Repulsion
(1965)


Image1
 
 
 ‘Repulsion’
tells
the
story
of
a
young
Belgian
beautician
named
Carol,
who
is
 completely
repulsed
by
sexuality.
When
her
sister
goes
on
holiday
with
her
 married
lover,
leaving
Carol
alone
in
the
apartment,
she
quickly
descends
into
 madness
with
some
dramatic
consequences.
The
film
was
directed
by
Roman
 Polanski
and
screened
in
1965.
 
 Polanski’s
approach
to
the
madness
of
Carol’s
character,
as
played
by
Catherine
 Deneuve,
is
initially
a
gentle
and
subtle
one.
When
seen
with
her
sister
Helen,
 Carol’s
nature
is
a
slightly
odd
one
but
then
again
she
might
just
be
a
shy
 character.
However
as
soon
as
Carol
is
left
to
cope
alone,
things
take
a
rapid
 downturn.
This
falling
from
grace
is
achieved
with
a
variety
of
filming
techniques
 as
is
highlighted
by
‘Time
Out
London’
‘Polanski
employs
a
host
of
wonderfully
 integrated
visual
and
aural
effects
to
suggest
the
inner
torment
Deneuve
suffers.’

 (GA,
2012)
He
insisted
on
blurring
the
lines
between
Carols
reality
and
her
 imaginings,
allowing
audiences
to
experience
Carol’s
madness
‘first
hand’.



Written
by
Emily
Clarkson


Camera
views
close
to
Carol
and
over
her
shoulder
allow
an
insight
into
her
life,
 so
that
soon
the
viewers
are
drawn
into
her
routine.
They
begin
to
understand
 her
thoughts
and
feelings.
But
in
order
to
hammer
home
what
it
might
be
like
to
 loose
ones
mind,
Polanski
uses
the
environment
as
a
form
of
narrative
and
a
 surface
upon
which
to
project
of
Carol’s
psyche.
Cracks
appearing
in
walls,
men
 appearing
in
mirror
reflections,
groping
hands
reaching
our
of
the
corridor
walls
 instill
the
fact
that
something
is
most
definitely
wrong
with
Carol’s
world.
 (Image2
and
3.)
 



Image2



Image3
 
 There
is
a
great
use
of
sound
to
this
film.
Its
limited
use
providing
tense
 moments
but
also
painting
pictures
and
removing
all
need
to
film
certain
explicit
 scenes;
such
is
noted
by
Variety
‘There
are
two
brief
sequences,
for
instance,
when
 the
young
heroine
tosses
in
her
bed
as
she
listens
to
the
muted
sound
of
her
sister
 and
her
lover
in
the
next
room.
The
moans
and
ecstatic
whimperings
of
the
love
act
 is
a
dozen
times
more
effective
and
sensual
than
any
glimpse
of
the
lovers
in
bed.’
 (Variety
Staff,
1965)
The
raw
sounds
of
these
scenes
leave
the
audience
in
the
 same
situation
as
Carol,
made
to
feel
uncomfortable
and
wanting
to
put
their
 fingers
in
their
ears.
But
for
the
rest
of
a
soundtrack
is
heard,
used
to
unnerve
 the
audience
in
the
eyes
of
Christopher
Long,
of
Movie
Metropolis.
A
discordant
 Written
by
Emily
Clarkson


Jazz
score
jangles
the
nerves
in
key
scenes,’
and
‘Even
more
powerful,
sounds
 constantly
intrude
from
off
screen
and
from
outside
the
apartment.’
(Long,
2009)
 The
intruding
sound
effects
Long
speaks
of
remind
the
audience
the
world
 expands
beyond
the
edges
of
the
scene,
but
also
disturb
the
peace
that
Carol’s
 character
seems
to
be
seeking
from
all
of
the
sexuality
in
the
world,
especially
 when
she
barricades
herself
inside
the
apartment.
 
 To
make
Carol’s
reality
all
the
more
tangible,
there
is
a
potential
love
interest
 named
Colin.
However
due
to
her
repulsion
of
the
affection
of
any
man,
all
the
 polite
advances
of
Colin
are
met
with
barely
any
recognition.
His
involvement
 with
such
a
sensitive
young
woman
was
only
ever
going
to
end
in
disaster
as
the
 audience
begin
to
realize
Carol
is
not
only
a
danger
to
herself,
but
also
the
people
 around
her.
 
 The
storyline
of
this
film
is
twisted,
tumultuous
and
tragic,
calling
into
question
 what
is
real
in
this
world
of
Carol’s
and
what
she
is
fabricating.
It
is
a
production
 that
successfully
draws
in
the
audience,
to
play
with
their
minds
and
shock
them
 with
visuals
and
Carol’s
erratic
behaviour
towards
all
men
as
she
goes
insane.
 Despite
there
never
being
a
concrete
explanation
as
to
why
Carol
behaves
the
 way
she
does
throughout
this
film,
there
is
opportunity
to
draw
conclusions
and
 this
helps
to
wrap
up
the
cinematic
experience
of
Repulsion.
This
is
a
fantastic
 psychological
thriller,
fully
capable
of
making
viewers
jump,
skin
crawl
and
 chin’s
wag,
trying
to
fathom
Carol’s
motivations
and
what
is
real.
 
 


Bibliography



 
 
 GA
(2012)
Repulsion
(1965)
 http://www.timeout.com/film/reviews/76606/repulsion.html
 (8/12/2012)
 
 Variety
Staff
(1964)
Repulsion
 http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117794407?refcatid=31
 (8/12/2012)
 
 Long,
Christopher
(1009)
Repulsion­
DVD
Review
 http://moviemet.com/review/repulsion‐dvd‐review
 (8/12/2012)
 
 Pictures
 Image1:IMDb
(2012)
Repulsion
(1965)
 http://uk.imdb.com/media/rm821921792/tt0059646
 (8/12/2012)
 
 
Image2
and
3:
Roboto,
Fister
(2012)
repulsion
(1965)
movie
review
 http://lefthandhorror.com/2012/10/25/repulsion‐1965‐movie‐review/


Written
by
Emily
Clarkson