The Gluten Free Blueprint

Contents Introducing Gluten Free Living ................................................................... 3 What is Gluten? ............................................................................................ 5 Why wheat is bad for us ............................................................................... 6 Malnutrition and Gluten ............................................................................... 7 Identifying the Symptoms of Gluten Sensitivity ......................................... 8 Celiac Disease and Misdiagnosis ............................................................... 10 Celiac Disease ............................................................................................ 12 Gluten and Moods ...................................................................................... 14 Autism and Gluten ..................................................................................... 15 Grains you can’t eat.................................................................................... 16 Foods that contain Gluten .......................................................................... 17 Gluten Free Grains ..................................................................................... 18 Amaranth ................................................................................................. 18 Arrowroot ................................................................................................ 19 Millet ....................................................................................................... 20 Grain and Starches you can eat .................................................................. 20 Gluten and Depression ............................................................................... 21 Gluten and Weight Loss ............................................................................. 22 Irritable Bowel Syndrome IBS ................................................................... 23 Where to buy Gluten Free Foods From ..................................................... 23 Natural Food Stores ................................................................................ 24 Supermarkets and Grocery Stores........................................................... 24 Online Shopping ..................................................................................... 25 Farmers Market ....................................................................................... 25 How to be gluten free with spending a fortune .......................................... 26 Travelling when you are Gluten free ......................................................... 28 How to Read the Labels ............................................................................. 31 Eating at Friends......................................................................................... 33 Eating at Restaurants .................................................................................. 35
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Restaurants to Avoid .................................................................................. 37 Cooking alternatives in Gluten Free Food ................................................. 38 Soy sauce ................................................................................................. 38 Pie Crust .................................................................................................. 38 Tortillas ................................................................................................... 39 Thickeners ............................................................................................... 39 How to make sure it’s gluten free .............................................................. 39 How to test for Gluten ................................................................................ 41 Keeping your kitchen gluten free ............................................................... 41 Things to watch out for with gluten cooking ............................................. 42 Alcohol and Gluten .................................................................................... 43 Breakfast ..................................................................................................... 45 Porridge ................................................................................................... 45 Buck Wheat Pancakes ............................................................................. 46 French toast ............................................................................................. 49 Granola .................................................................................................... 50 Lunch .......................................................................................................... 52 Ham and Cheese Panini .......................................................................... 52 Reuben Sandwich .................................................................................... 53 Red Broccoli Salad.................................................................................. 54 Dinner ......................................................................................................... 55 Lasagne.................................................................................................... 55 Grilled Marinated Shrimp ....................................................................... 57 Pesto Penne ............................................................................................. 58 Cookies and other treats ............................................................................. 58 Chocolate Fudge ..................................................................................... 58 Coffee Cake ............................................................................................. 60 Living the Gluten Free Life........................................................................ 60

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Introducing Gluten Free Living

Depression, Fatigue, Joint Pain, Headaches

What do all of these things have in common?

The answer is they can all be caused by eating wheat. Gluten intolerance is one of the major health problems facing society today. It is estimated in the United States alone that there are over two million people who suffer from Celiac disease and many more who are gluten intolerant to some degree.

When a person is intolerant to Gluten all sorts of nasty symptoms can occur. The symptoms of gluten intolerance and celiac disease are multisystemic meaning they can exhibit in many different forms.

Not only this but there is numerous digestive problems related to eating gluten including weight gain, constipation, malformed stools and a host of other problems. There is even strong evidence pointing towards a connection between autism and a gluten filled diet.

Sadly most people who are gluten intolerant remain undiagnosed. As you will see is this book there are a number of reasons why people fail to get receive a proper diagnosis for celiac disease or gluten

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intolerance but the results of the improper diagnosis are always uniformly tragic.

A disease which is 100 per cent treatable through correct diet goes untreated. Not only does the sufferer not receive help for their condition it is often aggravated by the medication that they are given.

If you are reading this book then you probably fall into one of three categories. Maybe you suspect that you are gluten intolerant or maybe someone you know suffers from gluten intolerance, or maybe you simply want to adopt a healthier lifestyle through living gluten free.

The truth is that going gluten free is a sensible option no matter your tolerance for gluten. As you will soon see our bodies are simply not designed to consume gluten. Removing it from your diet can do wonders for your health and energy levels. And the fact is there is a huge array of healthier grain alternatives to choose from.

While we live in a society that is still wheat based being gluten free is going to be a challenge. This book aims to make that challenge a little easier by giving you tips on how to eat gluten free when you are out, how to travel gluten free and how to shop for gluten free foods. It will also show that you don’t need to be rich to live gluten free.

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You will also learn about the science surrounding the gluten free diet and why gluten can cause so much damage to our digestive system. Products that contain gluten will be clearly identified and you will discover how to read food labels to make sure that the food you are eating is free of Gluten.

Making the change to a Gluten free lifestyle can be one of the best things that you do. If you are currently suffering from any of the symptoms of celiac disease or gluten intolerance it is not an exaggeration to say that going gluten free can give you a new lease on licence. I hope that the information you find here will make that change all the easier.

What is Gluten?

If you are new to gluten free living you might me wondering what exactly Gluten is. Put simply gluten is a protein which is found in wheat, barley, rye, and malt. It is also used as an additive for thickening, stabilising and flavouring.

Some strict Gluten free diets also exclude Oats which are often exposed to cross contamination of Gluten. Some of the most common Gluten foods are pizza, crackers, pasta, cookies, bread, bagels and
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beer. Of course this list includes some of people’s favourite foods. Luckily there are now Gluten free versions of virtually every food that you can think of.

Why wheat is bad for us

Wheat is such a commonly accepted part of our diet that it is hard to believe that it is the cause of so many of our health problems. But when we look at the way our diet has changed even over the last hundred years and the effect that has had on obesity and diet related diseases it is obvious that something is seriously wrong. Worldwide there are approximately more than one billion people who are either overweight or obese. And in the United States this figure is some 64% of the population.

When we compare ourselves to Palaeolithic man who had very low body fat and with none of the many health problems such as heart disease or cancer that we now suffer from we may ask where we started to go wrong.

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The answer lies with the rise of the agricultural revolution which began 10,000 years ago and has been magnified in the last one hundred years with the virtual removal of fresh vegetables and fruits from many people’s diets. The fact is that we are not designed to eat wheat. Man has been living on the earth for over half a million years but he has only been eating wheat grains as a predominant part of his diet for just under 10,000. Evolution does not work this quickly and our bodies have not had time to adapt. Unlike cows which have four stomachs were as we only have two. So while a cow maybe to handle wheat ok we are not able to do so.

Malnutrition and Gluten

In order to understand the damage that Gluten can do to your body you need to learn a little about the intestine. Your intestine is lined with hair like structures that are known as villi. The villi protrude from lining of the small intestine so that their total surface area is increased. This maximises the amount of nutrients that they are able to absorb. When you have gluten intolerant the body treats gluten as a toxin. In the process of trying to rid itself of this toxin it damages the villi essentially flattening them out. These flattened villi are not able to fully absorb nutrients as a result. Nutrients such as vitamins and

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minerals are vital for your health and the correct functioning of your body.

The good thing is that this damage need not be permanent. If you remove gluten from your diet then your villi will grow back and you will be able to absorb these vitamins and minerals again.

Identifying the Symptoms of Gluten Sensitivity

The first thing that you need to know about the symptoms of Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac disease is that they are multisystemic. That is they exhibit in multiple parts of the body. While the damage that is being done is only occurring in one place which is in the intestine. This can make it hard to identify all the symptoms of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity because there are so many. However some symptoms of the condition are common to most people.

The list of possible symptoms is extensive as you will from this list below:  respiratory problems  infertility  joint pain
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 hair loss  low blood sugar  fatigue  headaches  depression  lactose intolerance  acne  skin disorders  seizures  problems with menstrual cycles  depression  inability to concentrate  canker sores

And this is not even the complete list, there is in fact over 250 known symptoms for gluten sensitivity and celiac disease.

While the actual damage done by the condition is done in the intestine as you can see from the list above that is not where most of the symptoms exhibit. However some people with gluten intolerance and celiac disease will exhibit gastrointestinal symptoms as well. These include:  nausea
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 weight loss  acid reflux  bloating  constipation  diarrhoea  flatulence  abdominal pain

Identifying celiac disease in children can actually be a little easier as they tend to exhibit common symptoms. These include abdominal pain, late onset of puberty, weak bones, nose bleeds, behavioural problems such ADHD, irritability and difficulty concentrating. As you will see in the section on Autism it is often confused for celiac disease as the symptoms are very similar.

Celiac Disease and Misdiagnosis

Celiac disease is one of the most commonly misdiagnosed diseases. This can cause serious problems. Not only is a condition which can be a 100% treated with the correct diet not properly addressed the patient receives medication which will not only be ineffective may actually make them worse. The drugs used to treat the misdiagnosed conditions often will have serious side effects.
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Celiac disease can be misdiagnosed for a range of other conditions including irritable bowel syndrome, lupus, diabetes, cancer, thyroid disease, physiological problems, cystic fibrosis and many others. The patient who is diagnosed with these problems will receive medication which is unhelpful and can cause damage to the internal organs.

There are number of different reasons why doctors misdiagnose Celiac disease. Firstly it is not that well known in the medical community. Up till a decade ago it was thought that only one in every ten thousand suffered from celiac disease but more recent research puts that figure at one in every 133 people in the United States. This means that when most doctors were receiving their medical training it was still considered a fairly uncommon occurrence. It is still not widely taught about in medical school and many doctors still have trouble diagnosing it.

Secondly a routine blood test will not detect celiac disease. While there are indications in a routine blood test that celiac disease maybe present such as low potassium and protein levels, the doctor must have the training and experience to pick up on these clues. As you have seen from the section on the symptoms of celiac disease the problems are multisystemic. This means that there is huge variety of possible symptoms for the condition. Because of the many different

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possible symptoms it can be hard to isolate the problem as coming from celiac disease.

Thirdly because many of the symptoms are psychological in nature such as depression or anxiety, doctors will often assume that the either there are environmental factors that are effecting the patient or that the patient has mental health issues. This can have awful consequences for the patient as they are usually prescribed antidepressants which are for the most part ineffective and have serious side effects. Also they are lead to believe that they have a problem which is untreatable.

Lastly diagnosis is not helped by the fact that the condition is completely curable through diet alone and there exists no pharmaceutical cure. Some doctors rely on pharmaceutical company’s sales literature, journals and conferences in order to stay informed. This can lead to doctors who are uneducated when it comes to celiac disease.

Celiac Disease

It is estimated that Celiac disease affects one per cent of the population making it a fairly common occurrence. It is also estimated
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that most of the people who are affected by the disease are currently undiagnosed. If you have a close relative who suffers from Celiac disease the chances is around 1 in 40 that you too will suffer from the disease.

There are multiple reasons why Celiac disease occurs. It is a combination of your own genetic predisposition combined with a diet that contains gluten and some environmental trigger. The two key genes for developing Celiac disease are HLA DQ4 and HLA DQ8. It is not necessary that you have both of these genes in order to develop Celiac disease. Of the two DQ8 is a more common indicator of the likelihood of developing Celiac disease. Having these genes is not enough by itself to say that you will develop the disease. But if you don’t have these genes then the chances of Celiac disease occurring is very remote.

As you have seen above people who are predisposed to Celiac disease through genetic makeup will not necessarily develop the disease. There needs to be an external environmental trigger as well. Some of the most common triggers are surgery, illness, stress such as job loss or a death of someone close, and pregnancy. Celiac disease is auto immune diseases; this is where the immune system attacks the body. It is triggered by eating gluten.

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People who suffer from Celiac disease have a malfunctioning digestive system. The problem occurs when the gluten reaches the small intestine. Wheat that is in the body causes the body to produce too much of a protein which is known as zonalin. This protein causes junctions between the cells in the small intestine to open up releasing toxins and gluten into the bloodstream. This is known as Leaky Gut Syndrome. The body notes that there are unwanted toxins in the bloodstream and starts to attack them, the Villi which are the “fingers” which line the small intestine and are responsible for absorbing nutrients, are damaged in the process. This in turn limits the body’s ability to absorb nutrients. Gluten and Moods

Gluten sensitivity or celiac disease can restrict the amount of nutrition that the brain needs in order to function correctly. This is turn can lead to problems such as fatigue, depression, anxiety and lack of motivation.

To understand why the brain is unable to function properly we need to look at how the brain works. The brain requires the

interaction of various biochemical nutrients to function. The
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neurotransmitters are composed of amino acids. The amount of protein, sugar and carbohydrates directly affects the functioning of the neurotransmitters.

Studies have showed that people who are malnourished (unable to absorb nutrients properly) usually suffer from heightened levels of stress hormones. The effect of these high stress hormone levels contributes to learning problems, anxiety, and fear of new situations.

Autism and Gluten

Studies have shown there is a much higher prevalence of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in those people who are autistic. What is harder to prove is whether celiac disease is more prevalent due to autism or whether celiac disease contributes to autism. Autism is not the same thing as celiac disease it does however react well to removing gluten from the diet.

While the link between autism and celiac disease needs further work to understand fully there are cases of people who have managed to successfully treat the symptoms of autism with a gluten free diet. These previously autistic people saw their autistic behaviours either
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lessen or become reduced completely. The fact is though that it is quite possible that these people were never truly autistic to begin with but that there celiac symptoms were misdiagnosed. It could however be the case that gluten free diets can successfully treat autism.

Grains you can’t eat

The list of grains that you can’t eat on gluten free diet is actually fairly short. Some people don’t include oats but really it is best to stay away from them due to cross contamination problems. The list of grains you can’t eat when you are on gluten free diet includes:

* Barley * Oats * Triticale * Rye * Wheat

If a food has the word wheat in it then you probably will need to avoid it. This includes such things as wheat germ, wheat protein and wheat starch. The major exception is wheat grass which like all grasses does not have gluten in it. Wheat also goes by a variety of

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different names include flour, korn, farina, couscous, matzoh, matzo and cake flour.

Foods that contain Gluten

The following are foods that contain gluten. Generally you should be able to find an alternative which is gluten free, but unless stated it is best to assume that these products have gluten in them:

Beer Bread Biscuits Cereal Cookies Cupcakes Donuts Cornbread Crackers Croutons Gravies Liquorice Marinades Pasta
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Pizza crust Pretzels Sauce Soy sauce Stuffing

Gluten Free Grains Amaranth The grain has been cultivated for approximately 8000 years. It was one of the main staples of the Aztec diet and was an important part of Aztec religious ceremonies. When the conquistadores conquered the Aztec nation they stopped the active cultivation of this grain. Thankfully the plant continued to grow as a weed and genetically it is pretty much identical to what it was then.

While raw amaranth grain is not edible and cannot be digested it can be prepared and cooked like any other grain. Some of the notable features of this grain include the fact it is high in protein. In fact amaranth contains more protein that any other gluten free grain and wheat. It is also a great source of lysine which is a particularly important amino acid. Grains are well known for having low lysine

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content. Amaranth also contains more fiber and iron than other gluten free grains and it lower in carbohydrates.

Arrowroot These easy to digest start are extracted from the roots of the arrowroot
plant. The starch is used as a thickener in many foods such as

puddings and sauces. It can also be used to make cookies and other baked goods. In terms of taste Arrowroot is very bland and while it is not particularly nutritious many believe that it helps to relieve upset stomachs.

The arrow root plant is native to the tropics of South America. It has been cultivated by native people there for a long time. The arrowroot
plant was first encountered by Europeans when the Arawak Indians

instructed them that it was known as the aru-aru or “meal of meals.”
The Indians believed that arrowroot was a particularly important food.

It was also used as a medicine with indows believing that it should be placed on wounds in order to draw out toxins from poison arrows.

In terms of appearance it is a fine white powder with a look and feel

which is similar to that of corn starch. It is a translucent paste which has no flavour. It is a useful replacement for corn starch in our cooking as it can be used a thickening agent. Bear in mind that the consistency will not hold for as long they after you finish cooking.
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Millet

Millet is a particularly delicious and versatile grain. It can be creamy like mashed potatoes or fluffy like rice. It is also available throughout the year. Millet comes in a variety of colors including white, yellow or red. It is small and round in appearance with the most commonly form being the hulled variety.

Millet is an excellent source of some very important nutrients. These include manganese, phosphorus and magnesium.

Millet is a very good source of magnesium. Magnesium is noted for its heart protecting quality. It has also been shown to reduce the severity of asthma and to cut down on the frequency of asthma attacks. The heart benefits of consuming magnesium include lowering people’s blood pressure and reducing heart attacks.

Grain and Starches you can eat

While the most common grains and starches that people eat in western countries maybe no no’s there are still plenty of grains and starches

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for you to choose from. These include potato, chickpeas, beans, millet, taro root, soy, rice, arrowroot, montina and ragi as well as many more.

Gluten and Depression

Typically when we think of celiac disease we tend to associate it with problems with our digestive system. However when we talk about gluten sensitivity a full two thirds of sufferers will not have problems with digestion but with other systems in their body. A full 20 – 30 % of people who suffer from gluten sensitivity will have problems with their nervous system. This can lead directly to problems with depression. The cause of this is malabsorbtion which is in turn caused by damage done by Gluten to the small intestine. The can cause the body to fail to absorb certain enzymes one of which tryptophan. The leads to a decrease in the amount of serotonin the body produces. As you may be aware serotonin in the chemical which makes us feels good.

The other major reason that gluten can have an adverse effect on our moods is because the gluten in the small intestine is not fully digested. This protein is then spread throughout other parts of the nervous system including the brain. This can lead to inflammation which sets

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of a series of problems. One of the problems that can result is depression.

Gluten and Weight Loss

There is a common misconception that removing Gluten from your diet will actually cause you to gain weight. The reason for this is because many sufferers of Celiac disease are severely underweight when they are finally diagnosed. Once the stressor, in this case Gluten, is removed from the digestive system naturally these people start to normalise their weight.

In the case of people who are suffering from Gluten sensitivity however they are not suffering from the same damage to small intestine that a Celiac suffers from. In general people who are Gluten sensitive will have a build-up of Gluten in there body. This acts as a toxin in the body. Once this toxin is removed the body is able to fully absorb the nutrients from the food it is digesting.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome of IBS features symptoms such as gas bloating, diarrhoea and constipation. About 20% of the population suffer from the syndrome. This may involve up to fifteen bowel movements a day. This can be debilitating as people don’t want to be far away from a toilet. Generally this problem is diagnosed as a problem of anxiety and depression.

One of the major problems with much of the advice concerning IBS is that it doesn’t matter what you are digesting. If the root cause of your IBS is gluten sensitivity then your diet is precisely why you are suffering from these symptoms. By removing gluten from your diet these problems will sometimes quickly disappear

Where to buy Gluten Free Foods From

Buying gluten free products is nowhere near as difficult as it used to be. The awareness around Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity has increased significantly in the last ten years. As more people become
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aware of their need to adopt a gluten free lifestyle they are demanding that gluten free products be stocked. Supermarkets, speciality stores and groceries have all responded to this demand and are now stocking gluten free products.

Of course you are not limited to gluten free speciality products only. Most fresh food does not contain gluten and so there should always be a large selection of possible produce for you to choose from no matter where you shop.

Natural Food Stores

It is not surprising that natural food stores have responded to the trend towards gluten free eating and now stock a wide range of these products. You will also be able to find organic varieties of all your favourite fresh gluten free vegetables and fruits. These are great places to visit if you are looking for speciality gluten free products that are hard to find elsewhere.

Supermarkets and Grocery Stores As you have seen in the section on gluten free foods there are plenty of food options which are gluten free. When it comes to fruits and vegetables the vast majority do not contain gluten. Also corner
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grocery stores and especially supermarkets often stock gluten free versions of popular products. This can make shopping for gluten free food even easier.

Online Shopping Online shopping has opened up a world of gluten free food to even the most isolated people. Now no matter where you are in the world you can order your own favourite gluten free treats. The following are some of the biggest websites that you can shop at for your gluten free products:

www.Glutenfree.com http://www.celiac.com/glutenfreemall/

Another great option is www.Amazon.com . If you visit the grocery and gourmet section of Amazon you will see that there is a Gluten Free tab click on this to see Amazons extensive range of gluten free products.

Farmers Market Like natural food stores these can be a great place to find organic foods that are gluten free. Visiting a farmers market is not only a good
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place to buy gluten free food it can be a really fun experience. If you have children with gluten intolerance or celiac disease visiting the weekend farmers market can be an opportunity for them to see one of the fun sides of their condition.

How to be gluten free with spending a fortune

One of the most common objections to living gluten free is that it is simply too expensive. This doesn’t have to be the case though. It is possible to live a one hundred per cent gluten free lifestyle without spending a fortune.

The first area that you should look at cutting back on is with speciality items. Many people who adopt the gluten free lifestyle wish to simply replicate their old eating habits but with a gluten free alternative. There are advantages to this approach. Making a significant lifestyle
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change like choosing to be gluten free can be difficult and so it can be a good idea to make your new diet as similar to your old diet (without the gluten) of course. The disadvantage to this approach is that it can be really expensive. Speciality foods such as gluten free cookies, crackers and cakes can cost twice as much as the gluten inclusive variety. The fact is that eating these foods is not a necessity and if you want to cut back on your costs the best way is to remove them from your diet.

Provided you are up for the challenge creating a more holistic approach to your change in diet can produce health benefits and savings. These gluten free versions of common treats are loaded with sugar and are not particularly good for you. Become gluten free is a chance to change your overall lifestyle and eat healthy.

Another good option is to buy generic food brands. These brands must be labelled to the same standard as other foods but they can cost significantly less. If you are going to buy generic foods you want to make sure that you are purchasing gluten free foods first but once you are sure you will be able to add these to your shopping cart. By purchasing a few of the same basic generics every time you shop you will find that you don’t need to do much research to find out what foods are ok for you.

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Writing a shopping list before you go is a good way of saving money even if you are not gluten free. However if you are following a gluten free diet then it can be especially important. The real costs with a gluten free diet come from purchasing the speciality items. If you don’t have a list of ingredients that you need it is easy to throw of the extras in the shopping cart. Also when you go shopping make sure that you are not hungry. There are a couple of reasons for this. Firstly if you are hungry you are likely to over shop. And secondly when we are hungry we are more tempting by ready to eat foods such as gluten free crackers which are expensive. Knowing that you are not going to eat for a while after you shop means that you are more likely to purchase cheaper produce that you can prepare later.

Travelling when you are Gluten free

Travelling can be a frustrating experience for a person on a gluten free diet. At home you have established where you can buy gluten free foods, you probably have a few favourite restaurants where you know you can eat a delicious gluten free meal and at home you have a cupboard full of gluten free treats. But when you hit the road you lose all of these comforts.

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Ensuring that travelling while gluten free is as pleasant as possible simply requires a little more planning and forethought than you might otherwise put into it. However the internet has made researching the cities that you will be visiting a whole lot easier. Before leaving your home spend some time researching whether there is a natural food store in the city that you will be visiting. You should also check out if there are fast food restaurants which you know serve gluten free food. Make sure that you now where they are located and mark these on your map or store the information in your smart phone.

Next you want to make sure that you always bring gluten free food with you when you are travelling. If you are on a road trip you should have plenty of space to keep your gluten free food. If you are flying you might be a little bit more restricted but it is a good idea to bring some gluten free snacks anyway.

Check to see if the place that you are staying at has cooking facilities. If it does bring gluten free supplies with you so that you will be able to cook something while you are away.

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If you are flying you may be able to get a gluten free meal at the airport but you should not rely on this fact. It is a good idea to make sure that you are filling before you reach the airport. You will also want to make sure that you put your request in for a gluten free meal early on when flying. Most likely the airline will have no trouble in meeting your request as gluten free food is a popular option these days but just in case make sure that you have gluten free snacks handy.

If you are planning on staying at a bed and breakfast make sure that your host knows ahead of your arrival that you will need a gluten free alternative for breakfast. Typically you will be served some version of the continental breakfast and this will not be suitable for a gluten free diet. Bed and breakfast owners often have special dietary requests made of them and with many people on a gluten free diet many will be aware of what can and cannot be included in a gluten free meal. If they seem in doubt explain to them more specifically what foods are restricted.

For the most part you should avoid vending machines on your travels. Almost all foods that are in vending machines contain gluten in some form or another. Also you will be unable to check the ingredients before purchasing so in order to stop disappointment simply stay away from vending machines.

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One of the major problems with eating in foreign countries is the language barrier. It can be difficult enough explaining to a waiter what gluten free means in your own country but when you don’t even speak the language it can be impossible. In order to avoid these kinds of problems you should make sure that you purchase some fresh food from the local grocery store or market in the city that you are visiting and store it in your hotel. If you know you have food waiting for you at home you will be less likely to take a chance on food that may contain gluten.

How to Read the Labels

It has only been relatively recently that there has been a uniform system of labelling whether food contained gluten or not. Thankfully in 2007 the Food and Drug Administration introduce new rules about food can be labelled. These rules stated that for a food to be gluten free it must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) it must also not contain any ingredients from a prohibited grain which means wheat, rye, barley or any hybrid of these. However if those grains are processed sufficiently to fall below the 20ppm barrier then the food can be considered gluten free. Also for a food to be labelled gluten free it cannot be gluten free naturally. For example eggs are not gluten free because in their natural state they are already gluten free.
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The first thing you should do when looking for gluten free food is to check the front of the package. If you see the words Gluten Free or GF then the product is almost certainly safe to buy. If you do not see this designation checks the ingredients listing at the bottom of the nutrition facts box. This will include a list of all the ingredients. In order to know whether the food is gluten free or not you will have to check every single ingredient on the list. Start at the top of the list and work your way day. This can take a little bit of getting used to but after a while you will have memorised the foods that you cannot eat on your gluten free diet. Until you are completely familiarised with the foods that are ok to eat it is recommended that you take a list with you when you go shopping. The first culprit you will want to look out for is flour. If you see the word flour it is safe to assume they mean wheat flour and that the food is not acceptable. There are also a number of substitute words that you will want to look out for these include spelt, bran and duram. All of these are no good and so you will want to reshelf the food. You also want to look out for:  malt  barley malt  wheat starch  oat flour  soy sauce
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You may read on the label that it says made in a facility that processes wheat. If you see this label you will want to watch out. Even if the product is gluten free there is obviously a possibility of cross contamination. The choice as to whether you want to purchase this product will depend on your own particular sensitivity to Gluten. If you are celiac then you will almost certainly want to avoid it. If you are less sensitive to Gluten then purchasing this product maybe okay.

Another thing you want to watch out for is the claim that the product is wheat free. Just because a product is wheat free does not necessitate that it is gluten free. This is of course because wheat is not the only food that contains gluten. One exception to this rule is soy sauce. Soy sauce is typically made with wheat however if this ingredient is not included you can be sure that a gluten

Eating at Friends The first thing you have to come to terms with is that other people are not responsible for accommodating your dietary habits. Being gluten free is not something that most people are familiar with. Even if you explain what gluten free entails you shouldn’t expect that your host will be able to understand exactly what your requirements. Remember

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if it was really that easy to get your head around you probably wouldn’t need to buy a book on the subject.

So what can you do to make sure that you can enjoy dinner parties and other functions while still remaining gluten free?

First off you may want to discuss your eating requirements with the host. This will involve (tactfully) asking what will be on them menu. Simply explain that you are only able to eat certain foods and you want to find out what will be on offer. If they are not serving something that fits your requirements you should offer to bring a dish for the dinner. You should not expect them to change the menu to meet your requirements.

Secondly it is a good idea to fill up before you leave the house. Arriving with a full stomach can make the evening go a lot easier. The main point of any social function is to meet people and have a good time. If you arrive and find that there are only a few things for you to nibble on or if you can’t find anything to eat at all, then at least the whole evening will not be lost. And of course if you have brought your own dish people will often appreciate the gesture and it gives you an opportunity to discuss the benefits of a gluten free lifestyle.

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Most importantly do not allow your evening to be ruined simply because of the food that is being served. Eating with friends is not primarily about the food it is about spending time in good company. Eating at Restaurants Being gluten free doesn’t mean that you can never eat at a restaurant again. However it does mean you need to be a little more careful in the choices that you make. Firstly you will make things much easier on you choose a restaurant which is more likely to serve appropriate food. This means that eating an Italian restaurants or pizza joints is probably not the best idea. Stick to a restaurant that has a wide variety of different meals or an ethnic restaurant which features non gluten meals as part of its cuisine.

Secondly you should get a feel for what will be on the menu. Many fine dining restaurants now feature their menu online. If you can’t find the menu online you can call the restaurant and ask them to either detail the menu over the phone or have them email it to you. You can also bring your own food if you like and ask the chef to prepare it for you. When you explain your eating requirements almost any high restaurant will be happy to prepare your meal for you.
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When you at the restaurant you should make you’re eating requirements clear. It is important that they realise the seriousness of your condition. You should also make sure that you are polite with your requests. Do not be rude and if the staff makes a mistake simply be firm that it is not acceptable and ask for the dish to be changed. People do make mistakes in a busy environment such as a restaurant. When they do get your order right makes sure that you express your gratitude for meeting your request.

Finding Gluten Free restaurants is a lot easier than it used to be. One of the best places to find a restaurant that serves Gluten free food is www.glutenfreerestaurants.org

Fast food restaurants often have gluten free options such as salads, chilli or fries. If you do order fries you want to look out for breading and whether they have been gluten contaminated when cooked in oil. You may also be able to request a lettuce bun even if it is not on the menu. Check carefully before purchasing to make sure that there are no gluten contamination issues.

Mexican restaurants usually have some good gluten free foods. One thing to watch out for is flour being added to the sauce. If you stick to corn tortillas or carnitas you should usually be ok.

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Salad bars are another good place to visit for Gluten free meals. If the salad is being prepared in front of you it is a great way to check what is going into our food.

Restaurants to Avoid Chinese restaurants use soy in virtually everything that is prepared. And soy contains gluten. This means that you either have to be very careful and specific with your requests or avoid it all together.

Italian restaurants are problematic because of the emphasis on pasta. Some Italian restaurants serve polenta however which corn based and a safe alternative when eating Italian.

Coffee shops and bakeries are both bad bets if you want to go Gluten free. Bakeries for obvious reasons are unlikely to offer anything that is Gluten free and coffee shops usually do not offer gluten free options.

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Cooking alternatives in Gluten Free Food Soy sauce Because soy sauce usually has wheat in it you can’t use it for gluten free cooking. This can severely limit your Asian cooking options as soy sauce is a part of many popular recipes. If you want to use soy sauce in your cooking look for gluten free variety or alternatively you can use an Asian fish sauce instead. This can take a little get used to but if you like the taste of fish it can be an easy alternative.

Pie Crust To make gluten free pie crust you will only need three common ingredients. These are:

½ Cup of shortening 1 ½ cups of rice flour 4 table spoons of water

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To prepare the pie crust first preheat an oven at 400 degrees. In a bowl cut shortening into the rice flour and add the water. Using your hands work the dough until is soft and make a ball. Place the dough on a pie pan and press it in using the back of a wooden spoon. Place
the pie crust into the oven and bake for fifteen minutes until it is

golden brown.

Tortillas
Many people enjoy eating flour tortillas, if you are one of them, then

you will need to change to eating corn tortillas instead. You should also try out some of the gluten free wraps that are available such as Asian rice wraps as these can be a very healthy alternative to flour based wraps.

Thickeners A good alternative to flour thickeners is gelatine. You may also want to try arrowroot flour, agar or corn starch which all makes for good thickeners.
How to make sure it’s gluten free

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In 2006 a law was passed called the Food Allergen Labelling and Consumer Protection Act. This law was designed to protect allergy sufferers and requires that products that contain the eight most common allergens list this carefully on all food products. One of these allergens is wheat. For people going Gluten free this can make the job a lot easier. These foods are definitely off limits and that can cut down the potential pool of candidates significantly. There are of course other grains that contain gluten however and you need to watch out for these. These glutens also have derivatives which are used in flavouring and additives.

Another thing to watch out for is the label Gluten Free. While this usually means the product does not contain any gluten there can be cases where the gluten level is considered low enough that is still labelled gluten free. Of course for people with Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity this distinction is irrelevant.

The most common cause of Gluten free products actually containing gluten is cross contamination. Cross contamination most commonly occurs when the crops are being grown. Unless the farm has a single grain free crop they will usually rotate the crops through the fields. This can lead to gluten containing grain appearing in otherwise gluten free products. Cross contamination can also occur when the grain is stored and during its transportation or milling.

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How to test for Gluten There are actually home test kits that you can purchase to test for gluten. These tests usually involve dissolving the gluten in a fluid in a tube and then placing the liquid into a pen. The window passes through a test display window and the lines on the pen tell you whether or not the food has gluten in it. The most popular of these home tests is called EZ Gluten. Keeping your kitchen gluten free

The easiest way to prevent any gluten contamination occurring is to make your entire house gluten free. For many people though this is not an option that you will want to take. Many households contain people with a different level of sensitivity to Gluten and they may not want to exclude Gluten from their diet even if you do. Creating Gluten free cooking environment doesn’t mean that you have to get rid of Gluten from the kitchen completely. It simply means observing some safe practices to ensure that cross contamination does not occur.

Making liberal use of aluminium foil can help to prevent contamination. Any tray or oven rack should be covered with aluminium foil which can then be removed when not in use. This will prevent cross contamination between baking gluten and non-gluten foods.
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When you are preparing your foods always make sure that you cook the gluten free food first. This will mean that the cooking surface and the utensils do not contain any traces of gluten. If you forget to cook the gluten free food first simply wash the cooking materials thoroughly or use fresh cooking equipment.

Make sure that anything you cook and store is well labelled. If you are cooking gluten and gluten free versions of the same food it is easy for the two to get mixed up. This is particularly true if you have someone else such as a nanny feeding your children. To avoid this confusion make sure that all foods are very clear and easy to understand.

Most utensils and cooking equipment can be used for both gluten and non-gluten foods as long as they are cleaned well. If you have equipment which is harder to clean you may need a separate item for your gluten and non-gluten cooking.

Things to watch out for with gluten cooking

Gluten free cooked goods such as breads or cookies do not contain any preservatives. This means that they are healthier for you but they

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also become inedible faster. In order to overcome this problem it is important to vacuum seals them so that stay fresh.

You will also need to make good use of your freezer. Freezing gluten free goods well help them to last longer. Simply take them out and reheat when you want to eat them.

Alcohol and Gluten One of the biggest concerns people (in particular men) have with adopting the Gluten free diet is whether they will be able to drink alcohol. The answer is that most alcohols are ok, although beer as it is traditionally made is out.

The following are some of the popular alcohols you can still enjoy while you are on a Gluten free diet:  Armagnac  Bourbon  Brandy  Champagne  Cider (be careful though many add barley for enzymes and flavour)  Cognac
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 Gin  Grappa  Margarita  Martini  Ouzo  Rum  Sake  Scotch Whiskey  Sherry  Tequila  Vermouth  Wine

There are even many different types of premium and craft beers that are now produced which are gluten free and use gluten free ingredients such corn, rice and sorghum. Some beers that claim to be gluten free have had the gluten removed from them using special filters or enzymes. This means they may not actually be 100% free of Gluten so it pays to watch out.

There are three basic types of alcoholic beverages that are not allowed. These are:  Malt Beverages
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 Distilled Spirits  Beer

The reason that you are able to drink the many alcoholic beverages made from distilled alcohol is that the distillation process gets rid of any traces of gluten.

Breakfast Porridge Ingredients

One part brown rice flakes One part quinoa flakes One part chia Two parts millet cereal

Preparation

Step One: First you will need to mix all of the ingredients together in order to make the porridge mix. You should store this in an airtight container when not in use.
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Step Two: When preparing porridge simply remove about a ¼ of cup of porridge. Next prepare milk or water in a non stick sauce pan and allow to simmer. Wait until bubbles appear and then start to add the porridge mixture. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon for the entire time.

Step Three: Once the bubbles appear again reduce the heat. Cover the pan and allow it to cook for about 8 minutes. The cooking time will vary according to your porridge mixture. The finished porridge should be thick but still pourable.

Buck Wheat Pancakes Ingredients

1 ¼ Cup of buckwheat flour One Egg One Apple (diced) ¼ cup of coconut Teaspoon of baking powder One Cup of water Tablespoon of olive oil
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Preparation

Step One: Mix baking powder, coconut, apple and egg

Step Two: Pour in water slowly and stir it as you go. Make sure you do not add to much water or you will need to add more flour. You should have a nice even batter constancy.

Step Three: Put frying pan on medium to low heat. Grease pan with coconut oil or butter.

Step Four: Pour in the pancake mixture; you should be able to fit in two pancakes for each time.

Step Five: Allow for about two minutes on each side. Flip when ready and cook on the other side. You may want to melt butter on the top once they are cooked but still in the pan.

Step Six: Serve with your favourite sweet or savoury topping.

Ingredients

Two cups of water One cup of Quinoa
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One Teaspoon of cinnamon One Teaspoon of ground nutmeg One Chopped Peach ½ Cup of Greek Yogurt One pinch of nutmeg One tablespoon of lime

Preparation

Step One: Rinse the Quinoa in water to remove the coating and drain.

Step Two: Boil two cups of water and then add the Quinoa stirring the entire time.

Step Three: Turn down the heat so that the water is simmering leave at this temperature for about fifteen minutes.

Step Four: Drain the water and mix in the nutmeg and cinnamon

Step Five: Mix in the chopped peach with the yogurt in a bowl. Serve the Quinoa in a separate bowl placing a few teaspoons of yogurt and peach on the top. Add nutmeg and lime juice to the top.

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French toast Ingredients

One cup of water 1/4 cup of cashews ½ teaspoon of vanilla 1/8 teaspoon of cinnamon 1 tablespoon of maple syrup Gluten Free Bread

Preparation

Step One: Using a blender mix the water and the cashews.

Step Two: Add vanilla, maple syrup and cinnamon to the mix.

Step Three: Blend mixture thoroughly.

Step Four: Pour mixture into a bowl; coat the gluten free bread with the mixture.

Step Five: Cook the coated bread in a non-stick pan.

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Granola Ingredients

Dry Ingredients:

7 cups of oats ½ cups of rice brain One Cup of Quinoa flakes One Cup of coconut One Cup of chopped walnuts One Cup of chopped pecans One Cup of chopped almonds One Cup of sunflower seeds ½ Cup of sesame seeds ½ Cup of flax seeds Three table spoons of cinnamon One teaspoon of salt

Liquid Ingredients

One Cup of Canola Oil One Cup of Honey One Tablespoon of Vanilla

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Preparation

Step One: Mix all of the dry ingredients together in a large bowl and mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon.

Step Two: Mix all the liquid ingredients in a glass bowl and then pour into the large bowl. Using your spoon mix all of the ingredients thoroughly. Make sure that all of the dry ingredients are as uniformly covered as possible.

Step Three: Pour half the ingredients onto a baking tray. Take a second tray and pour onto a second baking tray. Shake the trays and smooth the mixture out.

Step Four: Bake at 350 degrees. After cooking for ten minutes take out the trays mix the granola and place the top tray on the bottom shelf and the bottom shelf on the top tray. Place back in the oven and repeat the mixing process. Turn down the heat to 250 degrees and cook for a further fifteen minutes.

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Lunch Ham and Cheese Panini Ingredients

4 Slices of Ham 4 Slices of Swiss or Gruyere cheese 4 Tablespoons of apricot preserve 8 Slices of gluten free bread Butter or Cooking Spray

Preparation

Step One: Place the slices of gluten free bread on the kitchen bench and light coat with cooking spray or butter. Turn the slices over and place a slice of ham and cheese on each slice. Next place a tablespoon of apricot preserve on each of the slices.

Step Two: Place the top piece of bread on each of the slices.

Step Three: Turn the Panini machine on and allow it to heat up. Grill the sandwiches on the Panini machine. Wait until the sandwiches are golden brown and turn once.

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Reuben Sandwich 8 Slices of Swiss cheese ½ Pound of Corned Beef (Sliced thinly) 16 Ounces of Sauerkraut 8 Slice of Gluten Free Bread 2 Tablespoons of Butter ¼ Cup of Thousand Island dressing

Preparation

Step One: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step Two: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper then butter one side of each of the pieces of bread and place them on the tray. The buttered side should be facing towards the baking sheet.

Step Three: Spread out the Thousand Island dressing on the four slices of bread. Next add two tablespoons of sauerkraut to each piece of bread. Add a slice of Swiss chess and a layer of two ounces of the corned beef.

Step Four: Add one more layer of the Swiss cheese and another layer of the sauerkraut.

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Step Five: On each of the other four pieces of bread place one tablespoon of thousand islands dressing.

Step Six: Place this slice on top of the other slice of bread which has the layered ingredients. Push the sandwich down.

Step Seven: Bake in the oven until the sandwiches are golden brown. Remove and serve.

Red Broccoli Salad Ingredients

One head of broccoli ¾ Cup of Chopped Celery ¼ Cup of Green Onions ¼ Cup of Red Onions 2 Pounds of Bacon ¼ Cup of White Sugar 2 Tablespoons distilled white vinegar 1 Cup of Mayonnaise 1 ½ Cups of grapes ¾ Blanched Silvered Almonds

Preparation
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Step One: Put the bacon into a large skillet cook at a medium temperature while turning throughout.

Step Two: Preheat the oven at 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the almonds evenly over a cookie sheet and bake for about 12 minutes. Allow the almonds to cool.

Step Three: In a bowl mix the mayonnaise with the sugar and vinegar

Step Four: Using a larger bowl mix the broccoli, celery, green onions, red onions, grapes and almonds with the bacon. Add the mayonnaise dressing. Leave to chill for three hours in the refrigerator. Dinner Lasagne Ingredients 32 Ounces of Spaghetti Sauce 1 ¾ Cups of Water 1 ½ Pounds of Lean Ground Beef 1 Tablespoon of Butter 2 Tablespoons of Olive Oil ½ Small Onion Chopped Finely 3 Cloves of Garlic 1 Egg 2 Cups of Ricotta Cheese
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¼ Cup of Parmesan Cheese Grated 8 Gluten Free Lasagne Noodles 2 Cups of Mozzarella Cheese 1 Tablespoon of Italian Seasoning Preparation Step One: Preheat the oven to 400 Degrees. Coat a glass dish lightly with cooking spray. Step Two: Bring water and spaghetti sauce to boil in a large saucepan. Turn the temperature down to a medium heat and then finally to low. Leave to simmer. Step Three: Brown the ground beef in a large skillet. Melt the butter and add olive oil and the onion. Cook for four minutes. Step Four: Add the minced garlic and cook for one minute. Step Five: Remove the onions and garlic and add the spaghetti sauce mixture. Add in the ground beef and stir with a wooden spoon. Step Six: Combine the egg, ricotta and parmesan cheese in a bowl. Spread two cups of the spaghetti sauce into the bottom of the dish. Step Seven: Layer the lasagne in four layers over the top. Place approximately half the egg mixture on the top of the lasagne layers. Step Eight: Layer with two cups of the meat sauce followed by two more layers of the noodles followed by the rest of meat sauce. Make sure that the meat sauce covers the entire dish. Step Nine: Cover with foil and bake at 400 degrees for thirty five minutes. Step Ten: Take off the foil and check the noodles. If they have not softened put back into the oven for a further fifteen minutes.
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Step Eleven: Mix the mozzarella with the Italian seasoning. Sprinkle this over the top of lasagne and leave to bake for a few more minutes while the cheese browns. Step Twelve: Leave the mix for fifteen more minutes and then serve.

Grilled Marinated Shrimp

Ingredients 2 Pounds of Shrimp peeled and deveined 3 Garlic Gloves Minced 2 Teaspoons of Dried Oregano 1 Cup of Olive Oil One Lemon ¼ Cup of Chopped Parsley 2 Tablespoons of Tomato Paste 1 Teaspoon of Salt 1 Teaspoon of Black Pepper Preparation Step One: Mix the garlic, tomato paste, oregano, olive oil, lemon juice, hot sauce, salt and pepper into a large mixing bowl. Step Two: Pour the left over marinade into a sealable plastic bag with the shrimp and leave for two hours in the refrigerator. Step Three: Preheat the grill at a medium temperature. Thread the shrimp onto the skewers. Step Four: Oil the grill lightly and then cook the shrimp for five minutes on each side.
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Pesto Penne Ingredients One Pound of Gluten Free Penne ½ Cup of Basil Pesto 1 ¼ Cups of Grated Parmesan Cheese or Soyco Preparation Step One: Bring a pot of water to boil whilst adding salt. Step Two: Once the water is boiling add the penne pasta. Step Three: When the penne is cooked drain the pasta and add pesto. Use the Parmesan to garnish the dish and serve

Cookies and other treats Chocolate Fudge 2 Cups of Flour 2 teaspoons of baking powder 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of butter ¾ Cups of grated cheese 2 cups of milk

Preparation
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Step One: Preheat your oven to 450 degree Fahrenheit

Step Two: Sift the baking powder, salt, and cayenne into a mixing bowl

Step Three: Cut up the butter into small pieces and add to the mix

Step Four: Mix all the ingredients together using your hands.

Step Five: Stir in the cheese and the milk into you have soft dough.

Step Six: Make the dough into small balls using your hands.

Step Seven: Cut up the dough into roughly eight pieces and shape each into a circle around ½ an inch thick.

Step Eight: Put the circles onto a baking sheet. Make sure that you allow room between each before baking.

Step Nine: Bake for about 15 minutes until they are golden brown.

They taste best when they are hot out of the oven!

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Coffee Cake Ingredients ½ Cup of Milk ¼ Cup of Salad Oil 1 Egg 1 ½ Cup of Gluten Free Flour 1½ Teaspoon of Xanthan Gum ¾ Cup of Sugar Salt Preparation Step One: Mix the egg, milk and salad oil Step Two: Sift all the dry ingredients and add to the mix. Stir thoroughly with a wooden spoon. Step Three: Pour onto a greased pan Step Four: Mix xanthan gum and flour and sprinkle over the top Step Five: Bake at 375 for about half an hour.

Living the Gluten Free Life

Changing to a gluten free lifestyle doesn’t have to be a hardship. Many people find it easier to switch to a gluten free diet when they don’t try and make too many changes to the type of food they eat all at once. For most foods there is a gluten free variety. If you enjoy
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eating French toast on Sunday eat gluten free French Toast instead. If you like having pasta try Gluten free pasta. The idea is not to change the meal but rather the ingredients. Later on once you have adapted to the Gluten free lifestyle you can start to phase out some of these dishes and look for recipes that are specifically designed for gluten free food.

Next bear in mind that being Gluten free these days is nowhere near as difficult as it used to be. No matter where you live in the world you can order delicious gluten free food via the internet. Almost all grocery stores stock gluten free foods and restaurants are increasingly adding gluten free options to their menu. It is important to understand that once you get used to it Gluten free living does not mean a restricted lifestyle.

The Gluten free community is growing and thanks to the internet there is information easily available at the touch of your fingers. There are gluten free forums that you can join to meet other gluten free devotees. These are great places to go if you have any questions that you need answering as they are filled with people knowledgeable about the diet. As the community grows it is becoming increasingly easy to be gluten free. Food manufacturers see the strong demand for gluten free food and are offering an ever widening range of products. Remember that there may be as many as 2,000,000 celiac sufferers in the United States. This doesn’t include the even larger number of
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people who are glucose intolerant or simply wish to make the switch to a healthier lifestyle. This is a huge market that businesses will increasingly want to serve.

Many people who adopt the Gluten Free lifestyle actually find that it opens up more eating options for them. Foods that they previously thought they were incompatible with turn out to be just fine once they discover the true villain is Gluten. It can also be incredibly liberating to realise that your depression or anxiety were nothing more than an incompatibility with the types of food you were eating. This realisation can open up a whole new world of possibilities for people.

The benefits of going gluten free are clear but sticking to your new lifestyle can be a little more difficult. The best thing you can do is to start today and say no to gluten. Every time you turn away a gluten dish you will find the next time easier. Beginning is always the hardest step. You should also be prepared for the fact that sometimes it’s going to be a little difficult. Even though gluten free is more popular than it once was society is still primarily gluten based. Until those changes you as a gluten free person will have to take a little extra care. That means planning ahead.

As you have seen in this book whether it is visiting a restaurant or taking a trip prior planning is key to making gluten free living as easy as possible. The better organised you are the fewer times you will find
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yourself hungry and with no options. This will decrease the chances of you quitting.

Remember your health is the most important thing that you have. You
may have adopted gluten free eating because of celiac disease or

gluten intolerance but even if you didn’t suffer from these conditions it is still the healthiest option. Simply put humans are not designed to eat gluten. By choosing to be gluten free you are guaranteeing a
healthier future.

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