
Sacred Heart Prep in the Lions Club Tournament.
“I asked them if they’ve ever beaten those
guys. And they said they hadn’t. So, I told them
this would be a good time to win one of these lit-
tle rivalry games for themselves.”
It was a battle for Atherton supremacy
Wednesday night at Burlingame High School
and the Bears answered their coach’s call by tak-
ing down the 2011 Lions Club runner-up 47-45.
“I think they wanted it just a little bit more,”
Molieri said of his players. “I’m very proud of
their effort tonight.”
It was one of those games where it was evident
early on that every single possession was going
to play a factor. Consider that after one quarter,
SHP was up 13-10. But come the end of the sec-
ond period, the Bears had flipped the script on the
Gators and the teams went into recess tied at 23.
Come the third quarter, the Gators looked
poised to push ahead. Korbin Kosh scored a cou-
ple of key baskets in the period and it was a
buzzer-beating lay-up gave SHP a 35-31 lead
heading into the final quarter.
As it turned out, it was exactly where the Bears
wanted them.
“Right now, we’re struggling on offense to be
honest,” Molieri said. “But I was happy with the
way we were able to keep our composure down
the stretch.”
Leading that charge was Blake Olsen — who
flew all over the court in the fourth quarter, get-
ting key steals, rebounds and more importantly,
baskets. Olsen scored 10 points in the second
half.
“He played the game of his Menlo-Atherton
career,” Molieri said.
An Olsen bucket tied the game at 41. And his
steal plus coast-to-coast basket gave M-A a 43-
41 lead with two minutes left in the game. Oliver
Bucka hit a jumper in the lane shortly after to
give the Bears a 45-41.
After a Koch basket made it 45-43, a huge steal
by Jamar Gladdis and subsequent foul sent him
to the line where No. 3 iced the game with a pair
of free throws.
Menlo-Atherton will face Aragon High School
at 8 p.m. Thursday.
Aragon 57, Terra Nova 39
In an intriguing Peninsula Athletic League
matchup, Aragon showed why the basketball
world is buzzing about the Dons.
After the Tigers kept things close for two
quarters, Aragon found its offensive groove and
clamped down on defense come the second to
pull away from Terra Nova 57-39 and advance
to the Lions Club tournament semifinals.
“They got hot and we turned the ball over,”
said Terra Nova head coach Kenny Milch. “And
when you let a team like Aragon start getting
things going, they can put up a lot of points in a
hurry. And that’s what they did.”
“It’s really early,” said Aragon Sam Manu of
the win. “Terra Nova, that’s their first game so
they’re better this year than they were last year
at this point. They have more skill players this
year. Terra Nova, when you play them, they
always box out really hard and we knew that.
And in the first half, we were horrible, basical-
ly. We knew that going in but it’s one thing to
say it and another to get a big body pressing on
you. So, that was the difference. Once we got
the boxing out done, everything else settled
down.”
Aragon got 20 points from Alex Manu in the
win and 16 from Nick Frankel. Sam Halaufia
added nine.
“It’s one of those things we worked on at
practice because on offense, people were just
standing and watching around,” Sam Manu
said. “And any offense is horrible when you just
stand — you need a lot of motion and we need
to remind ourselves of that. As the game got
going, we were able to get into a nice flow.”
“The thing is with us, having played our first
game of the season and that’s now their fifth, we
need to learn how to play the entire game, not
just how to shoot a 3, not just how to block a
shot,” Milch said. “And against Aragon, if you
don’t do everything well, they’re going to make
you pay because they have good basketball
players, not just good shooters. Their top seven,
eight guys are basketball players. And they’ll
punish you for any flaws they can expose.”
Terra Nova will face Sacred Heart Prep at 5
p.m. Thursday.
M-A upsets Gators, Dons pull away fromTigers
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sacred Heart Prep’s Will Bannick,left,battles for
a rebound with M-A’s Oliver Bucka.
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Aragon’s Sam Halaufia, right, applies
defensive pressure during the Dons’win over
Terra Nova.
Providing Lifelines to the Community
for 65 Years
w w w . p e n i n s u l a v o l u n t e e r s . o r g
“If it were not
for Peninsula
Volunteers
I would be
living on the
street.”
Celebrating 65 Years Serving Peninsula Seniors
“Meals on
Wheels
has saved
my life.”
Meals On Wheels
W
hat is it like to be home alone with no way to shop or cook for
yourself? Every year, Peninsula Volunteers, Inc., delivers 70,000
hot, nutritious meals to homebound seniors and adults with disabilities,
who are unable to cook for themselves.
For those homebound for a long time, the delivery of a hot meal may
be the only live human contact they have that day.
For others, momentarily sidelined for a few days or weeks, the arrival
of a delicious meal can be a precious lifeline that allows them to get on
their feet again. Every safety check saves lives!
Peninsula Volunteers, Inc., began preparing and delivering Meals
on Wheels in 1977. Celebrating 35 years of providing meals to the
community, Peninsula Volunteers, Inc., currently serves San Mateo
County from Belmont through East Palo Alto.
Peninsula Volunteers, Inc., Nutrition Services also delivers another
60,000 meals a year to other senior centers to ensure that their
participants also eat a healthy meal.
Rosener House Adult Day Service
F
or 35 years, Rosener House has been providing respite and peace of
mind to families of older adults with memory impairment and other
limitations.
The participants have lived in the Bay Area for many years and have
contributed to the community throughout their lives. Now they need a
purpose —a reason to get up in the morning. This is especially important
for disabled older adults who tend to be very susceptible to depression.
Rosener House provides a stimulating social environment lled with
therapeutic activities, health and support services in a caring environment
so they again feel needed, accepted, and respected.
Licensed by the State of California, Rosener House serves as an
alternative to premature institutional placement. Each participant
is supported and motivated to maintain his/her highest degree of
independence and well-being, allowing participants to remain in their
homes for as long as possible.
Rosener House began in a small house on Amherst Avenue in
Menlo Park, but in 1980, with the help of the City of Menlo Park,
Rosener House moved to the former Fremont School. After twenty
years and a major earthquake, the City gave Peninsula Volunteers
the go-ahead to plan for a new facility on the same site.
After a successful Capital Campaign, the new Rosener House was
opened in 2001. Designed by Petersen Architects to specically meet
the needs of older adults, the $4.2 million state-of-the-art, 12,000 square
foot facility accommodates up to 80 participants a day in bright, happy
and safe surroundings.
Little House
Roslyn G. Morris Activity Center
T
he rst suburban senior center in the United States, Little House
began in 1949 with seven members in what was indeed a little
house in Menlo Park. Little House moved to its present home in Nealon
Park in 1954 and was the rst senior activity center in the United States to
have a building specically designed for the over-50 age group.
Today, over 4,000 people of all ages walk through the doors each
year. The lives of all who enter are enhanced through classes and
services, support groups and a welcoming social atmosphere. For
many seniors it is a home away from home, where they can enjoy
a nutritious meal in the café, an interesting lecture or an exercise
class, or find life-assisting services and information.
Members quickly discover that there simply aren’t enough days
in the week to sample all the opportunities available to them at
Little House.
Peninsula Volunteer Properties
I
n 1959, PeninsulaVolunteers enlarged its missions to provide aordable,
safe senior housing. Today, Peninsula Volunteer Properties (PVP)
provides 82%of the low cost housing in Menlo Park.
Partridge Kennedy Apartments – A National First!
In 1960 the city of Menlo Park permitted the Peninsula Volunteers
to rezone their land for retirement living units – the rst such zoning
in America. This was followed by another “rst” when the predecessor
to HUD granted a construction loan for 30 apartments. Today these
apartments oer seniors below market rents, providing aordability to
all who live there.
Crane Place Apartments – A Modern Model
Recognizing the signicant need for aordable senior housing, PVP
built Crane Place near downtown Menlo Park in 1981 with a HUD loan.
The 93 units of additional aordable senior housing became available
to eligible seniors and disabled adults. Crane Place oers signicant
rental assistance, providing residents the opportunity to enjoy excellent
housing while only paying 30%of their income as rent.
Crane Place consists of studio and one-bedroom apartments, ten
of which are mobility accessible. Residents enjoy a craft room, large
meeting room, dining room, kitchen, library, well-appointed lobby,
laundry and gardens. A Social Service Coordinator assists residents
in connecting with community services to meet daily challenges and
enable them to remain independent as long as possible.
Crane Place completed a major renovation in 2011, including features
to ensure safety and energy e ciency.
“Little House is
my home away
from home.”
“Life is better
for our
whole family
with Rosener
House.”
I
n July of 1947, a group of forward-thinking
women founded an organization dedicated
to improving the quality of life in their
community – Peninsula Volunteers, Inc.
Decades before others were focusing on the
needs of seniors, these pioneers decided to
create high quality and nurturing programs
for the aging to ensure that those who helped
build our community would be able to
continue to live here in dignity and comfort.
Today, over 65 years later, Peninsula
Volunteers, Inc., has established four
community programs that have impacted
hundreds of thousands of residents on the
Peninsula: Meals on Wheels; Rosener House
Adult Day Services; Little House - The Roslyn G.
Morris Activity Center; and, through Peninsula
Volunteers Properties, low cost senior housing at
Crane Place and Partridge/Kennedy Apartments.
Throughout its 65 year history, Peninsula
Volunteers has achieved a number of rsts. It
opened and funded the rst suburban senior
center in the United States – Little House --
and was the rst volunteer organization to
develop and build low-income senior housing
in the United States.
This visionary service organization raises
funds to provide seniors with over $5 million
annually in lifelines and services that enhance
and enrich their lives.

Your leadership in sponsoring retirement housing
is an example for all the nation. The start you have made
will soon be followed by similar projects like yours.

President John F. Kennedy, 1961
Yes, I want to help Peninsula Volunteers, Inc., provide lifelines to seniors in the community. Count on me for:
____ $60 Provides the cost of a Little House membership for a lonely senior for one year ____ $125 Subsidizes a month of Meals on Wheels delivered to a home-bound senior
____ $520 Provides a full week of Physical Therapy for a group of 15 at Rosener House ____ $1000 Subsidizes two weeks of care at Rosener House for a memory-impaired adult ____ Other/Specify $________
Name:_________________________________________Address: ____________________ City:______________________________ State:______Zip:________________
Phone:_______________________ Email:___________________________________________________
I would like to make the gifts below:
Enclosed is my gift to Peninsula Volunteers, Inc. in the amount of: ❑ $__________
Please dedicate my gift to: ❑Greatest Need ❑Little House ❑ Meals on Wheels ❑ Rosener House
Contact me about a recurring gift monthly or annual.
Enclosed is my check (made out to PVI) or
Please charge my credit card. ❑ Visa ❑ MasterCard ❑ Discover ❑ American Express
Card # ________________________________________________________________________Exp. Date______/_______/______
Signature: _______________________________________________________________Card Billing Zip Code:______________
Donation is made: ❑ In honor of ❑ In memory of _______________________________________________________________
Please send an acknowledgment of my gift to: Name:__________________________________________________________
Address:_______________________________________City:___________________________State_____Zip________________
Message:___________________________________________________________________________________________________
QUESTIONS? Call us at (650) 326-0665 ext 238 to discuss your donation.
You can donate directly by credit card online: www.peninsulavolunteers.org/donate
Thank you for investing in the lives of the seniors in our community!
Pioneering Programs for Peninsula Seniors
Help Us Help Seniors
We strive for efficient operation, as reflected in our 2011-12 audit:
For every dollar donated an astounding 87.1% goes directly
to our programs! You can feel secure knowing that your donation
makes a real impact.
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stars, moons and planets have long
been inspiration for designers. For afi-
cionados and anyone who appreciates
the artistry to be found in astronomy,
there is a galaxy of beautiful items for
the home.
Oscar Tusquets Blanca designed his
Luna rug in 2010, and it’s an amazingly
realistic recreation of the moon in its
waxing phase. (www.yliving.com,
$2,580)
Megan Lee in Tampa, Fla., makes
ethereal prints of the planets that have a
haunting, lovely quality. “In the past
couple of years, I became extremely
interested in astronomy, and wanted to
pay tribute to our own solar system,” she
says.
She hopes people will display the
prints remembering “what we’ve discov-
ered, and how much more we have to
explore.” A grouping would be a won-
derful feature wall, but even one of them
would make a statement. Lee also offers
a print of all the planets together.
(www.meganleestudio.etsy.com )
Artisan and designer Asher Israelow
makes walnut tables inlaid with brass
dots that map out the constellations. You
supply a specific date and he researches
what the sky looked like on that night,
then makes a custom table depicting the
star map. He’s done them as wedding
and birthday gifts. (www.asheris-
raelow.com)
Another Brooklyn-based designer,
Palo Samko, crafts tables out of claro
walnut and blackened steel evoking the
Northern Hemisphere sky map with
Southern Cross detail.
(www.palosamko.com)
Urban Outfitters has a neat lamp
stamped with a constellation that looks
lovely when lit. Find here too a cool
glow-in-the-dark moon clock that stays
lit for half an hour after you turn off the
switch — a great night light for a kids’
room, it would also work well as an
unexpected light for an entryway foyer.
The retailer also has Los Angeles-based
artist Claire Oring’s Star Catcher wall
art, a conceptual print of a young woman
reaching up to grasp a handful of nebu-
lae. (www.urbanoutfitters.com, constel-
lation lamp, $49; moon clock, $49; Star
Catcher, $39)
Another neat clock features a mashup
of 65 of astronomy photographer
Norbert Rosing’s moon photographs. It’s
also luminescent, for up to two hours.
(www.coolstuffexpress.com, $32.97)
Pillars of Creation, in Portland, Ore.,
offers a striking digital print featuring
the phrase, “We Are All Made of Stars.”
The words are composed of space
images. The studio also offers an inter-
esting pillow cover printed with Hubble
telescope images of stars and galaxies.
(www.esty.com/shop/pillarsofcreation,
print, $18; pillow cover, $38)
Bring the night sky indoors in a big
way with an 8- or 12-foot glow-in-the-
dark stencil kit, great for a media room.
(www.coolstuffexpress.com, kit,
$27.95)
Artifactory has produced a conversa-
tion starter: When the Voyager 1 and 2
missions were launched, they carried
golden records similar to LPs. Engraved
into these were sounds and images from
Earth, chosen by a NASA team led by
cosmologist and astronomer Carl Sagan.
Included on each disc was a detailed dia-
gram giving the finder instructions on
how to play it. Artifactory’s 12-inch gold
metal alloy replica comes mounted and
ready to hang. (www.thespacestore.com,
Night Sky stencil kit, $27.95; Voyager
wall plaque, $149.)
Stylish items with a spacey vibe
The Luna rug is a realistic recreation of the moon in its waxing phase.
Maximize seating
for entertaining
By Melissa Rayworth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The joy of home entertaining at the holidays often comes
with a challenge: How do you provide enough seating for a
roomful of holiday revelers with just a sofa and a few chairs?
Are there creative options besides resorting to folding chairs?
Los Angeles-based interior designer Betsy Burnham fre-
quently hears from clients who want help solving this puzzle.
“People are doing more home entertaining than ever,”
Burnham says, so they want to design their living space to
accommodate guests easily. For those without huge rooms,
that can be challenging.
Here, Burnham and designers Brian Patrick Flynn and Kyle
Schuneman offer advice on maximizing seating without sacri-
ficing style.
STEALTH SEATING
“I’m a big fan of vintage ottomans, stools and sturdy side
tables like stumps for this exact purpose,” says Schuneman,
author of “The First Apartment Book: Cool Design for Small
Spaces” (Clarkson Potter, 2012). These pieces can work as
tables or storage surfaces, he says, then occasionally serve “as
extra seating for game nights or casual gatherings around the
coffee table.”
Benches can work the same way. Schuneman suggests buy-
ing two benches that coordinate nicely with the decor of your
living room, and then placing them at the foot of beds in your
home. When extra seating is needed, “you can easily pull them
out for the holidays and bigger dinners,” he says. “And you
have a cohesive looking space, as opposed to a bunch of stuff
you just pulled from around the garage.”
Flynn, founder and editor of decordemon.com, uses
ottomans in a similar way. “What I often do is use an uphol-
stered or hardy wood storage ottoman on casters instead of a
coffee table in the sofa area,” he says. “Inside the storage
ottoman, I keep floor cushions. When it’s time for guests, the
ottoman can be wheeled just about anywhere as extra seating,
and the floor cushions allow guests to lounge.”
Burnham points out that using ottomans or benches may be
more appropriate in a casual family room or great room than
in a more formal living room. But even for formal spaces, an
elegant ottoman can work: “Done well, it’s a beautiful way to
bring another fabric into your space,” she says.
CHAIRS FROM ELSEWHERE
Flynn often uses a mixture of different chairs and benches at
a dining room table year-round, rather than a matching set.
The look is stylish, and when chairs need to be brought into a
living room for a party, they don’t necessarily look like they’re
been taken from the dining room set. The mix can include “a
three-seater bench, squatty stools, armless chairs, six chairs
and a pair of wingbacks at each end,” he says.
Another option he suggests: “Bring in your outdoor seating
and deliberately mix it in with the indoor pieces. The juxtapo-
sition can be nice, plus you can coordinate them with similar
colored cushions or accessories.”
See SEATING, Page 20
SUBURBAN LIVING 20
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes º Mu|ti-Fami|y º Mixed-Use º Commercia|
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Reñnance / Cash Out
Investors We|come º Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
Burnham does something similar with seat-
ing from game tables: A poker table with four
chairs can be a great way to fill one corner of
a room, she says, and those four chairs can be
placed elsewhere in the room during a larger
party.
THE RIGHT SOFA
Pay attention to size and depth when choos-
ing a sofa, Burnham says. “A standard-size
sofa is 7 feet. If you have three seat cushions,
people sit in a pristine way in their cushion,”
she says, and you’ll be limited to a maximum
of three guests on your sofa. She prefers
“sofas that have bench seams, so that it’s one
big seat,” making it more likely that four
guests might use the space.
Longer sofas offer additional seating, but
Flynn says they’re best used in what he calls a
“floating space plan,” where two identical
long sofas are placed across from one another
in the center of a room, rather than having one
sofa against a wall. They need to be “balanced
with an extra-long coffee table,” he says.
Sofas with deep cushions are another
option, but Flynn points out that “extra-deep
sofas are very tricky. They are insanely com-
fortable, but can be a space planning disaster.
I only use them in super large or grand living
rooms. ... You’ve got to ensure the tables and
chairs which surround it have the same visual
weight.”
Schuneman agrees: “I think you definitely
want to mix it up with different patterns and
textures of throw pillows, so it doesn’t
become a big blob in the room.”
If you have extra space after choosing your
sofa, Burnham suggests focusing on adding
chairs to your living room rather than a
loveseat. Although loveseats seem to offer
more seating than chairs, they are often occu-
pied by just one person. “A loveseat’s a tough
one,” she says, “because I don’t think people
want to be super physically close” at parties.
FOLDING AND STACKING
“Folding chairs are often eyesores,” Flynn
says, so he prefers chairs that can be stacked
when not in use. “My favorite stacking chair
is the Emeco Navy chair. It’s super light,
maybe 7 pounds or so, and it’s classic in
design. When not in use, stack them seven
high in a closet and you’ll never know they’re
there.”
Burnham and Schuneman have each found
a few types of stylish folding chairs, but they
tend to come with higher price tags. She
favors black bamboo folding chairs from
Ballard Designs (about $100) for rooms with
a more traditional style, and has used clear
Lucite folding chairs (”kind of like the
Philippe Starck ghost chairs”) in more modern
living rooms.
Schuneman likes the fabric-covered “terai”
folding chairs from Anthropologie (about
$200), and suggests they can serve as a “great
inspiration point for a DIY project.” Try
recovering the cushion of an old upholstered
folding chair “in some beautiful fabric that
works in your room,” he says.
Planning carefully, shopping well and using
a little DIY creativity are the keys to solving
any holiday seating dilemma, says
Schuneman.
“I always tell people to buy pieces that can
move throughout your home,” he says, “so
that chair in the guest room can come into the
living room, and that bench in the bathroom
could double as an extra surface for gifts or
what not. If you purchase pieces in your home
that work throughout, it really maximizes
your potential.”
Continued from page 19
SEATING
Voters currently elect supervisors county-
wide so an individual district’s results are not
enough to determine the outcome. However,
in the same Nov. 6 election in which Warren
Slocum prevailed, San Mateo County voters
also passed a charter change amendment
switching to district elections. In other
words, had the new method been in place,
Masur might be the one preparing for swear-
ing in next month.
In District Four, 79.7 of registered voters
turned out and 22,535 favored Masur while
19,317 chose Slocum, according to the offi-
cial Statement of the Vote released by the
county Elections Office.
District Four includes Redwood City,
Menlo Park and East Palo Alto and the
uni ncorporat ed areas of Nort h Fai r
Oaks and Oak Knoll.
Slocum received the most votes in the four
remaining districts, particularly the third in
which he garnered nearly 10,000 more than
Masur.
Slocum, who has been a consistent sup-
porter of district elections, said his position
has not changed and that he campaigned
countywide because that was the system in
place at the time.
“Now as supervisor-elect, I look forward
to working to best represent my constituents
in District 4 and throughout the county. I
plan to be a local voice for District Four and
a strong voice for San Mateo County,”
Slocum wrote in an email.
In the June primary, the results were
reversed with the district mirroring the coun-
tywide results. Slocum and Masur were the
top vote getters in both, creating the need for
the November runoff, followed by five other
opponents.
Masur could be reached for comment on
the outcome but, during the campaign, also
supported the county measure to change the
election process.
Until November, San Mateo County was
the only California county that elected its
supervisors at-large although each must live
in the district they represent. County voters
twice defeated earlier measures to change the
system.
During the campaign for Measure B, the
charter amendment, supporters of the change
argued that all voters should be able to weigh
in on elected officials who represent every
resident. Opponents said the status quo
favors incumbents and causes a fundraising
burden for candidates who must throw their
net wider for money and votes. A pending
lawsuit filed by six residents in April 2011
against the county seeking to change the
method also contended the process was
unfair to minorities.
Some also argued the countywide process
is unfair because a candidate could theoreti-
cally secure his or her district but lose
because countywide voters supported some-
body else. This last happened during the spe-
cial May 2011 election when now-
Supervisor Dave Pine lost his district to
opponent Gina Papan but won the District
One seat because of overall totals.
On Tuesday, Mark Church, chief elections
officer and assessor-county clerk-recorder,
officially certified the Nov. 6 results follow-
ing a mandated 1 percent manual tally to
confirm the outcomes. Voter turnout was
officially 79.83 percent which is the highest
since 1992, Church said.
Of those, 165,877 of the 288,592 ballots
cast were absentee and 119,212 were at
polling locations.
A full copy of all the election results,
including breakdowns by precincts and dis-
tricts, is available at
www.shapethefuture.org.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
TALLY
seven teachers by the 2014-15 school year,
Hungerford wrote. Also, the district is seeing
positive property tax growth after two years of
losses. The 2010-11 school year had a 5.819
percent loss and last year had a further loss of
.252 percent. This year, Hungerford said the
county is projecting a 4.316 percent increase.
A main reason for the district’s solvency are
two parcel taxes.
Measure G, a $96 a year parcel tax for 10
years, passed in 2004. It generates about $1.2
million annually. In 2008, voters passed
Measure U, a seven-year $78 annual tax that
brings in about $950,000 per year. Both will
end by the 2015-16 school year.
The district began talking about the possi-
bility of a new measure in 2011. A poll com-
pleted late last year showed a moderate base
of voter support for a parcel tax measure.
However, without support strong enough to
pass such a measure, the polling companies
are suggesting the district initiate a public out-
reach effort before considering placing some-
thing on the ballot. Matthews said that out-
reach to the community continues.
The budget planning could be altered dras-
tically next month since the governor is
expected to present a new funding model for
California schools. Currently, Belmont-
Redwood Shores is considered a basic aid dis-
trict, which means it is funded through local
property tax.
At the same meeting, the board will hold its
annual reorganization.
Continued from page 1
BUDGET
SUBURBAN LIVING 21
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
(Between Brittan & Holly)
652-388-8836
Making Peninsula homes more beautiful since 1996
www.cinnabarhome.com
FREE DESIGN SERVICE WITH PURCHASE
•Home furnishings & accessories
•Drapery & window treatments, blinds & shades
•Free in-home consultation with purchase
•Gifts • Interior Design
SHOWROOM HOURS:
Wednesday – Satureday 12:00 noon- 5:30pm
All other times by appointment
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Salt in the soil can be deadly for lawns,
trees and gardens, robbing plants of their
ability to absorb water. Salt-tolerant vari-
eties are available, however, and ground
laden with soluble toxins can be flushed
clean to depths below the root zone.
Regular soil testing is the best way to
determine salt levels, said Richard
Koenig, associate dean and director of
Washington State University Extension.
“The problem is common in the Desert
Southwest (with irrigation buildups),
along roads cleared with de-icers and
near oceans, where you get wind-blown
sea spray,” he said.
Salinization frequently appears as
white-crusted soil on the ground’s sur-
face or stunted vegetation, particularly in
low-lying areas.
“Another characteristic symptom is
brown and brittle plants,” Koenig
said. “People often refer to (soil)
salinity as ‘chemical drought.’”
Anyone who has tried to sprinkle salt
from a wet shaker knows how readily salt
stores water, said Leonard Perry, an
extension professor with the University
of Vermont.
“Rock salt exhibits the same property
in the soil, and absorbs much of the water
that normally would be available to
roots,” Perry said. “That’s especially a
problem in the spring, when plants are
coming out of dormancy and their roots
are the most active. Salt competes with
plants for that water.”
Saline soils cannot be reclaimed with
chemical amendments, conditioners or
fertilizers, according to horticulturists
with Colorado State University
Extension.
But there are methods for reducing or
eliminating salinization in the root zone.
These include:
• Detoxifying the soil by flushing. “If
you have a way to wash the soil using
excess water that is not high in salt, then
you can leach them down deeper into the
soil,” Koenig said.
• Improving drainage. Mulching to
prevent evaporation and retain water in
the soil also helps. Hose salt spray and
pollutants off plants and lawns after
heavy storms.
• Using raised beds filled with fresh
soil that provides some control over
salinity, pH and compaction. “That ele-
vates your soil and lets you leach it out of
the beds,” Koenig said.
• Adding windbreaks — snow fences,
hedges and trees — deflects sea spray.
• Removing and replacing soil covered
with road salts. “But unless you can
replace the cause of the problem, like
moving plant sites farther from road-
ways, the problem will persist,” Koenig
said.
• Growing plants that tolerate soil
salinity. “Some plants simply grow better
than others in salt,” Perry said. “If salt
concentrations are heavy, going from
perennials to annuals might help.”
Salt can leave a bad taste in lawns and gardens
Regular soil testing is the best way to determine salt levels.
DATEBOOK
22
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, DEC. 6
Save the Bay Winter Planting
Season Festival. 9 a.m. to noon and
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Volunteers are
needed at restoration sites in the
Palo Alto Baylands and Ravenswood
Pond in Menlo Park. Help restore the
Bay for people and wildlife by
helping plant native seedlings. Free.
RSVP required. For more information
call (510) 463-6850.
Skyline College Art Gallery. 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. Building No. 1 lower level
parking lot entrance, 3300 College
Drive, San Bruno. Free. For more
information contact
schmierert@smccd.edu.
Ultra Sound Bone Density
Screening. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 700 S.
Claremont St., Suite 111, San Mateo.
$40. For more information or to
reserve a time call 348-4133.
Loft’s 20th Anniversary Party. 4
p.m. to 8 p.m. Loft Boutique, 1316
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. There
will be appetizers, drinks, raffle prizes
and more. Free. For more
information visit loft.com.
Holiday Open House. 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. Elements Therapeutic Massage,
39 E. Fourth Ave., San Mateo.
Elements Therapeutic Massage’s first
Holiday Open House, featuring
music, studio tours, door prizes, gift
card specials and free chair massage
(first come first served). For more
information call 558-8775.
HIP Housing Holiday Party. 5:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 160 Bovet Road, San
Mateo. Come join HIP Housing and
their supporters for an afternoon of
celebrating the gift of ‘A Place to Call
Home.’ Free. For more information
contact cveloso@hiphousing.org.
Healthy Communities Forum:
Senior Health — Living Long and
Prospering in San Mateo County.
5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Millbrae
Community Center, room E/F, 477
Lincoln Circle, Millbrae. Free. For
more information and to RSVP visit
healthycommunitiesforum.org.
Carol Aust: Figurative Paintings. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. The Studio Shop, 244
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Opening
reception. Exhibit continues through
Dec. 22. Carol Aust’s figurative
paintings are emotionally-charged
narrative fragments infused with
mysterious tension and secrecy. All
art is for sale. Free. For more
information visit
www.thestudioshop.com.
Peninsula Volunteers’ Authors
Salon Committee Hosts the Books
Inc. Pre-Holiday Party. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Books Inc. Town and Country
Village, 855 El Camino Real, Palo Alto.
There will be hors d’oeuvres, wine,
hot apple cider and more. Family and
friends are welcome. Books Inc. will
donate 20 percent of every purchase
to Peninsula Volunteers.
The Hakka Cookbook, Chinese
Soul Food from around the World:
Author Event. 6:30 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Linda Lau Anusasananan,
former Sunset Magazine food writer,
travels the world in search for her
Hakka identity through food. Her
brother, Alan Lau, weaves her stories
through the cookbook which is
listed as a favorite cookbook for gifts
by the Associated Press and Martha
Stewart Living. Free. For more
information call 522-7802 or visit
thehakkacookbook.com.
Men of Many Shades — A Male
Revue. 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $20. For
more information visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
‘Lassie Come Home!’ 7 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. Aquarius Theatre, 430 Emerson
St., Palo Alto. Palo Alto Humane
Sociey’s 2012 Gala Holiday Event.
Popcorn and small drink will be
included. During intermission,
NorCal Collie Rescue will show their
rescued collies. $2. To reserve seats
call 424-1901 or email
pahs@paloaltohumane.org. For
more information visit
www.paloaltohumane.org.
CSM Fall Electronic Music Concert.
7 p.m. CSM Theatre Building 3, 1700
W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo.
Showcase of New Music by CSM
students in the Electronic Music
Program. Performances cover a wide
variety of musical styles, including
pop, classical, experimental, hip-hop,
jazz, house and more. General
admission $5, free for students. For
more information call 574-6204.
FRIDAY, DEC. 7
Save the Bay Winter Planting
Season Festival. 9 a.m. to noon and
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Volunteers are
needed at restoration sites in the
Palo Alto Baylands and Ravenswood
Pond in Menlo Park. Help restore the
Bay for people and wildlife by
helping plant native seedlings. Free.
RSVP required. For more information
call (510) 463-6850.
Free First Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
Old Courthouse, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. At 11 a.m. preschool
children will be invited to learn
about houses and will be able to
make a family portrait to take home.
At 2 p.m., museum docents will lead
tours of the museum for adults. Free.
For more information call 299-0104
or visit historysmc.org.
Annual LEGO Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. There will be
a variety of LEGO creations made by
members of the Bay Area LEGO User
Group and Bay Area LEGO Train Club,
featuring train layouts and Bay Area
landmarks. There will also be club
members there to answer questions.
The exhibition will be on display on
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays
through Jan. 13 (except on Dec. 24,
25 and 31). $2 per person. Free for
members of BayLUG and MOAH. For
more information visit moah.org.
Noon Concert: Harpsichord
Students of Elaine Thornburgh.
12:15 p.m. Campbell Recital Hall,
Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall,
Stanford. Free. For more information
visit music.stanford.edu.
Back Street Bazaar. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
2120 Broadway. Redwood City. Free.
This bazaar will feature scarves,
shawls, capes, purses, pillow cases,
rugs, jewelry and over items from
Turkey and Italy. 18 percent of the
proceeds will be donated to the
Dragon Fundraising Campaign to
complete and build the new Dragon
Theatre. For more information call
493-2006.
Documentary Film Screenings:
Shorts by Film Production 114
Students. 7 p.m. Annenberg
Auditorium, Stanford University, 450
Serra Mall, Stanford. Free. For more
information call 723-3404 visit
art.stanford.edu.
First Friday Flicks: ‘Brave.’ 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. The film is rated
PG and will last 93 minutes. Free. For
more information visit smcl.org.
NDNU presents ‘A Christmas Carol:
The Musical’ Gala Performance. 7
p.m. NDNU Theater, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. Reception to follow
show. Those who plan on attending
are encouraged to bring a non-
perishable food item or new toy to
be distributed to members of the
Peninsula community. $25 for
children under 12. For more
information visit
christmascarolthegift.org.
Ballet America’s Nutcracker. 7 p.m.
Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway,
Redwood City. The performance is
friendly toward children and adults
alike. Tickets start at $18. For more
information and for tickets visit
balletamerica.org.
Music Department Student
Concert. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. CSM
Music Building 2, Room 110, Choral
Room, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo. Come and enjoy a potpourri
of music of all types, including jazz,
pop and classical, composed and/or
performed by our talented students.
Open to the public. Donations
welcome. Free. For more information
email jacksonj@smccd.edu.
St. Catherine of Siena School’s
Drama Club presents A Christmas
Story. 7:30 p.m. St. Catherine
Auditorium, 1300 Bayswater Ave.,
Burlingame. $25 for VIP seating, $10
for general admission and $8 for
students/children. For more
information and for tickets visit
www.stcos.com.
‘Die Fledermaus.’ Taube Center,
Notre Dame de Namur University,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. 7:30 p.m.
The Department of Music and Vocal
Arts at Notre Dame de Namur
University presents Johann Strauss’
operetta ‘Die Fledermaus.’ Performed
in English and presented in
collaboration with the Castro Valley
Arts Foundation Opera Academy of
California. General admission $25,
students and seniors $15. To
purchase tickets visit
www.BrownPaperTickets.com or call
(800) 838-3006.
Menlo Park Chorus Holiday
Concert. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Trinity
Episcopal Church, 330 Ravenswood
Ave., Menlo Park. The evening’s music
ranges from seasonal pops to
traditional carols. $15 general
admission, $12 for seniors and
students. Children ages 12 years and
under are free. For more information
visit
menloparkchorus.org/index.html.
A Festival of Lessons and Carols.
8 p.m. Stanford Memorial Church,
450 Serra Mall, Stanford. Free. For
more information call 723-3811 or
visit arts.stanford.edu/event/a-
festival-of-lessons-and-carols/2012-1
2-07/.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
cities such as Washington, D.C., and
New York City.
In San Mateo, the city will use the
technology to better manage its existing
inventory of parking, said Matt Bronson,
interim streets and facilities manager for
the city’s Public Works Department.
San Mateo has 135 sensors spread
over four blocks downtown that will be
in place for a two-year demonstration
period as the city embarks on a long-
range mission to improve the downtown
experience.
The app, Bronson said, will make life
easier for motorists and help to improve
the business climate downtown.
Local merchants can even embed
widgets on their own websites that its
customers can use to gauge parking
availability.
The goal, said Streetline’s Justin Bean,
is to reduce the amount of circling time
drivers endure while searching for park-
ing as Parker shows where available
spaces are located.
The app even shows drivers where
city-owned parking garages are in down-
town and is also voice guided for a safe
hands-free experience.
Up to 30 percent of all traffic down-
town is related to motorists trying to find
parking, Bean said.
The app will even show a driver where
they parked their car and a timer can
even indicate when the meter will
expire, Bean said. The app can be used
in cities all across the country but local-
ly so far just in San Francisco, San
Mateo and San Carlos. Mobile payments
will also be possible at some locations.
Sensors embedded in the pavement of
the selected parking spaces detect when
a space is available. Cisco’s smart
routers communicate with Streetline
sensors to aggregate sensor data and at
the same time communicate with
Streetline’s cloud center to deliver the
availability of the parking spots.
“By deploying this cutting-edge smart
parking technology, San Mateo has
taken a great step towards becoming a
smarter city,” Zia Yusuf, chief executive
officer of Streetline, wrote in a state-
ment. “We are pleased to be working
alongside Cisco to bring this technology
to San Mateo and hopefully resolve one
of the most pressing concerns facing
today’s cities — parking.”
Merchants through the Downtown San
Mateo Association are also involved in
the two-year pilot program.
“Merchants are fed up with the park-
ing situation,” said Jessica Evans, execu-
tive director at the DSMA. “Parking
technology hasn’t changed in 75 years
and this will bring us into the 21st cen-
tury.”
Making parking easier will allow peo-
ple to “enjoy all downtown has to offer,”
Bronson said.
It will also be better for the environ-
ment.
Vehicle emissions resulting from driv-
ers looking for parking are so closely
linked that a year-long study found that
drivers in a 15-block district in Los
Angeles drove in excess of 950,000
miles, produced 730 tons of carbon
dioxide and used 47,000 gallons of gas
searching for parking.
Streetline is a privately held company
headquartered in Foster City and Cisco
is headquartered in San Jose.
For more information and to down-
load the free Parker app visit www.thep-
arkerapp.com.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Keaton honored at Women
in Entertainment breakfast
BEVERLY HILLS — When Diane
Keaton learned she would receive the
Sherry Lansing Leadership Award, the
66-year-old actress immediately began
panicking about her speech.
Keaton accepted the diamond-and-
ruby-encrusted prize Wednesday at the
Hollywood Reporter’s 21st annual
Women in Entertainment breakfast hon-
oring the most powerful women in
Hollywood. She opened by warning that
her speech wasn’t funny, then proceeded
to crack up the crowd inside the ball-
room of the Beverly Hills Hotel.
“I just wanted my speech to be the
most touching, heartfelt, funniest, yet
also persuasive, because that’s what a
leader is,” the Oscar winner said. “I just
knew that my speech had to be way bet-
ter than Meryl Streep’s speech or Jane
Fonda or Helen Mirren” — all previous
Lansing Award winners.
Keaton paid tribute to her parents, par-
ticularly her mother, who died in 2008 of
Alzheimer’s. Keaton revealed all the
things she wished she would have said to
her mom, describing her as “my first and
most inspired leader.”
Continued from page 1
PARKING
park at Nealon Park on Middle Avenue
in Menlo Park. City ordinance governing
the off-leash park states owners must
control dogs at all times, not leave them
unsupervised and not bring dogs with a
known history of dangerous behavior.
Just after 8 a.m., according to the suit,
Ollie was playing with another dog near
the third base dugout when Furman
released Dylan and either left the park or
began talking on her cellphone. The
German shepherd ran to Ollie and
clamped his jaws around the dog’s neck
and throat, thrashing him around, until
several others including Otera inter-
vened by kicking and pulling. When
Otera grabbed the German shepherd’s
collar, it bit her right hand, the suit
claims.
The suit also claims at least one
bystander at the time started screaming
for the dog’s owner who was absent
because she was walking the perimeter
of the park fence while on the phone.
After the incident, the biting dog was
quarantined for 10 days to ensure it did
not have rabies before being released
back to the owner, said Scott Delucchi,
spokesman for the Peninsula Humane
Society.
Otera’s attorneys did not return an
inquiry for comment.
Furman is currently unrepresented by
an attorney in this matter, according to
court records.
Otera’s suit claims Furman knew or
should have known her dog had danger-
ous or vicious propensities. The suit also
holds the rescue group liable, claiming it
as negligent by placing the dog in
Furman’s home.
The group, which is located in
Oakland, rescues German shepherds
from shelters throughout Northern
California and places them in foster sit-
uations or permanent homes with quali-
fied owners. The dogs undergo a series
of tests for temperament and behavior
before being accepted and is monitored
constantly for at least two weeks in a
foster home environment before being
ready for placement. Prospective owners
are also graded and many of the roughly
100 people who apply every month are
rejected, said Rob Holloway, president
of German Shepherd Rescue of
Northern California.
“We pride ourselves on being able to
match people with the right dogs,” he
said.” German shepherds are large dogs
and we work very hard on procedures to
make sure they go into homes with the
right people.”
Holloway declined to address the case
directly but said it will be looking at the
dog’s evaluations and foster parent
report to see if anything in its history
indicated such aggressive behavior was
possible.
“My first reaction though is that I’m
sorry for the person and her dog,” he
said.
A case management conference in the
case is scheduled for May 10.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
ATTACK
People in the news
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Unless your
efforts are organized and effcient, things aren’t
likely to work out too well. If you’re impulsive,
problems could arise just when you’re about to fulfll
an objective.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Keep an
open mind, and you’ll fnd that situations will
automatically adjust themselves to your satisfaction.
Any feelings of unfairness that linger will be of your
own creation.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Be extremely
mindful of your behavior if you are involved in
an arrangement with a friend that requires an
investment from both. Either one of you could feel
put upon.
PISCES (Feb. 2-March 20) -- Endeavors you manage
solely will have excellent chances for success.
Problems could quickly develop, however, if you
have to share your authority with another.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Be sure to treat
serious matters with the respect they deserve. Left
unattended and unresolved, they are likely to rear
their ugly heads and demand you tend to them.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Heed the warning
signs that impel you to wrap up all important
projects and to not take a gamble when it comes to
choosing a delegate for a vital task.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Although you’re an
excellent conceptualizer, you aren’t likely to be
equally as competent where execution is concerned.
Make a good game plan and follow it to the letter.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Even though you are
quite adroit at managing your material affairs, you
may not be too impressive at handling personal
relationships. Stick to what you do best whenever
you can.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It is far better to go without
than to make a bad deal with strings attached. In
order to get what you want or think you need, it
would be far better to wait until the timing is right.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Unless you set a
shining example, don’t expect your friends and
associates to behave perfectly. On the contrary, they
will emulate you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Those with whom you
are involved aren’t likely to tolerate any heavy-
handed tactics. Use measures or procedures
that are fair but frm, and be considerate of other
people’s feelings.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- When and where your
expectations are within feasible perimeters, things
should work out reasonably well for you. You’re not
apt to get something for nothing, though, so don’t
waste time wishing.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
12-6-12
wEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
2
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
1
2
-
6
-
1
2
ACROSS
1 Oval nut
6 Fern leaf
11 Acid in proteins
12 Edmonton puckster
13 Lectern
15 -- uno
16 Loud sleeper
18 Alley from Moo
19 Start of a bray
21 Prune off
22 Be bold enough
23 Twosome
25 Skipper’s OK
28 Give the slip
30 Day- -- paint
31 Plant sci.
32 Peace offering
33 Quiet sound
35 Crack fller
37 Devotee
38 Brown bag
40 Ferber or Best
41 Chaucer pilgrim
42 Gam
43 -- chi
46 The reason why
48 Genghis’ grandson
50 Jeweled coronets
54 Winter constellation
55 Moving about
56 Full of back talk
57 Lascivious looks
DOwN
1 Food for infants
2 Comic -- Philips
3 England’s FBI
4 Liqueur favoring
5 Verb preceder
6 Bridge quorum
7 Crater edge
8 Diet spread
9 Orchid-loving Wolfe
10 Send by parachute
14 Downy fungi
15 Sherpa’s home
17 First draft of a movie
(2 wds.)
19 Saintly rings
20 Release violently
22 -- Arnaz
24 Terrier or poodle
25 Residence
26 Kittens
27 “Butch Cassidy” role
29 Double curve
34 Vietnam’s capital
36 Let go
39 Woven
43 Bout enders
44 Mystique
45 Egret cousin
46 Indefnite number
47 Glass container
49 -- Alamos, N.M.
51 AAA suggestion
52 Mammal’s need
53 12th-graders
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253110
The following person is doing business
as: Buyvia, 63 Bovet Rd. Ste 311, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: NF8LF, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2012.
/s/ Norman Fong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 517443
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Andy Berdj Gamitian
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jennifer Rene’e Palm filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Andy Berdj Gamitian
Proposed name: Andrew Berdj Gamitian
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 8,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/01/2012
/s/ Beth Larson Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/30/2012
(Published, 11/29/12, 12/06/12,
12/13/12, 12/20/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253112
The following person is doing business
as: Mirinae Productions and Services, 67
41st Ave., Apt. 5, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: John Chang-Eun Cha, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/14/2007.
/s/ John Chang-Eun Cha /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253177
The following person is doing business
as: Car’s Auto Body Shop, 233 S. Maple
Ave #7, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Alina Claros, 682 Villo St. #4,
Daly City, CA 94014. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/1/12.
/s/ Alina Claros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253176
The following person is doing business
as: Best Specialty Products and Serv-
ices, 114 Somerset St., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94062 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Kathleen Pfister,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Kathleen Pfister /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/15/12, 11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253151
The following person is doing business
as: Brian’s Tutorship Center, 1220 Ho-
ward Ave. Ste. 220, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Roberto Astudillo, Po Box
620742, Woodside, CA 94062. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Roberto Astudillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253254
The following person is doing business
as: ADVEMTV, 631 Oregon Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Eyemagnet TV,
INC., DE. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Francois Modarresse /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253085
The following person is doing business
as: R Sweets, 1449 El Camino Real #2,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Riva Rufi-
no-Alvarez, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Riva Rufino-Alvarez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253334
The following person is doing business
as: Flow Salon,132 South B St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Roy Ho, 1380 El
Camino Real Apt. 8, Millbrae, CA 94030.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Roy Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253215
The following person is doing business
as: Hitting World, 1353 Cordilleras Ave.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: B Side
Enterprise, INC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Bryan Sidensol /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253340
The following person is doing business
as: Made In China Restaurant, 681 San
Mateo Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Fengzhi Gao, 1763 Hubbard Ave., San
Leandro, CA 94579. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Tiffany Lapedus /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253172
The following person is doing business
as: Lo Reaux & Son Plumbing, 570 San
Bruno Ave., West, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: John I. Lo Reaux, 549 Cedar
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066-4117. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/1960.
/s/ John I. Lo Reaux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253259
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Laurie McLean Consulting, 2) Am-
bush Books, 3) Joyride Books, 9200 Al-
pine Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Laurie McLean, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Laurie McLean /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253375
The following person is doing business
as: C & A Tours, 17 E. 4th Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Philip Zhou, 300
Murchison Dr., #316, Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Philip Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253088
The following person is doing business
as: Chateau Esthetics, 549 Commercial
Ave. #6, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Elise Chateauvieux, 2211
33rd Ave., San Francisco, CA 94122.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Elise Chateauvieux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253385
The following person is doing business
as: Terrazza on 25th, 25 West 25th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jamie Lynn
Oliveira, 47 East 20th Ave. San Mateo,
CA 94403. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Jamie Lynn Oliveira /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253374
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Table Tennis Club, 1299
Bayshore Hwy #100, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Yu Xuan Chen, 3826 Kirkham
St., San Francisco, CA 94122. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Yu Xuan Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253392
The following person is doing business
as: Ugly Duck Studio, 662 Coleman
Ave., MENLO PARK, CA, 94025 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Pauline Prideaux, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Pauline Prideaux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253409
The following person is doing business
as: K-Bob Co., A Partnership, 217 Irving
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Robert
Kidwell, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/01/2012
/s/ Robert Kidwell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
25 Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253332
The following person is doing business
as: Integrity Auto, 1792 El Camino Real,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Roger
Kanbar and Paulina Kanbar, 1670 El Ca-
mino Real, #260, Menlo Park, CA 94025.
The business is conducted by Husband
and Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Paulina Kanbar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PRPERTY
AT PRIVATE SALE
No. 122764
In re the matter of the Estate of Olive
Robertson, Deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that subject
to conformation by this court, onDecem-
ber 16, 2012, or thereafter within the time
allowed by law, Ralph A. Rizzo, as exec-
utor of the above-named decedent, will
sell at private sale ot the highest and
best net bidder, on the terms and condi-
tions stated below, all right, title, and in-
terest of the decedent at the time of
death and all right, title, and intrest that
the estate has acquired in addition to that
of the decedent at the time of death, in
the real property located in the San Ma-
teo County, California, more particulary
described below:
The property is commonly referred to as
114 McLellan Avenue, San Mateo, Cali-
fornia, assessor’s parcel number 040-
052-200, and is more fully described as
follows:
The Southwesterly 50 feet, front and rear
measurements of lot 2, Block4, Map of
Town of Beresford Map 1, filed October
30, 1926, Book 14 of Maps,Page 44, San
Mateo County Records.
The property will be sold subject to cur-
rent taxes, covenants, conditions, restric-
tions, reservations, rights, rights of way,
and easements of record, with any en-
cumbrances of record to be satisfied
from the purchase price.
The personal repersentive has given an
exclusive listing to Teri Shaughnessy, a
licensed agent of the offices of RE/MAX
Star Carlmont.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and can be deliv-
ered to or mailed to the office of Teri
Shaughnessy, RE/MAX Star Carlomont,
1940 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA
94002, or to Matthew M Shafae, attorney
for the Executor, at 1156 El Camino Re-
al, San Carlos, California 94070, at any
time after the first publication of this No-
tice and before any sale is made.
The property will be sold on the following
terms: all cash, 10% of the amount of
the bid to accompnay the offer by certi-
fied check, and the balance to be paid
upon confirmation of sale by the court.
Taxes, rents, operating and maintenance
expenses and premiums on insurance
acceptable to the purchaser shall be pro-
rated as of the date of recording of con-
veyance. Examination of title, recording
of conveyance, transfer taxes, and any ti-
tle insurance policy shall be at the ex-
pense of the purchaser or purchasers.
The undersigned reserves the right to re-
ject any and all bids.
For futher information and bid forms,
contact Teri Shaughnessy, of the offices
of RE/MAX Star Carlmont, 1940 Ralston
Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
Date: December 5, 2012
/s/ Executor, Ralph A. Rizzo/
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on December 6, 13, 20, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
210 Lost & Found
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, August program, fea-
turing Gloria Stuart, George Sanders,
Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20. (650)341-
8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE “Off to the
Moon”, featuring Armstrong, Aldrin, and
Collins, article by Charles Lindburgh,
$25., San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
298 Collectibles
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, SOLD!
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO (650)345-5502
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
302 Antiques
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7” x 7”
x 9”, New, never used, $25. pair,
(650)375-8044
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET TV - double doors,
34”W, 22”D, 16”H, modern, glass, $25.,
(650)574-2533
BASE CABINET, TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $55 Call (650)342-7933
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COCKTAIL BAR, Mint condition, black
leather, 2 shelves, 52" long /40"wide
/18"wide, rollers, $99.00 (650)578-9208
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
304 Furniture
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
306 Housewares
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, Italian, in original box, clear
color, $12., (650)578-9208
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size, Fully stuffed; new, allergy-free tick-
ing, Mint condition, $25., (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , elegant, durable. $25.,
(650)578-9208
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
71 1/4" WORM drive skill saw, SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
26
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Sundsvall rollers
6 Trickeries
11 Pops
14 Portion out
15 Knighted
conductor
16 Took in
17 Typically pink-
flowered bloomer
19 Paris pronoun
20 Title words
preceding
“beneath the
milky twilight,” in a
1999 hit
21 “So relaxing!”
22 Worrisome
engine sound
23 Gateway Arch
architect
26 Set straight
29 Hit, maybe
30 Breeders’ Cup
event
31 Loses on purpose
34 Light touch
37 Key Egyptian
artifact unearthed
in 1799
41 Coll. applicants
42 Big name in beer
43 Mindless process
44 Manitoba tribe
46 Blood sugar
regulator
49 Postwar reception
53 Neutrogena rival
54 Like “ifs” and
“buts”: Abbr.
55 Throw a feast for
59 Back talk
60 Tools of the
mischievous god
hidden in 17-, 23-,
37- and 49-Across
62 Cézanne’s
summer
63 Pad user
64 Light wash
65 Le counterpart, in
Leipzig
66 Like-minded gps.
67 Guide
DOWN
1 Grain holder
2 Jai __
3 Mass robes
4 Raspy-voiced
“Like a Rock”
singer
5 Where the anther
is
6 Dallas-to-Houston
dir.
7 Wedding dances
8 HI hi
9 Highest peak in
the Calif.
Cascades
10 “Sprechen __
Deutsch?”
11 Single-and-
looking group
12 Do a makeup
job?
13 Stoop
18 “Unfaithful” co-
star
22 One that stands
to prevent a
strike
24 More strange
25 Soft-spoken
painter Bob
26 Liberal subject?
27 1939 Garland co-
star
28 Defroster
alternative
32 “Who am __
say?”
33 Moral principle
35 Con
36 Summer intern,
often
38 Plural medical
suffix
39 Stock holders?
40 John Wayne
classic
45 Campanella of
Cooperstown
47 North of Paris
48 Mascara
mishaps
49 Sank, in a way
50 High class
51 Cary of “The
Princess Bride”
52 Blond comic strip
teenager
56 Secretary of
Education
Duncan
57 Get whipped
58 Fancy pitcher
60 Org. with Eagles
61 Hardly shows of
support
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
12/06/12
12/06/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, $99.obo,
(650)315-5902
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
310 Misc. For Sale
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
310 Misc. For Sale
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case $75 OBO,
(650)345-7352
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLAYBOY MAGAZINE COLLECTION -
over 120 magazines, $60.obo, (650)589-
8348
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RUG - 8x10, oriental design, red/gold,
like new, $95., San Mateo,
(650)579-1431
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SMALL SIZE Kennel good for small size
dog or cat 23" long 14" wide and 141/2"
high $25 FIRM (650)871-7200
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
310 Misc. For Sale
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, SOLD!
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
KEYBOARD CASIO - with stand, adapt-
er, instructions, like new, SanMateo,
$70., (650)579-1431
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, SOLD!
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DESIGNER SHOES, Size 9 1/2 & 10,
many styles and colors, (650)580-3316
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
316 Clothes
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MEN’S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened package, XL, High Sierra, long
sleeves and legs, dark green plaid, great
gift, $12., SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS JACKETS
(2) - 1 is made by (Starter) LG/XLG ex-
cellent condition $99. for both,
SOLD!
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
CALLAWAY GOLF Clubs Hawkeye
Irons, Graphite Shafts, # 4 thru P/W
Excellent Condition $79 SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 Bait runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole , SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, SOLD!
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE/BAKE SALE
Fundraiser for local
baseball team!
BELMONT
1250 Avon St.
(off Ralston, just east
of Barrett Park)
Sat., Dec. 8th
9 am - 3 pm
Sports equipment, furniture, electron-
ics, toys, dishes, books, DVD’s,
costume jewelry and more!
27 Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money,
make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2000 CHEVY camaro standard transmis-
sion $2000 call dave at (650)344-9462
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95.,
(650)333-4400
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, SOLD!
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry Contractors Cleaning Cleaning
Rose’s
HOUSE CLEANING
Affordable
Move In & Move Out
Discount
First Time Cleaning
Commercial & Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 847-1990
www.roseshousecleaning.com
BBB • Lic. & Bonded
Ask about
our Holiday
Special
Concrete
Construction
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
28
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
NORTH FENCE
& DECK CO.
Lic #733213
Specializing in:
• Redwood Fences
• Decks
• Retaining Walls
650-756 0694
W W W .
N O R T H F E N C E C O
. C O M
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
LOPEZ HANDYMAN
Bath & Kitchen
Remodels
Specializing in granite,
tile & flooring.
(650)219-4050
Handy Help
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
INDEPENDENT
HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 •
Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
HVAC
HRAC HEATING & APPLIANCES
Refrigeration - Water Heaters
REPAIR ,REPLACEMENT
& SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES WITH REPAIR
SAME DAY SERVICE
(650)589-3153 (408)249-2838
www.hracappliancerepair.com
Lic.#A46046
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
Painting
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH &
BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
29 Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
Massage Therapy
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
ERRANDS WITH
CARE
Housecleaning,
Cooking,
Appointments, Errands
Call anytime
(650) 271-2505
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 30 Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS
Supporters of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi carry a supporter injured by anti-Morsi
protesters during clashes outside the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt.
By Hamza Hendawi Aya Batrawy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt descended into political tur-
moil on Wednesday over the constitution drafted
by Islamist allies of President Mohammed
Morsi, and at least 211 people were wounded as
supporters and opponents battled each other with
firebombs, rocks and sticks outside the presiden-
tial palace.
Four more presidential aides resigned in
protest over Morsi’s handling of the crisis, and a
key opponent of the Islamist president likened
Morsi’s rule to that of ousted authoritarian leader
Hosni Mubarak.
Both sides were digging in for a long struggle,
with the opposition vowing more protests and
rejecting any dialogue unless the charter is
rescinded, and Morsi pressing relentlessly for-
ward with plans for a Dec. 15 constitutional ref-
erendum.
“The solution is to go to the ballot box,”
declared Mahmoud Ghozlan, a spokesman for
Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood, asserting the char-
ter was “the best constitution Egypt ever had.”
The clashes outside the presidential palace in
Cairo’s Heliopolis district marked an escalation
in the deepening crisis. It was the first time sup-
porters of rival camps fought each other since
last year’s anti-Mubarak uprising, when the
authoritarian leader’s loyalists sent sword-wield-
ing supporters on horses and camels into Cairo’s
Tahrir square in what became one of the upris-
ing’s bloodiest days.
The large scale and intensity of the fighting
marked a milestone in Egypt’s rapidly
entrenched schism, pitting Morsi’s Brotherhood
and ultra-conservative Islamists in one camp,
against liberals, leftists and Christians in the
other.
The violence spread to other parts of the coun-
try later Wednesday. Anti-Morsi protesters
stormed and set ablaze the Brotherhood offices
in Suez and Ismailia, east of Cairo, and there
were clashes in the industrial city of Mahallah
and the province of Menoufiyah in the Nile
Delta north of the capital.
Compounding Morsi’s woes, four of his advis-
ers resigned, joining two other members of his
17-member advisory panel who have abandoned
him since the crisis began.
Mohamed ElBaradei, a leading opposition
reform advocate, said Morsi’s rule was “no dif-
ferent” than Mubarak’s.
“In fact, it is perhaps even worse,” the Nobel
Peace Prize laureate told a news conference after
he accused the president’s supporters of a
“vicious and deliberate” attack on peaceful
demonstrators outside the palace.
“Cancel the constitutional declarations, post-
pone the referendum, stop the bloodshed, and
enter a direct dialogue with the national forces,”
he wrote on his Twitter account, addressing
Morsi.
Islamists battle opponents as
Egypt crisis continues to grow
By Amy Teibel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Palestinians and Israelis
hardened their positions Wednesday over a con-
tentious new settlement push around Jerusalem,
with Israel going full throttle on plans to devel-
op the area and the Palestinians trying to block
it through an appeal to the U.N. Security
Council. The settlement push — Israel’s retalia-
tion for the Palestinians’ success in winning
U.N. recognition of a de facto state — has
touched off an escalating international show-
down. Palestinians claim the construction would
deal a death blow to Mideast peace hopes. Even
Israel’s staunchest allies have been outraged by
the move, feeding speculation they might
squeeze Israel more than usual to back down on
its construction plans.
The U.N. move came last week, with the
General Assembly recognizing a Palestinian
state in the West Bank, east Jerusalem and Gaza
Strip — territories captured by Israel in the 1967
Mideast war. Israel, which rejects a return to its
1967 lines, says borders with a future Palestine
should be resolved through negotiations.
Although the Israelis say construction could
be years away, the settlement plans have sent a
message that within these U.N.-recognized bor-
ders, Israel remains in firm control. The plans
include 3,000 new settler homes in the West
Bank and east Jerusalem, and intentions to press
ahead with two other projects that would drive a
wedge between east Jerusalem, the Palestinians’
desired capital, and its West Bank hinterland.
International condemnation was harsher than
usual, with some of Israel’s closest European
allies, including Italy and the European Union
on Wednesday, calling in Israeli ambassadors
for rebukes or issuing especially stern criticism.
The issue was expected to be high on
Germany’s agenda during a visit to Berlin by
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Ahead of his arrival, Israel showed no signs of
bending, holding a preliminary planning meet-
ing for a new development in a section of the
West Bank outside Jerusalem. The project,
known under its Israeli administrative term “E-
1,” is the most contentious of the new settlement
projects because of its strategic location.
Syrian civil war
spills over into Lebanon
TRIPOLI, Lebanon — The families of
Lebanese men killed in Syria last week say
their relatives were more interested in nice
clothes and vacations than fighting a civil war.
Yet Syrian President Bashar Assad’s regime
branded them foreign jihadists — and their
deaths set off three days of new spillover vio-
lence.
Gunmen loyal to opposite sides in Syria’s
civil war battled Wednesday in the streets of
the Lebanese city of Tripoli.
The fighting has killed six people and
wounded nearly 60 since Monday, security
officials said.
The bloodshed is a sign of just how vulner-
able Lebanon is to getting sucked into the
Syrian crisis. The countries share a porous
border and a complex web of political and sec-
tarian ties that is easily enflamed.
Among the 17 Lebanese men who turned up
dead in Syria last week were Bilal al-Ghoul
and his childhood friend, Malek Haj Deeb,
both 20. Malek’s older brother, Jihad, said the
two men sympathized with the rebellion, but
they were not fighters.
Israel, Palestinians
escalate showdown
Around the world
31
Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
32 Thursday • Dec. 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 12/31/12
WEBUY
$â0
OFF ANY
$â0
OFF ANY

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful