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DEC. 12-18, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
School investigated
State looking into high school
attendance records. PAGE 4
STEPHEN GOLDSMITH Photos/Special to The Sun
TOP LEFT: The Princeton boys soccer team fights hard to tie the
score in the second half against Ramapo High School in the state
championship game on Dec. 1. TOP: The Princeton boys soccer team,
by many accounts, outplayed their opponents, but couldn’t get the
go-ahead goal. ABOVE: The Princeton boys soccer team celebrates
with the state championship trophy after they tied for the title.
Soccer team takes title
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
On Dec. 1, the Princeton High
School boys soccer team became
state champions.
So did their opponents, the soc-
cer team of Ramapo High School.
The game, which was held at
The College of New Jersey in
Ewing, ended in a 1-1 tie.
According to league regula-
tions, championship games may
only have two overtimes, and
there are no shootouts to deter-
mine victory.
On Dec. 1, after 100 minutes of
play, the game was still tied, and
both teams were declared the
winner.
“The league has always ended
the state final after regulation
without a shootout,” said Prince-
ton head coach Wayne Sutcliffe.
“In other sports they keep playing
until somebody wins, but that’s
just the way it is.”
Nearly every media outlet that
covered the game reported that
regardless of the score, 11th-
ranked Princeton had outplayed
Ramapo, ranked first in the state.
Sutcliffe agreed.
“I think the general consensus
please see TEAM’S, page 10
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Police address changes
The Princeton police depart-
ment issued a press release re-
garding the tremendous amount
of changes taking place in antici-
pation of consolidation, which is
scheduled for Jan. 1, 2013. The
Township and Borough Police De-
partments have already begun
merging operations, with the fol-
lowing timeline and issues being
addressed and undertaken.
Borough Police Administra-
tion has moved into the building
at 1 Valley, with daily administra-
tive operations already underway,
Borough Detectives have also
moved their operations to 1 Val-
ley.
Beginning Nov. 30 at 8 a.m.,
Borough Communications have
moved all operations to the Com-
munications Center at 1 Valley
Rd. This will include all Police
dispatch, seven-digit and 9-1-1
communications. With the move
to 1 Valley Rd., the police console
at Borough Hall will no longer be
manned by police or communica-
tions personnel. Anyone wishing
to report an incident in person to
the Princeton Borough Police
should do so at the Township Po-
lice Department located at 1 Val-
ley Rd. Anyone wishing to reach
the Princeton Borough Police De-
partment by telephone can still
do so by calling 924-4141.
Beginning on Wednesday, Dec.
5 at 6:30 am, joint police opera-
tions began with the patrol bu-
reau of the Borough Police De-
partment moving to 1 Valley. As of
that date, patrol units will consist
of combined Township and Bor-
ough patrol officers.
Police operations for the cur-
rent Township and Borough De-
partments will continue separate-
ly but at the Valley Rd. location
until Jan. 1, at which time all op-
erations will combine.
Both the Princeton Borough
and Princeton Township Police
Departments are committed to
the level of service that has been
traditionally provided to the
Princeton Community. We all ap-
preciate the support that you’ve
shown us during this transition
period.
4 THE PRINCETON SUN — DEC. 12-18, 2012
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By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
The state Department of Edu-
cation is investigating Princeton
High School. The Department of
Education’s office of Fiscal Ac-
countability and Compliance re-
ceived an allegation from an un-
named source that the high
school’s attendance records had
been altered to allow students
who had missed too many days of
school to graduate.
Judy Wilson, superintendent of
Princeton schools, said she was
not making public statements at
present. A statement posted on
the district’s website said, “the
Department has requested
Princeton Public Schools’ data on
the attendance of graduates in
the classes of 2009-2012. That in-
formation has been submitted
and is being reviewed.”
Barbara Morgan, press secre-
tary at the Department of Educa-
tion, said she could not comment
specifically on the Princeton
High School investigation except
to say it was ongoing.
Should the department discov-
er wrongdoing of any kind, Mor-
gan said consequences will vary.
“Every situation is different,”
she said. “It all depends on an in-
dividual district’s circumstances
and merits. Ultimately a report
will be prepared and issued to the
district. Depending on what they
find, the district can take steps
they deem necessary to rectify
the situation.”
Morgan said she was unable to
speculate as to a timeline for the
completion of the investigation.
The statement issued on the
district’s website reinforced
Princeton High School’s accuracy
and integrity.
“The District has all policies,
procedures and data collection
clearly in place and works dili-
gently on a daily basis to not only
insure accuracy and align with
please see SCHOOL, page 9
Princeton High School under investigation
Department of Education looking into attendance records
DEC. 12-18, 2012 – THE PRINCETON SUN 5
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Students in the Lewis Center
for the Arts’ world-renowned Pro-
gram in Creative Writing will
present new work at a reading on
Dec. 12 at 5:15 p.m. at Chancellor
Green Rotunda on the Princeton
University campus.
Students from fall workshops
in fiction, poetry, nonfiction,
screenwriting and literary trans-
lation will read from new work
completed during the past semes-
ter. The reading, part of the Pro-
gram in Creative Writing’s Althea
Ward Clark W’21 Reading Series
at the Lewis Center for the Arts,
is free and open to the public.
“Audiences can expect a wide
range of very excellent, exciting
and engaging new work from our
students,” notes Chang-Rae Lee,
acting director of the program.
“These students have spent the
past semester in small, intimate
workshops learning from some of
the greatest writers of our time
and one another.”
Through the program, stu-
dents can earn a certificate in cre-
ative writing in addition to their
degree in a major. They have the
opportunity to pursue original
work in fiction, poetry, screen-
writing and translation under the
guidance of 15 practicing, award-
winning writers, including Jef-
frey Eugenides, Chang-rae Lee,
Paul Muldoon, Joyce Carol Oates,
James Richardson, Susan Wheel-
er, Edmund White, C.K. Williams,
and Tracy K. Smith, who this
year received the Pulitzer Prize in
Poetry. Small workshop courses,
averaging eight to ten students,
provide intensive feedback and
instruction for both beginners
and advanced writers. Each year
15 to 20 seniors work individually
with a member of the faculty on a
creative thesis, such as a novel or
a collection of short stories,
poems, or translations.
Graduates of the program in-
clude such well-known writers as
Jane Hirshfield ’73, Jodi Picoult
’87, Jonathan Safran Foer ’99,
Jonathan Ames ‘87, and Monica
Youn ‘93.
The Althea Ward Clark W’21
Reading Series annually brings a
number of distinguished writers
to campus to read and discuss
their work. Writers reading in
the coming months include A.S.
Byatt (fiction) and Alicia S. Os-
triker (poetry) on Feb. 13, Azir
Nafisi (fiction) and Nikky Finney
(poetry) on March 13, and Joseph
O’Neill (fiction) and Matthew
Dickman (poetry) on April 17. All
readings are free and open to the
public.
To learn more about the Pro-
gram in Creative Writing, the
reading series, and the more than
100 public events offered annually
by the Lewis Center for the Arts
visit princeton.edu/arts.
Lewis Center students to present work
Please recycle this newspaper.
6 THE PRINCETON SUN — DEC. 12-18, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08042 and 08540 ZIP
codes. If you are not on the mailing list, six-
month subscriptions are available for
$39.99. PDFs of the publication are online,
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ing information, call (609) 751-0245 or
email advertising@theprincetonsun.com.
The Sun welcomes comments from readers –
including any information about errors that
may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@theprincetonsun.com, via fax at
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you can drop them off at our office, too. The
Princeton Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium – including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
PRINCETON EDITOR Katie Morgan
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
A
s 2012 winds to a close, The
Sun has a special edition
planned.
The special edition will be on Jan. 2.
It will be a look ahead to 2013, and it’s
where we invite you to help us with
our coverage.
Our associate editors are lining up
interviews with local leaders, such as
mayors and school superintendents.
We’re preparing a list of questions re-
garding the new year. The idea is to
give the leaders an opportunity to dis-
cuss upcoming issues.
Do you have any questions for your
local officials? If so, please send an
email to us. Our email address for
news submissions appears on this
page and throughout the paper.
Now, we’re not asking officials to
break out a crystal ball and offer their
prognostications for 2013. No one can
anticipate everything that will happen.
Hurricane Sandy is a prime example.
The storm’s impact will be felt well
into 2013 and, in some places, even
longer.
But it is possible to set a basic agen-
da for the new year. There may be
some lingering issues from 2012 that
will be wrapped up. There may be
some opportunities or challenges that
already are on the schedule for the up-
coming year. Taxes, for example, al-
ways will be a major topic of discus-
sion. Hopefully, local governing bodies
already are working on plans to make
efficient use of your tax dollar, and
perhaps leaders can share some of
those ideas.
Other possible issues include the use
of open space, making a municipality
more “sustainable” and planning for
growth.
Our editors want to be as thorough
as possible when interviewing local
leaders. They don’t want to miss a
question that is on your mind, which is
why we’re asking for your input.
Send us your questions, and we’ll do
our best to get answers from your local
leaders.
in our opinion
Looking ahead
Questions about 2013 for your local leaders? Send them to us
What’s on your mind?
The Sun will be asking leaders about
their plans for 2013. We want to include
any issues that are on your mind. If you
have a question for your mayor or
school superintendent, email it to us,
and we’ll do our best to get an answer.
Special to The Sun
The Westminster Community Chorus and Chamber Choir, conducted by Devin Mari-
man, will present a concert entitled ‘De Colores: Christmas Music from the African-
American and Latino Traditions’ in Bristol Chapel on the campus of Westminster
Choir College of Rider University in Princeton.
The Holidays at Westminster Festival will
conclude with a concert entitled “De Col-
ores: Christmas Music from the African-
American and Latino Traditions” on Friday,
Dec. 14 and Saturday, Dec. 15 at 8 p.m. in
Bristol Chapel on the campus of Westmin-
ster Choir College of Rider University in
Princeton.
The program will feature the Westmin-
ster Community Chorus and Chamber
Choir, conducted by Devin Mariman, per-
forming African-American spirituals, vil-
lancicos and other Christmas songs from
the United States, Canada, Central and
South America and the Caribbean. They
will be joined by Martha Davidson, accom-
panist; Carlos Cuestas, guitar; Drew An-
dreatta and Jacob Ezzo, percussion; Akiko
Hosaki, harpsichord.
Mariman has been conductor of the West-
minster Community Chorus since 1998 and
Holidays at Westminster Festival to conclude with concert
please see CHOIR, page 9
DEC. 12-18, 2012 – THE PRINCETON SUN 7
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The Princeton Planning
Board continues to hold hear-
ings for Princeton University’s
plan to relocate the “Dinky”
train station located on its cam-
pus.
The plan for the University’s
new arts and transit center re-
quires that the historic train
station be moved about 500 feet
south.
“Save the Dinky,” a group of
Princeton residents who object
to the station’s relocation,
protested at the planning board
meeting Nov. 29.
The group’s attorney outlined
his clients’ objections and pre-
sented alternate plans that do
not require relocating the sta-
tion to build the $300 million
proposed project.
The planning board is expect-
ed to vote and issue a final deci-
sion on the University’s propos-
al at the Dec. 18 meeting.
Hearings continue to relocate
university’s ‘Dinky’ train station
For those who prefer to com-
memorate Jesus’ birth in a minor
key, Princeton United Methodist
Church offers a Longest Night
Service on Friday, Dec. 21, at 7:30
p.m. in the Sanford-Davis Room,
opening onto Nassau Street at
Vandeventer Avenue.
“We understand that grief and
loss are intensified in the lime-
light of celebration, so we have
created a service that downplays
the cheer and uplifts the need for
sobriety and the need to be in the
shadows of painful memories,”
says Catherine Williams, assis-
tant pastor. “We believe that God
is with us, even on the darkest of
nights; so on this year’s Winter
Solstice – the longest night of the
year – there will be an elegantly
designed service of worship and
remembrance.
On Monday, Dec. 24, at 6 p.m.,
families are invited to a Christ-
mas Eve service planned especial-
ly for young children. The Candle-
light Service of Traditional Les-
sons and Carols will be at 8 p.m.
On Sunday, Dec. 30, there will be
one service at 10 a.m. The regular
worship schedule, Sundays at 9:30
and 11 a.m., resumes on Jan. 6.
PUMC is a diverse congrega-
tion whose members come from
many surrounding communities,
backgrounds and faiths. For
parking information go to
www.princetonumc.com or call
609-924-2613.
Longest Night Service
planned for Dec. 21
Visit us online at www.theprincetonsun.com
Pet Friends – Grief support for pet owners
(800) 404-7387
PSA
WEDNESDAY DEC. 12
JWI of Princeton Luncheon: Lunch-
eon to celebrate Hanukkah and
sing along with Sue Stember at
noon at the Windrows. Guests
welcome. Cost is $22 at the door.
Questions, call (908) 421-2043.
Princeton Township Environmen-
tal Commission meeting: 7:30
p.m. in the community room at
Municipal Complex, 400 Wither-
spoon St. To confirm meeting
time, for agenda and for more
information, visit www.princeton-
twp.org.
Story Time: 10 to 10:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library Story Room,
third floor. Stories, songs,
rhymes, fingerplays and move-
ment for children 16 months and
older. All children must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Baby Story Time: 11 to 11:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library Story Room.
Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-
plays and movement for children
up to 15 months. All children must
be accompanied by an adult.
Origami Club: 6:30 to 8 p.m. at
Princeton Library. Anyone inter-
ested in the traditional Japanese
art of paper folding is invited to
meet for 90 minutes of new,
often seasonal folding. Beginners
are welcome. The club is not just
for kids; adults are invited, too,
and must accompany anyone
under the age of 7.
“The Holiday Pines”: 7 to 9 p.m. at
Princeton Library. Take a break
from holiday preparations and
stress to join members of the
Writers Room Group as they read
excerpts from “The Holiday
Pines,” a fictional family newslet-
ter. Writing as individual mem-
bers of the Pine family, each
member will present a typical hol-
iday newsletter entry contrasted
with what really happened during
the past year.
THURSDAY DEC. 13
Princeton Township Planning
Board meeting: 7:30 p.m. To con-
firm meeting time and for more
information, visit www.princeton-
twp .org.
Fiction Book Group: 10:30 to 11:30
a.m. at Princeton Library Confer-
ence Room. Librarian Kristin
Friberg leads this discussion of
“The Forgotten Waltz” by Anne
Enright, winner of the 2012
Andrew Carnegie Award for
Excellence in Literature.
Black Voices Book Group: 7 to 9
p.m. at Princeton Library Prince-
ton Room. This group meets
monthly to discuss works by
African-American authors. All are
welcome.
FRIDAY DEC. 14
Social Media for Career Transition-
ing: 10 a.m. to noon at Princeton
Library Community Room. For
those seeking employment or
contemplating a career change,
career coach Alex Freund focuses
on the importance of using social
media effectively.
SATURDAY DEC. 15
Go-Between Club: 11 a.m. to noon at
Princeton Library Conference
Room. This club for middle school
students meets monthly at the
library. Talk about books and oth-
er interests, help with library
events, plan programs with the
staff and have a say in library
services. New members are
always welcome; participation is
limited to 25. Register on the
online events calendar at prince-
tonlibrary.org.
SUNDAY DEC. 16
Jersey Transit Holiday Concert: 3
to 5 p.m. at Princeton Library
Community Room. The a cappella
ensemble Jersey Transit per-
forms unique arrangements of
holiday songs using complex
vocal harmonies augmented by
claps, grunts and Aboriginal click-
ing noises in this concert that
includes a sing-along.
MONDAY DEC. 17
Princeton Township Committee
meeting: 7 p.m. To confirm meet-
ing time and for more informa-
tion, visit www.princetontwp.org.
Author Lucette Lagnado: 7 to 9
p.m. at Princeton Library Fire-
CALENDAR PAGE 8 DEC. 12-18, 2012
Lic #10199 • Cont Lic #13VH01382900
Give The Gift Of Music
Present this ad to receive $50 off your hoIiday gift of music
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DEC. 12-18, 2012 – THE PRINCETON SUN 9
mandates but also to insure fair
processes for all students and
families,” the statement said.
“Every student who receives a
diploma from the District does so
by fully meeting the graduation
credit requirements of the State
and the District.”
According to the high school’s
attendance policy, students are de-
nied credit for a course, even if
they have attained a
passing grade, if they have ex-
ceeded the number of allowed ab-
sences.
In a full-year course, the num-
ber of allowed absences is 18
days. Semester-long courses allow
nine days and students enrolled
in quarter-long courses may only
miss four days.
The Princeton High School
website contains a full explana-
tion of the attendance policy and
explains the importance of regu-
lar attendance.
“The educational program of-
fered by this district is predicated
on the regular attendance of all
students and requires continuity
of instruction and classroom par-
ticipation,” it says. “The regular
contact of pupils with one anoth-
er in the classroom and their par-
ticipation in a well-planned in-
structional activity are vital to
this purpose. Therefore, to ac-
quire a thorough and efficient ed-
ucation, each enrolled student
shall attend the entirety of each
class, each day that school is in
session.”
founding conductor of the West-
minster Community Chamber
Choir since 2001 He has conduct-
ed major works such as Haydn’s
Lord Nelson Mass, Handel’s Mes-
siah, the Duruflé Requiem,
Honegger’s King David, Rach-
maninov’s All-Night Vigil and a
critically acclaimed performance
of Carl Orff ’s Carmina Burana.
He is also an adjunct assistant
professor of voice at Westminster
Choir College and chorusmaster
for the Westminster Conservato-
ry’s Children’s Opera. Previously,
he served as adjunct professor of
conducting at Westminster and
the College of New Jersey, and as
conductor of the Garden State
Philharmonic Chorus.
The Westminster Community
Chorus is composed of singers
from all walks of life who share a
love of choral music.
Since its inception in 1996 as
part of Westminster Conservato-
ry’s choral program, the group
has developed a reputation for ex-
cellence in the Westminster tradi-
tion.
The chorus performs a wide
variety of accompanied and un-
accompanied choral music as
well as frequent collaborations
with the Westminster Communi-
ty Orchestra.
Founded in 2001, the Westmin-
ster Chamber Choir comple-
ments the Westminster Commu-
nity Chorus as a select ensemble
that performs music especially
suited to a smaller choir – motets,
madrigals and other works – and
frequently features members of
the group as soloists. The ensem-
ble has performed a wide variety
of music ranging from the Ren-
aissance and Baroque, often with
period instruments, to modern
including Bach’s Lobet den Her-
ren, Carissimi’s Jephthe and oth-
ers.
Westminster Choir College of
Rider University is at the corner
of Hamilton Avenue and Walnut
Lane in Princeton. Admission to
the concert is $15 for adults and
$10 for students and seniors. For
tickets or to receive Westmin-
ster’s 2012-2013 season catalog,
call the box office at 609-921-2663.
For updates, visit Westminster’s
Web site at www.rider.edu/arts.
SCHOOL
Continued from page 4
School website explains attendance policy
CHOIR
Continued from page 6
Choir composed of singers from all walks of life
place, second floor. The author of
the bestselling “The Man in the
White Sharkskin Suit,” an inves-
tigative reporter for The Wall
Street Journal, discusses her sec-
ond book, “The Arrogant Years:
One Girl’s Search for Her Lost
Youth, From Cairo to Brooklyn,” a
memoir in which she reveals the
unexpected and heartbreaking
arc of her own life.
TUESDAY DEC. 18
Princeton Joint Pedestrian and
Bicycle Advisory Committee
meeting: 7:30 p.m. To confirm
time and for more information,
visit www.princetontwp. org.
Story Time: 10 to 10:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library, Story Room,
third floor. Stories, songs,
rhymes, fingerplays and move-
ment for children 16 months and
older. All children must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Baby Story Time: 11 to 11:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library, Story Room.
Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-
plays and movement for ages
newborn to 15 months.
Baby Playgroup: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Princeton Library, Story Room,
third floor. Stay for playgroup
afterwards. No big kids allowed.
Chess Club: 4 to 5 p.m. at Princeton
Library, Teen Center. Members of
the Princeton High School Chess
Club lead these afterschool ses-
sions for young people of all ages
and abilities. Some instruction
will be available in addition to
matches. The library provides
chessboards.
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
CALENDAR
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is Princeton outplayed Ramapo,”
he said. “We had five chances in
the second half – terrific chances
– but the Ramapo goalie had a ca-
reer game.”
Zach Halliday, a senior co-cap-
tain of the team, said he was
happy at the way the game turned
out.
“We do feel we outplayed them,
but overall we’re very happy,”
Halliday said. “The only down-
side was not being able to sneak
another one or two past their
keeper.”
Scott Bechler, a senior right de-
fender, said he would’ve liked to
have kept playing to see if the
team could win the champi-
onship outright.
“It would have been great,” he
said. “But in the end, it’s just cool
to be champions.”
Senior left midfielder Colin
Lamb, though happy about his
state championship title, said
there was something bittersweet
about the game’s resolution.
“There’s a little bit of a sour
taste, I’m not going to lie,” he
said. “It was so anticlimactic at
the end. Everyone just thought, ‘I
can’t believe this just happened.’ I
don’t like the idea of sharing a
title that every team has worked
so hard to get. And I know
Ramapo worked just as hard as
we did.”
Lamb feels that changes should
be enacted in the regulations to
prevent similar outcomes in the
future.
“There should be another solu-
tion to ending the came without a
tie,” he said. “It came down to a
coin toss about who gets the state
championship trophy. I don’t
think that’s the lesson we’re sup-
posed to get here, that your hard
work goes to chance. I understand
the ruling, I just don’t think it’s
the best possible solution.”
Sutcliffe said the team perse-
vered as a result of their maturi-
ty, technical skills and teamwork.
“They’re so talented,” he said.
“Our strength in the midfield
combined with the strikers sets
us apart from most teams in Mer-
cer County and statewide. Beyond
that, I think their commitment
and level of competition carried
them here. More than anything,
they were truly a team. They
worked hard for and with one an-
other.”
Bechler said he felt that a huge
strength for the team was its abil-
ity to be flexible during the sea-
son.
“We’ve had some goalie
changes and injuries, people mov-
ing around,” he said. “It’s been a
bit of a rollercoaster, but no one
ever complained or thought it
was the end. I think it really
shows a lot that we were able to
pull through, and keep momen-
tum. I think it shows that every-
body on our team has each others’
back.”
Lamb attributed the win to the
hard work of the coaching staff
and the support of the school.
“The coaching staff, they’re
fantastic,” he said. “They contact
us as soon as the season ends and
stay on us. They want to know
what’s going on with our club
teams and how we’re doing.
They’re so connected with the
school and us and so supportive.
And the fans are just amazing. We
get so much support from our
peers.”
Halliday said he was incredibly
proud of the team, and was
thrilled that they were able to
bring the state championship
back to PHS in his senior year.
“In the past three years, suc-
cess in soccer at PHS has come
pretty easy,” he said. “But we
started the season 1 and 2 and I
think that woke people up. It
made this team realize that you
don’t win games because you’re
PHS. You win games because you
work hard and you play as a
team.”
TEAM’S
Continued from page 1
Team’s flexibility a huge
strength, says player
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20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
classified
T HE P R I N C E T O N S U N
DECEMBER 12-18, 2012 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 5 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/6/13.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/6/13.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/6/13.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 2/6/13.
FREE
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With any new roof
and siding job
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CLASSIFIED DECEMBER 12-18, 2012 - THE PRINCETON SUN 15
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OMEGA
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609-584-1133
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Hours: Monday-Saturday 9-10 • Sunday 10:30-7
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PRICES EFFECTIVE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5
THRU TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012
At some stores prices may vary, quantities may be limited and some products may
not be on hand. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. All prices subject
to sales tax. We reserve the right to limit quantities. No further discount on sale items.
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