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OLIVIA MARCINKA ’13 On Nov. 6, President Barack Obama was elected for his second presidential term, winning in a close race against Republican rival, Gov. Mitt Romney. Just a few hours before 11 p.m. on Election Day, media outlets everywhere were projecting maps of electoral winnings that were seemingly bleeding Romney red—with the gentle reminder that their infallible prediction would remain in question until Ohio (major swing state) decides. After Obama’s Ohio win, things began to look increasingly worse for Romney. For those following the media that evening, the voting record became a bit jumbled as both displaced and undecided voters left the ultimate decision hanging by a string. Despite the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy, East Coast voters still found a way to the polls. In most cases, displaced citizens in New Jersey and parts of New York were left to frantically fill out paper ballots at local voting sites before evacuating yet again for a second storm. Although Florida was still tallying votes hours after the election was decided, there was no question through all of the cha-

The Free Student Newspaper of Chestnut Hill College

GRIFFIN
Philadelphia, PA November 2012

Obama Wins Close Election
os; Barack Obama was to take office again. Citizens can now look forward to the policies promised by Obama’s 2012 campaign. Some of the key points included in his plans for the future are: tighter foreign policy regulations, more attention to tax breaks for the middle-class, and encouraging American-produced energy. Obama’s main goals for foreign policy pertain to his desire to create more jobs for Americans. His plan is to eliminate tax breaks for companies that outsource employment, subsequently increasing the need for domestic labor. As stated on his campaign website, Obama seeks to “incentivize companies to create jobs.” This will likely require the President to follow through with his plan to invest $2 billion in community colleges to encourage partnerships between those colleges and employers. To further appeal to the college community, Obama seeks to cut tuition growth by half in the next decade. Some of his more specific goals include: cracking down on China’s unfair trading practices, reducing the deficit by $4 trillion, reducing oil imports by half by 2020, and ending the war in Afghanistan by 2014. In his Victory Speech given on Nov. 7 in Chicago, Obama stated that he believes in America as a strong force that can keep on fighting. Obama said, “I believe we can build on the progress we’ve made and continue to fight for new jobs and new opportunity and new security for the middle class.” In his final remarks on the future of our country, Obama trusts that “We can seize this future together because we are not as divided as our politics suggests… [and that] we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions.” With Obama’s gaining 303 electoral votes and Romney’s close but disappointing gains of 206 votes, the race was resolved with Obama winning just 2% more of the popular vote than Romney. In his Concession Speech, Romney said that “At a time like this, we can’t risk partisan bickering and political posturing.” He made it clear that although he would have liked to win, it is important for everyone to keep on track with our hopes for the future as a unified nation. As per usual, many individual opinions related to the outcome of the election were posted

On Nov. 7, President Obama is pictured with his family moments before delivering his Election night Victory Speech. President Obama will be inaugaurated on Jan. 21, 2013.
online through social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Heavily opinionated postings caused a social uproar between users, turning these sites into a forum for argument. Nicole Mezzanotte ’13 like many other social networkers, is familiar with the negative remarks made online. On the night of the election, Mezzanotte said, “I will be staying far from Facebook for the next few days.” Matt Stojakovich ’14 wrote on Facebook, “Change is not determined when you cast a ballot. You can’t bank your future on one presidential candidate or the other.” He responded to some of the more radical postings, writing, “Inform yourself, don’t assume. Empower yourself, don’t complain. Stand up for what you believe in, don’t hope it will magically happen in the next four years.” So, as it seems throughout the country, the job of the people should mirror the job of our leader. “To return to greatness, our society needs to take more responsibility and more action. You want to see change? Make it happen,” wrote Stojakovich.

image: Christopher Dilt, flickr.com/barackobamadotcom

Brimmerfest Celebrates SSJ
MICHAEL BRADLEY ’14 On Oct. 11, the first-annual Brimmerfest was held at Chestnut Hill College. The ice cream social was held as both a memorial for Regina Marie Brimmer, SSJ, and a fundraiser for the K-12 Brimmer Foundation Collection in the Logue Library. The event, which was held on the patio of the McCaffery Lounge, fell on what would have been Sister Regina’s birthday. Many students volunteered to serve ice cream and other refreshments while the crowd fondly remembered Sister Regina and her contributions to the College. Brimmerfest earned contributions of nearly $600, $150 of which came from first-year honor society Alpha Lambda Delta. Many of the donations came through the purchase of a tee-shirt which was sold at the event. The shirt has “Brimmerfest” written on the chest over an image of an ice cream cone – one of Brimmer’s favorite foods. Each shirt was available for purchase for $10. “The contributions will be used to purchase library materials, particularly children’s literature for the Brimmer Collection,” said Mary Jo Larkin, SSJ, the library’s director. Although the event fell on a chilly October afternoon, the sun was shining and the patio was packed with people from all different facets of the campus community. “Most of the attendees were students, but there were sev-

Olivia Marcinka ’13 is pictured above at Brimmerfest on Oct. 11. The event was a success, raising nearly $600 for a Memorial Fund in honor of Regina Maria Brimmer, SSJ.

image: Caitlin Kain ’13

eral staff members, relatives of Sister Regina and some faculty members, too,” Sister Mary Jo said. Seniors Olivia Marcinka and Chris Dunn, both of whom worked closely with Brimmer in Logue Library since their firstyears here at the College, executed many of the preparations for the event. Although this was Brimmerfest’s first year, it is expected to become an annual event on campus to celebrate the life of a pivotal figure to the College community. Brimmerfest tee-shirts are still available for purchase for $10 each. Sizes offered are Men’s S, M, L and XL. If you would like to pre-order a shirt please email Marian Ehnow at Mehnow@chc.edu.

NEWS

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The Griffin

GRIFFIN
Vol. III, Issue 4 The Free Student Newspaper of Chestnut Hill College Olivia Marcinka ’13 Editor-in-Chief Westly Mandoske ’13 Business Manager Michael Bradley ’14 News Editor Bleu Lane ’13 Style Editor Amanda Finlaw ’15 Style Editor Jessica Pennell ’14 Opinion Editor Marilee Gallagher ’13 Sports Editor Mary Frances Cavallaro ’13 Online Editor Jess Veazey ’13 Photo Editor Skyler Stillwaggon ’14 Senior Layout Staff Andrea Wentzell ’15 Layout Staff Advertising Assisstant Sally Simons ’15 Senior Copy Editor Zac Grubb ’12 Copy Editor Susan Magee, M.F.A. Facilitator Make your opinion heard and submit editorials to The Griffin. Submissions become property of The Griffin and are subject o editing for style, clarity and length. The views represented in submissions do not represent Chestnut Hill College. Submissions also do not represent The Griffin’s position, or that of its facilitator. The Griffin strives for accuracy and fair representation in all of its publications and factual correctness. If an error is found, email the issue number, the error, and the correction that needs to be made to the.griffin.chc@gmail. com. Corrections may be printed in the next issue.

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Writer’s Forum Features Local Author
TAYLOR EBEN ’14 STAFF WRITER Justin Kramon still has not figured out why he decided to become a writer. “Somehow these books end up getting written. I’m not really sure how,” said Kramon. Kramon, author of the acclaimed novel, Finny, stopped by the College on Oct. 17 to participate in a panel discussion and reading at the Writer’s Forum hosted by the English department. A native of Baltimore County, Md., and a graduate of Swarthmore College, Kramon has authored two novels, the second of which is due out in the fall of 2013. He has also published a number of stories in a handful of literary reviews. During one summer in college, he worked the night shift at a homeless shelter in Boston and ended up taking a fiction writing class at Harvard University as something to fulfill his days. “I came back the next summer and I took another course with another teacher,” he said. “She was pretty encouraging and mentioned MFA programs, which I hadn’t really heard about before.” Kramon applied to a few schools and eventually decided to go to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa, where he honed in on his writing skills and his interest intensified. Armed with what he calls a “completely impractical degree,” he went to New York and continued to write, while working typical starving-artist jobs as a bartender, waiter, and lounge piano player. He sold Finny, his first novel, to Random House in 2008 and then moved to Philadelphia with his wife. Kramon lends credit to 19th-century literature for a lot of his inspiration in writing Finny, a coming-of-age love story that begins with a young woman and man over the course of two decades. “I had been reading a bunch of big, 20th-century novels, particularly Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy and Jane Austen,” Kramon said. “I really like old adventures that you don’t get as much of in modern novels, like the kind of story where you get a lot of mystery-where there is adventure and a big love story and fun, quirky characters.” Kramon loved the style of these older novels, like Dickens’ David Copperfield, but wanted to put his own original spin on that type of story. “A lot of books that were in this particular form were about young men growing up and coming into the world,” he said. “The idea for the book was to tell that story from the point of view of a contemporary young woman.” Kramon said Finny borrows Dickens’ penchant for taking certain character traits and blowing them up to make them so obvious that it becomes humorous. “A lot of times I get into reading certain books and they suggest something that might be interesting to try in my writing,” said Kramon. He had been reading a lot of thrillers and mysteries, which influenced him to pen his upcoming novel, The Preservationist, something he began writing in early 2011 after an extensive book tour with Finny. The Preservationist focuses on a love triangle that a young woman starts with a much older man. “As certain things start to happen,” Kramon said, “there’s another young man who’s involved with them and there’s a threat of violence that approaches this couple and it’s unclear who’s responsible for that.” Kramon admits that it is not always easy to stay motivated while writing. “One big thing I did to stay motivated when I was working on ‘Finny’ was Google-ing job search opportunities and finding how unqualified I was for so many jobs,” he joked. “It motivated me to go back to writing because I just felt like there wasn’t anything else I was going to be able to do with my life. More seriously, reading is the big one for me. It’s a boring answer, but it’s the truth.” When he’s working on something, he treats it like it’s a job: waking up everyday and writing. “It doesn’t seem like a job compared to the way that most people spend the day,” he said. “That’s just the quirky way that I’ve figured out how to do something so I don’t just sit around and watch the movie channel.” It doesn’t surprise Kramon that he is able to stay so focused on his writing. “It happens to suit my temperament really well,” he said. “I’m a routineoriented person and that helps a lot.” For those of us who do experience the aggravation of hitting the creative roadblock every once in a while, Kramon says the best thing to do is to “leave it alone for a little while, to not beat yourself up over not

being able to do something for a day.” He recommends finding other productive ways to spend the time. “If you read something that might help you come up with some ideas or if you can walk somewhere and come up with some ideas, I think that’s a really productive approach, rather than sitting there and being annoyed with yourself.” For now, Kramon is teaching at Haverford College and has also taught at Arcadia University. He will be back at Chestnut Hill College this spring semester to conduct a three-session writer’s workshop, which will be a condensed version of a fiction workshop. Students will analyze other styles of writing and will share their own writing while learning how to write good fiction. If you would like more information about the workshop or are interested in signing up, email Dr. Karen Getzen at GetzenK@chc.edu.

alpha lambda delta presents: second honors gala
Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. Commonwealth Chateau at SugarLoaf $5 students $7 faculty and staff Don’t want to pay? Bring 2+ children’s books for donation. RSVP to DunnC@chc.edu by Nov. 21.

Simulating Poverty for Understanding
KERRY O’BRIEN ’14 STAFF WRITER Many people wish to end poverty, donating their time and money to worthy causes that support those in need. But truly understanding and placing ourselves within the daily hardship of being poor is often difficult, if not impossible, for those who are not actually burdened by poverty. In order to bridge the gap between the impoverished and privileged, Chestnut Hill College hosted a poverty simulation on Oct. 10 in the rotunda. The event, which was organized by many departments and organizations on the campus, gave participants the opportunity to experience poverty firsthand. The goal of the event was to have participants witness how deplorable poverty is and understand those who are unable to escape its grasps. To achieve this, organizers placed each participant within a family. They were then given a hypothetical situation and told to go to various resource centers, set up throughout the rotunda, in an attempt to find the help they needed. By the end, many families found themselves evicted or walking away from their homes due to lack of sufficient aid. Participants learned that not every agency will be able to provide the help needed to get to families to a better financial place. Many students initially viewed this event as a game. “Students thought of the simulation as a fun way to spend a few hours and not get too overwhelmed,” Debra Lawrence, Ph.D., assistant professor of education, said. “However, as they continued through the activities, participants realized the seriousness of poverty. It was no longer a game when reality set in and their families was facing serious financial struggles.” Lawrence brought the idea of the event to the College from Kansas City, Mo.. She views the simulation as an opportunity to engage and involve students in a way that would give them a new perspective on life. There were many departments and organizations that looked forward to participating in this educational experience. Kappa Delta Epsilon, the education honor’s society, along with the rest of the education department, were the leaders in organization. The criminal justice department, the religious studies department, Campus Ministry, the Center for Forgiveness and Reconciliation, Service Learning, Student Activities, and the Psy.D. department also collaborated to make the event possible. Faculty and staff who attended, volunteered as members of the common resource groups. Ellie Convie, a sophomore who participated, said, “The poverty simulation was a great opportunity to experience the struggles that those living in poverty face every day.” While this was the first time Chestnut Hill has hosted a poverty simulation, participating departments wish to hold the event again next year. They also wish to continue hosting the event multiple times a year, and to encourage local community involvement.

NEWS
“Kopje”
The College’s English honor society, Sigma Tau Delta, recently hosted a halloween-themed writing contest. Our first-place winner, Derek Ithen ’12, is featured in this issue of The Griffin. Derek’s piece will be introduced in two installments. The first, printed in this issue and the second, in our upcoming Dec.-Jan. issue. Enjoy the first installment of “Kopje.” “Caracas! Caracas!” Luke gazed upon the dark wheat field before him, flashlight and leash in hand. That damn dog managed to break out of the house again—it always wanted to be outside, almost like it needed to be out there. It could be impossible to find a lost dog out here—living so far from civilization had its disadvantages. When your neighbor lives on the farm a mile and a half down the road, it leaves you with a vast amount of open space, enough for a dog to vanish. “Caracas!” Luke shouted once more, cupping his hands to his mouth in a pointless effort to project his voice, unfortunately not even receiving the quick, rapid panting of a tired dog as a response. He let his arms fall and dropped the flashlight and leash to the ground, gently lowering himself to sit down. His head fell into this hands—he was never going to find this damn dog. Gabrielle would have been crushed; she used to love that dog. As the cancer spread, confining her to the bed, Caracas used to lie for hours on end beside her, occasionally jumping up to bring her a chew toy. It always cheered him up; Caracas must have thought it might make his owner happy. Once Gabrielle stopped coming home from the hospital, Caracas developed that inexhaustible need to escape. Luke was jettisoned to his feet as a single gunshot followed by a dog’s yelp sounded in the distance. He looked to all sides—it sounded like the shot and the yelp came from past the woods at the end of the field. It would be impossible to figure out where, so Luke grabbed the leash and flashlight and ran straight ahead at a full sprint. He shouted Caracas’ name repeatedly, in the intervals between praying that the dog was not in danger. As he breeched the edge of the woods, he heard a trio of shots, seemingly much closer than before. There was no sound of a distressed dog this time, but Luke kept sprinting, leaping over logs and rocky streams, tearing through vines and foliage, all in order to not disappoint Gabrielle. Moments before he was to crash in exhaustion, he lost his grip of the flashlight and instantaneously collided with a rock of knee-high height, causing him to flip in mid-air and land on his back. Luke clenched and ground his teeth, suppressing his urge to scream. He tried to roll on to his stomach to prop himself up, but he found he couldn’t move. He lay in agony, physically paralyzed, assuming that he was not going to escape. The sounds of feet shuffling through leaves and forest debris filled the air around him. Luke held his breath as long as possible, his skin going cold. It could be a harmless animal, a deer even. Suddenly, the sound of panting emerged from the wood, and Luke’s spirits rose. He called Caracas name and heard a bark—the shuffling of leaves grew more prominent as the dog approached. Caracas sounded several more barks as it ran to Luke, overjoyed to see him. Just before Caracas was able to lick Luke’s face in joy, it let out a hideous cry, a canine scream, as it felt its body leave ¥the ground. Luke’s heart sped up ferociously as the sound of the dog’s curdling cry. He called Caracas’ name once in thoughtless instinctual reaction, only to hear a whoosh and a massive thud with a sharp crack against a tree near him. Leaves soon fell on to Luke as he desperately called Caracas’ name once more. He began to cry briefly before he heard more shuffling around him. It approached and stopped, a heavy breathing now presided over him. Luke could see nothing—no light, no shadows, no hope, he could just hear the breathing. As Luke began to mutter the prayers of his Catholic school youth, a large, painful blow clocked him square in the jaw. Luke awoke to find himself lying on a tattered mattress in a room adorned with sinewy shadows from the faint glow of moonlight in the window. He noticed the window, how high it was set from the floor. It created a church-like image of light from the heavens shining upon earth. As he regained consciousness, he found he was able to move his body now. He managed to sit up on the mattress. A squeal came from across the room...

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Mask & Foil’s upcoming production is Larry’s Favorite Chocolate Cake, to show on Nov. 17 & 18 at 7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Nov. 19. Pictured in the bottom row are Meghan Gerry ’14, director, and Gabriel Henninger ’15, producer and President of Mask & Foil, with some of the cast above.

image: Caitlin Kain ’13

Fighting Incivility on college campuses
MEGAN WELCH ’16 In light of national incivility on college campuses, in the media and everyday life, Chestnut Hill College picked civility as the focus of both the freshman summer reading assignment and their First-Year Initiative (FYI) classes. Kent Weeks’ book, In Search of Civility, was assigned to all incoming freshmen over the summer. The book, and the topic of civility in general, is one of the primary topics being discussed in FYI classes this year. The topic was chosen because the college views incivility as a national problem, although it may not be considered prevalent on this campus. “I don’t think civility is a problem here,” said Krista Murphy, dean of student life. “I think, if anything, our campus probably bucks the national trend and the people here are friendly and welcoming. But it is a problem nationally, on many other campuses and with bullying in high schools.” The presidential election was also taken into consideration. “Sometimes it seems as though no one is talking about issues,” Murphy said. “It is just a conversation about how flawed the other candidate is. With all that discourse about the election, it seemed like a good time to choose civility.” Thus far, Murphy said that the topic has elicited a positive response from her FYI students. “My FYI class pointed out a lot of positive things that they see on campus but also challenges that they have, both here and offcampus,” she said. Some first-year students see the importance of the topic and how it applies to their lives. “I feel like the topic of civility was a good choice,” said freshman Sabrina Bella. “Civility is a very common issue in society today and bringing attention to it in the classroom allows for a reevaluation of everyday mannerisms. It is important because it is something that is involved in everyday life and because it is often ignored.” James Gee, ’16, also said it is important, though not necessarily an issue on CHC’s campus. “It’s very relevant,” he said. “Obviously, in the media, civility is not a popular subject. I don’t think it’s a huge problem here, but that’s probably because it’s not a very big campus. It just seems like there’s less opportunities for people to have problems like that.” Gee believes that incivility is a constant in society. “I just see it a lot and it’s disheartening,” he said. “Seeing kids disrespect their parents, their elders, seeing the elderly being mugged, and all of the rampant sexual assault and rape is honestly disheartening to know about.” When it comes to civility at the College, Gee sees it as “contained and not usually turned into a big deal,” he said. “Usually, it just affects the people doing it. It’s usually just in the form of drinking and partying.” Murphy said that civility connects to many different aspects of campus life, including the classroom. “It connects very closely with the idea of academic integrity,”

she said. “Promoting civility encourages educated and respectful discourse in classroom.” It also reflects the mission of the Sisters of Saint Joseph. “Part of their mission is the idea of always being in relationship with people,” Murphy said. “Civility ties directly to that idea.” According to Murphy, civility ties into many other areas, too. “Civility is an ongoing process,” she said. “Residence halls signed a ‘Dear Neighbor’ pledge. Lots of passport events have been tied to idea of civility, both locally and nationally. Faculty wrote a book last year that was just published. It consisted of essays about civil discourse. The topic is definitely relevant.” However, some students believe the way in which the topic is currently being handled leaves much to be desired. Gee said that more could be done to promote the topic in a way students might find engaging. “Right now, I think it’s something students think about but it’s not something being promoted the right way,” he said. “It’s just not hitting home. I think maybe they could do simulations where students themselves are placed in situations where they encounter uncivil behaviors, like situations where people are rude to them and they face conflicts that happen to many in their lives.”

Hurricane Sandy relief
In efforts to support the victims of Hurricane Sandy, the College’s main service organization, Campus Ministry, has placed collection boxes throughout the school to collect needed items: buckets, brooms, shovels, mops, sponges, rubber gloves, work gloves, cleaning solutions, contractor trash bags. Gift cards to Shoprite, Exxon or Sunoco are also accepted for donation and should be delivered directly to Campus Ministry. This effort is in support and connection with the Sisters of Saint Joseph in Belmar, N.J. For more information, please contact Michele Lesher, SSJ, at LesherM@chc.edu.

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The Griffin

The Modern Bennets
AMANDA FINLAW ’15 If you love Youtube videoblogs (vlogs) and modern interpretations of classic literature, “Lizzie Bennet Diaries” is sure to become your next obsession. Jane Austen’s enduring novel, “Pride and Prejudice,” has yet again been adapted. However this time, it is in the format of video blogs from a 24-year-old mass communications grad student, Lizzie Bennet, who is in massive debt and still living in her parents’ home. The series, which has just reached the climax of the story, contains well thought out and clever modernizations of the events of the novel. Each episode is narrated by the opinionated, strong-willed, and firm-inher-judgments Lizzie. It is easy for any fan of the book to greatly appreciate how clever the script writing is. Hank Green, the creator of the series and popular Youtube vlogger on the Vlogbrothers channel talks about his first ideas to convert this project into a Youtube video. “I wanted to do something that no one had ever done before; an adaptation in online video,” Green said. “Taking a previous work and translating it to this new media. I don’t know any examples of that happening.” The project required hiring actors, a sound team, and writers to break it up and translate it into present day. As this is a brand new way to tell a fictional story, it is very exciting to watch how they adapt the plot within each episode. In the first few episodes we are introduced to Lizzie and her best friend Charlotte Lu (Charlotte Lucas in the book), who goes to school with Lizzie and edits the videos. We are also introduced to Lizzie’s sisters Jane and Lydia (Mary and Kitty are only in the videos as a cousin and a cat, respectively). Jane works in the fashion industry and is shy and innocent, while Lydia is mischievous, hilarious, more likable and less selfish than the book character. Later, we meet Mr. Ricky Collins, who is as annoying as ever, Bing and Caroline Lee, and George Wickham, a charming swim coach who bears his abs on camera. Character development is very well-done in these vlogs. One of the most interesting adaptations the Lizzie Bennet team has already achieved is Mr. Collins’ marriage proposal to Elizabeth, and then to Charlotte. In this version, it is a proposal of a job that Lizzie cannot accept based on her values, which Charlotte is inclined to take for financial reasons. In a recent episode, viewers were finally introduced to Darcy, who Lizzie has unabashedly been discussing her hatred for since the first few episodes. The writers built up bountiful anticipation until what in the books is the moment when Darcy proclaims his love for Lizzie and explains his motivations, which she has wrongly assessed due to her pride and prejudice, in a letter. As we have reached this point, we see Lizzie slowly progress and come to an awareness that her judgements may sometimes be extreme and that her videos are very biased. Another beautiful and unique aspect of “Lizzie Bennet Diaries” is how in-depth the project is. Not only do viewers get to see into the mind of Lizzie, but also get glimpses into other characters’ lives through Twitter, Tumblr, and Pinterest accounts the actors run under the name of their characters. Lydia Bennet also has her own vlog channel, which directly relates to Lizzie’s. You can watch the “Lizzie Bennet Diaries” at Youtube. com/LizzieBennet.

Green Day 2012: Uno, Dos, Tré
CATHERINE DEMPSEY’15 The first installment of a trilogy of albums by Green Day, UNO!, released Sept. 21, is filled to the brim with classic threechord riffs and lyrics that literally scream teen-angst, despite Billie Joe Armstrong and company being over 40-years-old. Upon my first listen to this album, I was left bored and wondering if the finished product was rushed and effortless to produce. However, a few plays later and it has grown on me. UNO! is a mix between old and new, showing a few signs of riffs from past albums like "Shenanigans" and "Dookie" especially on stand-out tracks "Carpe Diem," "Let Yourself Go," and "Loss of Control.” For the most part, the tracks are upbeat and catchy, especially "Kill The DJ," which has a classic ska two-tone beat that will be stuck in your head for hours. "Troublemaker," is a playful and lighthearted tune that incorporates clapping hands for percussion. The lyrics are also composed in a very entertaining manner. "Sweet 16" is a cute and soothing song dedicated to Armstrong's wife, and leaves one reflecting on their own first love. It's unfortunate that Green Day chose "Oh Love" as the first single because it is the most drawn out song I've ever heard, and it in no way represents the album. A more exciting track like "Nuclear Family" would have probably been a much better pick for radio play. In comparison to "American Idiot" and "21st Century Breakdown,” UNO! is far less complex, both lyrically and instrumentally. In this case though, less is more. However, it is also less passionate and raw than early releases like "Kerplunk!" and "Nimrod.” This album certainly isn't bad, but it's not amazing either. It is however, a breath of fresh air from their recent pattern of concept albums that were quickly becoming stale, boring, and generic. I'd give it a generous 6.5 out of 10. I do still have hope in the second installment of the upcoming trilogy, DOS! though. After listening to the premier of "Stray Heart," which is written around a beautiful and strong bass line, things may be looking up. Maybe, once Armstrong is back on his feet after his recent stint in rehab, UNO!'s tracks will be worthier in a live setting.

STYLE

Top 5 Free Sites for E-Books
ANDREA WENTZELL ’15 Want a good book to cozy up to as the colder weather hits? Try out any of these sites to get some free e-books: Amazon.com has hundreds of free books to offer readers; some professionally published, while others are independently published. But no matter what, they still offer a great book listing. Search the site by typing in “free Kindle book list” or something similar and start searching through to find a great read! BarnesandNoble.com has a selection of over 50,000 free e-books to offer. Just switch the search engine to Nook Books, type “free” and there they are! Tread through those thousands and find some awesome indie books or even some wonderful publish house novels. Gutenberg.com (Project Gutenberg) offers over 40,000 e-books for free in the United States, because of copyright expirations. This includes thousands of classic novels, and self-published books. So if you are in need of a classic book for class, check out this site and get it for free instead. Freebooksy.com lists a variety of free e-books daily. You might find books here that none of these other sites have listed! You can also enter to win print version of popular books!, here. So take a chance and maybe win a book at this great site! Smashwords.com offers a great variety of self-published or indie short stories, novellas, and books. Many of these books are by first time writers and are free; some are outstanding, but tread carefully! Even if you don’t have a Nook or Kindle, you can get these books sent to your smart phone, tablet, computer, or other device through the Nook or Kindle applications, or by downloading .pdf file versions.

Kayne West: G.o.o.D Album
BRANDON EDWARDS ’13 Rapper, Kanye West recently released an album called Cruel Summer, featuring Big Sean, 2 Chainz and Pusha T. These individuals, all artists who have very promising careers, have collaborated and formed a group called G.O.O.D. MUSIC. Some people who have bought the album are criticizing Kanye because he has only performed on seven of the 12 tracks on the CD. Fans of Kanye want to know why he is not present on all tracks of the CD. According to critics on MTV.com, the public feels cheated by Kanye’s decision not to be a part of all 12 tracks. I believe that Kanye West is the type of artist who is not selfish. It is evident that Kanye has extraordinary talents and that the public has generally enjoyed his vocals on all the tracks of the CD. On the other hand, he trusts his group’s talent and allowed them the opportunity to showcase it on five tracks. The songs that he’s not present in are good. The song “Mercy” brilliantly blends all the talents of the group. Another track that Kanye is not featured in is, ‘’BLISS,’’ featuring John Legend and Teyana Taylor. It is a phenomenal song with a slow swagger that is not usually associated with rap CDs. I believe that adding John Legend to a CD lives up to the name of G.O.O.D. MUSIC. So instead of looking for fault in Kanye’s new CD, let us embrace the forming of his new group, G.O.O.D. MUSIC., which is more than capable of being very successful in the rap industry.

Pictured above Jane (left) and Lizzie Bennet (right) during Episode 5 of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, a YouTube Series based on Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.

screencap: youtube.com/LizzieBennet

STYLE SPOTTER: NOVEMBER 2012
Style Spotter is a regular feature in this section that showcases some of the diverse fashion tastes found on our campus. Think you or one of your friends is well dressed? Feel free to send recommendations to us at the.griffin.chc@gmail.com.

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1. Griselle rodriGuez ’15

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Who/what are your style inspirations? My biggest style influence is New York City. I tend to dress like my hometown; a patchwork of different styles all at once. What are your favorite stores? My favorite go-to store is H&M or Uniqlo.

2. Chris shriver ’15

Who/what influences your style? I’m definitely influenced by various tech-journalists, and what they might wear, as well as Joseph Gordon Levitt. I don’t really know why. That guy can rock a mean vest. What are your favorite stores? My favorite stores are definitely H&M, Kohl’s, TeeFury.com, RIPTApparel. com, JCPenney, and any second-hand shop I can find. I try saving money as much as possible when it comes to clothing.

3. shannon MCFadden ’14

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What article of clothing/accessory can you not live without? My black leather boots. How would you describe your personal style? Pretty but sophisticated.

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images: Jess Veazey ’13

New Film Releases to Be Blockbuster Entertainers
AIZAZ GILL ’14 All I want this Christmas season is for Hollywood to brighten up my holidays with movies that will be entertaining. Please Hollywood, don’t make me regret the ridiculous amount of money I have to pay to watch a film in movie theatres. As of right now, it certainly looks as if Santa will deliver, with filmmakers such as Kathryn Bigelow and Peter Jackson set to release their newest masterpieces upon unsuspecting audiences. Skyfall – Nov. 9 Daniel Craig (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) and his steely eyed gaze reprises his role as England’s favorite spy when James Bond returns to cinemas near you. Skyfall features a stellar cast as Academy Award winner Javier Bardem (No Country for Old Men) and Academy Award nominee Ralph Fiennes (In Bruges) join Judi Dench (Shakespeare in Love) in the 23rd Bond film, which promises to shake Bond and MI-6 to their very cores. The film’s plot revolves around Bardem’s enigmatic and villainous character who claims to have a personal connection with M. Moreover, the secrets that he possesses may actually force Bond to question his own loyalties. With director Sam Mendes (American Beauty) and his remarkable cast, Skyfall has a chance to return the Bond franchise to its former glory. Oh and did I mention that Adele is singing the traditional Bond opening song? This November, the British are indeed coming and they will be taking over a movie theater near you. The Hobbit – Dec. 14 Director Peter Jackson (King Kong) revolutionized filmmaking when he adapted JR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy to film. Not only did Jackson provide the fantasy genre with the credibility that it desperately needed, his trilogy made billions of dollars at the box office, and earned worldwide adoration from critics and audiences alike. Ever since the credits rolled on Return of the King, audiences have been clamoring for Jackson to go back and revisit Middle Earth. Now they are getting their wish as Jackson adapts The Hobbit. Joining him in his endeavor are Ian McKellen, who once again dons his wizard hat to play Gandalf the Grey, and Andy Serkis (Rise of the Planet of the Apes) who comes back to his “precious” as Gollum. Joining them will be Benedict Cumberbatch (Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy) and Martin Freeman (Hot Fuzz), also known as Sherlock Holmes (Cumberbatch) and Dr. Watson (Freeman), from the BBC’s brilliant contemporary take on the detective series. With the talent he has assembled and Peter Jackson’s pedigree in filmmaking, it’s almost impossible to think that this film won’t be precious to fans everywhere. Oscar for Best Director, a feat which had never been achieved by a female before. Add in the fact that screenwriter Mark Boal (The Hurt Locker) conducted extensive research into the decade-long hunt and eventual assassination of Osama Bin Laden, and any fears of exploitation or fabrication should be thrown out the window. Most of the details surrounding the movie have been shrouded in secrecy, but what is known is that Bigelow assembled a topnotch cast and plans to cover the story from all angles. The depiction of one of the most significant events in recent history, by an extremely talented filmmaker no less, ought to get anyone excited.

Going Out Guide: Nov. 2012
BLEU LANE ’13 If you are not originally from Philadelphia, exploring the city may be on your list of things to do while you’re at Chestnut Hill College. Need some suggestions on where to start? The Piazza at Schmidt’s (1050 N. Hancock St.) in Northern Liberties has something for everyone. This 80,000-square-foot. paved courtyard lays in the center of large commercial and residential buildings (think our piazza only much bigger). The variety of shops, restaurants, and activities the Piazza has to offer practically makes it a small town in itself. 1. The focal point of the Piazza is a 40 foot Jumbotron television which is almost always showing whatever Philly sports game is happening at the moment. A number of festivals/concerts also take place in the Piazza. For a list of upcoming events, check out www.atthepiazza.com. 2. Are you really into music? Check out Creep Records, which sells punk and hip-hop records along with clothing and lifestyle accessories. 3. For the sneaker heads, Sole Control is the place to go for rare, limited, and exclusive sneakers. 4. If you are interested in eating heathily, stop by Homeslice. They support local farmers and pride themselves on their use of fresh, quality ingredients. Also, their slogan is “We make the food that loves you back, Philly.” 5. Established in 2009, the Toothless Cat is an art gallery which showcases both established and emerging artists. 6. If you like burgers then add PYT to your list of places to eat in the Piazza. They offer a variety of specialty burgers such as the Cheesesteak Pretzel Roll burger and Krispy Kreme sliders along with other (non-burger) foods.

Zero Dark Thirty – Dec. 21 From the moment this film was announced, it was surrounded in controversy. Zero Dark Thirty seeks to tell the story behind the manhunt and killing of the US’ top target: Osama Bin Laden. In addition, the filmmakers promise to reveal some of the classified details which surround one of the most famous missions in United States’ history. Lost within the debate of ethics around Zero Dark Thirty is the fact that the people behind this movie are the ones who brought you The Hurt Locker, which was recognized as one of the most realistic war movies ever filmed. For her work on the film, director Kathryn Bigelow won the

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Subjective Scrutiny
GABRIEL HENNINGER ’15

Commuter Concerns at CHC
ALEXANDRA FUSCO ’14 Recently, an article was published in the Griffin concerning the grievances of being a commuter. These gripes included the lack of swipe access, unfriendly guards and a social divide between commuter and resident students. As an ex-commuter and current president of the commuter club, I have the experience to address these grievances in order to bring clarity to this previously addressed situation. The current policy for commuter swipe access is in place in order to ensure the safety of all of our students. It is not always the most effective policy, but it does keep our students safe and provide security with the necessary monitoring information. It is also important to note that the Student Government Association (SGA) is currently working on the visitation policy with a specific goal in mind: to improve commuter swipe access. Unfortunately, I cannot disclose any more information, but as a member of SGA, I can assure the student body that we are working very hard on this issue. As a commuter student for two years, I had positive and negative experiences with guards. However, I also had these experiences with other staff members. Additionally, living on campus has proved the same results; some people are generally kinder than others. I have not noticed a widespread difference in the way security guards, or any staff members for that matter, have treated me since I’ve made the transition to a resident student. The main goal of the commuter club this year is to integrate commuter and resident life more fully. The club members have made great efforts to involve themselves in mainly resident-attended events such as Fall Fest and the Brotherly Love Cup. But it is going to take the effort of the entire school in order for the wall between residents and commuters to come down.

OPINION
The Griffin

Millennials disTanced from hurricane sandy
BLEU LANE ’13 Ignorant, arrogant, self-centered, technology-dependent – these are just a few harsh adjectives that have been used to generalize the Millennial Generation. As a Millennial myself, I would like to think that those stereotypes do not accurately depict our generation. But just as I think we’re proving everyone wrong, we go and prove them right. These stereotypes have most recently come out to play during Hurricane Sandy last week. While older generations were busy taking safety precautions, Millennials were doing what we do best; talking about ourselves on the Internet. The hurricane experience of any given 20-something-year old could be followed in real-time on many social networks. Status updates, tweets, and Instagram pictures allowed Millennials everywhere to broadcast their play by play Make your opinion heard by submitting letters, articles, or cartoons to The Griffin. Submissions become property of The Griffin and are subject to editing for style, clarity and space concerns. Submissions represent the opinions of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent The Griffin’s position. Please send all submissions and ideas to Jessica Pennell at PennellJ@chc.edu. of Hurricane Sandy. As the storm progressed, Millennials began to share their concerns. Some were upset because Halloween parties might be cancelled and well, now no one would get to see how great that cat costume looks. Others panicked that they might have to actually find some source of entertainment if the cable went out. Some had it really rough and had to face the fear of not being able to charge their phone without power--having to watch their batteries drain down until the phone unavoidably turned off. Then there were those who claimed that “the storm isn’t even that bad.” For those in areas not severely affected by the storm, no, the storm may not have been that bad, but perhaps requesting a Millennial to think outside of their own situation is a lot to ask. Whether it was live-tweeting the progression of Sandy or reposting viral photos (many of which were edited or not even taken during Sandy), a lot of Millennials really helped prove the stereotype. I understand that this was not the case for everyone. Some people were and are legitimately concerned for the safety and well-being of their families, friends, and homes. This is true for a large part of the College community. Students at the College have been putting together many different fundraisers and collections to consciously take part in Hurricane Sandy relief. All I can hope for the rest of us, is that our priorities mature as we do.

Yes, residents do pay more to live here, but the primary reasons we attend college are to get an education and have new experiences. If we all share these two fundamentals then it is possible to have a more integrated student body. Students have to be proactive in this movement. Staying positive, taking actions and stepping outside of one’s comfort zone is the only way for our student body to progress. Being a commuter does not have to be a negative experience, and being a resident does not mean you are ensured a positive college experience. Instead of complaining about the issues you are facing, take action. I encourage all commuters and off-campus residents to come forward and speak to me and/or any member of SGA. I enjoyed being a commuter, and if I still could, I would commute from home. I look forward to representing both residents and commuters on this important issue.

Arab Spring Falls Short
AIZAZ GILL ’14 Almost a year ago, the world looked on as countries in the Middle East and North Africa took part in one of the most significant events in modern history; the Arab Spring (or Arab Revolution). Countries such as Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen and Libya all successfully overthrew long-term dictators in the name of freedom. The Western world cheered as the oppressed populations transitioned towards democracy. Meanwhile, countries such as Bahrain and Syria were inspired by the civil uprisings and sought their own freedoms too. Fast forward a year later, and both the Middle East and North Africa are once again under the international spotlight, although it is for entirely different reasons. On Sept. 11, 2012, a U.S. diplomatic mission in Cairo, Egypt was mobbed by protesters. U.S. ambassador to Libya, Christopher Stevens, and three State Department officials were killed in what proved to be a preplanned and targeted rocket attack after there had already been rioting in the streets. This was the beginning of protests which had been triggered in response to an anti-Islamic online video known as “Innocence of Muslims.” The short film is said to have been written and produced by American filmmaker Nakoula Basseley Nakoulan, who created the film on his own accord. There was absolutely no involvement by U.S. government in the making of the film whatsoever. And yet, this fact did little to dissuade the millions of violent protesters who scaled American embassies, burned American flags and often chanted “Death to America.” These protests resulted in billions of dollars in damages, the regrettable injuries of nearly 700 people, and the fateful death of approximately 75 people. The timing of these protests makes the situation all the more ironic. A year ago, the people of Libya, Egypt and Yemen were fighting for their basic human rights including freedom of speech and expression. However, the same people who waged a revolution for their rights cannot seem to respect the rights of others. By no means am I supporting Nakoulan’s “Innocence of Muslims” (if you ask me, it is an awful production), but Nakoulan certainly has the legal right to make that movie just as everyone who opposes its message has the right to make the decision not to watch it. I have often heard the argument that the short film is beyond offensive specifically to Muslims, and that we should be sensitive to what their religion represents. My response to that particular argument is that shows such as “Family Guy” and “South Park” have lampooned several religious figures including Jesus and Buddha, on several occasions. However, I have yet to see any mass-rioting or violent protests by those religious groups and they have just as much to complain about as the people who were offended by “Innocence of Muslims.” There is no doubt that religion is a sensitive topic for a lot of people but burning embassies, rioting on the streets, and killing innocent civilians certainly isn’t the way to go about expressing your displeasure. The people who ignited a revolution with bombs would do well to realize that you cannot cause mass chaos, destruction and death when you disagree with someone’s personalized beliefs. After all, if people keep on doing so, what can now set them apart from the tyrants like Gaddafi or Mubarak who killed the opposition based on disagreements? Until that lesson is learned, the dream of the Arab Spring will not be fulfilled.

Despite Loss, Volleyball Team Learns Lessons On and Off Court
ADELE GIANGIULIO ’16 After a Senior Day victory over their conference rival, Bloomfield College, the Chestnut Hill College’s women’s volleyball team capped off a season filled with its fair share of excitement and disappointment. Despite a losing record, head coach Kim Feeny believes that her team experienced a lot of growth this season and that overall, it is the talented younger players that are going to make this a better program as they move forward. “First-year players get through the transition from high school to a DII college level and start to take themselves to an even higher level with their talent and skills,” she said. Feeny pointed out that with so many freshmen on the squad, a lot of them were tasked with big roles in big matches, ultimately providing them with much needed experience for next season. The freshmen worked well with the upperclassmen as they really came together and bonded both on and off the court. As impressive as the girls were on the court, and despite their talent, the team faced a lot of adversity resulting in a 9-21 record. “We have a very talented team, but we were challenged a great deal throughout the season by opponents. Through all of that, we were able to learn a lot of lessons about hard work, mental focus, and the importance of being a unified team to work through any challenges” Feeny said. One of the biggest improvements the team has to develop for the future is simply maturation. Feeny believes that this will come when the younger girls gain more experience. She also plans on really focusing on this in next season’s preparation. Even though their record was not at its best, the Griffins took a lot from two of the high points of their season, the first being their second annual Dig Pink game. This game is held to raise money for breast cancer research in the middle of October (Breast Cancer Awareness Month). This year the team more than doubled what they earned their first year. “It is a fun event that gets a lot of student fans engaged in the match and also puts the focus on the cause [raising money for research],” Feeny said. This is a game that gets a lot of students out to support the team as well as the cause, and is working its way into becoming an annual event

SPORTS

The Griffin

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The Volleyball team rallies during their annual Dig Pink Game, which raised double the first years proceeds towards fighting Breast Cancer.

image: Griffin Athletics

Alumni Success encourages Athletic Excellence
MARILEE GALLAGHER ’13 Continuing to celebrate a rich history of tradition and athletic success, Chestnut Hill College inducted the second class to the CHC Athletic Hall of Fame. Honored as members of the 2012 class were the 1963-65 women’s basketball teams, the undefeated 1968-69 women’s tennis team, three sport athletes Joanne Sauer Burke ’82, and Jaime Lester ’03 and the college’s leading scorer in men’s basketball, Isaac Greer ’07. In the 1963-64 season, the CHC women’s basketball team put together an undefeated season with wins over Temple, Drexel and the Mighty Macs of Immaculata. They followed the season by only losing one game their next season, capping off a two-year period that saw them achieve a 22-1 record. This is something that has stood as a benchmark for women’s basketball ever since. It was in 1968, behind the strong and gutsy performance by a very special group of girls, that the women’s tennis team recorded an undefeated season of their own. They battled fearlessly in both close and shut-out wins, ultimately having the chance to experience what few teams ever do: perfection. Joanne Sauer Burke represented what it meant at that time to be a true Griffin. She excelled in basketball, lacrosse and field hockey while in her four years, taking three teams to conference championships and recording a PAIAW scoring title as well. She captained all three of the teams in her senior year and finished as the college’s first ever 1,000 point scorer. Jaime Lester never pitched a game in her life before taking up the mound and becoming a double-threat for the championship winning 2002 softball team. Lester batted .569 that season and earned the conference MVP as a team captain. She too was a three sport athlete, displaying her talents in basketball and field hockey as well. Isaac Greer proved that sometimes even a small school can make an impact in a big league. As a member of the inaugural season of men’s basketball, Greer set the standard for future players and stands alone atop the ranks as he is the all-time leading scorer with 2,065 career points. He received several league and conference recognitions and led the team as they reached their first conference championship in just their third year of existence. While all of these athletes undoubtedly belong in the Hallof-Fame, the induction of such a diverse class shows a lot about the athletics program at Chestnut Hill--both the direction the program is moving in and what this means for the future. Since the college’s early days of athletics back when statistics were non-existent and women’s sports were relatively unimportant, so much has changed in terms of the quantity and quality of programs. As president of the College Sr. Carol Jean Vale said, “Athletic programs are vital aspects of the college experience at Chestnut Hill.” This is evidenced by the current 11 full-time employees, 20 part-time head and assistant coaches and 14 sports programs. Additionally, the athletic tradition is now carried on by the 1/3 of the undergraduate population that has the privilege of calling themselves student athletes. As Lester pointed out, “The athletic program was very minimal when I came to CHC in 1999 but throughout my four years, I saw it grow a lot.” This growth has become evident with the hiring of Lynn Tubman as director of athletics. In addition to the creation of the Hall-of-Fame, Tubman has overseen the transition from Division III to Division II, the development of a state-of-theart fitness center and is currently in the process of preparing to usher in the inaugural season of the new track and field team, all of which give her “a great sense of pride.” In expressing his honor at being recognized in the Hallof-Fame, Greer believes this is something that will help move the athletic program even further. “Before my time there were no medals,” Greer said. “I definitely think the Hall-of-Fame gives athletes something to work for.” Lester echoed this statement in saying that she thinks it’s going to be “a good thing for the college and a great step forward.” Evidenced by the athletes and their former coaches and administrators, part of what has made athletics such a rich and time-honored tradition at Chestnut Hill has been the long- time relationships the student-athletes have been able to build with their instructors. Each honoree was introduced by their former coach as both athlete and coach spoke highly of one another. Introducing Greer was current men’s basketball coach Jesse Balcer, who described his honor in getting to start a program with Greer as his first recruit. “He asked me what my goals for the program were,” Balcer said about Greer, adding that as it turned out, “his goals were the same as mine.” Now in its 90th year, the college’s adoption of the new motto: “Aspire. Believe. Commit” is perfectly fitting for this Hall-ofFame class and for the athletics program in general. “Passion, teamwork, respect, sportsmanship and service is what is best about Chestnut Hill athletics,” President of the College, Carol Jean Vale, SSJ said, adding that “participation in athletics is a true test of character and authentic witness to the power of unity and team play.” All of these elements are found in the 2012 Induction Class and are perfectly displayed in each of the college’s athletic programs as well.

image: Griffin Athletics

for many years to come. The second high point of the season was a post-match clinic the Griffins held for local seventh and eighth graders. This was the first year doing this clinic for the young aspiring athletes and Feeny believes that the young girls were not the only ones to get something out of it. “It not only seemed to have an impact on the young athletes we worked with,” Feeny stated, “but it made our own players grateful for where they are in their careers as athletes and have a renewed appreciation for their sport when seen through the eyes of the younger girls we had the pleasure of working with.” Through a season filled with great adversity as well as many great lessons learned, the Griffins grew as a team and will continue to grow and mature into a very successful volleyball team.

Upcoming Home Game Calendar
nov. 16
Women’s Basketball vs. Molloy C. Sorgenti Arena 4 p.m.

Dec. 1
Men’s Basketball vs. Bloomfield C. * Sorgenti Arena 3 p.m. Women’s Basketball vs. Bloomfield C. * Sorgenti Arena 1 p.m. * denotes a CACC contest

nov. 28
Men’s Basketball vs. NY Institue of Tech. Sorgenti Arena 5:30 p.m.

For more information, visit: griffinathletics.com

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The Griffin

Final Record

(Current as of Cross Country On 11/4, at the NCAA Divison II East Regional Meet, team members, Rachel Barnett and Steven Say each placed at 170 in their respective races. Men’s Soccer 5-12-1

11/10) Golf 2-5 on 10/22 at the Goldey-Beacom College Invitational. Women’s Soccer 8-11-0 Women’s Tennis 11-4 Women’s Volleyball 9-21

For more information, visit: griffinathletics.com

Playoffs on the Hill: Women’s Tennis and Soccer
MARILEE GALLAGHER ’13 It was a fall season of ups and downs for the Chestnut Hill College athletics program but when all was said and done, two teams managed to reach the postseason as a result of their regular season success. Women’s Soccer The women’s soccer team played to an 8-10 overall record, earning their way to their fourth straight CACC Championship Tournament. With a 7-5 conference record, the team earned the seventh seed and was faced with the daunting task of playing the second seed, Philadelphia University. In one of the best games played all season, the Griffins really came together and put forth an amazing effort. Senior goalkeeper Jess Veazey, warded off attacks and kept the game scoreless until the 72nd minute. With Philly U up 1-0, Kaelyn Pizarro ‘14 executed a perfect pass to midfielder and CACC leading goal scorer, Carly DiGiovanni ’14 to tie up the game. Unfortunately, the Lady Rams scored shortly after to give Philly U the 2-1 victory in the Quarterfinal. Despite the loss, Veazey expressed the feelings of her team by admitting, “It was amazing to make the playoffs this year.” She added that everything was coming together at the end of the season and that really propelled the girls forward. “We played well at the end of the season and had the momentum we needed,” she said. Although the Griffins had an earlier exit than hoped, their season certainly wasn’t a lost effort. DiGiovanni finished as the conference leader in goals and points scored, earning her AllCACC First Team honors. Junior defender Lauren Nolte also earned distinction from the AllCACC Second Team. Finally, Veazey herself capped off a season that saw her lead the conference in saves and save percentage, adding to her CHC records in saves, wins and shutouts. It was another great season for the women’s tennis team, which under head coach Albert Stroble, reached its second straight postseason appearance with a record of 10-3 in the regular season. With the playoffs taking place on CHC’s home courts, the girls enjoyed a home field advantage that helped propel them from a deficit in the semifinal round to come back to win the match by a score of 5-4. Women’s Tennis In reaching the conference finals for the first time in program history, the Griffins were up against a tough task in threetime defending champion Concordia University. The team of Kelly Dennis ‘14 and Morgan Oechsle ’15 started the Griffins off with a victory in number two doubles but both fell in their singles competition. With Concordia leading 4-1 in singles, senior Anastasiya Shcherbakova scored the Griffins’ lone singles point, winning her match 7-5, 6-2. With the goal being to make the postseason, Stroble was indeed proud of his team. In describing them as a strong group of girls, the coach also said that “when giving 100 percent, they can be tough to beat.” Concordia certainly learned this as the Griffins really gave them there all. Stroble also acknowledged that “commitment and hard work was the focus for what they [the team] were able to do.” This commitment and hard work was certainly evident all season not only in the runnerup finish of the team, but also in the three athletes that earned conference honors. Shcherbakova was recognized with AllTournament distinction as well as being named to her third consecutive All-CACC First Team. Dennis also received tournament honors and her and Maria Parapouras ’13 were additionally named to the all-league roster.

SPORTS

With an overall 8-10 record the women’s soccer team played in their fourth straight CACC Championship Tournament this season.

image: Griffin Athletics

High Hopes as Women’s Basketball Season Begins
COURTNEY ANNIS ’14 As the CHC women’s basketball team prepares to start the 2012-13 season, the team is full of high hopes that they can improve on last season’s performance. The Lady Griffins’ record was a disappointing 6-20 last year, but the team has made the necessary adjustments that they believe will lead them to a successful season. They are approaching the season with a new mentality and a lot of heart. Laura Pruitt returns for her second season as head coach of the Griffins and is very focused on getting this team back to the playoffs. Joining her coaching staff is first- year assistant coach, Mike McDonald. Although this is McDonald’s first year with the team, he is no stranger to Chestnut Hill College as he is a men’s basketball team alum. He provides an insightful addition to the team and the Griffins are very lucky to have him and his knowledge behind the bench. As well as adding a new assistant coach, the Lady Griffins also recruited five new players to the team. Emily Soller ‘16 and Brittany McDonough ‘16 represent the new freshmen additions while, Aimee Bouie ‘14, Shayla Felder ‘14 and Da’Kiya Johnson ‘14 all join the team in their current junior year. Coach Pruitt is very excited about each new addition to the team, as well as the team’s performance in the preseason. “The girls not only have a great mentality, they are also working very hard,” Pruitt said, “I am very confident we will do

Lindsay Alexander ’13 (left) and Olivia Gorczynski ’15 (right) during the 2011-2012 season.

image: Griffin Athletics

A successful CACC season for the women’s tennis (below) team rewarded them with a runner-up finish in the conference. While three team members, including Anastasiya Scherbakova ’13 (above), Kelly Dennis ’14 and Maria Parpouras ’13 were honored with conference honors.

images: Marilee Gallagher ’13 (above), Griffin Athletics (below)

well this season.” Leading the team this season are co-captains Lindsay Alexander ‘13, Tenisha Townsend-Mobley ‘15 and Latoya Laing ‘13, all of whom believe the team’s mentality and work ethic are just what they need to start off to a great season. According to cocaptain Lindsay Alexander, all of the girls are, “excited for the season.” She believes that “the chemistry between the team and coaching staff is great and I am confident that it will be a large contributing factor to our success this year.” Alexander also spoke highly of the new additions, believing that they have a very important role this season and that they will compliment the returning players. “As a team we fully believe that if we play hard and together,” Alexander said, “this year will be a fun and memorable season.”

Congratulations Coach!
On behalf of the Chestnut Hill College community, the staff of The Griffin would like to congratulate Head Men's Lacrosse Coach, Brian Dougherty, on his induction into the 2012 Class of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) Hall of Fame!

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