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e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan - Report January 2011

Ministry of Communications & Information Technology

E-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

'This report has been prepared for and only for MCIT, Government of Ethiopia, in accordance with the terms of our contract agreement package no EICTDA/C-09/10 Credit No 3899-ET dated June 2010 and for no other purpose. We do not accept or assume any liability or duty of care for any other purpose or to any other person to whom this report is shown or into whose hands it may come save where expressly agreed by our prior consent in writing.' 2010 PricewaterhouseCoopers. All rights reserved. PricewaterhouseCoopers refers to the network of member firms of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity.
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E-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Document Control Overview PwC has been engaged as a consultant by MCIT, Government of Ethiopia, for development of National e-Government Strategy and designing the Ethiopian e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Document Title

Final e-Government and Implementation Plan Report

Document Status

Revised Submission based on inputs from Final Workshop

Abstract

This document elaborates the strategy and Implementation roadmap of Federal Government of Ethiopia.

Document Publication History Date 27-September-2010 5-October-2010 15-October-2010 28-October-2010 Author Avinash Kaushik Raj Kamal Singh, Anurag Johri, Avinash Kaushik Anurag Johri, Avinash Kaushik, Raj Kamal Singh Nilachal Mishra, Prasad Unikrishnan, Anurag Johri, Raj Kamal Singh Nilachal Mishra, Prasad Unikrishnan, Anurag Johri, Nilachal Mishra, Prasad Unikrishnan, Anurag Johri, Nilachal Mishra, Prasad Unikrishnan, 19th December-2010 13th January, 2011 Reviewers Date 8-October-2010 18-October-2010 30th October -2010 3rd Nov - 2010 Reviewers Nilachal Mishra Nilaya Varma Nilaya Varma Dr Mesfin, Mr Damtew, MCIT Version 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.3 Remarks Review and Comments Review and Comments Final Review Review and comments in workshop mode Prasad Unikrishnan, Nilachal Mishra 1.8 1.9 Version 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Remarks Creation of template Creation of First draft Creation of Second draft Creation of Third draft

7-Nov-2010 24-Nov-2010 15th December-2010

1.4 1.5 1.6

Updated draft based on MCIT comments Updated draft based on MCITcomments Updated draft based on workshop comments Revised Report Finalization Final Report

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E-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

15th November -2010 30th November- 2010 17th December,2010 11th January, 2011 9th February, 2011 26th February

Dr Mesfin, Mr Damtew, MCIT Internal Workshop Nilaya Varma Final Workshop Final workshop Inputs & Feedback Feedback comments

1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9

Review and comments Review and comments in workshop mode Review & Comments Discussion and Comments Feedback comments Comments of Mr. Damtew

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Table of Contents I.
I. II. III. IV. V.

Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 14
Project Scope ................................................................................................................................................ 14 Structure of this report ................................................................................................................................. 15 Mapping of the Report to areas to be covered in the contract ....................................................................... 16 Project Status ............................................................................................................................................... 17 Limitations of the report .............................................................................................................................. 19

II. Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................. 21


I. II. Outcomes and Targets .................................................................................................................................. 25 Strategic Dimensions ................................................................................................................................... 29

III. Governance Structure .......................................................................................................................... 39


I. II. III. Drivers for the Governance Structure ........................................................................................................... 39 Governance Structure: Options and Recommendations ............................................................................... 40 Recommended Governance Structure .......................................................................................................... 44

IV. Strategic Dimension 1 - e-Services Enablement .................................................................................. 57


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 57 Guiding Principles for electronic enablement of Service .............................................................................. 57 Recommendations and Targets .................................................................................................................... 58 Agency Priority Projects ............................................................................................................................... 58 Agriculture Services ..................................................................................................................................... 61 Benefits Management System ...................................................................................................................... 65 Education ..................................................................................................................................................... 67 E-Health ....................................................................................................................................................... 71 E-Trade ........................................................................................................................................................ 74 Employment ................................................................................................................................................. 79 Transport ..................................................................................................................................................... 82 Tourism ........................................................................................................................................................ 86 Tax ............................................................................................................................................................... 91 e-Court ......................................................................................................................................................... 94 Municipalities .............................................................................................................................................. 97 Passport & Visa .......................................................................................................................................... 108

XVII. National Data Set: ...................................................................................................................................... 113 XVIII. National Enterprise Service Bus: ................................................................................................................ 114 XIX. XX. XXI. National Integrated Authentication Framework: ....................................................................................... 116 National Payment Gateway: ....................................................................................................................... 118 Public Key Infrastructure ........................................................................................................................... 120

XXII. Woreda Net ................................................................................................................................................ 122 XXIII. Data Center ................................................................................................................................................ 123 XXIV. National Enterprise Architecture Framework ............................................................................................ 125

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XXV. Common Applications ................................................................................................................................ 128 XXVI. e-Procurement ........................................................................................................................................... 128 XXVII. Government wide HRMS ........................................................................................................................... 129 XXVIII. Financial Management Information System ...................................................................................... 130

XXIX. eOffice / Document Management .............................................................................................................. 131 XXX. Government wide email system.................................................................................................................. 132

V.
I. II.

Strategic Dimension 2 - Channels ...................................................................................................... 134


Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 134 Current Status ............................................................................................................................................ 134 Summary of the status of the different channels is as below ................................................................... 135 Guiding Principles for Channels Strategy ................................................................................................... 135 Recommendations and Targets .................................................................................................................. 136 e-Government Portal .................................................................................................................................. 137 Contact Center ........................................................................................................................................... 140 Mobile Gateway .......................................................................................................................................... 143 Common Service Center ............................................................................................................................. 147 Channel Migration Strategy ....................................................................................................................... 149

III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X.

VI. Strategic Dimension 3 - Enablers ...................................................................................................... 151


I. II. III. IV. V. Capacity Building ....................................................................................................................................... 151 Monitoring and Evaluation ........................................................................................................................ 161 Marketing and Awareness .......................................................................................................................... 169 Standards and policies ............................................................................................................................... 182 Public Private Partnerships (PPP) .............................................................................................................. 187

VII. Over all Implementation Plan and Timelines .................................................................................... 199


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Overall Implementation Plan ..................................................................................................................... 199 Sample Detailed Implementation Plan and RACI Chart for Education Priority project ............................. 204 Portal Implementation Plan and Timelines ................................................................................................ 210 ICT Center Implementation Plan and Timelines ........................................................................................ 213 Contact Center Implementation Plan and Timelines .................................................................................. 215 Mobile Implementation Plan and Timelines .............................................................................................. 217 Capacity Building Implementation Plan and Timelines ............................................................................. 219 Marketing and Awareness Plan and Timelines ........................................................................................... 222 Public Private Partnership - Plan and Timelines ........................................................................................ 223

VII. Cost Estimation & Funding ................................................................................................................ 227


I. II. III. IV. V. Budgetary Estimates .................................................................................................................................. 227 Funding Framework ................................................................................................................................... 229 Program funding Options ........................................................................................................................... 231 Fund Management Framework (FMF) ....................................................................................................... 233 Fund Allocation Process ............................................................................................................................. 236

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Annexures ................................................................................................................................................. 240 Annexure I: Concept of Service Life Cycle ................................................................................................ 240 Annexure II: PMO Staffing Requirements ............................................................................................... 242 Annexure III: Training Courses and Course Levels ................................................................................. 248 Annexure IV: Detailed Marketing and Awareness Strategy ...................................................................... 251 Annexure V: Detailed Project Report - Template ...................................................................................... 254 Annexure VI: Services Prioritization Framework ..................................................................................... 256 Annexure VII: ICT Standing of Ethiopia Some international Rankings ................................................ 258 Annexure VIII: Risk in E-Government Strategy Implementation ............................................................ 268 Annexure IX: Sample Project Management templates ............................................................................. 269 Annexure X: List of Services ..................................................................................................................... 290 Annexure XI: Overview of Stakeholder Assessment ................................................................................. 304 Annexure XII: Scope of work for Baseline Survey Agency ........................................................................ 310 Annexure XIII: Scope of work for Marketing and Awareness Agency ...................................................... 314 Annexure XIV: Job Descriptions of the IT Officials at the Ministry ......................................................... 316 Annexure XV: Job Descriptions of the ITSG to support in the Ministries ................................................ 318 Annexure XVI: Key Considerations during Procurement Process ............................................................ 319 Annexure XVII: Costing details of Individual Projects ............................................................................. 322

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List of Tables Table 1: Mapping of the Report to areas to be covered in the contract .......................................................... 16 Table 2: Outcomes and Targets ........................................................................................................................ 25 Table 3: Implementation Plan for common applications................................................................................ 33 Table 4: Implementation Plan for Core Projects ............................................................................................. 34 Table 5: e-Services Implementation Plan for the Channels ............................................................................ 36 Table 6: Overall Implementation Plan ............................................................................................................. 37 Table 7: Options for sponsorship ......................................................................................................................40 Table 8: High Committee Assessment ............................................................................................................. 41 Table 9: Technical Committee .......................................................................................................................... 41 Table 10: PMO Options ..................................................................................................................................... 42 Table 11: Ownership of IT Initiatives ................................................................................................................ 43 Table 12: Role and Responsibilities of Ministry Level Organization Structure ............................................. 54 Table 13: PMO Support ..................................................................................................................................... 55 Table 14: Agency Priority Projects .................................................................................................................... 58 Table 15: e-Service Enablement of Agency Priority Projects .......................................................................... 59 Table 16: Core Projects .................................................................................................................................... 110 Table 17: Core Projects- Implementation Plan ............................................................................................... 111 Table 30: Existing WOREDA Net ................................................................................................................... 122 Table 19: Channel Current Status................................................................................................................ 135 Table 20: e-Government Portal Implementation .......................................................................................... 138 Table 21: Contact Centre Implementation Options ........................................................................................ 141 Table 22: Middleware required for Wireless Applications............................................................................ 144 Table 23: Mobile Gateway Implementation Options .................................................................................... 145 Table 24: Analysis of Options for ITSG .......................................................................................................... 154 Table 25: Outsourced vs. Individual Recruitments ....................................................................................... 155 Table 26: Target Groups for Training ............................................................................................................ 155 Table 16: Training Levels ................................................................................................................................ 156 Table 49: Government transformation index: key indicators ....................................................................... 164 Table 50: Customer satisfaction index: key indicators.................................................................................. 166 Table 30: Marketing and Awareness Brief ..................................................................................................... 172 Table 31: Message Development ..................................................................................................................... 176 Table 32: General Awareness Campaign Overview ........................................................................................177 Table 33: Development / Approval Process ................................................................................................... 179 Table 34: Feedback, measurement of effectiveness and improvement ........................................................ 180 Table 35: Regulations, Policies, Guidelines and Standards .......................................................................... 182 Table 36: PPP opportunities and Recommendations .................................................................................... 189 Table 37: ICT Events ....................................................................................................................................... 192 Table 38: PPP Implementation Roadmap ..................................................................................................... 194 Table 39: Guidelines for leveraging PPP ........................................................................................................ 196 Table 40 Overall Implementation Plan ....................................................................................................... 199 Table 41 Education Project Implementation Plan..................................................................................... 204 Table 42 Portal implementation Plan ......................................................................................................... 210 Table 43 ICT Centre Implementation Plan ................................................................................................. 213 Table 44 Contact Center Implementation Plan .......................................................................................... 215 Table 45 Mobile Implementation Plan ....................................................................................................... 217 Table 46 Capacity Building Implementation Plan ..................................................................................... 219 Table 47 Marketing and Awareness Implementation Plan ........................................................................ 222 Table 48 Public Private Partnership Plan ................................................................................................... 223 Table 48 e-Government Strategy Summary of Costs .............................................................................. 227 Table 48 Funding Options ........................................................................................................................... 231 Table 51 PPP Options ................................................................................................................................... 232 Table 52: Categories of fund ........................................................................................................................... 235 Table 53: Approval for allocation ................................................................................................................... 235 Table 54: Lifecycle Event Description ........................................................................................................... 240
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Table 55: PMO staffing Requirements ........................................................................................................... 242 Table 56: PMO Staffing Requirements ........................................................................................................... 246 Table 46: Training Courses and Course Levels ..............................................................................................248 Table 47: Target Market Segments ................................................................................................................. 251 Table 48: Effectiveness of Media Channels by Marketing Segments ........................................................... 252

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List of Figures Figure 1: Project Status ..................................................................................................................................... 18 Figure 2 : e-Government Strategy and Goals ................................................................................................... 22 Figure 3: Key Strategic Dimensions ................................................................................................................. 29 Figure 4: e-Service enablement Plan ................................................................................................................ 32 Figure 5: Recommended Structure................................................................................................................... 44 Figure 6: Project Management Office (PMO) Structure ................................................................................. 47 Figure 7: ITSG Structure ................................................................................................................................... 50 Figure 8: Capacity Balancer .............................................................................................................................. 51 Figure 9: Ministry Level IT Organization Structure ........................................................................................ 53 Figure 10: Core Projects ................................................................................................................................... 112 Figure 21: National Enterprise Service Bus .................................................................................................... 115 Figure 22: National Integrated Authentication Framework .......................................................................... 117 Figure 23: National Payment Gateway ............................................................................................................ 119 Figure 24: Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) ..................................................................................................... 121 Figure 23: Proposed Nationwide Data center Layout ................................................................................... 123 Figure 16: The overall EA reference model .................................................................................................... 127 Figure 17: eProcurement ................................................................................................................................. 128 Figure 18: IBEX System .................................................................................................................................. 130 Figure 26: eOffice Components ....................................................................................................................... 131 Figure 8: e-Government Portal ....................................................................................................................... 137 Figure 21: Contact Center ................................................................................................................................ 140 Figure 22: Mobile Gateway ............................................................................................................................. 143 Figure 23: Four tier Architecture for Wireless Application Delivery ........................................................... 144 Figure 11: Common Service Center ................................................................................................................. 147 Figure 25: Capacity Building ............................................................................................................................ 151 Figure 26: ITSG ............................................................................................................................................... 153 Figure 27: Marketing and Awareness Plan .................................................................................................... 169 Figure 28: Continuous Improvement in Communications ........................................................................... 180 Figure 29: Policy/Standards/Guidelines Framework ................................................................................... 185 Figure 30: Implementation Plan for Standards and Policies ........................................................................ 186 Figure 31: Key Options for MOCIT ................................................................................................................. 229 Figure 32: Government Control/Risk ............................................................................................................230 Figure 33: Fund utilization framework .......................................................................................................... 234 Figure 34: Fund allocation prioritization .......................................................................................................238 Figure 35: Life-Cycle Services ......................................................................................................................... 241

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Abbreviations
Sr. No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Acronym BCP/DR CAPEX CB CDT CIO CISA CISM CISSP CoE CRTC CSC CTO DSC e-GIF EICTDA EMD ENDC FEMSEDA GRS GoE HRMS IBAS ICT IT ITSG JCMS KM KPI Full Form Business Continuity Plan/ Disaster Recovery Capital Expenditure Capacity Building Common Data Terminals Chief Information Officer Certified Information Security Auditor Certified Information Security Manager Certified Information Systems Security Professional Centre of Excellence Computer Refurbishment and Training Center Common Service Centers Chief Technology Officer Digital Signature Certificate Government Information Systems Interoperability Framework /Standard Ethiopian Information and Communication Technology Development Agency Earnest Money Deposit Ethiopian National Data Centre Federal Micro and Small Enterprise Development Agency Grievances Redressal System Government of Ethiopia Human Resource Management System Integrated Budget Accounting System Information and Communication Technology Information Technology Information Technology Services Group Judicial Case Monitoring System Knowledge Management Key Performance Indicator

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Sr. No. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48.

Acronym KPO M&E MIS NDC NOC PKI PMO PPP PR RDC RFP SDLC SLA SMS TCO TNA TVET VPN WAN/MAN WDMS

Full Form Key Performance Objectives Monitoring and Evaluation Management Information System National Data Centre Network Operating Centre Public Key Infrastructure Project Management Office Public Private Partnership Public Relations Regional Data Centre Request for Proposal System Development Life Cycle Service Level Agreement Scheme Management System Total Cost of Ownership Training Need Assessment Technical Vocational Education Training centers Virtual Private Network Wide Area Network / Metropolitan Area Network Workflow and Document Management System

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Section 1 INTRODUCTION

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

I.

Introduction

Ethiopias Information and Communication Technology (ICT) policy is an integral part of the countrys larger development goals and objectives. While the goal is to rapidly transform the countrys subsistence agricultural-based economy and society into a predominantly knowledge- and information-based economy and society, the focus of the policy will be on the countrys ICT development process. To achieve this objective, the Government of Ethiopia has developed multiple policies, most notable of which are the National ICT Strategic Plan and the ICT4D Action Plan for the year 2006-2010. The Ethiopian Information and Communication Technology Development Agency (MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT) has a mission to develop, deploy and use ICT to improve the livelihood of Ethiopians and optimize its contribution to the development of the country. The Agency has thus undertaken a number of e-Government assignments to avail government services online and improve the access to the general public. The Government Information System Development and Data Centre Administration team of the Agency is managing projects targeted towards development of integrated information systems to avail government services online. However in the current context there was a need to integrate the ICT initiatives undertaken and provide a strategic direction for e-Government implementation in the country. It is in this context MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT has engaged PricewaterhouseCoopers Pvt. Ltd. for designing the National eGovernment strategy and implementation plan for the Government of Ethiopia (GoE).

I. Project Scope The specific activities as agreed in the contract package no EICTDA/C-09/10 and Credit No 3899-ET include: Establish a clear vision for e-Government tied up with the Agencys mandates and come-up with a list of priority areas for e-Government program. (Define a vision that represents the priority objectives and the shared voice of all stakeholders as well as define strategies to communicate the vision to stakeholders); Critically evaluate the National ICT Strategic Plan and the ICT4D-2008 e-Government Action Plan of the country and other policy and strategy related studies that the Agency has undergone; Assess the countrys e-Government initiatives pursued in the Government ministries and implementing agencies; Develop an approach whereby a clear vision that ensures that key constituents and communities will buy into and support e-Government programs is developed; Identify models of e-Government that suits the countrys socio-economic conditions; and propose best model for Ethiopias specific case; Develop a work plan to implement the priority e-Government projects [this work plan may focus on content development, competency building (training employees at all levels of the bureaucracy including senior officials), connectivity, cyber-laws, citizen interfaces, and capital plus others]; Propose options for government information and knowledge management schemes; Define approaches on measuring progresses through e-government development; Establish mechanisms for the continuing involvement of key stakeholders;

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II. Structure of this report The report is structured as follows: Section 1 Introduction This section covers the Project Scope, current status of the project, mapping of the contents of the report to the contractual obligations, and limitations of this report. Section 2 Executive summary This section captures the background, Vision, Outcomes and Targets and summarizes the proposed eGovernment Strategy. Section 3 Governance Structure This section covers the proposed Governance structure required for the implementation of the Ethiopian e-Government Strategy. Section 4 Strategic Dimension 1 - e-Services Enablement This section details the strategic dimension of e-Services enablement of 211 e-services comprising of seventy seven (77) informational and one hundred thirty four (134) transactional services over a five year period. The implementation is proposed to be done through twelve (12) priority projects and service delivery would be through four channels (Portal, Call centre, Mobile devices and Common service centres) and delivery will be facilitated and strengthened through Six (6) core projects, including National Payment Gateway, Enterprise Architecture framework, Public Key Infrastructure, National Data Set, National Enterprise Service Bus and National integrated Authentication Framework. In addition common applications which will horizontally cut across all ministries are proposed, which include initiatives like E-Procurement, Human resource Management System, E-Office, E-Mail and Financial management & Information System Section 5 Strategic Dimension 2 Channels This section covers the Implementation details of the service delivery channel enhancement projects that will enable the implementation of e-Government in Ethiopia Section 6 Strategic Dimension 3 - Enablers This section covers the details of the key enablers to assure successful and timely implementation of the e-Government strategy and ensure the sustainability of the initiatives Section 7 Implementation and Timelines This section describes the Implementation Plan for the Ethiopian e-Government Strategy along with the detailed timelines. Section 8 Cost Estimates This section provides the estimates of the costing and funds required for the rollout of the e-Government Implementation plan.

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Annexure This section covers the following: I: Concept of Service Life Cycle

II: PMO Staffing Requirements III: Training Courses and Course Levels IV: Detailed Marketing and Awareness Strategy V: Detailed Project Report - Template VI: Services Prioritization Framework VII: ICT Standing of Ethiopia Some international Rankings VIII: Risk in E-Government Strategy Implementation IX: Sample Project Management templates X: List of Services XI: Overview of Stakeholder Assessment XII: Scope of work for Baseline Survey Agency XIII: Scope of work for Marketing and Awareness Agency XIV: Job Descriptions of the IT Officials at the Ministry XV: Job Descriptions of the ITSG to support in the Ministries XVI: Key Considerations during Procurement XVII: Costing details of individual Components III. Mapping of the Report to areas to be covered in the contract The table placed below maps the areas to be covered under the contract with the sections which cover those areas: Table 1: Mapping of the Report to areas to be covered in the contract S.No. 1 Areas Informational Needs and Transactional requirements of selected Ministrys Customers Coverage in Report The Stakeholder Requirements have been captured through workshops and Survey of Stakeholders and have been presented in the VMO Report and the Stakeholder Assessment report. This information has been the source for formulation of the Strategy and Implementation plan presented in this report. Section 5 addresses the accessibility and the delivery channels for providing the Citizen Services. 5.4.1 e-Government Portal 5.4.2 Contact Center 5.4.3 Mobile Gateway 5.4.4 Common Service Center 5.4.5 Channel Migration Strategy Section 6.7 addresses the business applications to be enabled to provide the citizen services
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Accessibility of Citizen Services

Business Applications to be e-enabled

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S.No.

Areas

Coverage in Report 6.7 Common Applications 6.7.1 e-Procurement 6.7.2 Government wide HRMS 6.7.3 Financial Management Information System 6.7.4 e-Office / Document Management 6.7.5 Government wide email system etc. Section 6 addresses the enablers which would be used to transform business models and maintain interoperability 6.1 Capacity Building 6.2 Monitoring and Evaluation 6.3 Marketing and Awareness 6.4 Standards and policies 6.5 Public Private Partnerships (PPP) Section 6.4 covers the Standards and guidelines for all services and processes Section 6 addressed the strategy for effective and efficient utilization of the Government resources. 6.6 Core Projects 6.6.1 National Data Set 6.6.2 National Enterprise Service Bus 6.6.3 National Integrated Authentication Framework: 6.6.4 National Payment Gateway: 6.6.5 Public Key Infrastructure 6.6.6 Woreda Net 6.6.7 Data Center

Integration of People, Process and technology using web to transform business models and maintain interoperability

5 6

Standards and guidelines for all services and processes Effective and efficient Utilization of Government Resources- Network Infrastructure necessary for providing e-services

IV. Project Status The e-Government Strategy and Implementation project was initiated on 16th July 2010, with the kick off meeting, where senior members of MoCIT and PwC were present. As committed in the kick off meeting, PwC team has submitted the detailed Inception report covering Work Plan, Timelines of deliverables, Deployment Plan and Activities. Vision, Mission and Objective (VMO) workshop was conducted on 5th Aug 2010 to ascertain the vision and objectives of the e-Government Strategy. The PwC team also conducted a dip-stick study of 13 ministries and 11 agencies and a customer survey to understand the expectations and aspiration of the stakeholders from the e-Government Strategy. A draft report has been discussed with MoCIT Officials and a workshop was conducted on 30th November, 2010 where the report has been presented to all the MoCIT officials. Further the final workshop was held between the Ministries and Agencies to seek inputs for finalization of the Strategy. This report is a culmination of these efforts and presents the final recommendations and implementation plan based on the study The figure1 overleaf shows the activities undertaken till date and the present status of the project.

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Inception Report

Figure 1: Project Status

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V. Limitations of the report The recommendations of the e-Government Strategy are based on the Assessment study of 13 Ministries and 11 Agencies that have participated in the study. The sample size of Ministries/Agencies was finalized during the inception Stage. The information presented in the report is based on the inputs received through questionnaires and interactions with the Ministries/Agencies. No separate field validation study has been done on the data received from Ministries/Agencies. The assessment study was done during the Months of August September, 2010 and Undertaken by the Government was designed thereafter. However there has been an Organization Restructuring of Ministries/Agencies in Ethiopia in Month of October, 2010, which has resulted in changes in the Strategy. PwC has captured the inputs on revised Governance Structure, during design of this report, however it may not be reflective of all the changes under the Government. While, the strategy takes into account all common e-Government initiatives in the country and those in the participating organizations, there are bound to be independent and isolated initiatives that do not form part of the study and thus do not reflect in the strategy. However, this should not restrict the government to pursue other initiatives, as long as they are in conformance with the overall e-Government program. The Voice of Customer (VoC) Survey was conducted based on sample size agreed between MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT and PwC in the contract and also during the inception stage, and it should be noted that it is a dip stick study and the findings are only indicative and not representative of the entire country.

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Section 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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II.

Executive Summary

The Ethiopian Information and Communication Technology Development Agency (MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT) has a mission to develop, deploy and use ICT to improve the livelihood of Ethiopians and optimize its contribution for the development of the country. Towards this end, the agency has undertaken a number of e-Government initiatives to improve the internal efficiencies within the government organizations and to improve the access to government services for the general public. MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT realizes the need to integrate these initiatives to provide a strategic direction for e-Government implementation in the country. It is in this context that the eGovernment strategy for Ethiopia has been designed, with a focus on facilitating effective delivery of government services to customers (residents, businesses and visitors). The strategy envisages implementation of 219 e-services comprising of seventy seven (79) informational and one hundred thirty four (140) transactional services over a five year period. The implementation is proposed to be done through twelve (12) priority projects and service delivery would be through four channels (Portal, Call centre, Mobile devices and Common service centres) and delivery will be facilitated and strengthened through Six(6) core projects, including National Payment Gateway, Enterprise Architecture framework, Public Key Infrastructure, National Data Set, National Enterprise Service Bus and National integrated Authentication Framework. In addition common applications which will horizontally cut across all ministries are proposed, which include initiatives like E-Procurement, Human resource Management System, E-Office, E-Mail and Financial management & Information System The Strategy has been design keeping the following guiding principles of e-Government E-Government is focussed in creating a SMART (Simple Moral Accountable, Responsive and Transparent) Government; E-government promotes causes of e-citizen and e-democracy; E-Government is not translating processes, however transforming processes; E-Government necessitates Capacity building within the Government; E-government aims networked and integrated government; E-government is citizen-centric; E-government provides multi-channel delivery of public services; E-Government aims in providing convenient access of information to all, and improving service access & delivery; E-Government enables development & participation of all segments of population to reap benefits of IT and also participate in the Governance process and be able to voice their opinions more effectively; and E-Government supports in development and inclusion of Private Sector in public service delivery.

The e-Government strategy has a customer-centric focus so as to facilitate the delivery of services and information through alternate channels in a manner that is convenient for the citizens and is in line with their expectations and aspirations. Life cycle based representation of services is a powerful tool towards this end and therefore, the strategy envisages the use of life-cycle events while electronically enabling the services. As per the life cycle based concept, all services for a particular event, for e.g. starting a business should be available under a single umbrella and the customer should not be required to have multiple touch points for the same. In addition to classifying and prioritizing services, services must be integrated at the backend based on customer lifecycle approach. The services can be grouped by their customer base, and these
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can further be mapped onto the various customer lifecycle events, where they each respond to a particular need of the customer at a given time. Hence existing services can be identified based on life-cycle services approach for the various customer groups citizens/residents, businesses, visitors and government employees. Life-cycle of events for the citizens/residents, business, visitors and government employees is discussed in detail in Annexure I. In line with the above, Vision, Outcomes, targets and strategic plan for the Government of Ethiopia has been pictorially depicted in the figure overleaf. Each of the components depicted in the figure overleaf are further detailed in the next few pages. A brief of the proposed implementation plan for the strategy is also mentioned thus encapsulating the complete E-Government Strategy and its implementation in this chapter. Figure 2 : e-Government Strategy and Goals

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The vision of the e-Government strategy has four key elements: 1. Bring the Government closer to the people: The e-Government strategy aims to increase the awareness levels of the people regarding the services offered by the Government and their rights as customers and also make it easier for the customers to influence and participate in design of Government policies and schemes. This participation is expected to create a sense of ownership and a culture of higher compliance leading to closer ties between the government and the people.

2. Effective governance: The implementation of the e-Government strategy will lead to backend automation and adherence to a common set of policies and standards leading to better integration and information sharing amongst them and resulting in making the government organizations more effective and efficient in discharging their services and duties. Furthermore, capacity building to impart training to public servants on skills that will enable them to serve the customers in a more effective manner is an integral part of the overall e-Government strategy. 3. Improved service delivery: The sine qua non of the e-Government Strategy is the electronic enablement of 219 services to be delivered through alternate channels such as the internet, mobile, call centre and the citizen facilitation centres. The introduction of these alternate channels will empower the people with the choice of how, when and where they interact with the government to facilitate a no-wrong door policy which will further improve the customer satisfaction levels with the government services. It is also envisaged that electronically enabled services would be not only faster, and easier to demand and avail but will also have pre-defined and published service levels thereby leading to a visible enhancement in quality of service delivery. 4. Socio-Economic growth: The implementation of the e-Government program will benefit through participation of the private sector and deployment of its resources, entrepreneurship and competence. At the same time, the private sector would also benefit through the e-Government program as government services will be delivered faster and at a lower cost to the customers thereby resulting in lower cost of doing business. This is likely to foster a symbiotic environment that would promote economic growth and sustainability of the e-Government initiatives.

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I. Outcomes and Targets In order to measure and manage progress, it is imperative to define key outcomes and targets that would enable realization of the vision. Also linkages with the National ICT policy Goals have been provided in the table below: Table 2: Outcomes and Targets Outcomes and Targets Element of Vision: Bring government closer to the people Outcome 1: Customer participation in Government policy/scheme design Target 1 - Ethiopia to be amongst the top 30 countries in the world in the eParticipation index of UN by the year 2015 (Ranked 135 in 2010): Most countries are using electronic channels to understand firsthand the views, expectations and aspirations of their people. UNs e-Participation index measures the progress made by all the member countries in doing the same. It is envisaged that the e-Government portal as well as other alternate service delivery channels will facilitate the citizens in putting forth their feedback and preferences on national issues. Target 2: Customer Feedback Mechanism available on all Government Channels: A comprehensive Grievance redressal mechanism and a process to inculcate feedback from various stakeholders would be established so that existing Government policies and schemes can be modified and new schemes created as per customers feedback. Outcome 2: High awareness regarding all Government Schemes/Services Target 3: More than 70% of Customers aware of the e-Government program: An integral element of the implementation of the strategy would be a high decibel marketing and awareness campaign at the federal as well as regional levels to create awareness regarding the e-Government program and the benefits of availing e-Services. E.g. The customers need not travel to Addis Ababa or any other regional centre to seek information and services such facilities would be made available within their immediate community. This will not only present the government in positive light as working towards the benefits of the customers but will also facilitate in higher take-up of new channels. Linkage to National ICT Policy Goal: To ensure access to ICT by Ethiopias rural population.( It is also linked to Vision of Improved Service Delivery across different Channels) Element of Vision: Effective Governance Outcome 3: Improved turnaround time for service delivery Target 4 At least 30% improvement on Government Transformation Index (GTI) from 2010 to 2015: Government Transformation Index (GTI) helps to assess impact of the e-Government program on Government based on parameters such transparency, accountability, responsiveness and quality of delivery of services. It aims to measure the beneficial impact of projects in transforming government practices at a program level. This tool will also build a review mechanism to assess the impact of implementation of e-Government strategy in enhancing the effectiveness of the government. The target is to improve government efficiency by at least 30% from 2010 to 2015. Description

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Outcomes and Targets Outcome 4: Joined-Up Government

Description

Target 5- Integration of Ministries /Agencies through common applications, standards and policies: The e-Government Strategy mandates the implementation of common applications, standards and policies to improve government efficiency and costs through facilitation of better coordination amongst the government departments. Towards this end, two key imperatives would be: Core projects which include, Data Centre, Woreda Network, National Dataset, Payment Gateway, Enterprise Architecture and PKI would be implemented to provide the requisite foundational infrastructure upon which service enablement can be accomplished Along with the core infrastructure, common applications need to be made available across the Ministries and Agencies to enable smooth functioning and provide focus on implementation of the priority projects by reducing the effort required. The common applications would also facilitate collaboration and consistency across common processes such as procurement, HR management, Financial Management etc.

Outcome 5: Customer friendly and Accountable Government Target 6 Capacity building of all officials on IT and Customer behaviour: Capacity building is an integral part of the e-Government strategy and is envisaged to be a tool for change management, imparting relevant IT skills to government personnel and to re-orient the customer facing staff in terms of customer etiquette and quality of service. By 2015, all the officials should have received training relevant to their job which will enable them to discharge their responsibilities in a more effective and efficient manner. Linkage to National ICT Policy Goals: Establish highly skilled ICT human resource base for transforming Ethiopia into a knowledge- and information-based society and economy.( Through Capacity Building Initiatives detailed in further sections) Promote infrastructure development including physical and telecommunications and communications infrastructure as a backbone for ICT development.( Core Projects and Common Applications which will help in delivery of public services)

Element of Vision: Improved Service Delivery Outcome 6: All services accessible within the community Target 7 - Electronic enablement of 219 services: Electronic enablement of the 211 service transactions to enable services across Life Cycle Events for businesses and citizens/residents. All services that can be provisioned electronically will be made available through alternate channels. Procedural information and support for services that are not amenable for electronic delivery will be provisioned through alternate channels. Additionally, a Grievance Redressal System will be developed during the first year of the program, i.e. 2011. Procedural information about all the services that may not be amenable for electronic delivery will also be made available through electronic channels. (Definition of Life Cycle Events and transactions has been provided in Annexure I).

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Outcomes and Targets

Description

Target 8 All the 4 Channels established with more than 50% uptake for alternate service delivery channels: The customers should be able to interact with the government at a time and place of their liking. To facilitate this endeavour, the access to government services and information would be provisioned through internet, m-Government and contact centre so that citizens can connect with government 24*7. Further, common services centres would be leveraged to provide all government services within the community. All the channels are envisaged to be functional by 2012 albeit with different number and maturity of services. All identified services to the maximum possible depth to be provided through all channels by 2015. Uptake of services through alternate channels is the best indicator to test the success of these channels and therefore all efforts would be made to ensure that at least 50% of the transactions with the government are conducted through the alternate channels. This would reflect the efficacy of reaching out to all customers and the effectiveness of the alternate channels created as part of the strategy. Outcome 7: Improvement in Customer Satisfaction Target 9 60% customer satisfaction: The Customer Satisfaction Index would use mechanisms like e-Poll, Feedbacks, e-Consultation, surveys, etc, to assess customer satisfaction levels with delivery of government services. Comprehensive reviews will be undertaken to take corrective measures wherever satisfaction rating falls below 50% of all customers. The target is to achieve 60% customer satisfaction rate by 2015. Target 10 - Published Customer Charters for all services provided by government organizations by 2015: Customer charter is a published document that announces the service levels such as the turnaround time for service, escalation mechanism in case of unsatisfactory quality of service, requirements for availing services etc. The target is to put in place a Customer Charter in place for all services provided to citizens, businesses, government employees and visitors. This is likely to increase customer satisfaction levels due to higher transparency and accountability in provisioning services. Linkage to National ICT Policy Goals: Deliver efficient and effective public and civil service to all citizens.( Through Multiple Channels, enablement of e-Services and customer charters for transparency) Ensure that ICT as an integral part of education and training at all levels.(Education is one of the 12 Priority Projects being implemented as part of the Strategy) Modernize and expand improved health services coverage using ICT. (Health is one of the 12 Priority Projects being implemented as part of the Strategy) Modernize agriculture and radically increase output and productivity. (Agriculture is one of the 12 Priority Projects being implemented as part of the Strategy)

Element of Vision: Socio-Economic Growth Outcome 8: Improve Business Climate Target 11 Amongst top 75 in Doing Business rankings of World Bank for ease of doing business in the country (Ranked 116 in 2009): Doing Business is an annual report
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Outcomes and Targets

Description

investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. It presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 181 economies. The delivery of services through alternate channels is likely to simplify business processes and reduce the cost of doing business and compliance with regulations. Outcome 9: Growth of ICT entrepreneurship/Industry Target 12 Investment of > 10% of Budget of e-Government Program through PPP: Experience of other countries illustrates that a number of industries such as banking, education, Information Technology, Telecommunication etc. get positively impacted due to large scale eGovernment implementations. The players in these sectors invest not only as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives but also to create goodwill and awareness regarding their products through advertisement and association with the e-Government program. It is envisaged that such partnerships will facilitate in accrual of 10% of the total funds required for the implementation of the e-Government strategy. Linkage to National ICT Policy Goal: Develop an efficient and globally competitive ICT industry( Through Private sector Involvement and Growth) Ensure Ethiopias effective participation in national, regional and global trade( Trade portal is one of the 12 Priority Projects being implemented as part of the Strategy)

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II. Strategic Dimensions In order to achieve the above outcomes and targets leading to the realization of the vision, strategic components and an action plan for the implementation of these strategic dimensions has been defined. The figure below presents the key Strategic dimensions: Figure 3: Key Strategic Dimensions

As can be seen from the figure above, the key dimension of the e-Government strategy for Ethiopia are Services enablement through the implementation of 12 Agency priority projects, delivery of services through 4 alternate channels of services delivery and the enablers which will facilitate the creation of a sustainable ecosystem for the implementation of the e-Government strategy. All these dimensions are shrouded in the Governance structure to highlight the key role that the governance mechanism for the e-Government program is envisaged to play in ensuring that each of the strategic dimensions gets implemented in a way that furthers the overall implementation of the eGovernment program. The strategic components are explained as follows: Strategic Dimension 1 -Service enablement 1. Agency Priority Projects - 219 services through implementation of 12 Agency Priority Projects that will facilitate service enablement of these services based on lifecycle based service requirements of customers. The key priority projects are mentioned in brief below:

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ii.

iii.

iv.

v.

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Agriculture Services - Given this overwhelming significance of Agriculture in the Ethiopian economy, it is imperative to leverage ICT to facilitate services provided for the agricultural sector. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. Benefits Management - Benefits are offered to Citizens by various agencies and departments. To improve satisfaction with the services, it is essential that the customers are able to get information about their eligibility for different schemes and file a single request to avail all the benefits. Such a common interface also enables better management and improved service levels of the services offered by such benefit schemes. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Social Security Agency or Ministry of Labour & Social Affairs and would also involve Addis Ababa city administration. Education - Education is one of the priority areas for the development of Ethiopia. Education related services have huge potential for leveraging ICT. The field of education is apt for initiating such a project as it has a direct impact on the future development of the country. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of Ministry of Education. E-Health - Health is also one of the focus areas for the government of Ethiopia. It is imperative that the field of health is IT enabled not only to improve the efficiency and the effectiveness of the Hospitals and labs but also to build a base for gaining access to future advancements in medical science. The field of health is also a prime candidate for leveraging ICT for better service delivery to the citizens of Ethiopia. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of Ministry of Health. Trade Portal - The portal would serve the business communitys need for information and services such as business registration, licensing, loans, penalties etc. Also investment related regulations and processes would be facilitated through the G2B Portal. The portal is also a medium of interaction and feedback on Government policies and regulations. It is imperative for the G2B space to be e-enabled for sustained economic growth of Ethiopia. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of Ministry of Trade and Investment. Employment - Generation of adequate employment opportunities is imperative for the prosperity of Ethiopia. This project envisages facilitating the same through better information dissemination amongst the unemployed and by providing a forum for the companies and the individuals to interact. This will also help the businesses find the right people. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Ministry of Labour. Transport - This project would facilitate the electronic enablement of the services provided by the Ministry of Transport and Communication and the Transport Authority. Most of these services such as the services related to Drivers License and Registration of vehicles are high volume, high impact services that would improve the service experience of a large number of people. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Ministry of Transport and Communications. Tourism - The government is keen to leverage the same to enhance the contribution of the tourism sector in the national economy. This priority project is envisaged to be a facilitator towards this end. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and participation of Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Tax - The Government of Ethiopia has launched an ambitious government transformation plan aiming at double digit growth of the economy for the next 5 years. In order to support such a voracious growth, a huge number of resources need to be mobilized. In order to generate these resources, it is imperative to ensure that the cost of compliance to tax system in Ethiopia is

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xi.

xii.

lowered so that tax collections may be enhanced. This project aims to facilitate the same. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Revenue and Customs Authority. e-Court - e-Court project envisages leveraging ICT to facilitate the delivery of services provided by the judiciary. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Ministry of Justice. Services of the Federal Supreme court would also be covered under the project. Municipalities - This project envisages leveraging ICT to facilitate the delivery of services provided by the Municipalities. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Addis Ababa City Administration. Passport & Visa This project envisages automation of services relating to issuance of passports and visa and the services would include application/renewal /replacement of passport, visa processing and ID Card issuance for Foreign Nationals. The project would be undertaken by Ministry of Foreign Affairs

The electronic enablement of services will be undertaken in a phase wise manner. It is expected that while all information services, grievance redressal mechanism and most information services will be provided electronically by the end of year 1 (2011), transactional services will be enabled progressively over the course of next 5 years (2015).

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The e-Services enablement plan for 219 services through the priority projects is provided below in figure Figure 4: e-Service enablement Plan Agency Priority Projects Agricultural Services Benefits Management system 5 Education Health 6 e-Trade 3 Employment 6 Transport Tourism 7 Tax e-Court e-Municipality 2 e-Passport Yearly Services Transactional Informational 35 4 73 5 64 30 9 219 11 6 4 25 13 19 5 62 7 13 11 8 4 2 4 4 14 14 12 7 5 7 18 3 4 10 14 5 13 Year 1 15 6 2 3 5 8 29 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

Total Services ( 79 Informational,140 Transactional)

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2. Common Applications: Common applications need to be made available across the Ministries and Agencies to enable smooth functioning and provide focus on implementation of the priority projects by reducing the effort required. The common applications would also facilitate collaboration and consistency across common processes such as procurement, HR management, Financial Management etc. The details of the common applications include i. e-Procurement: Provide businesses and ministries with common platform to transact with features such as Demand aggregation, catalogue based procurement, dynamic pricing engine, etc ii. HRMS - Government wide HRMS application to handle all functions related to leave, transfer, payroll, recruitment etc. iii. E-office- To eliminate the paper-based interactions even within the government across different agencies by using a single solution iv. FMIS - Enhancement of the existing Integrated Budget and Expenditure System (IBEX) addressing the core functions of public financial management v. Email Management System: Email can be used as a very effective medium for the interoffice and intra-office communication. Since the email system will be common across the departments, the common system can be used across with the standardization in email addresses. The implementation plan for the common applications is provided below: Table 3: Implementation Plan for common applications Implementation plan Yr. v/s Project e-Procurement HRMS e-Office FMIS Email Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

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3. Core Projects: The core projects, as mentioned are proposed to be implemented in the 1st three years of implementation of the strategy implementation, considering the fact that they would be building blocks/ or the facilitators for the priority project implementation. I. National Data set: Provisioning a national level data set of commonly used data elements across ministries, that can be used by all inter-ministerial applications as well as channels of delivery (national portal, mobile portal, CSC, NCC etc.) for delivering eServices II. National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB): Provisioning a platform for seamless integration of ministry / agency applications and database at the back end; integrating all front end channels to deliver eServices III. National Integrated Authentication Framework(NIAF): Provisioning of a unique identity based login to individuals for accessing the various electronic channels of government (National Portal, Mobile Portal, Common Service Centre (CSC) and National Contact Centre (NCC) & other ministry applications IV. National Payment Gateway: Provisioning of a national payment gateway for Ethiopia to enable all modes of electronic payments to be transacted through all the electronic channels of delivery V. PKI : Provisioning of PKI based identification, integrity and non-repudiation for online transactions related to the e-Government projects in Ethiopia VI. Woreda Network: Provisioning of high bandwidth connectivity between ministries and agencies for sharing data, voice and video communication throughout the country VII. National data Centre: It is proposed that the Ethiopian National Data Centre (ENDC) would consolidate services, applications and infrastructure to provide efficient electronic delivery of G2G, G2C and G2B services. ENDC infrastructure shall provide adequate space to house ICT assets of various departments and Government agencies within the country in an environment that meets the need for reliability, availability, scalability, security and serviceability. VIII. National enterprise Architecture: Unified architecture adoption across ministries enabling better integration of ministry applications The implementation plan for the common applications is provided in the table below: Table 4: Implementation Plan for Core Projects Implementation plan Yr. v/s Project National Data Set National Enterprise Service Bus National Integrated Authentication Framework National Payment Gateway Public Key Infrastructure Enterprise Architecture * WoredaNet and National data Centre is already being implemented by MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT
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Strategic Dimension 2- Channel Enablement: Implementation of the following four service delivery channel enhancement projects that will enable the customers to demand and avail services as per their choice and convenience: 1. e-Government portal where customers can use internet to request and avail services, search information, make payments, etc the national e-Government portal of Ethiopia www.ethiopia.gov.et needs to be updated and enriched with the electronic enablement of 219 services over the next 5 years. Currently Ethiopias e-Portal is managed in-house. Based on the current assessment of the existing portal and websites of various departments, it is suggested that the government continue with the inhouse portal model. However, the portal must be enhanced to be able to provide eServices.

Given the high cost of ownership of internet, PC and mobiles and the relatively low ICT literacy in Ethiopia, Common Services Centers are expected to be the primary vehicles of electronic services delivery during the initial part of the implementation of the e-Government Strategy. Mobile channel is also expected to become a key channel for delivery of services over the next 5 years if the projection of the number of subscribers of mobiles in Ethiopia were to be realized.
Additionally, the Government must consider options to allow private sector participation in the provision of related value-added services through the e-Government portal. 2. Phone (Call Center) where customers can call up to request services and information and access the same through call center agents and Interactive Voice Response technologies. Government of Ethiopia has set up an in-house government call center. Since the exiting set-up is very basic and not a full-fledged call center, it is suggested that as part of the e-Government strategy implementation, the government establish an Outsourced Call Center to facilitate e-Services. It is planned to provide around 77 Informational and 40 transactional services through the call centre channel. 3. Mobile Gateway where customers can request services and information through mobile phones and hand-held digital personal assistants. The departments can send customers regular alerts through SMS. It is recommended that the Government of Ethiopia should review options of Outsourced Mobile gateway and ASP model (vendor managed) gateway for its services as current number of transactions may not warrant a dedicated in-house mobile gateway. It is planned to provide around 77 Informational and 40 transactional services through the Mobile channel. 4. Common Service Centers (CSC) where services like Information dissemination, acceptance of service requests and delivery of services is provided to the customers at a single point of service delivery. It is recommended that the 92 existing ICT Community Centres and the proposed 42 Unified Billing Centres are leveraged as CSCs for offering government services. In addition it is proposed to set-up around 800 centres (equal to approx. number of Woredas) on a PPP model. These centres would provide access to the 219 services across the country.

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The implementation for e-Services through the channels is provided below Table 5: e-Services Implementation Plan for the Channels Channel Year I Year II Year III Year IV Year V

Portal Contact Centre Mobile ICT Centres

35 35

73 42 35

64 20 42 64

30 20 20 30

20 9

35

73

Strategic Dimension 3- Enablers: It is essential that the various components of the e-Government strategy are supported by the following Five key enablers to assure successful and timely implementation of the e-Government strategy and ensure the sustainability of the initiatives: Common standards and policies would enable an integrated and connected Government and facilitate standardization and efficiency across all key elements of the e-Government Components Capacity building activities such as training, career planning and change management would ensure the availability of personnel resources and skill sets required to achieve the strategy Marketing and awareness campaigns are key enablers in generating awareness and communicating with external and internal stakeholders to generate sufficient demand for the electronic services and reduce possible resistance to e-Government Monitoring and evaluation would enable the High Committee/Technical Committee, through the project office, to monitor progress, customer satisfaction and government transformation which would be important in assessing if the desired outcomes are being achieved Public Private Partnership models facilitate private sector participation for effective and efficient delivery of services

Overall Cost Estimates: Budgetary estimates for the implementation of the Strategy over a period of five years are approx. 3328.18 Mil. Birr or approx. 201.46 Mil USD. Details are provided in section 8 of the Report. Overall Implementation Plan: The E Government Strategy along with all its components is to be implemented and monitored and assessed over a period of five years. The components essentially comprise of the core projects which are the infrastructure projects, the identified twelve priority projects and the Enablers. The enablers would actually be implemented over a period of 1 year but they will be used on a recurring basis for the entire five year period. The brief of the proposed overall implementation plan is provided below. The details of the implementation are in chapter 7.
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Table 6: Overall Implementation Plan S No. Project Year 1 Core Projects 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 National Data Set National Enterprise Service Bus National Integrated Authentication Framework National Payment Gateway Public Key Infrastructure Enterprise Architecture Priority Projects Agriculture services Benefits Management System Education Ehealth G2B Portal Employment Transport Tourism Tax Ecourts Municipality Passport & Visa Enablers Marketing & Awareness Campaign Capacity Building Monitoring & Evaluation Standards & Policies Common Applications E-Procurement HRMS E-Office FMIS E Mail These components of the e-Government Strategy must be looked at in totality and the dynamic nature of the same must be acknowledged. Towards this end, the Governance Structure put forward in this document would provide an institutional mechanism responsible for coordinating and monitoring the implementation of the strategy and ensuring benefit realization. The following chapters detail out the recommendations for the Governance Structure and implementation of these strategic dimensions.
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Implementation Plan Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

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Section 3 GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

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III.

Governance Structure

This section describes the Governance Structure that should be established to oversee and facilitate the Ethiopian e-Government Strategy implementation process. Some of the key factors that have been considered while drafting the governance structure are: Ownership and Accountability for success of implementation of the e-Government program needs to be established; Focus on realization of the strategic dimensions identified in the strategy needs to be maintained; Ethiopian e-Government Strategy is a Government wide strategy that cuts across Ethiopias different Ministries/Agencies, it is not meant for any specific Ministry/Agency or sector. Therefore, a forum needs to be established to facilitate coordination amongst all stakeholders; and Government priorities, frameworks, processes and organization structures.

Based on the Assessment done the following gaps have been identified: Lack of a holistic coordination and cooperation across the Government for properly developing and utilizing IT; IT organization structures, roles, and responsibilities are not properly defined nor approved, resulting in IT organizations in the Government Entity with varying levels of maturity in terms of design and resourcing; Lack of a clear program and project management framework and tools to ensure all e-Government initiatives apply the same controls and quality measures and proper planning is in place for IT development; Lack of knowledge sharing and resources sharing which can speed the process of IT implementations in common domains; and IT expenditure is not recognized among the Ministries/Agencies budget, in addition, there is no allocation of a central fund to support central IT projects implementation.

I. Drivers for the Governance Structure To guide the program towards achieving its objectives, the development of the program governance should take into consideration the nature of the program and the surrounding circumstances and factors that will influence and drive the program in the long and short terms. The Ethiopia e-Government Strategy Governance Structure drivers include the following: The e-Government Strategy is for the Government as a whole; A large program with many projects needs to be coordinated and managed; A high number of stakeholders in different locations to be managed; A proper level of trust and confidence around the program need to be established; Standardization of approach and use of standards need to be enforced; Interdependency and conflicts need to be managed; Continuous monitoring and course correction is required; Ongoing alignment to business objectives is mandatory; Funding and spending critical decisions need to be tackled timely and properly; and A long term investment that require proper controls.

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II. Governance Structure: Options and Recommendations For the successful implementation of e-Government Strategy, the owners for various functions as well as their relationship with each other needs to be defined clearly. The various roles envisaged and the options available are analyzed in the following section. Various areas considered are as follows: Overall sponsorship of program Need for High Committee Need for the Technical Committee PMO as part of Ministry of Communications & IT Ownership of initiatives in entities

Overall Sponsorship of Program Considering the scope of e-Government Strategy and its impact, it is imperative that the ultimate ownership of project rests with a high level authority. The sponsor of program will own the functions related to funding and strategic directions. In the table below the options of having Council of Ministers under the Prime Minister or a Board under the Council of Ministers as program sponsor has been analyzed. Table 7: Options for sponsorship Options Council of Ministers under the Prime Minister Advantages A Board under the Council of Ministers as the sponsor Highest ownership in policy level decisions Establishment of the identity and importance of the program Easy co-ordination between Ministries/Agencies Quicker conflict resolution Sustainability of program will be ensured Quick decision making Disadvantages Decisions may be delayed Prime Minister may not be able to regularly monitor the progress of the Program

Multiple stakeholders in board with different roles No ownership at individual level Insufficient level of support

Need for a High Committee The best governance practices globally recommend the formation of a High Committee for large scale IT Strategy implementation. The role of this committee will be focused on providing guidance for the strategic directions and coordinating at the highest level. The available options for constituting the High Committee are analyzed in the table provided overleaf:

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Table 8: High Committee Assessment Options High Committee chaired by Minister of Communications & IT Advantages High visibility of program Co-ordination and conflict resolution mechanism amongst Ministries Program could become a part of high priority agenda of the Council of Ministers The legal and policy level issues can be managed Availability of members to meet and discuss Disadvantages Members may not be available to meet too often which may result in delays in decision making process

No High Committee Recommendations made by Technical Committee

Authority to enforce decisions across the Government is weak Decisions on Ministry level have to go through a higher level (the Minister)

Need for a Technical Committee The best practices globally recommend the formation of a Technical Committee for Strategy implementation. The role of this committee will be to coordinate, monitor the progress and establish standards for implementation. The advantages and disadvantages of constituting a Technical Committee are placed in the table below: Table 9: Technical Committee Options Technical Committee chaired by Representative Ministry of Communication & IT Advantages Co-ordination between Ministries Regular monitoring of the project progress Faster resolution of technical issues Disadvantages The organization structure may have too many committees and delays in decision making process The Technical Committee is not empowered to undertake policy decisions

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Project Management Office (PMO) under e-Government Directorate of Ministry of Communications & IT or separate Directorate or separate Entity In the new structure, the role of the Project Management Office (PMO) is focused on monitoring, compliance and supporting the central as well as entity level initiatives. PMO will also be playing a critical role in the capacity building and knowledge management across various Ministries/Agencies. The option of having the PMO as part of Ministry of Communications & IT or as an independent entity was evaluated, considering the scope of PMO. Table 10: PMO Options Options PMO as part of eGovernment Directorate Ministry of Communications & IT Advantages High maturity level as organization Office infrastructure is in place Availability of skilled manpower Ministry of Communications & IT will enable a structured reporting mechanism & process All conflicts related to IT implementation can be resolved easily Office infrastructure is in place Dedicated team to implement the e-Government Strategy All conflicts related to IT implementation can be resolved easily Disadvantages The implementation will require the ownership from different Ministries/Agencies and co-operation will require continuous & efficient coordination

PMO as a Separate Directorate Ministry of Communications & IT

PMO as an independent Entity under independent implementation agency like erstwhile EICTDA PMO will be Entity-independent

Recruitment of all the officials of the Directorate needs to be dome Coordination with the eGovernment Directorate with conflicting roles Reporting structure needs to be established PMO need to co-ordinate with various sub-committees within implementation agency PMO will need empowerment and support from Government officials A new Entity that will need to undergo different levels of maturity to reach the right shape The new reporting structure needs to be carefully designed and approved

* Please note that the role of implementation agency for e-Government implementation within MoC&IT may be finalized after structure of the MoC&IT is finalized.

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Ownership of IT initiatives in entity Implementation of all the central initiatives will be owned by the implementation agency but the ownership of initiatives at the Ministries level needs to be clearly defined to avoid any conflict in scope and responsibilities. The options available in this area are analyzed below: Table 11: Ownership of IT Initiatives Options Implementation Agency owns the implementation of Ministries/Agencies initiatives Advantages Central control on the implementation Easy to enforce standards and procedures Disadvantages Lack of ownership by Ministries/Agencies No domain expertise, as a result providing direction will be difficult Funding will be done by entity so ownership can be questioned Compliance with standards and procedures may be impacted

Ministries/Agencies owns the implementation

Faster implementation and better control Scope of project can be defined considering the requirements of the entity Sustainability resulting from ownership

The recommendations based on analysis of the various options are as follows o o o o o The Council of Ministers headed by Prime Minister should be the Program sponsor High Committee under the Minister of Communications & IT is needed in the overall structure for effective implementation of the strategy Technical Committee is needed in the overall structure PMO will be under e-Government Directorate of Ministry of Communications & IT Ministry/Agency initiatives will be owned by the respective Ministries/Agencies and will be supported by the PMO while core and common initiatives will be owned by the Ministry of Communications & IT

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III. Recommended Governance Structure In light of the recommendations above, envisaged governance structure is placed below:

Figure 5: Recommended Structure As shown in the figure above, the ultimate responsibility for the implementation of the Ethiopian eGovernment program lies with the Council of Ministers under the Ethiopian Prime Minister. The High Committee will be assisted by the PMO in Ministry of Communications & IT for monitoring, coordinating and directly following up the execution of IT initiatives. Ministries and other Government Agencies are the owners of their respective core and cross Government projects and will get the support for delivering these projects from the PMO. In addition, Ministries and other Government Agencies are responsible for developing their vertical IT Strategies and implementation plans in coordination and under the direct supervision of the Technical Committee, in line with the e-Government Strategy and are responsible for deploying their Ministry/Agencies specific IT vertical projects. The Technical Committee will report on the progress and the issues of the strategy implementation to the High Committee.

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Progress on vertical plans execution will be reported to the PMO to ensure alignment amongst all eGovernment initiatives. All work initiated and conducted by Ministries/Agencies should be in compliance with the approved Strategic Directions. Any deviation during implementation from the directions provided in the Strategy document should be pre approved by the High Committee. Description of the Entities presented in the Governance Structure 1. Overall Sponsor: The e-Government Strategy Sponsor is the council of Ministers under his Excellency, the Prime Minister. Ownership at this level is mandatory to ensure that the program receives sufficient support, which is necessary to ensure the success of the Program taking into consideration the size and nature of the change to take place. It is envisaged that the Prime minister as the Program owner will sponsor the program across the Government, push for change and resources, publicly take ownership of the projects and commit his time on a sustained basis.

2. The High committee chaired by Minister of Communications & IT will have the following members: 1. The Minister of Finance and Economic Development 2. The Minister of Labor and Social Affairs 3. The Minister of Transport 4. The Minister of Agriculture 5. The Minister of Education 6. The Minister of Trade 7. The Minister of Industry 8. The Minister of Foreign Affairs 9. The Minister of Works and Urban Development 10. The Minister of Justice 11. The Minister of Civil Services 12. Representative(s), PMO 13. DG, Social Security Agency The High Committee would be responsible to: Agree on priorities among Program initiatives; Lead the implementation of the e-Government Strategy across the Government covering all tracks defined within the Strategy and the implementation Roadmap. This includes submitting strategies for final approval by the High Committee, initiatives and projects approval and the monitoring and control activities; Harmonize the Strategy implementation across all the components and manage interdependencies; and Specify required funding and administer the allocated funds as part of Program management activities.

3. The Technical Committee is responsible for the Program implementation management through initiatives implementation management and provides Program integration, interdependency management and delivery assurance. The Technical Committee will report to the High Committee and will contain IT heads from the following Ministries/Agencies: 1. Ministry of Minister of Communications & IT 2. Ministry of Finance and Economic Development 3. Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs 4. Ministry of Transport
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5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Ministry of Education Ministry of Agriculture Ministry of Education Ministry of Trade Ministry of Industry Ministry of Foreign Affairs Ministry of Works and Urban Development Ministry of Justice Ministry of Civil Service Social Security Agency Head of PMO

The Technical Committee will be responsible for the following: Identify technical assistance requirement at project implementation units; Assist in developing program level training schedule for project teams, general IT skills, technology etc ; Identify competent technical as well as administrative resources (within the Government and externally) for specific requirements of stakeholders; Lead the development of IT related policies and standards and submit drafts for High Committee sign-off; Lead the development of IT related regulations and submit drafts for High Committee sign-off; Lead the discussions with the private sector organization; and Support resolving conflicts whenever they arise and escalate conflicts to High Committee whenever resolution is not possible.

4. Ministry of Communications & IT will own the implementation of e-Government Strategy with support from Programme Governing Body or PMO. Some of the important functions of Ministry of Communications & IT and the PMO are as follows: 5. Specify required funding and administer the allocated funds as part of e-Government Strategy activities; Lead the development of IT related policies and standards and submit drafts for High Committee sign-off; Lead the development of IT related regulations and submit drafts for High Committee sign-off Lead the discussions with the private sector organizations; and Facilitate implementation of the IT initiatives across the Ministries/Agencies.

The Project Management Office (PMO) will be part of the E-Government Directorate of Ministry of Communications & IT and will support the e-Government Strategy implementation through monitoring projects delivery, controlling the relation with vendors, managing the procurement process, ensuring compliance with policies and standards, auditing projects at hand over, knowledge management and sharing for areas related to project management. The PMO will play the following roles: Monitoring the implementation of the e-Government Program on the different aspects (technical, administrative and financial); Project Addition/Deletion Approval

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Supporting with evaluating requests received from the different Ministries/Agencies for implementations, and Supporting projects execution tasks through the identification and allocation of required resources; and Knowledge sharing for experiences gained through executing the different Program components Procurement and contracting process management.

The organization structure of the PMO (described in diagram in next page) was developed based on the above mandate, where the following key departments will have the core teams tasked to deliver listed roles: Project Coordination Knowledge Management Appraisal ITSG (IT Services Group) Marketing & Awareness Monitoring & Evaluation Cadre Control

The core teams will be supported by the following support teams which will report to the respective departments in the MoC&IT Financial Control Procurement

The PMO will contain a pool of resources that can be assigned different tasks depending on work load, projects nature and projects level of maturity. Accordingly, one team member can play several roles that can be of monitoring, support, and knowledge or procurement nature. The details regarding PMO Staffing requirements have been provided in Annexure II. The recommended structure for the Project Management Office (PMO) is provided in the figure below:

Figure 6: Project Management Office (PMO) Structure

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Core Team of PMO The details of the Core team of the PMO are provided in the following sections: Project Co-ordination Team This team will contain experts in infrastructure, applications, business process and information security and control requirements. It will be mainly responsible for the following: 1. Liaise with the implementing Ministries/Agencies closely and provide necessary coordination in order to ensure the realization of the Program targets and to facilitate the integration of the projects outputs with the e-Government Strategy;

2. Manage and monitor the implementation of the Program by assisting the Ministries/Agencies and other stakeholders; 3. Gather and review work plans from implementing Ministries/Agencies, and monitor the implementation of the different tasks defined in the plan; 4. Periodically report projects progress to the Program Governance Board with detailed analysis of status and deliverables; 5. Review projects deliverables and ensure deliverables specifications and quality meet those agreed in the contract signed with the service or technology provider;

6. In addition to monitoring projects, the Project Coordination team will also be involved in reviewing service level agreements for maintenance and operation contracts to validate compliance versus agreed terms and conditions from technical perspective; Knowledge Management Team It is mandatory to apply the same standards on the different projects within the e-Government Strategy Program; this includes applying the same procedures, using the same templates, and following the same controls. In addition, there will be similar implementations rolled out across the Government; the knowledge gained in one implementation will need to be shared among others. The Knowledge Management team will be responsible for the following: 1. Develop knowledge management objectives and plan on annual basis 2. Ensure the same project management standards are applied across the e-Government Program 3. Define the broad contours of the Knowledge Management Portal to be developed as part of the Capacity Building Initiative. 4. Maintain a central database of references, templates, projects documentation and other details 5. Provide project managers in the different Ministries with access to the central database 6. Conduct awareness sessions on approved project management frameworks and standards for the different stakeholders 7. Ensure project managers provide proper documentation on their projects at project conclusion

Appraisal Team To properly manage requests for implementations (and associate funding), all requests will be accompanied by a Detailed Project Report which will contain technical and financial information about the requested change. The Appraisal team will handle the evaluation of all received requests and will perform technical and financial reviews to ensure received requests are in line with the Strategy and within the approved budget allocations. The purpose of the technical review and the financial review are described below:
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Technical Review The technical review will target ensuring the following: Alignment of project with the Strategy No overlap with approved, core and common initiatives A proper utilization of shared and central facilities The scope of work is defined clearly A proper functional description is in place A proper technical description is in place Potential risk identified for the initiative and risk mitigation plan. Details about the dependency of initiative on other initiatives (core, common or Ministry/Agencies specific) Post implementation support plan is described properly

Financial Review Financial review activities target ensuring the following: Details about the fund required with sufficient break down are included in the request submitted by the Ministries Financial analyses including CAPEX and TCO are covered in the request Adherence with Procurement policy Availability of funds Identification of funding options/resources

ITSG (IT Services Group) To support the different projects that are part of the Program, resources will be needed to perform project management, technical activities and administrative activities. The need for resources will be assessed on a case by case basis to ensure projects are neither over staffed nor under staffed. The ITSG Resources team will play the role of Capacity Balancing by identifying resource requirements and allocating necessary resources accordingly. The source of these resources can be contracting with third parties. Option 1 Ethiopia Internal Resources The resources with required skills can be deployed for short term from MoC&IT or any other Ministries/Agencies. This will ensure a proper utilization of in-house capacity and will lead to the development of a pool of Government experts who are specialized in technical and functional domains. This option is the preferred option and will be more predominant once capacity has developed properly to meet the targets established under capacity building domain. Option 2 External Resources In the initial phase the mobilization of resources from within the Ethiopia will be a challenge, as a result experts can be hired from third parties. Consulting, outsourcing and managed services companies can be contracted to provide technical and project management experts. While mobilizing resources from external resources, it is important to have a system for knowledge transfer to support internal capacity building on the long term. The technical areas where experts will be needed can include; Database Administration and Management, Networking, Solutions Architectures and Integration, Software
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Development, Computer Hardware, Financial Analysis, Business Analysis and Re-engineering, and Organizational Development. Option 3- Fresh graduates and interns Its very important to employ fresh graduates and interns for suitable supporting roles in various Directorates in Ministries. ITSG will co-ordinate the hiring of qualified resources from the institutes in region and will be taking care of mobilization to various Ministries. This will help in building the future capacity for various positions where consultants will be hired initially. Graduates in Computer Science/IT, Engineering, Finance, HR and Management will form the part of this pool of resources. ITSG team will organize annual campus visits as part of internship program to identify such resources. The indicative structure of ITSG required at the Ministries/Agencies is provided in the figure below (The details regarding ITSG qualifications requirements have been provided in Annexure XV) Figure 7: ITSG Structure

Project Coordinator

Project Design Expert

PPP Expert

Standards and Policies Expert

Project Management Expert

Capacity Balancer Capacity Balancer role will be handled by the ITSG within the PMO who will play the expert role in supplementing the efforts of the project implementation teams of the initiatives on request. For a proper execution of the strategy, technical and administrative resources should be available where and when needed. It is expected to have a lack of sufficient resources in all Ministries/Agencies especially at the early stages of the Program implementation. To ensure this gap is managed properly a Capacity Balancer which is one of the main roles of the PMO will support in allocating the right resources to support initiatives, these resources can be from within Strategy or through contracting with third parties. This would integrate seamlessly across the centre and Ministry/Agencies departments to ensure capacities exist within the implementation units to prepare/undertake initiatives. The Program Governance Structure is designed to have a structured mechanism to assess individual Ministries capacities and their gaps and then devising the right intervention to help fill these gaps. This mechanism would supplement the Ministry/Agencies capacity and equip them to effectively prepare/undertake initiatives. The Capacity Balancer would need to address both long term capacity creations such as CIO, IT Management skills within the Ministry, etc. It would address both long term requirements either by implanting CIO from existing organizations for longer duration as internal staff and creating skill sets for
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the Ministry/Agencies staff. Short term requirements could be addressed by hiring private organizations or individuals with the required skill sets. The work of the Capacity Balancer is illustrated in the diagram below. For example, Ministry- A may have internal capabilities in project preparation and design but may not have the necessary know-how in BidProcess Management, Budgeting or the resources for Project Management. In such cases, the Ministry/Agencies may approach the ITSG unit of the PMO, which would in-turn help the Ministry to identify and engage appropriate resources for a given period to initially undertake the project and simultaneously build the required capacities. Ministry on the other hand, is fully equipped to undertake a project and thus would see no significant advantage in requesting support from the PMO Figure 8: Capacity Balancer

Monitoring & Evaluation Team This team of the PMO will play a very important role in terms of development & implementation of program monitoring tools, implementation of a Monitoring & Evaluation framework consisting of project progress tracking measures, benefits measurement and impact assessment. This team will also be responsible for implementation of Government Transformation Index (GTI) and Customer satisfaction index (CSI). Marketing & Awareness Team This team of the PMO will be responsible for all publicity, marketing and advertising activities, which will ensure that there is a wide awareness among all stakeholders about the program and accordingly the demand and uptake of the different services is increased. Cadre Control This is another important part of the PMO which will oversee the identification, deployment, progression and capacity building of a central pool of Government IT resources who will play an important role in the implementation

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Support Team The details of the support team of PMO are provided in the following sections. The support teams will be reporting to the respective directorate/division of the MoC&IT, which will also decide the structure and number of resources of the teams. Financial Control Team As the implementation of Strategy will involve huge investments, the strategy budget need to be managed through a comprehensive fund tracking mechanism. The Financial Control team will be responsible for the following: 1. Monitor the financial status of the program and report any deviation from the approved budget; 2. Perform financial analysis as part of evaluating requests received for new projects from the different Ministries; and 3. Develop the estimates for the Program annual budget. The Financial Control team will do ongoing periodic reviews of active projects and will also be involved in reviewing service level agreements for maintenance and operation contracts to validate compliance versus agreed terms and conditions from financial perspective. Procurement Team As the execution of the e-Government Program will involve large number of procurements in the form of services, hardware and software, central control over procurement is mandatory to properly control acquisitions and ensure the standards are applied consistently. The Procurement team will handle the following tasks: 1. Manage the tendering cycle for core and common initiatives; 2. Prepare purchase orders of IT products like computers, servers, peripherals, networking and any hardware requirements; and 3. Monitor purchase orders, release of payments, stock entries, billings, deliveries, utilization certificates related to all IT products; 4. Estimate expenditure details and manage departments/organizations after orders placement; 5. Manage framework contracts; and 6. Maintain vendors short list. The Procurement team will manage the Service Level Agreements (SLAs) with the different providers and will ensure the following: SLAs are signed on time; The terms within SLAs cover the required services; The providers are complying with their respective SLAs; and Compliance reviews are conducted by the Coordination team and the Financial Control team. correspondence with suppliers and

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Temporary Capacity Sourcing Agencies Since implementation of the Strategy would require experts from different domains as mentioned above, there is a need to have a Temporary capacity Sourcing Agencies who could provide resources with desired qualifications for a specified contract period. Human Resource Development, Capacity Building, Research and Consultancy Directorate of MoC&IT could be responsible for empanelment of such agencies and then procure resources based on the Ministerial/Agency project requirements. IT Organization Structure at Ministry/Project Level Each Ministry/Agency will have a dedicated IT department to manage the operations and support of the IT infrastructure and system implemented within the entity. Currently, the Ministry level IT department may not have requisite staff and skill set. The profile of the people, their experience and attitude are critical success factors for the successful implementation of IT initiatives. Given this, it is recommended that only experts in the respective domains be sourced. Leveraging expertise of resources from the private sector is a good option in this context. The strategy to have the best quality for a reasonable cost will be to hire people from the market in the initial phase, get the systems and processes in place. Simultaneously the senior government officials with sufficient experience and interest will be identified and trained over a period to take over their positions. This way, over a period of time, there will be systems and processes in place and people with the right skill-set to take the challenge of achieving the objectives. Taking cognizance of the above as well as the gaps identified in the present mechanism during current state assessment of all Ministry/Agency level the recommended minimum composition of the Ministry level IT Department is given in the following figure Figure 9: Ministry Level IT Organization Structure

Role of CIO/Head of Department The key to the long term success of the e-Government Strategy lies in the creation of effective Information Technology Managers within the Government Ministries. While project implementation along with associated process improvements could be considered as a onetime activity, the continuous improvement in processes and technology is an activity for which capacities need to be created within the individual Ministries/Agencies. International experience indicates that creation of CIOs has been extensively used by countries to sustain and increase the pace of IT development. The first step towards creating such capabilities is to create an appropriate position with the identified responsibility of information management within the Government. Across the globe, this is being achieved through the role of the Chief Information Officers (CIO)

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The governance structure proposed here briefly introduces the concept of CIOs. It is an important position and can play a significant role. This section highlights the concept and functioning of CIOs, in addition to describing the structures of IT departments within Ministries, the size of these departments will vary depending on Entity size and Entity level of dependency on information technology.

The primary role of the CIO/IT Head is to act as the IT manager of the Ministry. He or she would be the person responsible for Ministry IT strategy development and maintenance, further entity capacity building, sponsor of IT initiatives within the Ministry, and up keeping and maintaining the IT infrastructure. The role of other officials is provided in the table below. (Detailed Qualifications of the Officials in provided in Annexure IV) Table 12: Role and Responsibilities of Ministry Level Organization Structure Department Project Champion Roles and Responsibilities Project prioritization within Ministry Identification and resolution of interdependencies Annual projects budgeting Preparing Project Detailed Reports for submission to PMO Ministry projects management at all stages Implementing and using a Project Management Information System Track project progress with respect to desired outcomes and outputs and report the same to senior stakeholders Design a Capacity Building Strategy for the Ministry Design the Training Plan Conduct Trainings of the officials Monitor the trainings Procurement of experts from Outsourced agencies for providing training Monitor the BPR reforms implementation in the Ministry Monitor the service levels Identify further BPR opportunities for improvement in service levels Implement the BPR recommendations Monitor the BPR reforms implementation in the Ministry Monitor the service levels Identify further BPR opportunities for improvement in service levels Implement the BPR recommendations Design IT infrastructure requirements Support in Bid Process Management for procurement of IT infrastructure Test the IT infrastructure procured Support in Hardware and Software installation Design IT Security Requirements Implementation of IT Security requirements Review the Security Controls Design Application architecture Design the Application Controls Monitor the Software Development User Acceptance Testing

IT Capacity Building Expert

Government Process Reengineering Expert Domain Experts

IT Infrastructure Expert IT Security Expert Application Expert

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PMO Support Tools and Infrastructure Support Table 13: PMO Support Function Programme Management Tools and Infrastructure Support Technology Tools: Project Tracking, Document Management, Knowledge Management, Planning and Tracking Tool, Report Writer, risk management, change management, progress recording Methodologies : Project Management, Risk Management, Communication Management, Change Management, Training, Capacity Building, Project Assessment, Project Proposal and creation, etc. Infrastructure: Network connectivity, Mail Management, all office suit products and other office management products like projectors, visual boards, Video Conferencing facilities, etc. Fund Management Fund Management System, Financial Management System, Management Information System, Guidelines for project procurement and bid evaluation / Standard template for capability gap assessment, guidelines for processing technical assistance support Standard template and assessment methodology for training need assessment; formal linkages with select national/international training institutes for actual delivery Appointment of a Public Relations (PR) and an advertising agencies to manage communication internal and external Representation on standard setting working groups, Regular training and study tours on new technology and applications Strong knowledge management tools; Data mining

Technical Assistance Capacity Balancer HR / Training

Communication Policies / Standard Setting Centre Excellence/Knowledge Management of

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Section 4 STRATEGIC DIMENSION 1 SERVICES ENABLEMENT

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IV.

Strategic Dimension 1 - e-Services Enablement

I. Introduction A service is defined as an interaction or a set of interactions that involve exchange of information / documents between customers and the government. There are two types of services as enunciated below: i) Informational Services: includes those services that solely provide information to customers and do not involve processing of any transactions or documents. For example, providing procedural information for requesting a service / facility, providing status update of applications for availing services etc. Informational services have relatively simple back-office operations and can be easily electronically enabled. Transactional Services: includes those services where customers require specific actions to be taken by the department. For example, issue of a driving license is a transactional service. Transactional services mandate a higher degree of customer interaction and more complex delivery operations than informational services

ii)

II. Guiding Principles for electronic enablement of Service

Focus on designing eServices around citizen needs Any service should be electronically enabled only after business process has been reengineered for that particular service. Electronic enablement of services should result in visible enhancement of customer experience in terms of faster turnaround time, lesser visits to government offices and / or lesser cost of availing services (cost should not be confused with fees)

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III. Recommendations and Targets Based on the above guiding principles, 219 services have been considered for phase-wise electronic enablement. (This list of services is however not static and could vary at time of actual project implementation as- Ministries, Agencies may have added or modified their services or even make changes at time of finalizing the application requirements & functionality, for their services.) Some of the other recommendations are: 1. The Services should be presented on the e-Government portal as per the services life-cycle (explained in detail in Annexure I) so that the customers can access services intuitively.

2. The services for various groups such as businesses, individuals, government employees, visitors should be segregated to facilitate easy and fast navigation. 3. In order to implement the services in an integrated manner, bundle of services should be grouped as priority projects (discussed later). 4. Clear-cut service levels must be defined for electronically enabled services. The services should be designed such that breach of service levels is escalated to the higher levels so as to fix accountability for delays. 5. Electronic enablement of a service does not mean that no further work is required to be done regarding that service. It is imperative to provide robust maintenance support to facilitate acceptable uptime and performance of the eServices. Features of eServices should also be improved with technological improvements and based on feedback from users.

IV. Agency Priority Projects The electronic enablement of services will be realized through the implementation of Twelve (12) Agency Priority projects. The underlying idea is that the services can be electronically enabled in a sustainable manner only when the organization that offers the respective services takes ownership of the electronic enablement. Each of these 12 projects is detailed out in the next few pages. The service enablement across the priority projects is provided in the table below Table 14: Agency Priority Projects S.No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Agency Priority Projects Agricultural Services Benefits Management system Education Health E Trade Employment Year 1 15 0 5 0 0 Year 2 6 2 3 4 6 1 Year 3 8 3 5 10 5 6 Year 4 0 0 0 0 7 0 Year 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 29 5 13 14 18 7

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S.No. 7 8 9 10 11 12

Agency Priority Projects Transport Tourism Tax e-Court e-Municipality Passport & Visa Total Services

Year 1 6 0 7 0 0 2 35

Year 2 8 4 6 4 25 4 73

Year 3 0 2 0 7 13 5 64

Year 4 0 4 0 0 19

Year 5 0 4 0 0 5

Total 14 14 13 11 62 11

30

211

The e-Service enablement across the 12 priority projects is provided in the table below Table 15: e-Service Enablement of Agency Priority Projects Agency Priority Projects Agricultural Services Benefits Management system 5 Education Health 6 e-Trade 1 Employment 6 Transport Tourism 7 Tax e-Court
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Year 1 15

Year 2 6 2

Year 3 8 3 3 4 10 5 6 8 4 2 6 4 7 5

Year 4

Year 5

Total 29 5 13 14

18 7 14

14 13 11

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25 e-Municipality 2 e-Passport Yearly Services Transactional Informational Details of each of the Agency Priority Project is provided in further sections 35 4 73 5 64 30 9 211 11 13 19 5 62

Total Services ( 77 Informational,134 Transactional)

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V. Agriculture Services Initiative name e-Agriculture Objective To provide information & services to all stakeholders in the Agriculture sector (farmers, importers, exporters, investors, Government/regulatory agencies, research & support institutions) efficiently using ICT, and enable all stakeholders to contribute & participate in the development of the Agriculture Sector. Outcomes Improvement in Agriculture services provided by Government expected Provide access & improve access to informational & transactional services to all stakeholders across the country Improve Government administration and supervision of the Agriculture sector by using ICT Improve overall quality & productivity/yield in Agriculture sector in the country by providing timely access to information on agriculture techniques, practices, cropping, weather, markets etc Strengthening of Agrinet project Ministry of Agriculture Departments of Agriculture development, Agriculture marketing, Natural Resource, Disaster prevention, preparedness & food security (DPPA), Animal & Plant health, Plan & Program, Human resource dev., women affairs, Information & tec. Management, Procurement, finance & property admin and Public relations Regional Agriculture Bureaus Subordinate organizations including DPPA, EIARP (Ethiopian institute of Agr. Research), EGTE Ethiopian Grain trading enterprise, NVI Veterinary Institute and IBC Biodiversity centre Agriculture portal with separate sections for each of the stakeholders (farmers, Government and support institutions) or separate portals and including services for all stakeholders Agriculture information & management system Major component Category Service Type Channels

Coverage

List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered

Service

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Initiative name

e-Agriculture Information services 1. Provision of data on the Agroprocessing Industry. 2. Crop Failure Reports 3. Provision of information on Enabling Environment, Financing, and Infrastructure in the agro-processing industry. 4. Provision of Information on Market Fragmentation and Investment Potential. 5. Provision of Information on Quality Standard Implementation and Certification. 6. Provision of Information on Competition Indicators in the Agricultural sector. 7. Provision of Information on Investment Incentives in the Agroprocessing Industry. 8. Information on prices of Fertilizers, Pesticides, Seeds, and Crops. 9. Technical services and support for farmers. 10. Irrigation Request by farmers. 11. Information on livestock disease control & surveillance 12. Information on animal infrastructure distribution & personnel 13. Information on quarantine inspection and certification 14. Information on rural land admin. Policies, procedure & guidelines 15. Information on natural resources conservation

G2C, G2G, G2B

Informational

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

Portal, Agriculture Information & Management system

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Initiative name

e-Agriculture Transactional services Agricultural Product Inspection and Certification Services: For Investors or any Business man who is engaged in import and/or export of plant and animals products for commercial purpose Application for python sanitary inspection on export and import. Application for the import or export pesticide for commercial purpose Application for plant import permit, etc Services relating to provision of Farm Land to Investors : Local or Foreign Investors who need Agricultural land for Investment, the following requirements and services are given by MoA. Application form to obtain the land Provision of Information on the potential Agricultural land Technical and Administration support Continuous follow-up and support on the land use, Land management Other transactional services Custom clearance certificate for agriculture imports Certificate of competence on agriculture Certificate of import & export of animal & crop products

Portal, Agriculture Information & Management system

G2C, G2B

Transactional

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

Implementation plan

Implementation Plan Yr. v/s Project Spread of subprojects Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Portal Development AIMS Continuous improvement /updation of policy and regulatory framework ensuring the safety, authenticity, integrity and availability of the envisaged services across all the delivery channels & Expansion & Strengthening of Agrinet 33.86 Mil. Birr

Budget Pre-Requisites

The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging a complete end to end automation of some of the core functions of the ministry and agencies. For end to end automation of the service delivery, it will be important that core

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Initiative name

e-Agriculture infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) National Payment Gateway (NPG) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative the success of the health initiative will directly depend of the how successfully Ethiopia achieves high level of Internet and Mobile penetration and how successfully private hospitals are integrated into the system.

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VI. Benefits Management System Initiative Social Benefits Management System name Objective Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to transport ministry through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality and efficiency. Outcomes Better awareness about benefit schemes due to single source of information expected Higher satisfaction of beneficiaries with benefit schemes due to a single interface to access these schemes and faster turnaround times The service delivery can be monitored centrally for all benefit schemes making it easy to access the impact and benefits of the various schemes Better controls to check leakages in the system Coverage Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs Social Security Agency Department of Postal services Addis Ababa City Administration Benefit Schemes Portal (BSP) Pension Management System (PMS) e-Municipality Service Major component Channels Service Type

List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered

Category

Web-based information publishing

Benefit Schemes Portal (BSP)

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers, call center National Web portal, Ministry portal, ICT Centers, call center National Web portal, Ministry portal, ICT Centers, call center

G2C

Information al

Benefits eligibility calculator

Benefit Schemes Portal (BSP)

G2C

Informationa l

Applications for availing benefits

Benefit Schemes Portal (BSP)

G2C

Transactiona l

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Pension Services (Pensioner registration, and pension payment)

Pension Management System (PMS)

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Support Letter (for unemployment; free health treatment, scholarships)

e-Municipality

National Web portal, Mobile, Ministry portal, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Implementati on plan

Yr. v/s Project Spread of sub-projects

Implementation plan Year 2 PMS SBP Integration of various subprojects into a seamless and single Social Benefits Management System Continuous improvement / updation of policy and regulatory framework to ensure that benefits reach the intended beneficiaries through all available service delivery channels. Year 3 Year 4

Budget PreRequisites 33.63 Mil. Birr This initiative is a comprehensive project that would integrate all the welfare programs of the Government of Ethiopia. For end to end automation of the delivery of the welfare programs, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative, the success of the project will also depend on the success of marketing and awareness activities as the target group - underprivileged section of the society, is the least aware about new schemes and policies.

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VII. Education Initiative name e-Education Objective To provide information & services to all stakeholders in the Education sector (students, teachers, Government/regulatory agencies, and educational institutions) efficiently using ICT, and enable all stakeholders to contribute & participate in the development of the Education Sector. Outcomes Improvement in education services provided by Government expected Provide access to education across the country Coverage List of major components to be addressed Improve teaching standards by providing on-line access to latest teaching aids, material, techniques Improve Government administration and supervision of the education sector by using ICT Improve overall quality of education in the country through distance learning, E-learning, computer based training (CBT) Strengthening of Schoolnet project Ministry General Education, Higher Education & Technical & Vocational Education Training (TVET) departments Regional Education Bureaus Education portal with separate sections for each of the 3 depts. (general, Higher and TVET) or three separate portals. Student management system including registration, admission and complete student records for government schools & colleges Examination management system Education Institutes (schools, colleges, etc) administration system, including internal work-flow management system for the ministry, to provide services electronically Providing, facilitating internet connectivity with adequate bandwidth to schools & other educational institutions Service Major component Channels Category

Services that will be delivered

Service Type

National Exam results

Examination management system

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Informational

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Initiative name

e-Education Student placement results

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Informational

Teacher placement results

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Informationa l

Student registration

Education administration system and Student management system

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Certificate for completion of high school (original & replacement)

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Certificate for completion of degree (original & replacement)

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactiona l

Publish education statistics

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2G & G2C

Informationa l

Report student performance results

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2G & G2C

Informational

National exam candidate registration

Examination Management system

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactiona l

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Education Teaching permit for employment

Education Administration system

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Education certificate to be sent abroad

Student management system and Education Administration System Student management system and Education Administration System

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactiona l

Scholarships

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactiona l

Implementatio n plan

Yr. v/s Project

Year 1 Exam Management System

Implementation Plan Year 2 Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Student Management System Spread of sub-projects Education administration System Integratio n of various core projects and various channels Continuous improvement /updation of policy and regulatory framework ensuring the safety, authenticity, integrity and availability of the envisaged services across all the delivery channels & Schoolnet project

Budget Pre-Requisites 48.70 Mil. Birr The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging a complete end to end automation of some of the core functions of the ministry and agencies. For end to end automation of the service delivery, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS)

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Education National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) National Payment Gateway (NPG) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Expansion & Strengthening of Schoolnet project

Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative the success of the E-Education initiative will directly depend of the how successfully Ethiopia achieves high level of Internet and Mobile penetration and how successfully all education sector stakeholders are integrated into the system.

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

VIII. E-Health Initiative name e-Health Objective Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to Health through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality and efficiency. Outcomes Convenience to the general public , healthcare institutions( hospitals and expected pharmacies) for informational and transactional services Improvement in the service levels of health ministrys services leading to timely medical aid to the citizens thereby improving the overall health scenario in the country Uniform and transparent licensing process leading to efficient health care service delivery Convenient and accurate monitoring of certification and license status of health care institutions Putting HSDP project on a fast track and aligning the e governance objectives with the 8 project components of HSDP project Ministry Government Hospital Regional Health Bureaus Woreda Health offices Agencies Pharmacies Private Hospitals Health Ministry Portal (HMP) Hospital Information Management System (HMIS) Drug Information Management System (DIMS) Integration of hospitals(Public and Private), Pharmacies National Payment gateway Service Major component Channels Info / Transactiona l Category

Coverage List of major components to be addressed

Services that will be delivered

Issuance of Drug Marketing license Issuance and renewal of Certificates of competence to drug establishments

DMIS HMP NPG NIAF

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2B

Transactional

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Health Issuance, Renewal and cancellation of drug registration certificate Issuance of certificate of competence to health professionals Issuance of licenses to hospitals Issuance, Renewal and cancellation of license to conduct clinical trials Booking of Appointments Notification of Test results Hospital Information HMIS HMP NIAF NPG National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers G2B G2C Transactional Transac tional

HMIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Informationa l

Drug pricing information

DMIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C G2B

Informationa l

Drug Availability Information

DMIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C G2B

Informationa l

Doctors profile information

HMIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C G2B

Informationa l

Implementatio n plan

Yr. v/s Project Spread of subprojects

Year 1

Year 2 HMP HMIS

Implementation Plan Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

DMIS Integration of various

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Health core projects and various channels Continuous improvement /updation of policy and regulatory framework ensuring the safety, authenticity, integrity and availability of the envisaged services across all the delivery channels. The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging a complete end to end automation of some of the core functions of the ministry and agencies. For end to end automation of the service delivery, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) National Payment Gateway (NPG) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative the success of the health initiative will directly depend of the how successfully Ethiopia achieves high level of Internet and Mobile penetration and how successfully private hospitals are integrated into the system. 46.87 Mil. Birr

Pre-Requisites

Budget

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

IX. E-Trade Initiative name Objective e-Trade Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to Trade and Industry through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality and efficiency. Convenience to the Industries, Businesses ,Large, Medium, Small and Micro Enterprises, Investors and the general public for informational and transactional services Improvement in the service levels of Trade and Industry ministrys services leading to timely Business aid to the citizens thereby improving the overall Economic scenario in the country Uniform and transparent licensing process leading to efficient Trade and Industrial service delivery Convenient and accurate monitoring of certification and license status of Business institutions Putting SMME Development project on a fast track and aligning the e governance objectives with the Agencies and Bureaus Facilitating and developing the Import and Export Trade linkages Ministry of Trade Ministry of Works and Urban development Public Sector Undertaking(PSU) Regional Trade and Industry Bureaus Woreda Trade and Industry offices Agencies Large Industries Small Micro and Medium Enterprises (SMME) Foreign and Domestic Investors International Relations Sectoral Growth Trade and Industry Portal Works & Urban Development Application (WUD) Enterprise(SMME & Large Industries) Management System (EMS) Trade (Import/Export) Management System (TMS) Investors Management System(IMS) Integration of Domestic(Public and Private) Enterprise Linkages Sector and Business specific ICT Infrastructure and Applications Support

Outcomes expected

Coverage List of major components to be addressed

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name Services that will be delivered

e-Trade Service Major component Channels Info / Transactiona l

Category

Provision of Investor Information

IMS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2B

Informational

Policies on Business Loans

G2B

Informational

Trade name and trade mark registration and renewal

G2B

Transactional

Collection of fines if businesses operate without license or outdated license Requesting for Business area

G2B G2B

Transactional Transactional

Provision of Export/Import Trade Information to the business community

TMS

G2B

Informational

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Trade Dissemination of market research to Exporters for investing in existing as well as new markets Application for Subsidies and Duty relaxations National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers G2B G2B Informational Transactional

Provision of Information on SMMEs and Large Industries

EMS

G2C

Informational

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Trade - Licensing and Registration services(Issuance, Renewal and canc ellation), - Licensing of Professional, contractors - Licensing of construction machines Agency Government Housing: -Request Rental Service Residential Housing -Request renewal housing contract tenants. -Request maintenance -Request transfer of right -Various notifications for for request for of lease by by customers for for WUD National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers G2B Transactional

Housing include

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name Implementation plan

e-Trade

Yr v/s Projs

Implementation Plan Year 2 Ministry Portal WUD, IMS TMS EMS Industry Linkages Core Infrastructure Hosting Business Specific Applications Industry Linkages are initiatives to explore and implement synergies between the sectors/Industries and also between SMME and Large industries Year 3 Year 4 year 5

Spread of sub-Projects Pre-Requisites


PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

EMS, TMS and IMS Management Systems shall be purely informational in Year 1 with web interfaces. These systems shall be developed for specific workflow applications in Year 2 and Year 3.

Customized Business specific ICT Applications and Infrastructure shall be developed and hosted for usage by the Local industries. These could be implemented in collaboration with the Private sector on appropriate PPP Models.

Budget 9.83 Mil. Birr The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging a complete end to end automation of some of the core functions of the ministry and agencies. For end to end automation of the service delivery, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) National Payment Gateway (NPG) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Agrinet

Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Trade implementation of the initiative the success of the e-Trade initiative will directly depend on how successfully Ethiopia achieves high level of Internet and Mobile penetration and how successfully SMMEs are integrated into the system.

ICT Support to Domestic Industries: ICT support in terms of Infrastructure, Information and Linkages through ICT shall be extended to the local Industries and Small Micro and Medium Enterprises (SMMEs) in particular. Specific Software solutions shall be built for the SMME sector in view of the Growth and Transformation Plan of Ethiopia as follows. Developing the micro and small-scale enterprises sector so that it contributes, to the development of the industrial sector as a whole serve as the basis, and contributes to the development of the agricultural sector and create employment opportunities. Enabling all industries to utilize their full capacity in order to increase production and productivity. o o o o Enable the sector to develop strong linkage with the agricultural, medium and large scale industrial sector. Improving SMES management skills in a coordinated and networked manner with the existing extension systems. Working in collaboration with TVET and other appropriate institutions in expanding and strengthening the urban industrial extension programs. Providing credit facilities and develop saving culture for MSEs.

X. Employment Initiative Employment Management System name Objective Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to Employment to the ministry of Labour through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality and efficiency. Outcomes Management of Unemployment in the country expected Issuance and certification for unemployment Coverage List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered Integration and licensing of the Agencies Issuance and renewal of work permit Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs Addis Ababa City Administration Employment Information Portal Employment Management System Service Major component Channels Category Service Type

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Unemployment Registration/ Unemployment Certificate Overseas employment registration for Ethiopian Nationals Employment Agency License Renewal

Employment Information Portal Employment Management System

National Portal, Ministry of Labour Portal, ICT centers. National Portal, Ministry of Labour Portal, ICT centers. National Portal, Ministry of Labour Portal, ICT centers.

G2C G2C, G2G G2B

Transactional Transactional

Employment Management System Employment Management System

Employment Agency Licensing (New)

National Portal, Ministry of Labour Portal, ICT centers.

G2B

Transactiona l

Foreign Nationals work permit

Employment Management System

National Portal, Ministry of Labour Portal, ICT centers.

G2C, G2G

Transactional

Job Matching, Labour Market Information

Employment Information Portal

National Portal, Ministry of Labour Portal, ICT centers. National Portal, Ministry of Labour Portal, ICT centers

G2C

Informatio n

Registration of Labour Unions Employment Unions Work Places Collective Agents Safety & Health Committees Work place accidents Institution & Partner Organisations Implementati on plan Yr. v/s Project Spread of subprojects Year 2

G2C, G2B

Transactional

Employment Information Portal Employment Management System

Implementation Plan Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Employment Portal Employment Management System Integration with other systems

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

PreRequisites

Budget

This initiative is a comprehensive project that would integrate all the programs of the Ministries , agencies involved. For end to end automation & delivery of the programs, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative, the success of the project will also depend on the success of marketing and awareness activities as the target group - underprivileged section of the society, is the least aware about new schemes and policies. 35.04 Mil. Birr

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

XI. Transport Initiative name Objective Outcomes expected

e-Transport Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to transport ministry through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality and efficiency. Convenience to the general public, business community, other ministries for informational and transactional services Improvement in the service levels of transport ministrys services leading to efficient delivery of licenses, information and other services Uniform and transparent licensing process leading to efficient service delivery Convenient and accurate monitoring of certification and licenses and other vehicle registration information Ministry Government transport agencies Roads Authority Embassies Ministry of Foreign Affairs Private Transport/ Travel agencies Regional Transport Authorities Transport Ministry Portal (TMP) Vehicle Registration Information System (VRIS) Online ticket booking System (TBS) Government Vehicle Insurance Management System (IMS) Integration of various ministries (Ministry of Transport, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Insurance companies, Embassies, Roads Authority) National Payment gateway Service Major component Channels Category Info / Transactional

Coverage

List of major components to be addressed

Services that will be delivered

Issuance/ Renewal of drivers license (National/ International)

TMP VRIS NPG

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C, G2B

Transactiona l

Application for change of ownership of vehicles

TMP VRIS NPG

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactiona l

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Transport Application and renewal of vehicle Insurance

TMP VRIS IMS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Application for request of special numbers TMP VRIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Online notification and collection of fines for traffic violation

VRIS NPG

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Online booking of tickets for inter state government transport

TMP NPG TBS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Generic information on the application process, work flow, timelines, documents needed, ministry offices, work timings Notification of expiry/ renewal of insurance, licenses

TMP

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile

G2C

Informational

TMP VRIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile

G2C

Informational

Information on Public transport timings, tickets availability, routes, stops etc.

TMP TBS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile

G2C

Informational

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Transport Information on the traffic movement, special events, road works, Parking areas, detour information etc.

TMP

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile

G2C

Informational

Notification of traffic violations and penalties

TMP VRIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile

G2C

Informational

Information on regulation, policies, and import duty for vehicles

TMP

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile

G2C G2B

Informational

Implementation plan

Yr. v/s Project

Year 1 TMP VRIS

Year 2

Implementation Plan Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Spread of sub-projects

TBS IMS

Pre-Requisites

Integration with Other Ministries Integration of various core projects and various channels Continuous improvement /updation of policy and regulatory framework ensuring the safety, authenticity, integrity and availability of the envisaged services across all the delivery channels. The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging a complete end to end automation of some of the core functions of the ministry and agencies. For end to end automation of the service delivery, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) National Payment Gateway (NPG) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

Budget

e-Transport implementation of the initiative the success of the e transport initiative will directly depend of the how successfully Ethiopia achieves high level of Internet and Mobile penetration and how successfully other related government agencies and ministries are integrated into the system. 41.44 Mil. Birr

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

XII. Tourism Initiative name Objective

e-Tourism Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to Tourism through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality and efficiency. Ethiopia has great scenic beauty and tourist spots. The government is keen to leverage the same to enhance the contribution of the tourism sector in the national economy. This priority project is envisaged to be a facilitator towards this end. This project would be undertaken under the ownership of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and participation of Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The long-term vision of the Government is to make Ethiopia one of the top ten tourist destinations in Africa by the year 2020, with an emphasis on maximizing the poverty-reducing impacts of tourism, and utilizing tourism to transform the image of the country .The number of tourists who visited the country in 2009 was 412,341, obtaining $211.5 million in revenue. Ethiopia has announced plans to attract around one million tourists. Ethiopia has unique sites to attract tourists and eight of its heritages are inscribed by UNESCO as world heritage sites. Various projects are currently being carried out to expand the tourism industry with $35 million loan obtained from the World Bank in 2009.

Outcomes expected

Convenience to the Tourists and the general public for informational and transactional services Improvement in the service levels of Tourism ministrys services leading to timely aid to the citizens thereby improving the overall Culture and Tourism scenario in the country Convenient and accurate monitoring of certification and license status of Businesses in the Tourism sector. Putting Heritage Development project on a fast track and aligning the e governance objectives with the Agencies and Bureaus To enhance the capacity of national authorities & local communities through the development of a comprehensive & centralized database of the cultural industries Ministry Heritage Sites Artifacts Hospitality Industry (Hotels, Resorts, Traditional Accommodations, Camping Sites, Hostels, Guest Houses) Travel Agencies Tour Operators Tourism Information Travel Visa Disaster Alert International Relations Sector Growth

Coverage

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name List of major components to be addressed

e-Tourism Culture and Tourism Portal Hospitality Management System(HMS) Tour Management System (TMS) Disaster Management System(DMS) Travel Licenses Management System(TLMS) Resource Management System(RMS) (Natural and Cultural Resources, Heritage Sites, Artifacts) Geographic Information System(GIS) Service Major compone nt Channels Category Service Type

Services that will be delivered

Registration of private tour operators

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2B

Transactiona l

Information on Tour Operators, Travel Packages, Itinerary, Fee TMS Registering for a Tour

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C G2C

Informationa l Transactional

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

Registration of Hotels, Resorts, Guest Houses and Local Accommodations

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2B

Transactional

Information about the Accommodations

HMS G2C

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

Informational

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Tourism Booking a Hotel, Resort etc National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers G2C Transactiona l

Registering with the DMS for alerts

DMS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transaction al

Supporting letter for filmmakers ,Tourists to go abroad

TLMS

G2B,G2C G2C

Transactional Transactiona l

Application for Tourist VISA on Arrival

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

Driving license equivalence for foreign citizens

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactiona l

ID card issuance for foreign nationals

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactiona l

Issuing diplomatic and service visas

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Issuing Birth, Death and Marriage Certificates to foreign nationals

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

e-Tourism Information regarding various resources , Cultural and heritage centers RMS National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers G2C,G2B Informationa l

Permission to visit Heritage sites

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C,G2B

Transactiona l

Information on Various GIS Mapping statistics

GIS

National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers

G2C,G2B

Informationa l

Yr v/s Projs

Implementatio n plan

Spread of sub Projects

Year 2 Ministry Portal TLMS HMS

Year 3

Implementation Plan Year 4 Year 5

TMS DMS

Pre-Requisites

Budget

Core Infrastructure GIS The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging a complete end to end automation of some of the core functions of the ministry and agencies. For end to end automation of the service delivery, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) National Payment Gateway (NPG) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Agrinet Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative the success of the e-Trade initiative will directly depend on how successfully Ethiopia achieves high level of Internet and Mobile penetration and how successfully SMMEs are integrated into the system. 36.34 Mil. Birr

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Strategic Direction The Priority projects are aligned with the cultural policy that targets to create a favorable condition to the languages, cultural, historical and natural heritage, fine arts, handicrafts, oral literature, customs and other cultural elements of the nations, nationalities and peoples of Ethiopia, receive equal recognition. The Ethiopian Tourism policy focuses on identifying the countrys historical, cultural, wildlife and natural resources to develop responsible and sustainable tourism through the participation of the private sector, local community. Moreover, the wildlife conservation policy is to create conducive environment whereby the countrys wildlife and their habitats are protected and developed in a sustainable manner. Disaster Management System Ethiopias major cities like Addis Ababa, Nazret, Dire Dawa and Awassa are very near main fault lines such as the Wonji fault, the Nazret fault, the Addis-Ambo-Ghedo fault, and the Fil Woha fault lines along which numerous earthquakes of varying magnitude have occurred over the years. Other cities like Arba Minch, Dessie, and Mekele are also located in some of the most seismically active areas in the country. Hence the Government needs to constantly monitor and alert the citizens against Flood risk, Epidemic risk, Earthquake Risk, Volcanic Activity Risk etc. The Disaster Management System serves as a Disaster Alert and Coordination System provides near real-time alerts about natural disasters around the Country and tools to facilitate response coordination. It shall also provide linkages for provision of stand-by emergency centers and mobile sub-stations. Geographic Information System (GIS) Geographic information system (GIS) integrates hardware, software, and data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all forms of geographically referenced information.GIS systems are used in cartography, remote sensing, land surveying, Forest cover/ Population density mapping, hydrographs, public utility management, natural resource management, precision agriculture, photogrammetric, geography, urban planning, emergency arrangement, navigation, aerial video, and localized search engines. It integrates stores, edits, analyzes, shares, and displays geographic information for informing decision making. GIS applications are tools that allow users to create interactive queries (user-created searches), analyze spatial information, edit data, maps, and present the results of all these operations.

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

XIII. Tax Initiative name Objective Outcomes expected

Tax Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to Tax through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality and efficiency. Timely and effectively tax revenues generated efficient collections Simplifying administration of tax and providing better control over compliance Timely tracking of late-files and late-payers Over all view of all taxpayer liabilities and payments Ensure that tax payer data collected is valid and provides an easy-to use assessment calculation method Improvement in customer satisfaction levels regarding tax related services. Revenue and Custom Authority including the Business Processes and Directorates Regional Branch Offices Customs Authority Coordination offices Upgradation of Standard Integrated Government Tax Administration System (SIGTAS) to Tax Management and Information System(TMIS) National data set(NDS) Custom and Revenue Authority Portal(Portal) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Payment gateway (NPG) PKI Framework(PKI) Major component Channels Category Service Type

Coverage

List of major components to be addressed

Services that will be delivered

Service

Online application of Registration as a Taxpayer

Upgradation of SIGTAS TMIS

National Web portal, Authority portal, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, ICT Centers

G2C and G2B

Transactional

Online filling of Tax Return (Land tax, Rental Housing tax (paid by owner), Turnover tax, TV tax, VAT, and Excise tax)

G2C and G2B

Transactional

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

Tax File a declaration National Web portal, Ministry portal, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, Mobile, ICT Centers National Web portal, Ministry portal, ICT Centers G2C and G2B Transactional

View Pending messages

G2C and G2B

Informational

View Registration Data

G2C and G2B

Informationa l

View Field assessments

G2C and G2B

Informationa l

View list of decelerations not filed

G2C and G2B

Informationa l

List previous Tax returns

G2C and G2B

Informationa l

Show filed declaration

G2C G2B

Informationa l

Tax clearance certificate

G2C G2B

Transactiona l

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Initiative name

Tax TIN Number Registration National Web portal, Ministry portal, ICT Centers G2C G2B Transactional

Yr v/s Projs

Implementatio n plan

Implementation Plan Year 1 Portal TMIS Integration of various Sub Projects and various channels Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 year 5

Pre-Requisites

Budget

Continuous improvement /updation of policy and regulatory framework ensuring the safety, authenticity, integrity and availability of the envisaged Tax related services across all the delivery channels The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging a complete end to end automation of some of the core functions of the Authority. For end to end automation of the service delivery, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Payment Gateway (NPG) Public key infrastructure (PKI) Up gradation of National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative the success of the Tax initiative will directly depend of the how successfully Ethiopia achieves high level of Internet and Mobile penetration and how successfully all the Branch and coordination offices s are integrated into the system. 43.37 Mil. Birr

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Spread of Sub -Projects

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

XIV. e-Court Initiative name e-Court Management System Objective Provisioning of major informational and transactional services related to Court to Ministry of justice, Federal Supreme Courte and Regional Courts through electronic channels thereby improving the service deliverys quality, tracking and efficiency. Outcomes Better awareness about functioning and processes of the Ministry of Justice, expected Federal Supreme Court. Coverage List of major components to be addressed Digitized copy of the Law, Acts and case Documents. Applications for the Case filling, Property Details etc. Ministry of Justice Federal Supreme Court Regional Court E-Court Portal Property and Land management system Case Management Application

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Services that will be delivered

Service

Major component

Channels

Category

Service type

Buying & Selling Property Agreement Land Ownership Land transfer Property Registration Application for a Pleading Document Transfer Case Filing Adjourning Cases

National Portal, ICT Centers

G2C,G2B, G2G G2C,G2B, G2G G2C,G2B, G2G

Transactional

e-Court Portal, Property and Land Management System

National Portal, ICT Centers

Transactional

e-Court portal, Case management Application

National Portal, ICT Centers

Transactional

Implementatio n plan

Yr. v/s Project Spread of sub-projects

Year 2 e-Court informational Portal

Implementation Plan Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Case Management System Property and Land Management System

Pre-Requisites

Integration with Regional Court and Property Systems This initiative is a comprehensive project that would integrate all the programs of the Justice Ministry. For end to end automation of the delivery of the programs, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS)

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Budget

National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative, the success of the project will also depend on the success of marketing and awareness activities as the target group - underprivileged section of the society, is the least aware about new schemes and policies. 31.80 Mil. Birr

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XV. Municipalities Initiative e-Municipality Management System name Objective Provisioning of the e-services to ensure a safe and clean environment for a healthy and productive society with improved access to social services and physical infrastructure. Institute good governance with efficiency, transparency and accountability to the residents. Overall citizen satisfaction by providing convenience and improved service delivery. Provide decision support system to the Addis Ababa city administration Cabinet, Bureaus, Authorities and Agencies for better planning, development and management. Improve the quality of Citizen Service Delivery System and offer these services with optimal effectiveness and transparency. Allow data sharing across different departments, thus bringing about the efficiency in administration functioning. Help different departments to improve their revenue collection efficiency. Harness the use of technology to create sense of achievement amongst employees and citizens. All Urban Local bodies of federal and Regional Municipal Portal Certificate generation module Payment / Tax collection Module Accounts Module Licenses Module Project Systems (for Water/Sewerage / Roads /Building etc.) GIS Application Grievance Information System Human Resource Management System Document & Workflow Management System e-Procurement Asset Management System Material Management System Fleet Management System

Outcomes expected

Coverage List of major components to be addressed

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Implementati on Plan

Agency

Service

Channels

Major Component

Category

Service Type

A.A. City Administra tion Communic ation Affairs Bureau A.A Mass Media Agency

Information Provision about A.A. City Administrat ion Request for Archives of News, Television Programs, Radio Programs Download of Radio Program

Portal

Addis Ababa City Information Portal Portal, Storage Server, Grievances redressed system

All G2G All

Informational Transactional Informationa l

Portal

Portal, Mobile

Download of News

Portal, Mobile

All

Informational

Application for sponsorship of News, Communica tions Request to post News

Portal, ICT centre

G2B G2B

Transactional Transactional

Portal, ICT centre

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Request for Advertising different bids and names etc. Information on determinati on of design standards and preparation of design for construction of roads Appeal to damaged roads

Portal, ICT centre

G2B G2B G2C

Transactional Informational Transactional

Portal

Portal, ICT centre, Mobile

A.A. City Courts

Requests for the permission of blocking of the road temporarily Application for change of name.

Portal, ICT Centers

G2G,G2C Complete Backend applicati on in synchron ize with front end. Digital certificat es G2C

Transactional Transactional

Portal, ICT Centers

Application for declaration of absence. Application for succession Certificate.

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C G2C

Transactiona l Transactiona l

Portal, ICT Centers

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Application for marriage certificate.

ICT Centre

G2C

Transactiona l

Application for certificate of guardianshi p. Give information about court case such as adjournmen t date. Issuance of Resident ID

Portal, ICT Centre

G2C G2B, G2C

Transactiona l Informational

Portal, Mobile

A.A. acts and Civil Status Documents Registratio n Office

Issuance of Marriage Certificate

Portal with full back end applicati on processin g and Digital Certificat e

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C G2C

Transactional Transactional

Portal, ICT Centers

Issuance of Divorce Certificate

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Issuance of Birth Certificate

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Issuance of NonMarried Certificate

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

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Issuance of Death Certificate

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

A.A. City Administra tion Environme nt Protection Authority

Information on creating awareness for protecting the city from different pollution and natural resource degradation Issuance of license for mining

Portal, Payment Gateway, Backend Applicati on Integrati on

Portal, ICT Centers

All G2B

Informational Transactional

Portal, ICT Centers

Environmen tal Impact Assessment Permit. Request for environmen tal Lab test

Portal, ICT Centers

G2B G2B

Transactiona l Transactional

Portal, ICT Centers

A.A City Administra tion Cleansing Manageme nt Agency

Request for disposal of solid waste

Grievanc es Redresse d system, Call Centers

Portal, Call Centers, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

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Addis Ababa Civil Service Agency

Distributing Organizatio nal Structure for sub cities and center Offices Distributing directives, guidance, rules and regulation concerning with promotion, allowance, transfer, requirement of employment discipline. Collect data about employees profile form all offices Provision of statistical analysis about employees profile. Receiving appeals from employees (Administra tive court) Recruit new employees for all sub cities and center offices

Informati onal Portal, HRMS, Call Centre

Portal, Call Centers

G2G G2G G2G G2G G2G G2G,G2C

Informational Informational Informational Informational Transactional Transactional

Portal, Call Centers

Portal, Call Centers

Portal, Call Centers

Portal

Portal

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Addis Ababa City Administra tion justice bureau

Distribution of laws

Portal, Call Centers

Portal, Call Centers

All

Informational

Registration of complaints investigatio n and litigation sub process Registration of Tax appeal

Portal, Call Centers

All G2B

Transactional Transactional

Portal, Call Centers, ICT Centers

Addis Ababa Water and sewerage authority

Request for new water line

Request for maintenanc e of Water/Sewe rage lines Request for sewerage service

Internet Portal with Backend processin g, Payment Gateway, MIS

Portal, Call Centre, ICT Centers

All All All

Transactional Transactional Transactional

Portal, Call Centre, ICT Centers

Portal, Call Centre, ICT Centers

Bill collection

Portal, Call Centre, ICT Centers

All

Transactional

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Addis Ababa Educationa l Bureau

Educational managemen t information for researchers Information on how to get examinee ID Registration of Private ECLSE examinees

Portal, Payment Gateway, Digital Certificat es

Portal

All All G2B

Informational Informationa l Transactional

Portal, Call Centers

Portal, Payment Gateway, ICT Centers

Request for summer course registration

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C

Transactional

Request for grade 8 report card when they lost it City council of Addis Ababa News Release Portal, Grievanc es redressed system, Digital certificati on

Portal, ICT Centers

G2C All

Transactiona l Informationa l

Portal, ICT Centers

Press Release

Portal, ICT Centers

All

Informationa l

Documentat ion and disseminati on of information

Portal, ICT Centers

All

Informationa l

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Disseminati on of declaration ratified by the council Request for buying laws

Portal, ICT Centers

All G2B, G2C

Informationa l Transactiona l

Portal, ICT Centers

Receiving appeal

Portal, ICT Centers

G2B, G2C

Transactiona l

A.A Urban Plan and Informatio n Institute.

Preparing Structural Plan

Preparing Local developmen t Plan

Portal, Backend applicati on, GIS, Payment Gateway, ICT Centers

Application

G2G G2G

Transactional Transactional

Application

Collecting land and land related data Request for land and land related data (has transaction fee) Information on safety inspection and certification

Application

G2G G2B, G2C

Transactiona l Transactional

Portal, ICT centers

A.A Fire and emergency service

Portal, Call Centers

Portal, Mobile

All

Informationa l

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Information on safety consultancy

Portal, Mobile

All

Informationa l

Information on training and awareness A.A beautificati on park and symmetry Request for park and recreation center/hall Portal, Payment Gateway, Call Centers

Portal, Mobile

All G2B, G2C

Informationa l Transactional

Portal, ICT Centre, Payment Gateway

Information on how to get funeral service Information on the provision of ornamental seedlings Information on green area adoption and outsource service Information on public relation mobilization and awareness Implementati on Plan Yr. v/s Project Spread of core and subprojects

Portal, Mobile

Modules

Implementation Plan Yea Yea r2 r3

All All All All

Informationa l Informational Informational Informational Yea r4

Portal, Mobile

Portal, Mobile

Portal, Mobile

Year 5

Municipal Portal Certificate generation module Payment / Tax collection

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PreRequisites

Module Accounts Module Licenses Module Project Systems (for Water/Sewerage / Roads /Building etc.) GIS Application Grievance Information System Human Resource Management System Document & Workflow Management System e-Procurement Asset Management System Material Management System Fleet Management System This initiative is a comprehensive project that would integrate all the programs of the City Administration of Addis. For end to end automation of the delivery of the programs, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative, the success of the project will also depend on the success of marketing and awareness activities as the target group - underprivileged section of the society, is the least aware about new schemes and policies. 37.97 Mil. Birr

Budget

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XVI. Passport & Visa Initiative name Passport & Visa Management System Objective Automation of services provided with respect to issue, renewal of passports and visa services of Ministry of Foreign Affairs Outcomes Better functioning and processes of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs expected Faster & more efficient issue and management of applications and documents Reduction in opportunities for fraudulent applications

Coverage

Ministry of Foreign Affairs Immigration Offices International Airport Passport & Visa Management Application Status check facility on channels (Portal, call centre, etc) Service Major component Channels Category

List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered

Service type

Application Renewal Replacement Visa Application, Processing & Issue Passport & Visa Management system

National Portal, ICT Centers

G2C,G2B, G2G

Transactional

ID Card issue to Foreign Nationals

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Implementation plan

Yr. v/s Project Spread of subprojects

Year 1

Implementation Plan Year 2 Year 3

Year 4

Passport & Visa Management System

Pre-Requisites

Budget

This initiative is a comprehensive project that would integrate the programs of the Foreign Affairs Ministry in passport and visa areas. For end to end automation & delivery of the program, it will be important that core infrastructure projects run in parallel and are completed on time. Following core projects will have to be executed on time for successful implementation of the initiative National Data Set (NDS) National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF) Public key infrastructure (PKI) National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET) Implementation of the Network Master Plan Apart from the key core projects to be undertaken for the successful implementation of the initiative, the success of the project will also depend on the success of marketing and awareness activities as the target group - underprivileged section of the society, is the least aware about new schemes and policies. 31.80 Mil. Birr

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Core Projects Introduction: The e-Government strategy for Ethiopia has identified several strategic priority projects. These projects when implemented would deliver electronic services. As these projects cut across ministries and also if these projects are to deliver fully transactional services over the various electronic channels, it is absolutely essential to develop a robust infrastructure on which these projects should be hosted. This infrastructure would include the following to be implemented during the first 3 years of the strategy implementation. Table 16: Core Projects S.No. 1 Core Projects National Data Set (NDS) Strategy Alignment This infrastructure is required at a National Level to provide a commonly used master database which can be shared across ministries This infrastructure is required at the National Level to act a platform for exchanging data between ministries on a common platform This infrastructure is required at the National Level to authenticate users on the various electronic channels. This facility will provide secure user login based on certain credentials This infrastructure is required for providing a unified payment system for all ministries / agencies to deliver payment related eServices through the identified channels This infrastructure is required both to facilitate electronic transactions and provide required security for the same. Development of EA for all Ministries in line with the National framework Current Status Need to set up Owner Ministry MoCIT Estimated Cost 367 Birr Mil.

National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) National Integrated Authentication Framework (NIAF)

Need to set up

MoCIT

20.60 Mil. Birr

Need to set up

MoCIT

36 Mil. Birr

National Payment Gateway (NPG)

Need to set up

MoCIT

28.08 Mil. Birr

Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)

Enterprise Architecture (EA)

Project in progress, alignment required as per the strategy Needs to be done

MoCIT

124.75 Mil. Birr

MoCIT

6.30 Birr

Mil.

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National Data Centre (NDC)

This infrastructure provides the common hosting facility for all government applications, core projects etc.

National Wide Area Network (WOREDANET)

This infrastructure is required to provide the back bone connectivity for all ministries and agencies to be in a common wide area network

Project in progress, alignment required as per the strategy Project in progress, alignment required as per the strategy

MoCIT

MoCIT

Implementation Plan for the Core Projects The core projects, as mentioned are proposed to be implemented in the 1st three years of implementation of the strategy implementation, considering the fact that they would be building blocks/ or the facilitators for the priority project implementation. Broad level implementation plan of the core projects is as below Table 17: Core Projects- Implementation Plan Implementation plan Yr. v/s Project National Data Set National Enterprise Service Bus National Integrated Authentication Framework National Payment Gateway Public Key Infrastructure Enterprise Architecture Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

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The details of these initiatives are provided in the coming sections. A logical diagram of these infrastructures is provided below for reference:
Customers

NDC
Employee

Business

Citizen

Service Delivery Channels

WOREDANET

NCC

Mobile

kiosk

National Portal

Ministry Portal

Public Key Infrastructure

National Payment Gateway

National Enterprise Service Bus (Integration Layer)


Application

Application

Database Database

Private Agencies

Ministry 1

Ministry 2

NIAF

NDS

Application

Application

Application

Application

Database

Database Database

Database

Operational Applications / Databases @ Ministries

Figure 10: Core Projects

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XVII. National Data Set: Initiative name National Data Set Objective Provisioning a national level data set of commonly used data elements across ministries, that can be used by all inter-ministerial applications as well as channels of delivery (national portal, mobile portal, CSC, NCC etc.) for delivering eServices Outcomes expected A database system to support all business requirements of the government Coverage List of major components to be addressed A nation-wide metadata standard for creating and maintaining data repositories for any kind of information in government A common database for data sharing, data integrity, data redundancy, database security between ministries Support standardized nomenclature and value for common data across ministries Assist in better integration of services and applications across ministries Drive the National Meta Data standards Reduce the dependency of applications, channels, interacting with multiple master data bases

The coverage of NDS would be the following: All ministries and agencies of Ethiopia Build a central read-only repository of most commonly required master data that can be shared to all the data consumers (government ministries as well as private) as a single source of truth Develop and Maintain Metadata Standards (data owner, data source system, data type, data width, standard values, etc.) for uniform understanding of the data among the data providers and data consumers Data sharing and validation by the respective entities The expected project duration is 1.5 to 2 years. The project may be initiated within 6 months of the start of the eGovernment strategy implementation Clearly articulated Data ownership responsibility Data sharing policy and guidelines Communication infrastructure for data sharing (ESB) Development of data architecture Dedicated project teams during implementation Dedicated team for operations and maintenance

Services that will be delivered Project duration Critical Success Factors

Implementation options

As these projects involve specialized software and hardware, this should be implemented as a turnkey solution.

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XVIII. National Enterprise Service Bus: Initiative name National Enterprise Service Bus (NESB) Objective Provisioning a platform for seamless integration of ministry / agency applications and database at the back end; integrating all front end channels to deliver eServices Outcomes expected Increasing business agility: NESB enables enterprise to respond quickly to new business changes, develop distinctive new capabilities and leverage existing services for true responsiveness.

Simpler systems: NESB are based on industry standards and loosely coupled integration will reduce complexity when compared with integrating systems on a solution-by-solution API-based integration basis. Standards: Service-oriented architectures make it possible for organizations to develop, implement and reuse processes that are technically enabled and integrated through the use of web services standards such as XML, SOAP and WSDL Process/Data High Availability: NESB would provide high availability for business process runtime and process data, without any complex hardware and configuration. Ensure better scalability, reducing integration expense, and lowering maintenance costs. All ministry and agency applications identified in the eGovernment strategy Develop a nation-wide SOA and governance model for service delivery Set up of hardware and software for NESB

Coverage List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered

The NESB will act as an interconnection to bridge various component services provided by ministries for exchange of information. This would include the following: Seamless integration of applications and databases of ministries / agencies to deliver eServices Create SOA based service architecture Act as a framework for routing or mediating the information that flows between ministries, transforming the messages between requestors and providers

Project duration Critical Success Factors

The expected project duration is 1.5 to 2 years. The project may be initiated within 6 months of the start of the eGovernment strategy implementation Identify the list of all business services for integration Alignment of SOA for developing services Existence of Data sharing policy and guidelines Dedicated project teams during implementation Dedicated team for operations and maintenance

Implementation options

As these projects involve specialized software and hardware, this should be implemented as a turnkey solution.

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A logical diagram of the NESB describing the various components and interaction is provided below:

NIAF

N S E B

Figure 11: National Enterprise Service Bus

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XIX. National Integrated Authentication Framework: Initiative name National Integrated Authentication Framework - NIAF Objective Provisioning of a unique identity based login to individuals for accessing the various electronic channels of government (National Portal, Mobile Portal, Common Service Centre (CSC) and National Contact Centre (NCC) & other ministry applications. Outcomes expected Single authentication facility for individuals, business and government to be used across all ministries and agencies Assist in building other capabilities on the electronic channels like personalization Can be offered as an authentication management solution for private sector like banks, business offices etc.

Coverage

List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered

Project duration Critical Success Factors

The IAF is envisaged to be utilized by the following: Applications: All government electronic Channels- National portal, Ministry websites (Intranet and internet), Mobile, CSC, NCC, all ministry back end applications Usage: To be provided to all citizens and legal residents of Ethiopia Set up the NIAF infrastructure Provisioning of all levels of authentication Integration with channels and eServices A national authentication framework IAF to have the following levels of authentication Level 1: Username & password Level 2: Username & password + Biometric Level 3: Username & password + Biometric +Token (RSA, PKI) The expected project duration is 1.5 to 2 years. The project may be initiated within 6 months of the start of the eGovernment strategy implementation The above mentioned initiative is a comprehensive project envisaging the complete end to end automation of authenticating all individuals of Ethiopia to use the various electronic services provisioned on electronic channels. The pre-requisites are: A nation-wide unique identity number (UIN) for all citizens and residents of Ethiopia Data base of the Unique id Infrastructure for high end authentication chip based (smart card) for all (UIN), PKI certificates Availability of an Nation-wide enterprise service bus to integrate the NAG services to all requestors Dedicated project teams during implementation Dedicated team for operations and maintenance

Implementation options

As these projects involve specialized software and hardware, this should be implemented as a turnkey solution.

A logical diagram of the National Integrated Authentication Framework describing the various components and interaction is provided below:

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Figure 12: National Integrated Authentication Framework

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XX. National Payment Gateway: Initiative name National Payment Gateway Objective Provisioning of a national payment gateway for Ethiopia to enable all modes of electronic payments to be transacted through all the electronic channels of delivery Outcomes expected Single, unified electronic payment solution across all government entities. Enable all government payment services under one umbrella; making it easy, convenient and secure payment process for all its citizens, businesses and the government. Provide for greater payment flexibility, features & methods Enables all modes of payment -Card based payments, Direct Debit & eBanking, eWallet Coverage All transactional payment eServices All electronic channels that accept electronic payments List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered Set up the National Payment Gateway infrastructure Provisioning of all payment types Integration with channels and eServices Set up the payment gateway infrastructure with payment mechanisms such as - Credit cards, Direct Debits, Net Banking, ePurse, eWallet, eVouchers and/or, Any other payments that is currently available in the proposed product by the respondent need to be included in the solution

Project duration Critical Success Factors

Implementation options

The expected project duration is 1.5 to 2 years. The project may be initiated within 6 months of the start of the eGovernment strategy implementation Availability of eTransaction laws to support electronic payment Availability of infrastructure at the financial institution levels e.g. Banks to become Payment Service Providers (Card acquires, card issuers, merchant banks etc.) Compliance with international laws and practices for enabling electronic payments like PCIDSS Dedicated project teams during implementation Dedicated team for operations and maintenance As these projects involve specialized software and hardware, this should be implemented as a turnkey solution.

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A logical diagram of the National Payment Gateway describing the various components and interaction is provided below:

Figure 13: National Payment Gateway

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XXI. Public Key Infrastructure Initiative name Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) Objective Provisioning of PKI based identification, integrity and non-repudiation for online transactions related to the eGovernment projects in Ethiopia Outcomes expected Ensuring safe and reliable online transactions for government, public and private Coverage List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered Project duration Critical Success Factors Support the use of other online systems line Payment Gateway, Authentication Framework, eServices, document signing etc. Nationwide initiative for issuance and use of PKI for all electronic transactions for government and private Set up of the PKI environment Provisioning the PKI services Create suitable laws for support and use of PKI in online transactions Data encryption services for government and private Identity verification using digital keys Provide end users with eSignature, time stamping, etc. Integration with eServices and applications for use

The expected project duration is 1 to 1.5 years. The project may be initiated within 6 months of the start of the eGovernment strategy implementation Availability of electronic signature act, decree or ordinance Availability of eTransaction laws to support electronic payment Availability of infrastructure at the institution levels for using the PKI Readiness of applications and systems to use PKI based authentication Compliance with international laws and practices for enabling electronic payments like PCIDSS High skilled man power in the PKI area Increased PKI awareness level in ministries/agencies Create high bandwidth and ICT penetration Good telecommunications infrastructure Dedicated project teams during implementation Dedicated team for operations and maintenance

Implementation options

As these projects involve specialized software and hardware, this should be implemented as a turnkey solution.

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Figure 14: Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)

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XXII. Woreda Net Initiative name Woreda-net Objective Provisioning of high bandwidth connectivity between ministries and agencies for sharing data, voice and video communication throughout the country Outcomes expected Create / establish a government wide area network Create single unified, reliable, robust and secure Intranet for the Government thereby facilitating effective communication and creating less paper environment. Provide connectivity to all the e-Government applications.

Coverage Services that will be delivered Project duration

All the participating ministries, agencies, regional and local government offices to be covered in the Woreda-net 216 services would be delivered Phase I: Ethiopia has already covered 13 ministries with fiber optic connectivity and 700 Woredas with terrestrial and VSAT connectivity. Phase II: This phase would cover additional 10 Ministries and 175 woredas in the next 1 Year. Over a period of 5 years all the participating ministries, agencies, regional and local government offices to be covered in the Woredanet Availability of telecom provider to enable high bandwidth Availability of infrastructure at the institution levels High skilled man power for maintenance of the WAN Good telecommunications infrastructure Availability of High security infrastructure Dedicated project teams during implementation Dedicated team for operations and maintenance As these projects involve specialized software and hardware, this should be implemented as a turnkey solution.

Critical Success Factors

Implementation options

The current status of the existing WOREDA Net is provided below: (WOREDA is the administrative equivalent of a District) Table 18: Existing WOREDA Net S. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Region/Site Name Federal Office Addis Ababa Region Tigray Region Amhara Region Oromia Region Somalia Region Beneshangul Gumuz Region SNNP Region Afar Region Gambella Region Harari Region Total no of site (connectivity) 3 11 39 116 199 46 21 106 37 10 1 Connectivity VPN 3 11 5 7 3 1 21 3 37 10 1 VSAT 34 110 195 45 21 103 37 10 -

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S. No. 12

Region/Site Name Dir Dawa Region Total

Total no of site (connectivity) 1 590

Connectivity VPN 1 36 VSAT 554

XXIII. Data Center The Ethiopian National Data Centre (ENDC), under the management of MOCIT, aims to provide reliable ICT Infrastructure and storage facilities to all Government ministries and departments by hosting required hardware, software and applications in a centralized, secure environment, connecting National Data Center and Regional Data Centers (RDC) through fiber optics. 260 terra bytes (TB) and 60 TB of storage capacity is available at ENDC and RDC respectively.

National Disaster Recovery Centre

Regional DR site

Ethiopian National Data Centre

Regional Data Centre

ETC

Regional Data Centre


Regional DR site

Regional Data Centre

Regional Data Centre

Regional DR site

Regional DR site

Regional Data Centre


Regional DR site

Regional Data Centre


Regional DR site

Figure 15: Proposed Nationwide Data center Layout

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It is proposed that the Ethiopian National Data Centre (ENDC) would consolidate services, applications and infrastructure to provide efficient electronic delivery of G2G, G2C and G2B services. ENDC infrastructure shall provide adequate space to house ICT assets of various departments and Government agencies within the country in an environment that meets the need for reliability, availability, scalability, security and serviceability. Various applications and some of the functionalities envisaged at the ENDC include Secure Central Data Repository of Ethiopian e-government, Core Application Servers, Service Delivery Gateway, Citizen Information/Services Portal, Government Intranet Portal, Remote Management and Service Integration facility. Ethiopian National Data Centre will act as a mediator and convergence point between open unsecured public domain and sensitive government environment. The ENDC is equipped to host / co-locate systems such as Web Servers, Application Servers, Database Servers, SAN, and NAS etc. Recommendations: 1) Presently the data centre is not available on 24/7/365 basis though the infrastructure and facilities to provide on 24/7 basis have been created. The NDC is now operating on a single 8 hour shift. Hence there is a need to have 24x7 Team of trained resources at the Data Centres with well defined roles and responsibilities for each team member. 2) Reporting structure of the Data Centre Resouces should be published and shared with the respective Ministires and other government Agencies. 3) Complete Catalog of the inventory (Hardware/ Software) needs to be maintianed and updated regularly along with the vendor details. 4) A detailed Service catalog has to be maintained for each of the service that are being delivered through the Data Centres e.g: IP phone, V-Con, Web, Portal / Application hosting, e-Mail Etc.. 5) Currently services being provided by NDC need to be fully used by the various ministries, agencies e.g Though e-mail server and DNS are available and official mail ids can be used by all government personnel, this is not happening due to lack of a directive from the government making it mandatory for all govt. bodies to use official e-mail/domain. And most of govt. currently uses personal mail ids for govt. correspondence. 6) Domain(.gov..et) has to be created for all Ministries, Agencies and Federal Government to bring them all under that domain umbrella. 7) The infrastructure (Storage, IP Addresses and Connectivity etc.) for each of the Ministries, Agency at the National and Regional Data Centres should be planned, allocated and made available. Presently NDC does have block of IP addresses and also provides facilities for server co-location, provision of dedicated or shared servers for the various ministries. However these facilities should be provided in a planned and organised manner, as per the Governments own ICT implementation plans as well as per the plans of the individual ministries and agencies. 8) The Network capacity of the National Portal needs to be upgraded, considering that E-services will be implemented fully within couple of years. Further, the govt. also plans to migrate the portal to an open source platform. 9) Presently the connectivity between NDC and RDCs is through fibre links. There is a need to build in redundancy and provide back-up connectivity through other media like VSAT, RF etc..

10) DR sites (13 in number) are in process of being implemented. Good practices for establishment of
Disaster Recovery Centres such as building the DRC in a seismic zone different from where the Data Centre is hosted should be adhered to.

11) Capacity utilisation of NDC should be improved. E.g Though NDC is in a position to provide around
100 servers for the various ministries, agencies, only around 30 servers are being used.
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XXIV. National Enterprise Architecture Framework Initiative name National Enterprise Architecture Framework (NEAF) Objective Developing enterprise architectures for all Ministries in alignment with the NEAF Outcomes expected Unified architecture adoption across ministries enabling better integration of ministry applications Identification and implementation of proper governance mechanism for IT implementation across the country Unified standards, guidelines, taxonomies and processes for IT implementation (including software, hardware, interoperability standards) Identification of core and common projects which will act as an enabler for eGovernment implementation Reducing the cost of IT implementation by minimizing the duplicity, increasing re-usability, thereby providing better RoI. Nationwide initiative for all ministries and agencies Develop an EA for each ministry in line with the NEAF and eGovernment Strategy Identification of core and common projects to be implemented across the country Set up of the EA governance framework for continuous monitoring and adoption NEAF is a framework to be used by all ministries to develop the various architectures proposed. This architecture would form the base for eGovernment strategy implementation i.e. the services and strategic priority initiatives proposed. Identification of ministry specific, core and common projects to be implemented Defining the roles and responsibilities for implementation

Coverage List of major components to be addressed Services that will be delivered

Project duration

Since EA is a pre-requisite for any Business-IT implementation alignment, it would be appropriate to develop the EA for all ministries during the initial phase of eGovernment strategy implementation i.e. in the first year of strategy implementation. The ministry wise EA would be considered as the strategy implementation blueprint. Buy-in from High level (ministers of all ministries) for EA adoption Availability of required trained man power in each ministry on NEAF Set up of EA governance body Provision of suitable technical bodies at a national level to guide EA development, consolidation of EA of all ministries and also manage the EA implementation. Provisioning a good EA tool for knowledge management Continuous training for the ministerial staff on EA adoption

Critical Success Factors

Implementation options

Dedicated project teams during implementation There are two options for EA implementation: 1. In-house development: EA development is a continuous activity and therefore, training the internal teams in ministries and agencies to develop their own EA would be the most sustainable model for

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Initiative name

Alignment of EA and eGovernment strategy

National Enterprise Architecture Framework (NEAF) Ethiopia. However, this option would be time consuming, as providing training to all the key employees and then developing EA would take considerable time thereby delaying the eGovernment strategy implementation. 2. Consultant supported: In this model, an EA consultant may support the ministries to develop the first version of EA. The ministries and agencies should dedicate a core team to work with the consultants during the EA development. This would ensure that the ministry team acquires the ability to develop EA as an on-the-job training. This option would consume less time for completion. As a part of the strategy recommendation, we suggest option 2 as the involved in this case would be less and also provide on-the-job training. Ethiopia has already developed an EA framework for the country. This framework is all encompassing and has considered the various elements of the Ethiopia IT initiatives. The alignment of the EA with the eGovernment strategy is provided below depicting the major components: eGovernment Strategy Alignment Strategy has identified the various business services that have to be delivered to the customers and also the channels of delivery. However, the EA framework need to be used to develop the processes, KPIs, etc to develop the business life cycle processes of each of these ministry / agency services The eGovernment strategy has identified most of the core, common and ministry specific applications required for supporting the eGovernment strategy. However, EA may re-validate the same during the EA development. Each ministry will identify the list of applications required to support the government service delivery. This will consolidated at the national level and then the core, common and ministry specific applications will be duly allocated with roles and responsibilities for implementation. The strategy has identified National Data Set as a core project. During the EA implementation, the NDS has to be further elaborated technically to include the data elements, data structure, metadata etc. The components related to technology hardware, software, integration platforms, security, GDN (Woreda-net) etc has been identified at a high level by the eGovernment strategy. These projects need to be further elaborated from the technology adoption side while developing the Technology architecture.

NEAF Reference Components Government Services Architecture Application Architecture

Data Architecture Technology architecture

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The overall EA reference model is provided below:


Vision
ICT infrastructure development ICT in Industry and Private sector

Every aspect of Ethiopian life is ICT assisted


Human resource development ICT for improved health ICT for egovernance service delivery ICT for agriculture modernization ICT in the education sector ICT for research and development

Strategic Initiatives

BUSINESS DRIVERS FOR ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

ETHIOPIAN ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE REFERENCE MODEL


GOVERNMENT SERVICE ARCHITECTURE APPLICATIONS ARCHITECTURE DATA ARCHITECTURE COMMON NATIONAL DATA SET TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURE HARDWARE / SYSTEM SOFTWARE

GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK

DELIVERY CHANNELS

CORE APPLICATIONS
COMMON APPLICATIONS

SERVICES PROVISIONING

MINISTRY SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS

METADATA REPOSITORY ENTERPRISE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

INTEGRATION PLATFORMS

SECURITY
GOVERNMENT WIDE AREA NETWORK

APPLICATION , TECHNOLOGY, DATA AND SECURITY STANDARDS, GUIDELINES, SPECIFICATIONS

Figure 16: The overall EA reference model

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XXV. Common Applications Common applications need to be made available across the Ministries and Agencies to enable smooth functioning and provide focus on implementation of the priority projects by reducing the effort required. The common applications would also facilitate collaboration and consistency across common processes such as procurement, HR management, Financial Management etc. S.No. 1 2 3 4 Common Applications E-Procurement HRMS E-office Financial management Information System (FMIS) Owner Ministry MoFED Ministry Services MoCIT MoFED of Civil Estimated Cost 16.03 Mil. Birr 22.13 Mil. Birr 16.03 Mil. Birr 4.03 Mil. Birr

Proposed Implementation Plan for Common Applications Implementation plan Yr. v/s Project e-Procurement HRMS e-Office FMIS Email XXVI. e-Procurement Given the high percentage of government procurement as a percentage of total procurement in the economy, a comprehensive eProcurement solution can substantially improve efficiency and cost effectiveness of government procurement. eProcurement Agency/ Govt. Advertisers Buyers Employees system will provide businesses and ministries with a common platform to transact. With Multi-Channel Delivery features such as demand Government e-Procurement Meta-site Homepage aggregation, catalogue based User/Dept. Specific View (Personalisation) procurement, dynamic pricing Dynamic Government Search, Yellow Catalog Based Pricing Engine Pages, Supplier engine, etc; the system is expected Co-operative Suppliers Procurement, (Auctions, Suppliers Advertisements, Self-Service Enterprise Reverse eRFX, Business News, Zone to cut down the transaction costs Auctions, eTenders eProcurement Announcements Negotiations) External Portals for not only the government, but Core Transaction Platform; Content Service Providers also suppliers. It is envisaged that Data Analysis (Spend and Demand) Other training will be provided to small eProc. Back-end Application Integration & External Interfaces and medium enterprises so that Portals they can also benefit from the
Back-end / Legacy Systems

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

solution.
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e-Procurement solution will take care of the end-to-end procurement process, including: Vendor management Catalogue management Bid process management Auctions Payment management Contract management Transparency and accountability in procurements Reduction in cost of procurement for government due to increased competition and demand aggregation Reduction in cost of bidding by 50% Improve turnaround time for payments

Main benefits that should accrue due to implementation of the e-Procurement system include:

Following key activities need to be undertaken to establish an e-Procurement system for the Government of Ethiopia: As part of the project, the following key activities are required to be undertaken: 1. Reengineering and streamlining the complete public procurement process 2. Development of the eProcurement solution with the requisite functionalities 3. Procurement of hardware for hosting the application 4. Develop a meta-site homepage dedicated to eProcurement that can also be accessed through the eGovernment portal 5. Vendor development programme

XXVII. Government wide HRMS The efficient management of government resource personnel is imperative to bring in efficiency and improve productivity. A government wide Human Resource Management System is a compelling tool for this purpose. It is recommended that Government wide HRMS solution is commissioned across all government agencies under the leadership of Ministry of Civil Services. As per the assessment study, some work has already been undertaken in this regard. At a minimum following steps need to be undertaken to bring this to fruition: 1. Analysis of the management information needs of the Civil Services Agency and the HR departments of the ministries 2. Decision regarding development of a new software or purchase of a Commercial-off- the- shelf (COTS) HRMS solution. COTS solution is faster to procure and also has good practices embedded within, so using a COTS HRMS with minimum customizations can potentially yield higher performance improvements. 3. User training and awareness campaign to build support and uptake is required. Following benefits are envisaged from this project: Employee empowerment

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Enhancement of computer usage skills of employees as they are likely to use the system for availing services Efficient and effective management of the government workforce

XXVIII. Financial Management Information System An Integrated Budget and Expenditure System (IBEX) is an integrated financial management information system (IFMIS) addressing the core functions of public financial management with the flexibility to include other non-core functions has been developed by Ministry of Finance and Economic Development. It is a custom built solution using industry standard products and open source frameworks that has been developed to support public financial management reforms in Ethiopia. The IBEX web application is deployed on the countrys WoredaNET infrastructure. IBEX is an integrated budget and accounts financial application, which provides the framework for core public financial management functions and has the following core modules Budget Module: This module executes all the budget preparation activities performed by government financial offices. Account Module: This module executes all the budget execution activities of government budgetary institutions. More specifically, the accounts module records the financial transactions of the budgetary institutions, records the aggregated monthly accounting reports and provides accounting reports for ledgers, financial statements, management reports, transactions, expenditures and revenues. Budget Adjustment Module: This module provides the functionality to address changes to the approved budget during budget execution. It specifically enables the recording of budget transfers and budget supplements and the subsequent production of the adjusted budget. Budget Control Module: This module manages the activities of recording budget commitments and disbursement payments in order to enable budgetary control over expenditures. Account Consolidation Module: This module consolidates the budget and accounting data for the entire country. This module allows for the generation of regional and national consolidated reports. Disbursement Module: This module manages the public treasury functions associated with cash management and disbursing funds between public financial institutions. Administration Module: This module provides an interface to manage users and users profiles that interact with the IBEX system. Figure 18: IBEX System

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Under the e-Government Strategy it is envisaged to upgrade this system by undertaking the following initiatives: Implementation of the IBEX application across all the Regions in the Country Standardization of process and workflow for using IBEX across different Ministries/Agencies to simply the process of data compilation Hosting of the IBEX application in the National Data Centre

XXIX. eOffice / Document Management As more public constituents demand instant access to public information, government agencies need an efficient, affordable and accessible solution that eliminates paper work and provides a simple, searchable and secure way to publish documents on an intranet or the Internet. Going forward, the idea is to eliminate the paper-based interactions even within the government across different agencies by using a single solution. Document Management addresses the life cycle of documents (workflow), provides library services (versioning, security, audit trails), maintains components of documents (compound documents) and manages the long-term archives (records management). Managing documents typically involves structured business processes that are document-centric, and often involve lengthy and complex documents; examples include legal or regulatory documents (e.g., land records, applications, and standard operating procedures), contracts and proposals. A document management system helps in streamlining the internal processes to create a paperless office by ensuring an effective migration of old documents from legacy systems to the archives. This strategic initiative is envisaged to provide the following benefits: Communications management through digital registration and routing of government communications Efficiency in receipt, processing & output Performance management through standardization and automation of repetitive processes Knowledge management Transparency accountability operations Cost-effectiveness Responsive to customers Figure 19: eOffice Components and in

eOffice

Enterprise Content Management


Role and Group Management Metatagging Content Collection and Creation Workflow Content Transformation MultiLanguage Library Services Collaboration

Knowledge Management Document & Records Management Digital Asset Management

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Following are the broad steps required for implementing the solution: 1. Analysis a. c. 2. Design a. Definition of requirements i. Solution evaluation ii. IT infrastructure definition iii. Data migration b. Definition of documentation and training c. Transition planning d. Implementation design 3. Development a. c. Vendor selection User documentation b. IT development d. Testing 4. Implementation a. c. 5. System implementation User training b. IT support Roll out of the solution. Scope/definition of the system Analysis of the IT infrastructure b. Analysis of requirements d. Envisioning of the system

XXX. Government wide email system Email can be used as a very effective medium for the inter-office and intra-office communication. Though some of the departments use the commonly used web-based mailing services, it is limited by internet access. The email-ids must be created for the important functionaries in the department. Since the email system will be common across the departments, the common system can be used across with the standardization in email addresses. The Government has already undertaken commencement of this initiative and this may be speeded up and completed quickly, so as to help in the Strategy implementation.

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Section 4 STRATEGIC DIMENSION 2 CHANNELS

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V.

Strategic Dimension 2 - Channels

I. Introduction The term channel connotes the means through which services are delivered to the customers. Channel Strategy represents a set of business-driven choices about how and through what means services will be delivered to customers. The central theme of the e-Government strategy is to enhance public service delivery through the phased electronic enablement of services. However, provisioning services through electronic means is only useful if it facilitates the customers to access services anytime and anywhere in a more convenient manner. Identifying channels of customers preference is a critical success factor for effective eGovernment, as the choice of delivery channels has a major impact on the following: Technology infrastructure required to support the channel such as hardware, software and networking. Standard procedures and guidelines required to operate the channel. Organization structure required to manage and deliver the electronic services such as skills, roles and alliances. Convenience and satisfaction for the customers in availing public services.

II. Current Status Based on the assessment study conducted during the formulation of the eGovernment Strategy, following observations need to be highlighted: Ethiopian eGovernment Portal is already operational, albeit with limited functionality. Government information portals for around 15 Entities including Ministries and other institutions have been hosted presently and still more are under development. All regions and federal institutions are to develop and implement websites with basic level public service delivery information as per the existing policy of government. 69 websites have been developed for regional bureaus to make information accessible to the public. A call centre has been established by MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT with participation of 4 government entities - Transport Authority, Addis Ababa Transport Branch Office; City Government of Addis Ababa, Land Administration; Document Authentication and Registration Office and Social Security Agency. Three Services (weather forecast, currency exchange rates and Electricity) are likely to be provided through the mobile channel in the next 1 month. 92 ICT community centres have been established across the country. These centres are well equipped and could be leveraged as Common Services Centres (CSCs) in future.

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III. Summary of the status of the different channels is as below Table 19: Channel Current Status Sr. No 1 Channel National Portal Status Portals for around 15 entities including Ministries and other institutions have been hosted presently and still more are under development. Few Information services are present -27 Informational Services Channel uptake has been very low Four Agencies with around nine agents now providing information Approx. 700 calls answered per day But there is more demand existing - around 4000 calls are attempted every day Approx. 92 existing ICT Community centres Set up by ICTAD Under design Three Services (weather forecast, currency exchange rate and electricity bill information are likely to be provided shortly

2 Call centre

ICT Service Centres Mobile

IV. Guiding Principles for Channels Strategy Channel strategy should support wider government policies on universal access, modernizing government and social inclusion. Channel strategy should ensure social inclusion, providing coverage for the underprivileged and people with special needs for accessing services. Channel strategy must ensure a no wrong door policy citizens should be able to conduct different steps of the same transaction through different channels in a seamless manner. The agencies should adopt channel strategies in a coordinated manner so as to leverage synergies and economies of scale to deliver integrated services in a cost effective manner. Channel strategy should be focused towards providing clear benefits to both customers and agencies. A coherent and clear Channel migration strategy must be implemented to promote uptake of new channels Channel strategy should ensure integration an applicant should be able to perform different steps for availing the service through different channels Page 135

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V. Recommendations and Targets Based on the technological choices available today, readiness levels of participating organizations, customer preferences and an overwhelming preference of key decision makers for integrated service delivery, the following channels present themselves as viable alternatives for delivering government services alongside traditional government offices: 1. eGovernment Portal: where customers can use internet to request and avail services, search information, make payments, etc

2. Phone (Call Center): where customers can call up to request services and information and access the same through call center agents and Interactive Voice Response technologies. 3. Mobile Gateway; where customers can request services and information through mobile phones and hand-held digital personal assistants. The departments can send customers regular alerts through SMS. 4. Common Service Centers (CSC): where services like Information dissemination, acceptance of service requests and delivery of services is provided to the customers at a single point of service delivery. CSC includes self-service kiosks, utility bill payment centers, ICT community centers etc. Furthermore, the Government in Ethiopia is about to commence implementation of the Unified Billing System (UBS) in a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) mode in Addis Ababa. This project will establish 70 billing centres (for payment of power, telephone & water bills, to begin with), with all required IT Infrastructure. These may be considered for upgradation as CSCs by facilitating delivery of all e-Services. It is also planned to expand the UBS project to more cities. The options of the various channels and the factors of convenience and choice to the customers make it imperative to develop a comprehensively defined strategy for the enablement of service delivery channels. Each of these channels and their implementation plan is discussed in greater detail in the following pages.

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VI. e-Government Portal Government Portal is envisaged to be the primary electronic channel for providing eServices to the customers. There are several advantages that can accrue to the government through the use of eGovernment Portal as the primary service delivery channel.

Implementation model Existing in-house model for portal management Portal design based on customer segments and life events

Outcomes One stop-shop for all e-Services Service improvement through customer feedback

Critical Success Factors Introduction of eServices as per the schedule Content management processes for updating content High uptime Standards and policies for integration and security of data Marketing and awareness campaign
Figure 20: e-Government Portal

The portal can be the integration point and a one stop shop for all government services. It can also act as a linkage between the other delivery channels. User friendly all services available at a single location for anywhere, anytime access. The use of internet helps in reducing load on physical infrastructure of the government by reducing the need for customers to visit government offices. It requires minimal human intervention and enables interactive service delivery. Easier to remember 1 URL than a number of different URLs for each department Presents single face of the government Leads to higher usage of web services as users of already existing services get information regarding new eServices while transacting Internet is a cost effective and convenient means for providing information about services, rules and regulations etc.

Implementation Imperatives Ethiopian eGovernment Portal is already operational, albeit with limited functionality. The Government of Ethiopia needs to consider the following implementation imperatives for further development of the eGovernment portal as a delivery channel for Government services: Mandate a common look and feel for user interface for all government websites of Ethiopia The enablement of services for online/ electronic delivery channels would require: o Changes to departmental IT systems: The existing IT systems are designed to cater to the backend functioning of the departments only, hence would need modification for service delivery through the portal.

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Regulatory changes: The new process redesign for online delivery may also require changes to the regulations governing the service.

Well defined content management processes to ensure that the content published on the portal is relevant and up-to-date. A capable team and robust processes and systems for network and portal maintenance to ensure acceptable uptime and resolution of issues impacting services delivery 24*7. A Monitoring and Evaluation framework for measuring the effectiveness of service delivery through the portal and to identify opportunities for further improvement. Innovative measures such as Common Services Centers to ensure that the limitation of high cost of computer equipment and internet access does not result in low uptake of the portal. Single Government portal can only be successful if it has the backing of all the ministries and agencies. Therefore, it is imperative that an inter-ministerial group is constituted to oversee portal development and maintenance Marketing and awareness campaign for creating awareness regarding the benefits of availing services through the portal. This is extremely important considering that presently the usage of the portal is very poor (approx. 1000 hits per month). 98% uptime of the portal and eServices should be ensured through stringent service levels. Introduction of eServices as per the schedule to keep the momentum Standards and policies for integration and security of data to facilitate delivery of services that span across ministries

Options Analysis The various options available for enhancing the e-Government Portal along with their implications are as follows: Table 20: e-Government Portal Implementation Option In-house Portal Large up-front cost Difficult to implement stringent service levels Outsourced Portal Ownership of servers, data and basic project management team with government Outsource development, operation and maintenance of the portal Lower up-front cost and overheads ASP Model (Vendormanaged) Vendor gets paid based on the number of transactions No extra capacity created Implication

Recommendation Currently Ethiopias e-Portal is managed in-house. Based on the current assessment of the existing portal and websites of various departments, it is suggested that The government may continue with the in-house portal model in the immediate term (next one Year) with enhanced infrastructure to be able to provide eServices. However it needs to Outsource

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development & maintenance keeping ownership with Government, so that the portal is able to provide all services End to End, as they are developed. Enhancement of Portal to provide End-to End delivery of identified 216 E-Services - including facilities of online authentication, digital signatures, payment, etc Establish Governance Framework and portal management processes, to ensure continuous updation and improvement and provide more relevant content & facilities for online Citizen participation in Governance & development this will help increase uptake of the channel Consider options to allow private sector participation in the provision of related value-added services through the portal Government should also consider options to allow private sector participation in the provision of related value-added services through the e-Government portal

As mentioned above Government should consider outsourcing the development & maintenance of the portal, while retaining ownership. This will help ensure that the development of the portal is able to simultaneously develop as the various projects of E-Government Strategy are implemented. The Vendor would be responsible for ensuring that the usability and technical capacity of the portal are up to date while Government would focus on making different services available through this channel and the Governance and management processes, so that Content is always updated and is relevant to the needs of the different stakeholders. It is proposed that the outsourced operations of the portal will commence by year 3. Total estimated cost for the portal is 29.06 Mil. Birr. Outcomes Ethiopia should drive the implementation of the eGovernment portal by taking into account of outcomes such as E-Government portal to be the one-stop-shop for all Government services All possible Government services to be delivered completely through the eGovernment Portal. Availability of services on portal should be in line with their implementation, which will make the following number of services available through the portal channel, over five years -: o o o o o Year 1: 35 Year 2: 73 Year 3: 64 Year 4: 30 Year 5: 9

Visible enhancement in the customer experience and reduced cost of availing services Reduction in per transaction cost for the Government Provide 98% uptime for all online services All informational services, downloadable forms, grievance redressal and status tracking for applications to be provided online. Online feedback mechanism to be established to facilitate participation of customers in improving the services delivery

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VII. Contact Center A Contact Center can be an effective means of obtaining service related information, delivery of some services, and grievance redress. The call center provides the following advantages:

Implementation model Outsource Call Center operations to third party Outbound calls for targeted promotion and push services

Outcomes A single national toll free number for all information services, status checks and complaints

Critical Success Factors Bilingual support in English and Amharic Adherence to service levels and Standard Operating Procedures Integration with other channels especially the eGovernment portal Marketing and awareness campaign
Figure 21: Contact Center It provides an element of human interface to the process of information dissemination / complaints recording It is a cost effective means to disseminate information to the customer in an interactive way. It reduces the need for the citizens to visit the government office for information, thereby helping in reduction of the load on the physical infrastructure of the government departments. Most inclusive alternate channel as telephone is much more pervasive than internet and the number of people who can use telephones is much higher than those that use internet. A testimony to this is the fact that the present call center with participation of only 4 ministries is attracting over 800 calls a day. The record of all interactions with the customer can be maintained and analyzed for continuous improvement in service delivery. It can be used as an outbound centre to promote specific government schemes to target customer segments and pro-actively provide information to the customers.

The Contact centre will essentially provide support for all government services. It shall serve as a first point of contact for most customers exploring alternate delivery channels. The call centre would also provide information on all government services with certain value added services like status checking, and grievance redressal for all services. The call centre is expected to provide multi-lingual support. Implementation Imperatives Following implementation imperatives need to be considered for the development of the Call centre as an effective delivery channel for Government services: Learnings from the in-house call center established at MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT must be documented and utilized for better performance. Multilingual support in English, Amharic and identified regional languages must be provided. Increasing capacity to meet growing demand Adherence to service levels and Standard Operating Procedures. Page 140

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Integration with other channels especially the e-Government portal Marketing and awareness campaign to raise awareness regarding the existence of call center and benefits that accrue by using the channel for availing services. Design the database of expected FAQs from customers on services to facilitate call center operations. These would need to be updated continually. Design of efficient IVR system to resolve maximum queries through self-service by callers. Implementation of a CRM analytics system for analyzing the calls received.

Options Analysis The various options available for implementing the Call centre along with their implications are as follows: Table 21: Contact Centre Implementation Options Option In-house Call centre Implication Large up-front investment Hard to scale down in case up-take is weak Maximum control of government and data security Outsourced Call Centre Servers, data, and basic project management team belongs to the government Call centre infrastructure and operations by private party Lower up-front cost May take some time as call center industry is not very mature in Ethiopia Vendor-managed Call centre (transaction-based payment) Vendor gets paid based on number of calls handled No extra capacity created Least control of the government Concerns over data privacy Recommendation Government of Ethiopia has set up an in-house government call center. Since the current set-up is very basic and not a full-fledged call center, it is suggested that as part of the e-Government strategy implementation, the government should establish an Outsourced Call Center to facilitate e-Services. This is further necessiated by the fact that the Call Centre channel requires expertise of different domains, including IT and Communications infrastructure, operations, human resource management and training and service delivery excellence. However a dedicated team to continuously monitor the service levels and lead further improvements in services delivery must be established. So Government should consider Implementing outsourced call centre model This channel would be able to provide 77 informational and around 40 transactional services (estimate of 30% of the transactional services identified)

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The Call centre would also provide facilities for outgoing calls, emails, live chat, integration (connecting to live databases of Ministries)

It is proposed that a 100 seat facility (including 80 agents and support staff), be established which would take care of increased number of services as well as be able to serve calls from regions. Outsourced operations would start from year 3. Total estimated cost is at 164.57 Mil. Birr. Call centre outsourcing can be a PPP business model wherein there would be toll-free service for services like information and transaction services like payments etc, may be through paid calls. Private partner would be paid on number of calls and the services. Outcomes Desired outcomes of implementing the Call centre as a delivery channel are: A single national toll free number for all information services, status checks and complaints with Multi-lingual (English, Amharic and popular regional languages) support. The services rollout proposed through the call centre channel, over a period of 4 years is o o o o Year 1: 35 Year 2: 42 Year 3: 20 Year 4: 20

Visible enhancement in the customer experience and reduced cost of availing services Improvement in Service turnaround time Proactive service delivery (push services) by leveraging the Call Center. 30% of grievance resolved on call and 90% resolution of all grievances received within 5 working days.

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VIII. Mobile Gateway Mobiles are used world-wide for providing Government service due to their high penetration. Some of the advantages of the mobile Gateway as a service delivery channel are:
Implementation model Outsource Call Center operations to third party Outbound calls for targeted promotion and push services Outcomes All informational, status checking and payment services to be available through mobiles.

Critical Success Factors Cooperation and support of the Ethiopian Telecommunication Company Redesign of content and formatting for mobiles Identification of services amenable for delivery through mobiles Integration with other channels especially the eGovernment portal Marketing and awareness campaign

Figure 22: Mobile Gateway A mobile gateway helps in providing services to customers on the move. Reduction in cost of delivering and availing services. Anytime, anywhere access to information and select public services It reduces the need for the citizens to visit the Government office for information, thereby helping in reduction of the load on the physical infrastructure of the government departments. The mobile penetration is increasing at a fast rate, so this channel is likely to become the most pervasive service delivery channel in the future. Using the mobile gateway, a number of select services can be delivered such as: Payment services; Information services; Currency converter; Flight Information Weather information Status checks Information regarding important / emergency numbers Proactive delivery of services, i.e. push services (services such as intimation regarding renewal of licence which is due in future etc.).

The Government of Ethiopia has already awarded a pilot project for the enablement of 3 services (Currency rates, weather information and Electricity bill information). The high-level diagram below illustrates the different functions in end-to-end solutions of the various components of mobile middleware required to for delivering eGovernment services.

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Table 22: Middleware required for Wireless Applications Architectural Layer Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4 Middleware Required Device integration/drivers; Browsers Wireless gateways Web and wireless application servers; Wireless commerce servers Enterprise application connectors) integration (via application

Web Application Server / Agency Applications

Figure 23: Four tier Architecture for Wireless Application Delivery Implementation Imperatives Following implementation imperatives need to be considered for the development of the mobile channel as an effective delivery channel for Government services: Identification of services amenable for delivery through mobiles Redesign of content and formatting for mobiles Support and cooperation of Ethiopian Telecommunication Company (ETC) must be solicited. Mobile interface / application connectors need to be developed for the e-Government Portal and applicable agency applications. Adherence to service levels and Standard Operating Procedures. Integration with other channels especially the e-Government portal. Marketing and awareness campaign to raise awareness regarding the existence of call center and benefits that accrue by using the channel for availing services.

Cooper

Options Analysis The various options available for implementing mobile gateway along with their implications are as follows: Table 23: Mobile Gateway Implementation Options Option In-house Mobile Gateway Implication Large up-front cost Difficult to implement stringent service levels Lack of in-house expertise in government will require extensive recruitment for the purpose which may be time consuming Maximum control and data privacy Ownership of servers, data and basic project management team with government Outsource development, operation and maintenance of Mobile Gateway Lower up-front cost and overheads Faster implementation Vendor gets paid based on number of transactions handled No extra capacity created WAP server and content converter provided by vendor Integration effort also carried out by vendor Fast implementation

Outsourced Mobile Gateway ASP model (vendor-managed) Recommendation

It is recommended that the Government of Ethiopia should consider options of Outsourced Mobile gateway and ASP model (vendor managed) gateway for its services. This would involve Set-up of Mobile gateway and creation of content for the Mobile channel Provision of 77 informational services and around 40 transactional services

The business model option can be PPP implementation with the private partner responsible for development & maintenance and payment would be based on number of transactions/uptake of the channel. It is proposed that outsourcing of the mobile channel commence from year 2 and the total estimated cost at 19.25 Mil. Birr

Cooper

Outcomes Desired outcomes of implementing the mobile gateway are: All payment services and services related to status queries of applications for availing services to be made available through mobile. Availability of 77 informational and around 40 transactional services The services rollout through the Mobile channel, over 4 years proposed is o o o o Year 2: 35 Year 3: 42 Year 4: 20 Year 5: 20

Visible enhancement in the customer experience and reduced cost of availing services. Wherever possible, proactive service delivery such as reminders for deadlines etc. to be enabled through mobiles. At a later stage, services such as mobile parking solutions in busy areas to be introduced.

Cooper

IX. Common Service Center Common Service centers would facilitate single window multiple services delivery. This means that Common service centers though similar to departmental counters, would provide services of multiple departments. Key drivers for Common Service Centres are:

Implementation model Leverage existing ICT Community Centres and proposed Unified Billing Centres as CSCs

Outcomes Single window multiple service delivery All government services to be available in the locality

Critical Success Factors Training of staff at the CSCs Authority and empowerment of the staff at the CSCs Integration with other channels especially the eGovernment portal Adherence to Service levels and standard operating procedures Marketing and awareness campaign

Figure 24: Common Service Center Customer Preference for human interaction Some government services may require manual signatures on documents A wide array of services of multiple departments could be provided to customers from a single point Common Service Centres are an inclusive means of service delivery as service delivery is not dependent on technology requirements, and technical knowledge on part of the customer is not required. Further, the CSC transcend the problem of low literacy and low PC and internet penetration by leveraging ICT to reach the masses and also providing a human interface to facilitate the delivery of services. Ethiopia has successfully implemented fully functional 65 ICT community Centres that cover nearly 95% of the countrys population. These Centres along with the Unified Billing Centres could be utilized for delivery of eServices. Common Service Centers (CSC) can either be set up at existing government premises (government agency counters) or other locations such as the ICT Community Centers and Unified Billing Centers. CSC shall provide all portal based services and other services requiring physical presence. It would also provide payment related services, along with form distribution and submission for all government services. For customers who do not have Internet access, there would be an information help desk for assistance, and self-service (or facilitated) kiosks for accessing the Internet to avail government services.

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Implementation Imperatives Some of the implementation imperatives for successfully setting up CSCs as service delivery channels are: Framing processes and guidelines to facilitate the delivery of departmental services through CSCs including o o o o Process design, including clearly laid out roles and responsibilities for the people involved Identification of process owner Changes/upgrade in department IT systems Design and monitoring of SLAs, along with escalation and problem resolution in case of breach

Utilizing 92 existing ICT Community Centers and the proposed 40+ Unified Billing Centers for offering government services Customer orientation training and functional training regarding the services to staff at the CSCs Monitoring and Evaluation framework for measuring effectiveness of service delivery

Recommendation It is recommended that the 92 existing ICT Community Centres and the proposed 40+ Unified Billing Centres are leveraged as CSCs for offering government services immediately. The number of CSCs needs to be increased as per the demand for services across the country and also to facilitate easy access to government information and services even in interior and remote areas, in the longer run. It is recommended that additional 800 CSCs be set up in Partnership with the private sector on a PPP business model. This would cover all the Woredas in the country. Spreading the CSCs till Kebele level could subsequently be taken up by respective regions, based on need and demand. The CSCs would charge transaction charges for services availed by citizens which would not only include Government services but also others like photocopy, basic DTP services, etc. However it may be expected that around 50 % of the CSCs could be self-sustainable, in terms of being able to meet operational expenditure and recover capital investment to some extent. Remaining CSCs may need provision of subsidy and support from Government, in order to be viable. It is estimated that an investment of approx. 2206.21 Mil. Birr would be needed over a period of five years for the CSC project. However, the project is expected to start only from Year 2 on PPP model after required tendering and finalisation. Broad level estimate at this stage, of the support needed from Government would be around 50% of the investment i.e. 2206.21/2 = 1103.11 Mil.Birr. The remaining investment is proposed to be provided by the private partner.

Outcomes Government of Ethiopia should drive implementation of Common Service Centers by taking into account outcomes such as: CSC to offer service of all government departments Availability of services through CSCs would be in line with availability on National Portal, which will make the following number of services available through the portal channel, over five years -: o Year 1: 35

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o o o o

Year 2: 73 Year 3: 64 Year 4: 30 Year 5: 9

Visible enhancement in the customer experience and reduced cost of availing services No need for citizens to visit departments for services related to submitting applications, making payments, requests for duplicates, etc and to be provided from CSC All services offered through the portal to be available at the CSC Defined and published service levels for all services to be delivered through CSC Self-service kiosks also to be established ISO certification for processes at Common Service Centers

X. Channel Migration Strategy The introduction of alternate channels needs to be augmented with channel migration initiatives to increase the uptake of electronic channels. Some of the recommended initiatives towards this end are: Promotion of benefits of eServices: To promote uptake, it is essential to educate customers of the benefits of using the e-Services. The customers would use the new channels if there is a perceptible advantage to them in terms of cost, time or convenience. Hence, specific campaigns to highlight advantages of availing services through alternate channels should be conducted. Targeted promotion of service: The Government can identify specific high-value services for targeted utilization improvement. Incentives such as Differential pricing and faster turnaround times: Financial incentives including lesser fees for availing services through electronic channels could be useful incentives for promoting usage of electronic channels. Similarly, turnaround time for services demanded electronically could be reduced as compared to the services demanded through conventional channels to provide incentives to the early adopters. Adding value through information and expertise: Government needs to focus on pulling customers to more efficient channels by making the informational services more useful and attractive. Possible compulsion for channel shift: Government has the option of implementing compulsory channel shift, focusing initially on the more sophisticated audiences of business and intermediaries. One of the ways of compelling the users for channel shift is to offer some services exclusively through the electronic channels. This is one of the most difficult ways of implementing channel shift, but provides maximum benefit as closure of inefficient channels results in savings and enhanced efficiency for the Government.

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Section 5 STRATEGIC PRIORITY 3 ENABLERS

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VI.

Strategic Dimension 3 - Enablers

I. Capacity Building E-Government projects are not equivalent to conventional IT projects. The focus of the e-Government strategy is on service, service levels and sustainability; not on software and hardware. Capacity building seeks to address the skill gaps in the current system and people. Capacity building in the context of this strategy refers to the need to adjust policies and regulations, to strengthen institutions, to modify working procedures and coordination mechanisms, to enhance the skills and qualifications of people, to change value systems and attitudes in a way that meets the demands and prerequisites of implementing the eGovernment strategy. The adjacent figure depicts the journey towards developing a Capacity Building Strategy for Ethiopia. The Strategy emphasizes the need to not only strategize in terms of identifying and Figure 25: Capacity Building developing CB initiatives but also to sustain the capacity that has been developed. A structured Capacity Building framework has been developed as part of the Strategy. The report presents in detail this framework and each of its components. It also lists down the Capacity Building initiatives in each component and how they contribute to achieving objectives laid down for this objective area.

Summary of the Current Capacity Building Initiatives undertaken Ethiopia in the past few years has undertaken significant Capacity Building initiatives such as Technical Vocational Education Training (TVET) centers have been created and around 576 teachers have been trained on ICT to effectively deliver education to students. Around 15 ICT training labs in all the regions have been established for providing training to the TVET teachers. Four Business Incubation Centers to help entrepreneurs in ICT related businesses has been established. A total of 43 private ICT start-ups have entered into business under these established centers. In addition 18 Virtual Incubation in Addis Ababa have been established to support the ICT start-ups and create business opportunities. 645 SME operators have been trained on computer maintenance, basics of computing and database by training institutions such as FEMSEDA and PIC. The ICT Centre of Excellence has been established in Addis Ababa University for research and development of ICT solutions. Computer Refurbishment and Training Center (CRTC) has been established to provide hands on training on computer refurbishment and technical and business training. The key activity included refurbishing donated computers to provide affordable computers to schools, health centers and communities. Training to the Experts: 931 members trained in basic IT skill, 203 members trained in Interactive and Dynamic Webpage Development, 1180 members trained in Advanced Network Management, 103 in IT Security, 80 in IT Security & Cyber crime, 100 members trained in Business (IT) Continuity and
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Disaster Recovery, 60 members trained in C# with dot.net Frame work, 33 in CCSP, 112 members trained in Database Management. Seven Community Radios have been implemented and operationalized which helps in information dissemination and Capacity Building in rural communities.

Some of the improvement opportunities identified during the assessment study include: Almost all the ministries and agencies acknowledge that the biggest challenge to implement eGovernment in Ethiopia is the non-availability of the technical manpower and Capacity Building Lack of established communication between all the Capacity Building organizations for monitoring and evaluating the Capacity Building programs Limited number of IT professionals to support Ministries/Agencies in future plans and initiatives Lack of qualified employees and technical experts (the education and experience of some of the IT personnel are not relevant)

Capacity Building Objectives Objectives identified for IT Capacity Building are: Create appreciation and understanding of eGovernment projects amongst the decision makers Increased computer literacy among Government staff Re-orientation of the government staff to focus on customer service delivery Enhancement in capacities of the ministries to undertake e-Government Projects Development of skill sets amongst customers Effective government wide knowledge sharing and coordination Change Management Plan

Framework for Capacity Building The Capacity building initiative for the e-Government program should work towards the following: 1. Enhancement of required skills within the government to implement and run e-Government program 2. Development of skill sets amongst customers The Strategy for accomplishing the above is enunciated below

Enhancement of required skills within the Government This will be accomplished through the following initiatives: Initiative 1: Creation of Information Technology Services Group Initiative 2: Training Needs Assessment and Preparation of Training curriculum Initiative 3: Strengthening of IT Training Infrastructure including development of a Knowledge Management Portal and e-learning facilities Initiative 4: Conduct Seminars, workshops and study tours

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Initiative 5: Standardization of structure of IT Department across the Ministries and Agencies for smooth & effective implementation of the priority projects. Initiative 6: Incentivize employees to build capacity Initiative 7: Establishment of Common Data Terminals (CDTs) in each Ministry/Agencies Initiative 1: Creation of Information Technology Services Group Our experience shows that governments across the world face the following issues in retaining talented IT staff due to the following reasons: IT directorates / divisions within ministries are too small to offer any career path to IT professionals As IT divisions are small, even minor attrition has a high impact. Reactive hiring to fill up the resource gap leads to compromise in quality of new staff. Due to small IT staff size within ministries, available skill sets are not diverse, as a result evaluating and working on diverse technologies and solutions is difficult. Pay scales of trained IT staff in government are perceived as low as compared to prevailing rates for IT professionals in the private sector Some of the highly qualified staff such as software architects are either too expensive for the ministries to afford or even if they hire them, they are unable to utilize their services to the fullest as the amount of work a typical IT department handles only requires such specialized expertise sporadically.

In order to overcome these difficulties, a recommended course of action is the establishment of a government wide Information Technology Services Group (ITSG) to create a pool of IT resources available for all the government organizations on a need basis. Such an agency would be the responsible for central repository and exchange of all systems and software, would recommend and monitor external IT contracts, develop IT curricula and training models for use throughout government and provide a knowledge base for all IT needs linked to a central knowledge management repository. The detailed structure of ITSG is provided in Section-3 Governance structure. The existing Human Resource Development, Capacity Building, Research and Consultancy Directorate should be enhanced to provide support as envisaged from the ITSG group

Following benefits will be realized through the ITSG (as depicted in Fig 13): Capacity Balancer: ITSG would act as a capacity balancer for Ministries at different stages of IT maturity. While some Ministries may not require any outside support, others might require additional IT resources to accomplish time bound projects. ITSG would help the Ministries that need additional support through the provisioning of resources for completion of the IT projects undertaken by them. Focus on outcomes and timelines: As the ITSG staff will be deployed in any Ministry/Agencies for a fixed time to complete a project; there would be a higher focus to complete the projects on time. Better staff retention and career planning: The size of

Figure 26: ITSG

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the proposed ITSG will be large enough to provide a defined career path and growth opportunities to IT resources. Though the IT resources could work on projects in different Ministries / departments, they would report to the managers in the ITSG and have a deeper career path in the ITSG. Diverse skill sets: Due to the aggregation of resources, diverse skills sets would be available within the ITSG to undertake projects. This will enable the group to use most appropriate people and technologies to provide solutions. Table 24: Analysis of Options for ITSG Analysis of Options for setting up ITSG Options Option 1: Established as part of MOCIT Positive This option is the quickest way for establishing the group, as some of the IT staff from various Ministries may be deputed to the group. This option will allow private participation in provisioning IT human resources without relinquishing the control of the Government. This option will facilitate the linking of salaries to market rates and bring in higher efficiencies and productivity associated with the private sector. This option will allow the Government to cap its IT Human Resource expenditure and define strict service level criteria while also making the Government leaner. Negative However the issue of attrition due to lower wages than the market may not be addressed through this option.

There are three options for the organizational set up of the proposed ITSG:

Option 2: Incorporation as a separate company wholly/partially owned and controlled by the government

This will however, tie up the government with a private partner who may get an opportunity to cast undue influence over the e-Government programme.

Option 3: Outsourcing to private sector with the IT staff of the government being transferred to the private partners payrolls

This option would be the most difficult to implement due to various reasons such as lack of availability of private players in the local market, resistance from Ministries / employees against outsourcing.

Based upon the analysis of the options and current circumstances, option 2 appears to the preferred option. The broad modalities for implementing the concept are as follows: Resources: - To initiate the project, a group of 1-2 resources from each Ministry/Agencies will be identified. It is expected that over a period of time 100+ resources across the three levels (project managers, IT managers and analyst) and multiple skills (technical platforms, change management, project management, vendor management, etc) will be required. For expanding the ITSG, a private sector company can be hired to provide IT resources. The following table provides the advantages and disadvantages of directly engaging and outsourcing it to a private sector company.

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Table 25: Outsourced vs. Individual Recruitments Individual Recruitments Advantages Cost Effective Ensures availability at all times Cuts down the time required for following the procedures of recruitment One stop solution Saves time and effort Disadvantages Risk of attrition Delays in recruitment Risk of not finding the right manpower Funding: - A small budget for setting up of the ITSG and its core team will be required. The operation cost of the group would be centrally funded on behalf of Ministry/Agency depending on the IT projects. Management: - The ITSG will be managed by Programme Management Office (PMO) being set up as a separate initiative under e-Government directorate of MoC&IT Comparatively higher cost Outsourced Agency

Initiative 2: Training Need Assessment and Preparation of Training curriculum For the successful implementation of the e-Government program, it is imperative to ensure that the government employees are provided training so as to re-orient them for customer centric service delivery and educate them to utilize ICT for delivering the envisaged benefits to customers. An indicative list of training areas is provided below: Technology Management Project Management Change Management (including process reforms) Financial Management Soft Skills

However, it is imperative that a comprehensive training needs assessment exercise is undertaken to ensure that suitable course curriculum is designed. In this regard, owing to the different needs of officials at different positions / levels in the government hierarchy it is recommended that officials with similar duties / requirements are clubbed together for training purposes. The various Target Groups for training purposes are: Table 26: Target Groups for Training Groups Group A Group B Group C Responsibilities Leadership( Ministers and DGs) Directors Senior Experts

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Group D Group E Group F Group G

Middle and Junior Level experts Support Functions Staff Clerical Staff Custodian Services

The training needs of these groups will be aligned to specific training areas and courses. A sample of the same is provided as part of Annexure III. The Training Needs Assessment aims to elicit the views of the target groups (Ethiopia employees at various levels) addressing the capacity requirement of handling IT implementation in their own functional domain. It also focuses on addressing the general skill levels and educational background of the target groups. The TNA is to be administered across Ministries at every level. The nodal agency to drive this will be MOCIT. Training Need Assessment will provide inputs for preparation of training curriculum as well. Training courses will be identified for the training areas used in assessing the employees. We feel to cater to different levels of Government staff the training should be offered at three levels. The training levels are described as in the following table: Table 27: Training Levels Basic Level Intermediate Level Advanced Level 1.1.1 The basic level courses would enable the participants to gain an Understanding of the concepts and issues related to the topic It would create an awareness of the range of possible approaches and able to do the task in a simple environment, or with supervision The intermediate level courses would enable the participant to undertake the task in a medium complexity environment. It would also enable decision making and choose an approach where several approaches are available. The advanced level courses would enable the participant an indepth understanding of the topic; it would enable training and managing others performing the task It would enable application of the learning in a complex environment; Advanced level may count towards professional or academic qualifications (to be arranged with higher/further education institutions).

The training courses for each of the levels are provided in Annexure III. 15 ICT training labs in all the regions /Private Training Institutions/COE can refer to this course list and supporting course content may be provided to implement a comprehensive training program for Government employees of Ethiopia.

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Initiative 3: Strengthening of IT Training Infrastructure Development of the Ethiopian Government Knowledge Management Portal Ethiopian Government Knowledge Management Portal accessible to all employees through Woreda-net should be established within the first year of strategy implementation. It is envisaged that this portal will act as a one stop repository for documentation of different initiatives across the e-Government program to facilitate dissemination and sharing of knowledge in the form of learnings and good practices. This is expected to facilitate faster implementation while preventing wastage of effort and resources on reinventing the wheel. Towards this end, a Knowledge Management database needs to be developed to store all the information and be accessible through the Knowledge Management portal. This would help in the creation of the initial database but for the sustainability of this initiative and to increase its usefulness it is imperative that the employees are encouraged to share their learning on the portal and utilize others learning while working on new projects. eLearning modules would also be developed as part of this initiative so that the government employees can take up online learning at a time of their choice without compromising on their allocated duties and responsibilities. The PMO being set-up as part of the e-Government strategy will assist in defining the contours of this portal. Enhancing the existing Regional Training Labs The Regional ICT labs need to be equipped to train the employees in the courses provided in Annexure III. It is imperative to ensure that adequate facilities and infrastructure is created to provide practical hands on training at these labs as well as online training for government employees at remote locations. Tie-up with the ICT community centers The Community ICT Centers across different regions could also be mandated to provide training to the employees in the regions. A tie up between MOCIT and the ICT community centers should be established to provide training to the Government employees in the region. A business model should be established for long term sustainability of such trainings through the ICT centers. Partnering with Private Training Institutes Partnership with Private Training institutes is meant to tap the availability of physical infrastructure and other resources at these institutes. Another important dimension for IT Training is the access to the pool of specialized IT Training experts at Partner Private Training Institutes. To start the initiative, a list of all private Training Institutes operating in the region will be prepared and a study will be conducted to find out their ability to provide training to Ethiopia staff. Initiative 4: Conduct workshops, seminars and study tours Organization of Seminars and Workshops Organization of Seminars and Workshops will enable the knowledge and Skills transfer to a large number of Government employees in shorter period of time. This will also bring a group of experts from diverse experiences sharing them with a group of participants with different roles on a same platform. The content of these seminars and workshops in form of audio, video and printed material will be shared on knowledge gateway.

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As part of this initiative, it is proposed to conduct two seminars each year that will include key-note address by 3 speakers on different emerging technologies across the globe. The seminar will also include panel discussion on these emerging technologies where Government officials will get a chance to interact with elite technology experts from across the globe and gain valuable experience. In addition to these seminars, it is also proposed to conduct two workshops each year where leaders from elite global IT corporations will create awareness amongst the CIOs and CTOs of all Ethiopia Ministries about new technology trends that will enable in improving efficiency of IT functions in their respective Ministries. These seminars and workshops will support various IT initiatives in the region and help in creating a knowledge management system and culture. They will not only enable sharing of information and content but also create awareness amongst Ethiopia Ministries and its employees. Study tours and exchange programmes for the government employees Our experience suggests that Study tours and exchange programmes for senior government officials play an effective role in facilitating a mindset change and to illustrate the fruits of success of the e-Government program thereby building buy-in for the program. It is proposed to select 5 senior Government officials every year for study tours and exchange programmes that will spend a specified amount of time either with the Government of another country or attend relevant courses at reputed places such as the Kennedy school of government, National School of government etc. Such programs are also useful in building networks with other organizations to bring good practices and leading technologies to Ethiopia. Besides visits to leading countries and schools by Ethiopian government functionaries, foreign experts could also be invited to visit Ethiopia to work on specific assignments on various IT initiatives in Ethiopia. The idea here is two-fold: one to gain access to the knowledge of foreign experts in the short term and second to develop skills and expertise amongst the Government staff which will act as a building block for long term implementation of IT initiatives in the Ethiopia Initiative 5: Standardization of structure of IT Department across the Ministries and Agencies for smooth & effective implementation of the priority projects. For the effective implementation of the E-Government Strategy, it is important that a minimum capacity be available, created in the various ministries and agencies. Further, a common organization structure should also be prevalent across Ministries and agencies to facilitate smooth interaction and coordination during implementation and monitoring of the priority projects. The recommended organization structure is provided in the Governance Structure section of this document in section 3. Initiative 6: Incentivise employees to build capacity Encouragement to take up certification courses Employees will be encouraged to augment their skills through third party certifications such as a Microsoft certified systems engineer, a Cisco certified network associate, and a project management professional etc. The encouragement will be in the form of leaves for preparation of exams, payment of examination fees provided the employee clears the exam or any other support that can be provided by the Ministry/Agencies.

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These certifications can be made mandatory for some promotions so as to encourage employees willing to undertake certification courses. In addition to certifications they can be rewarded by their Ministry/Agencies on excellent performance in the exams leading to certifications. However, to keep checks and balances in place, a two member committee will be set up comprising of 1 representative each from the Ministry/Agencies concerned and the MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT that will evaluate the need of the certification for running the business of the Ministry/Agencies and future growth of employee in the Ministry/Agencies in order to avoid any misuse of this policy by the government staff. Encouragement to get trained on various courses provided by IT Academy Letter of recommendations for promotions and salary increments will be linked to successful completion of Trainings and also to employees who perform exceptionally well in IT training. Letter of recommendation will be on following lines: Best performer of the year in all IT training courses Recommendation Letter by Prime Minister Maximum number of credits through IT training courses in a year Recommendation Letter by the Minister Best Performer for each Ministry/Agencies Recommendation Letter by DG Best Performer of each sub-Ministry/Agencies Recommendation Letter by IT head

Encouragement to become Trainers High performing individuals will be provided an opportunity to take up Training of Trainer courses with special benefits from their Ministry/Agencies. They will become Training Champions in their own Ministry/Agencies and provide training to as many employees as possible. Such individuals will be eligible for Recommendation from Minister / Prime Minister and also for out of turn promotions in exceptional cases. Encouragement to take up eLearning modules The employees will be encouraged to take up eLearning modules for training where they dont have to attend classes and can take up online assessment at designated evaluation centres to complete training and earn credits for various courses. Initiative 6: Establishment of Common Data Terminals (CDTs) in each Ministry/Agencies Self-service data terminals will be set up at all the Ministries to promote usage of Technology and familiarity with Computer Systems. This will enable the government staff to learn the use of systems and build awareness amongst them about computer literacy. These data terminals will be used by government employees who do not require computer use in their day to day functioning but would like to get familiar and acquainted with IT environment. These Data Terminals will be operated and run by an outsourced private company. This company will set up a small training centre in each Ministry/Agencies which will be responsible for training Ministry/Agencies staff to become end users of these common data terminals. The training managed by the outsourced private company will be paid based on successful completion (PPP). Provided in Table below is a indicative list of companies who can provide training to government staff in the Ethiopia Ministries

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List of Companies (Illustrative only) S.No. 1 2 5 6 Name of the Company Microsoft IBM Corporation Learning Tree Microlearning

Development of skill sets amongst customers This will be accomplished through the following initiatives: Initiative 1: Promotion of ICT education and e-Government in Schools Initiative 2: Marketing and awareness campaign Initiative 3: Targeted training of businesses Initiative 1: Promotion of ICT Education and e-Government in Schools The course curriculum in schools must have modules on ICT education and e-Government. As Ethiopia has a high proportion of its population in schools, this is the most sustainable way of creating capacities amongst the customers. Moreover, children can help their parents in not only accessing services but also in informing them of the introduction of new services. It must be ensured that every school has Internet access facilities for children. Initiative 2: Targeted Training for Businesses Ethiopia has a high number of small and medium scale enterprises which may not have the resources to train the staff in using online services, e-Procurement etc., It is therefore critical to run elaborate training programs that will create awareness and capability amongst the businesses in using e-Services and electronic channels. This will also make the industry in the country more competitive.

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II. Monitoring and Evaluation The Government would need to keep a track on the progress and assure all stakeholders that the Governments time and financial resources are being spent in an optimal manner. Taking into account the unique challenges of e-Government services from their delivery modes and expectations perspectives, new performance measures need to be developed to provide accountability for various e-Government efforts. The Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) mechanism must not only provide information about the performance of Government policies, programs and projects. It must be able to identify what works, what does not, and the reasons why. The real value of Monitoring and Evaluation doesnt come from just conducting this exercise but from using the results of this exercise to improve performance of the eGovernment program. The objective of the M&E framework is to enhance the effectiveness of the e-Government strategy by establishing clear metrics to measures the success of the e-Government initiatives in delivering services to its stakeholders. The advantage resulting from the e-Government monitoring and evaluation is: e-Government initiatives, most of the times lead to change in the process and delivery modes for the service, hence it is essential to develop new performance measures for e-Government programs The e-Government programs also require significant investment from Government. Some of these cannot be measured in simple financial terms and need to be evaluated on such parameters o o o Improvement of service standards, Increase satisfaction level of stakeholders Increased authenticity and security of information

Provide supporting evidence in policy making in the context of defining Government priorities amongst the competing demands from citizens and society Enhance transparency and support accountability relationships within and outside the Government

Recommendation Implementation of the monitoring & evaluation framework will include 1. Establishment of the PMO to monitor the Programme implementation 2. Development and implementation of a Programme Monitoring Tool 3. Implementation of M & E framework by PMO consisting of: Project progress tracking measures Benefits measurement Impact assessment

4. Implementation of Government Transformation Index (GTI) 5. Implementation of Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI)

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1.

Monitoring physical progress of the projects

2. Monitoring financial progress of the projects 3. Monitoring and evaluating the program outputs 4. Assessing impact of the program Component 1: Monitoring physical progress of the project Physical progress of the project will be tracked based upon implementation status of the project. Based upon the current status of the project, indicators are required to be defined for tracking the progress of the project in a particular stage. The indicators for the various stages along with a conformance index would be defined to track the progress of the projects. The e-Government Project stages broadly include: 1. Conceptualization stage: During this stage, project description document for the project is under preparation. Indicators include: a. c. e. Conducting requirement analysis for the project Identifying services to be covered Risks and issues envisaged and a mitigation plan to address the same b. Identifying a project leader and a team d. Conducting stakeholder analysis 2. Design and Approval Stage: After the project description document has been prepared and Request for Proposal (RFP) for vendor selection has been released, the progress milestones for tracking progress would include: a. c. e. f. Appointment of an implementing agency Definition of target customer base Formulation of a plan for process re-engineering, if required Formal approval of the project b. Definition of core services and service levels d. Appointment of a project leader and a team

3. Pilot and Implementation Stage: In this stage, the Project design would have been approved and the funds released for implementation. The project tracking would be performed on meeting the following milestones. a. c. e. f. g. Status of Government Process Re-engineering Appointment of external vendor Integration with other agencies/projects Technology architecture Adherence to defined standards and policies b. Channel coverage d. Key milestones definition and adherence to them

h. Capacity Building plan and roadmap Component 2: Monitoring the financial progress of the project Measuring the financial progress of the projects is an essential component of the monitoring and evaluation framework. The key indicators identified for tracking the financial progress include:

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Total financial outlay of the project Total funds disbursed till date Expenditure incurred till date Committed expenses Yearly allocation of funds Yearly expenditure Total percentage of funds utilized Additional funds required

Component 3: Monitoring and evaluating the program outputs Overall program outputs/outcomes would be measured along the parameters as envisaged in the eGovernment vision for the project. The indicators definition would be one of the key components of the program design. Component 4: Assessing impact of the program Since feedback of the customers is essential for effective implementation of the Monitoring and Evaluation framework and also for facilitating in mid-course correction steps, the Monitoring and Evaluation framework proposes to measure customer satisfaction levels every year to provide recommendations for improvement. This will also enable the Government of Ethiopia in assessing the incremental improvements in services delivery and perceptions of the customer base as a result of the eGovernment initiatives. This would include the following: Customer satisfaction surveys Report on the uptake of the envisaged services in the project

Outcomes The following are the broad expected outcomes from the Monitoring and evaluation exercise. Quarterly user satisfaction survey on e-Services( Scope of work for an external agency to conduct baseline survey is provided in Annexure XII) Monthly reports tracking project implementation Monthly reports tracking citizen usage of electronic channels to interact with the Government 100% of projects to identify KPI/KPO as part of project design and parameters for measuring success 100% of projects to be evaluated against KPI/KPO by independent agency Award for e-Government programs in Ethiopia, instituted for departments/ individuals

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Monitoring and Evaluation GTI and CSI Government Transformation Index Detailed methodology for calculation of Government transformation index is provided below: Table 28: Government transformation index: key indicators S. No. Overall government transformation index (Assuming the maximum score to be 1000) 1. a. b. c. 2. a. b. c. 3. a. b. c. 4. a. b. 5. a. b. c. 6. a. b. c. 7. Efficiency of service delivery Increase in number of transactions handled Reduction in pending/backlog cases Integrated services provided to customers Quality of services provided Accuracy of reports Relevant services provided to customers Reduction of redundant information in application forms Increase in the capacity of the Government officials (awareness, knowledge, satisfaction) Increase in the awareness of the eGovernment initiatives Increase in the ICT usage of the officials Number of trained officials Grievance redressal system Redressal of grievances within the defined service levels Measures taken to prevent high frequency grievances Accountability and reliability Presence of audit trail activities Status tracking mechanism Ability to identify the owner of an activity / result Capacity to deliver services eGovernment portal Number of common service centres Number of additional alternate channels created for delivering services Digitization of the Government operations H1 H H M H1 H H M H1 H H L M1 H H H1 M H M H1 H H M H1 122 47 47 28 122 47 47 28 122 55 55 11 73 37 37 122 33 55 33 122 47 47 28 122 Rating Final score

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a. b. 8. a. b. 9. a. b. c.

Degree of data digitization of manual records Process reforms to deliver services through the computerized system Responsiveness Timeliness of delivery of services Availability of MIS reports for decision making Private sector participation PPP models established for delivery of services Number of private services delivery through CSCs Total number of services which are currently being delivered by PPP operators

M M M1 H M H1 H M L

61 61 73 46 27 122 68 41 14

Note: For the top-level parameters, the three ratings are H1 for high, M1 for medium and L1 for low For the parameters, the three ratings are H for high, M for medium and L for low The weights are indicative and have been assigned based on our experience of conducting similar exercises in the past with various Governments and Government agencies Maximum score is 1000

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Customer Satisfaction Index Detailed Methodology for calculation of customer satisfaction index is given in Table 50 Table 29: Customer satisfaction index: key indicators S. No. 1. a. b. c. 2. a. b. c. 3. a. b. 4. a. b. c. 5. a. b. 6. a. b. c. 7. a. b. Overall customer satisfaction Index (Assuming the maximum score to be 1000) Awareness about the availability of eServices Awareness of the e-Government portal, common service centres and other new delivery channels Extent of the customer awareness programmes Awareness of the customers about the online services Ease of accessibility of Government services Adequacy of the number of delivery centres on which information is available Location of service touch points Reduction of redundant information in the application forms Usage of eServices Number of transactions by the users on the alternate channels Number of visits for information versus transaction services Time savings of the customers for using eServices Reduction in time taken to deliver the services Reduction the number of visits to avail the services Reduction in travel time in availing services Cost savings of the customers for using eServices Cost of transactions for using services online versus offline Satisfaction with fee given for availing the services Quality of services - informational and transactional Number of visits reduced to the agency counters Quality of helpdesk and telephonic support Hassle free mechanism for payment Relevance of services to the customers Satisfaction with range of services provided Relevance of information asked for in application form(s) H1 H H H H1 M H M H1 H M M1 H H M H1 H M H1 H M H M1 H M Rating Final score 119 40 40 40 119 32 54 32 119 74 45 71 27 27 16 119 74 45 119 46 27 46 71 45 27

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8. a. b. c. 9. a. b. c. d. e. 10. a. b.

Effectiveness of grievance redressal mechanism Reduction in time taken for resolution of grievance Grievance redressal within the service levels Satisfaction of the quality of the grievance responses Ease of usage of the system Services provided in Arabic and English Ease of navigation (number of 'clicks' required) Security of interface/ data transfer User friendliness of the applications Comprehensive help facility, guidelines for using the system Attitude towards Government Customer perception towards Government: bureaucratic or customercentric Customer perception on the Government working: authoritative or participatory

H1 H H M M1 L M H M L M1 H M

119 46 46 27 71 5 16 27 16 5 71 45 27

Note: For the top level parameters, the three ratings are H1 for high, M1 for medium and L1 for low For the parameters, the three ratings are H for high, M for medium and L for low The weights are indicative have been assigned based on our experience of conducting similar exercises in the past with various Governments and Government agencies Maximum score is 1000

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Survey for CSI and GTI Objective The objective is to assess the awareness and reach of the e-Government projects amongst the customers and to determine satisfaction and impact amongst stakeholders and users of services offered by the eGovernment programme. Approach It is suggested that a bi-modular approach be adopted for conducting the assessment exercise. The first module would involve qualitative in-depth interviews with key stakeholders and the second module would consist of quantitative survey with the beneficiaries.

Target Respondents Module 1 Qualitative stakeholder assessment Since it is necessary to conduct an assessment from various perspectives, the target respondents would have to represent the stakeholders from both the service delivery as well as service access aspects. The target respondents for this module have been suggested keeping in mind the above. Agency officials involved in the delivery of eGovernment initiatives. Agency officials not directly related to eGovernment. Common service centres / point of service delivery These could be located at post offices, governorates etc. Interviews would be done with the person in charge of interaction with beneficiaries as well as overall supervision of the e-service delivery at the centres. Key influencers / opinion leaders These would constitute people who are in a position to have access to, are medium of information or influence the knowledge, attitudes and decisions at a community /population sub group level. These could be community leaders or other accepted motivators.

The qualitative module would help identify the parameters to be used for the quantitative module. Also it would give a good understanding of the existing practices. Module 2 Quantitative In this module, face-to-face quantitative interviews would be conducted with the stakeholders and persons who are eligible as a beneficiary for a particular service. The questionnaire to be administered in the quantitative survey would be based on the findings from the qualitative module and data gathered from secondary sources like CIO surveys, similar studies by World Bank, etc. Once the first draft is ready, a round of pilot interviews would be done. With the inputs gathered from this phase and a revision of the questionnaire, the same would be administered to a larger sample. The scales to be used in the questionnaire would be 5 point Likert scale. Information like awareness/satisfaction might be captured as the top 2 / bottom 2 box score on the 5 point scale.

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III. Marketing and Awareness A national awareness, education and marketing campaign is essential to ensure that potential customers know about the e-Government services being rolled out, aspire to use them and are able to conveniently use them. Raising awareness through informational and educational support is an ongoing activity, but specially designed and timed campaigns will be needed, for example, to coincide with the launch of specific services or to target a particular customer group. Such campaigns must serve the overall goal of changing customer attitudes and, critically, their behaviour in favour of using e-Government services. A common central strategy is needed to guide the Government-wide branding and marketing initiative within which more focused and short-lived campaigns can be accommodated. In this regard it is extremely important to Institutionalize marketing and awareness as part of the formal organizational structure of the MoC&IT. The detailed structure and role is provided in Section 4 - Governance structure. Undertake Selection of a Marketing and PR agency to be involved throughout the program, so as to effectively communicate developments at every stage to stakeholders( Scope of work of a Marketing & PR Agency is provided in Annexure XII)

The summary and components of the overall marketing and awareness plan is presented in figure below and explained in detail subsequently.

Essential to ensure that customers know about the eGovernment services being rolled out, aspire to use them and are able to conveniently use them

Target Segments

Channels wrt Target Segments

Messages Its easy, cheap, beneficial and smart to use eGovernment services You can save a lot of time and convenience by renewing your driving license online, just like Mahmood.

Timing

Development / Approval Process

Feedback / Review

Billboard Businesses Citizens Residents Visitors Government Newspaper Social

Empanelment of an agency
Pre-launch Creation of a

Groups
Internal

Launch

cross agency marketing Committee


PR and

Data

Collection
Analysis

Communicati on Newsletter
Mosques TV

Year 1, 2 and

Employee

marketing manager under the program office

Figure 27: Marketing and Awareness Plan Design of the marketing and awareness campaign will include 6 key components, each of which should be defined and described in as much detail as possible during the planning and design stage: Target market Channel (media mix) selection

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Message development based upon audience skills and education Timing Development/approval process Feedback/review

In addition to the above, internal communication aimed at Government employees would also need to form part of the marketing and awareness strategy

Target Market One marketing medium cannot reach all segments of the diverse community that makes up Ethiopia. Marketing campaigns do best when they define specific target markets and deliver a tailored marketing programme for each market. At a finer level of granularity, within the residential segment there are several specific segments of Ethiopian population that are traditionally harder to reach: Elderly Uneducated Socially underprivileged People with special needs

In the case of both specific residential and business segments, the country should consider using specially targeted media. For example, a greater use of personal communications channels, such as outreach through community organizations, working with opinion leaders, and developing word-of-mouth, may be more appropriate to reach the elderly and non-Ethiopian communities. In contrast, methods such as direct mail may be the best way to get messages across to segments of the business community.

Channel (Media) Selection An appropriate communication and media channel mix is critical to ensure that everyone in the target audience receives and understands the campaign messages. Given customer diversity, any awarenessraising campaign that relies too heavily on just one medium or type of communication is unlikely to achieve its goals. However, there could be services that might be targeted at only a small segment of the society that would require targeted campaign through the channels and media of the choice of that segment. E.g. Pensions is one service that will only be targeted at elderly people, so the campaign will have to be directed through a medium that is most appealing to the old age segment. Scholarship service should be directed towards students and the target area should be educational institutions.

Messages The development of specific messages should be undertaken after the formal adoption of the eGovernment strategy and implementation plan that specifies the order in which services will become available, the agencies affected, and other essential details. Assuming that the country adopts a phasedin approach to implementing the e-Government services, the marketing plan will need to reflect the planned sequence of operations. The marketing team within the Project Management Office should work with advertising and public relations professionals to craft specific marketing messages, including both Amharic and non-Amharic speaking customers. The development of messages should proceed in tandem

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with refinement of the overall marketing plan. Creative concepts and material should be tested in focus groups for clarity, impact, memorability and other dimensions. Specifically, decisions regarding the level of budget available for the marketing campaign will drive the types of media that can be utilized, which will in turn drive the development of messages appropriate for each medium. Working with experts to craft messages requires a disciplined time commitment. Work should begin on the development of marketing messages at least 3 months prior to the desired launch of the marketing campaign. The Country must also factor in the additional upfront-time required to select the vendor(s). Timing It is crucial that an appropriate communication and media awareness programme is spread across the various stages of the e-Government program, to achieve its goals; the marketing campaigns must commence before the launch of the e-Government programme and must be sustained through the launch and lifetime of the program. Development / Approval Process An explicit communications development/approval process will ensure that communications are appropriate and consistent. To avoid confusion, it is particularly critical that the meaning of messages delivered in the internal communications programme be congruent with those that are used in the external marketing campaign. The marketing team (to be created as part of the MOCIT) will be responsible for reviewing draft materials, contributing editorial suggestions, approving the final version and ensuring that scheduled release dates are met. The Technical Committee should also review, comment and approve on critical internal and external communications. Feedback, measurement of effectiveness and improvement For the Countrys marketing and awareness programme, it is critical that feedback be sought and the effectiveness of communications measured on a regular basis. This will require scheduling and commitment to respond to constructive feedback and take action to address issues raised. These assessment efforts will provide valuable insight into whether the generic messages are reaching the intended audience and provide insights into ad hoc messages required in the near term. The feedback mechanism envisaged will address two requirements. The first is quantitative, tracking plan against execution and the delivery of messages to the intended stakeholder/audience. The second will focus on qualitative data; stakeholder/audience understanding and engagement of issues generated through communications. Collation of data will occur on an ongoing basis, and periodic, pre-planned reviews with the marketing team will be scheduled. It is important that the communication plan be adapted and subsequent behaviours demonstrate actions in response to feedback collected. This data collection responsibility can be part of the mandate of the Monitoring and Evaluation team of MOCIT. Internal Communication The Countrys internal communication about the e-Government programme represents the best chance to create a common frame of mind for the diverse group of employees who make up the government family. Communications to employees will be concentrated during the development/pre-launch phase, but will continue throughout the implementation of the e-Government programme.
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An explicit marketing objective relates to employees: Obtain 100% awareness and understanding of the e-Government services among Government employees

To achieve this objective, Ethiopia must utilize formal and informal communications. The management of the overall e-Government programme must collaborate with other agency officials to build consensus regarding the need for change and the expected benefits. The e-Government programme management must also communicate project activities to all stakeholders with an explanation regarding the organizational and personal benefits to be attained. There will be 4 primary components of the internal communication programme: Internal stakeholder/audience identification Channel selection Message development Feedback, measurement of effectiveness and improvement

Marketing and Awareness Brief Each of the above elements has been summarized through the marketing and communication brief presented below, which can also be used as a brief for the appointment of the advertising and marketing agency. A detailed marketing and awareness strategy document is also provided as Annexure IV to the report. Table 30: Marketing and Awareness Brief Project Agency Background Governments around the world are leveraging advances in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to enhance their service delivery mechanism to improve citizen satisfaction and gain competitive advantage over other nations to attract investments As a part of this programme, major projects such as the Woreda Network and National Data Centre have been launched and should be marketed The impetus of the Country on leveraging ICT has resulted in a high degree of intra-ministerial computerization and a good ICT infrastructure The initiative on the ICT Community Centres to educate and create ICT awareness across the Country should be highlighted The Country has also set-up a High Committee and Technical Committee to provide direction and decision to developing and implementing a comprehensive e-Government strategy The e-Government strategy proposes providing customer value through aligning Government across the lifecycle events of the citizens, residents and businesses The strategy proposes to deliver most of the Government services in an integrated manner through multiple channels e-Government Strategy for Ethiopia To Be Decided

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Benefits offered under the e-Government programme for which the marketing and awareness strategy needs to cater: Convenience Efficiency Reach Value for money

Value proposition Its easy, economical, beneficial and smart to use e-Government services You can save a lot of time and convenience by renewing your driving license on-line, or apply Passport online or File Taxes

Marketing and Awareness objective The business objectives should aim for the following: Create awareness Build credibility for the e-Government strategy Drive higher participation across the various target segments Highlight the impact of the e-Government strategy Pull rather than push communications strategy We have to establish that e-Government strategy can actually make a difference to the customers in Ethiopia Drive confidence amongst businesses - Ethiopia is a good place to invest E-Government is about participatory Government

The communication objective is as follows:

Target Audience: Who are we talking to? What do these people currently think of our programme? What is the desired perception? At a finer level of granularity, within the residential segment, there are several specific segments of the Countrys population that are traditionally harder to reach: Elderly Uneducated Socially underprivileged People with special needs

Within the business community, there may be particular groups that will require special targeting. For example, if the Country launches a web application that enables applications for company registrations process to be done online, it may be necessary to market this service to the relevant users. In the case of both specific residential and business segments, the Country should consider using specially targeted media. For example, a greater use of personal communications channels, such as outreach through community organizations, working with opinion leaders, and developing word-of-mouth, may be more appropriate to reach the elderly communities. In contrast, methods such as direct mail may be the best

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way to get messages across to segments of the business community. Current Thinking: Diverse views about what is eGovernment and the benefits Overall OK with the objective of the programme Certain pessimism/scepticism within the customer segment in the use of electronic service What we are trying to achieve is far too down-the-line

Desired Thinking: The programme is useful Participation is important The programme would not wait for anyone There are many who would benefit Success of the programme is not in its design but in the collective participation in its implementation

What is the hot button that we can leverage to influence our target audience? The programme is already underway and people are benefiting It is only a start, but the best is yet to come People who participate now will benefit later

What is the key thought that marketing and advertising has to communicate? Participating is key to success e-Government is about services and about customers eGovernment is a key strategic priority Act now or repent later as an industry and as a nation

Call to action? Strong call-to-action on the desired strategy Large no. of responses

Possible communication vehicles

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One marketing medium cannot reach all segments of the diverse community that makes up the Country. Marketing campaigns do best when they define specific target markets and deliver a tailored marketing programme for each market. Prior experience with eGovernment awareness campaigns indicates that billboards and traditional media such as radio and newspaper would be most cost effective, but alone will not be sufficient to penetrate the target market with news of the e-Government services. We also recommend presentations at schools, community organizations and events to supplement billboards and traditional advertising. Additionally we could also look at Public places for distribution of flyers and leaflets. These marketing outlets will provide an opportunity for the Country to tailor specific messages to individual communities. Execution considerations Value for advertisement spend

Summary of the Marketing and Awareness Plan The objective of the marketing and awareness strategy would be met through the following: Initial burst of advertisement in dailies with the launch of programme stressing upon the delivery channels Sustained public relation efforts aimed at covering the benefits and recipients Branding of eGovernment strategy for the Country Documenting the benefits and outcomes of selected agency projects through the preparation of advocacy videos that can be circulated among the various interest groups Circulation of bi-monthly progress reports among all internal stakeholders Preparation and publication of a quarterly event planner for wider circulation through national dailies. This can also be used to call for applications under various strategies

Message The development of specific messages should be undertaken after the formal adoption of the eGovernment strategy and implementation plan that specifies the order in which services will become available, the agencies affected, and other essential details. Assuming that the Country adopts a phasedin approach to implementing the e-Government services, the marketing plan will need to reflect the planned sequence of operations. The marketing team within the project office should work with advertising and public relations professionals to craft specific marketing messages, including both Amharic and non- Amharic speaking customers. The development of messages should proceed in tandem with refinement of the overall marketing plan. Creative concepts and material should be tested in focus groups for clarity, impact, memorability and other dimensions. Specifically, decisions regarding the level of budget available for the marketing campaign will drive the types of media that can be utilized, which will in turn drive the development of messages appropriate for each medium. Working with experts to craft messages requires a disciplined time commitment. Work should begin on the development of marketing messages at least three months prior to the desired launch of the marketing

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campaign. The Country must also factor in the additional upfront time required to select the vendor(s). Table 23 summarises the message development component. Table 31: Message Development

Message Message Development Development

Work with the implementation team to track key milestones and likely timing Work with the implementation team to track key milestones and likely timing Identify generic messages in advance, plan and prepare drafts for publication Identify generic messages in advance, plan and prepare drafts for publication Work continuously with the implementation team to anticipate Work continuously with the implementation team to anticipate

communication/message requirements communication/message requirements


Manage detailed communications plan and work with experts to determine Manage detailed communications plan and work with experts to determine

content and format content and format

Challenges

The timeline for key implementation milestones may change so mapping key The timeline for key implementation milestones may change so mapping key

messages to it is a challenge messages to it is a challenge


Working with authors to craft messages; requires disciplined time commitment Working with authors to craft messages; requires disciplined time commitment Tracking and monitoring of messages distributed and to whom Tracking and monitoring of messages distributed and to whom

Actions

Proactive planning of generic messages and build database of items ready Proactive planning of generic messages and build database of items ready Clearly assign owners for content development of messages Clearly assign owners for content development of messages Conduct detailed planning on a rolling 3-4 month basis to reflect shifting Conduct detailed planning on a rolling 3-4 month basis to reflect shifting

for publication for publication

events timeline events timeline

There are a number of generic messages that can be pre-planned, prepared and pre-approved. These will serve to raise customers awareness, and to answer the basic questions that they are likely to have about the e-Government Strategy. Suggested subjects for these generic messages are listed below. Communication of the rationale What is the vision for e-Government programme Why do we need an e-Government strategy What are the major benefits?

Establish Awareness of the Project What is the e-Government programme about Sponsorship who is the champion? Structure & organization Implementation approach Implementation timeline Integration with other Country initiatives What will change? What will stay the same? What has happened so far?

Periodic update on progress

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Achievement of milestones and celebrations of success Changes in timeline, scope and/or approach Differentiation of this project from others Why will this one succeed? Lessons incorporated from other projects

Impact on the Governments functioning How will we operate differently? How will this be perceived by the outside world?

Impact on the Individual Customer What will change for me?

Generic, pre approved messages will only partially meet the information requirements of the Countrys employees. Ad hoc messages may also be needed as the dynamics and events change through the implementation lifecycle. Ad hoc messages will be needed to address key developments, issues arising and achievements across all facets of the e-Government programme. To capture these, the project office and the e-Government implementation teams in various agencies will need to remain in close contact. General Awareness Making a noticeable difference in the Countrys quality of customer service and increasing public access to Government information and services are intrinsic drivers of the e-Government Strategy. The judicious use of the modern customer service technology that will be deployed in the common channels being created will help to enhance the Countrys image in the public eye. While there may be a strong tendency to begin publicity early, the best approach will be to delay the campaign until sufficient infrastructure is in place to handle a sudden influx of telephone calls, emails, and service requests. In this manner, the Country will avoid the problem of building expectations that are then unrealized. Table 32: General Awareness Campaign Overview Implementation Stage Pre-launch (Build-up) Audience Government Employees Primary Themes Existing services and eGovernment strategy & plan Services and channels being launched

Launch

All Target Segments (Citizens and Residents, Businesses, Visitors, Employees) All Target Segments (Citizens and Residents, Businesses, Visitors, Employees)

First year of full implementation

Achievements Additional services and channel enhancements made available

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Second year of full implementation

All Target Segments (Citizens and Residents, Businesses, Visitors, Employees)

Achievements so far Additional services and channel enhancements made available Showcasing eGovernment programme internationally Achievements so far Additional services made available Showcasing eGovernment programme internationally

Third year of full implementation

All target segments (Citizens and Residents, Businesses, Visitors, Employees)

Government employees will continue to be responsible for delivering services to residents and businesses. Employees interface with the public on a daily basis and their understanding of the e-Government services is a critical success factor. Moreover, if employees are appropriately informed, they can serve as ambassadors, helping to spread the word about the new services. The general rule of tell them early, tell them often should be observed with truthful, straightforward, consistent communications to all Government employees. It is critical that Countrys management is fully educated about and supportive of, the e-Government programme. Government employees will take their cue from leadership. Managements approach and attitude about the new system will filter to Agency personnel where the new system actually interfaces with the public. If the management does not show its commitment to the eGovernment programme, employees will be reluctant to support the new system, eventually resulting in a lower level of customer service and satisfaction with the system. Development / Approval Process An explicit communications development/approval process will ensure that communications are appropriate and consistent. To avoid confusion, it is particularly critical that the meaning of messages delivered in the internal communications programme be congruent with those that are used in the external marketing campaign. The marketing team will be responsible for reviewing draft materials; contributing editorial suggestions, approving the final version and ensuring that scheduled release dates are met. MOCIT should also review and comment on critical internal communications. Table 25 below summarizes the development/approval process.

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Table 33: Development / Approval Process

Development // Development Approval Approval Process Process

Creation of a robust yet efficient process for reviewing communications Creation of a robust yet efficient process for reviewing communications Managing the development/editorial process to ensure appropriate content Managing the development/editorial process to ensure appropriate content Monitoring consistency of messages Monitoring consistency of messages Facilitating timely release of messages Facilitating timely release of messages Ensuring appropriate channel selection and delivery Ensuring appropriate channel selection and delivery

Challenges

Smart selection of message contributors Smart selection of message contributors Keeping to development and delivery schedule Keeping to development and delivery schedule Managing a fast path through the process in the case of extraordinary ad hoc Managing a fast path through the process in the case of extraordinary ad hoc

communications communications

Actions

Develop proposed process and seek agreement Develop proposed process and seek agreement Communicate and educate Champion and implementation team Communicate and educate Champion and implementation team Marketing Team within the Programme Office will instigate and manage the Marketing Team within the Programme Office will instigate and manage the

process process

Feedback, measurement of effectiveness and improvement For the Countrys internal communications programme, it is critical that feedback be sought and the effectiveness of communications measured on a regular basis. This will require scheduling and commitment to respond to constructive feedback and take action to address issues raised. These assessment efforts will provide valuable insight into whether the generic messages are reaching the intended audience and provide insights into ad hoc messages required in the near term. The feedback mechanism envisaged will address two requirements. The first is quantitative, tracking plan against execution and the delivery of messages to the intended stakeholder/audience. The second will focus on qualitative data; stakeholder/audience understanding and engagement or issues generated through communications. Collation of data will occur on an ongoing basis, and periodic, pre-planned reviews with the marketing team will be scheduled. It is important that the communication plan be adapted and subsequent behaviours demonstrate actions in response to feedback collected.

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Table 34: Feedback, measurement of effectiveness and improvement

Feedback and Feedback and Measurement of Measurement of Effectiveness Effectiveness

Develop and facilitate feedback mechanisms Develop and facilitate feedback mechanisms Capture, document and channel feedback and issues raised as appropriate for Capture, document and channel feedback and issues raised as appropriate for

resolution, action planning, further communication resolution, action planning, further communication
Develop methods of measuring effectiveness of communication activity, both Develop methods of measuring effectiveness of communication activity, both

quantitative and qualitative quantitative and qualitative


Conduct scheduled reassessments of communication activity and build Conduct scheduled reassessments of communication activity and build

amendments to plan amendments to plan


Leveraging the Kingdoms communications network to gather and channel Leveraging the Kingdoms communications network to gather and channel

Challenges

feedback centrally feedback centrally


Reacting appropriately and speedily to feedback Reacting appropriately and speedily to feedback Showing that the eGovernment team listens and hears Showing that the eGovernment team listens and hears

Actions

Develop standard approaches for obtaining qualitative data through focus Develop standard approaches for obtaining qualitative data through focus

groups and on site feedback groups and on site feedback


Develop standard approaches for assessing quantitative data from plan Develop standard approaches for assessing quantitative data from plan

execution, distribution, questionnaires, etc. execution, distribution, questionnaires, etc.


Schedule periodic reviews with the eGovernment team Schedule periodic reviews with the eGovernment team

Figure below illustrates the continuous cycle of data collection, followed by review and analysis, adjustment to the communications plan, incorporating feedback from stakeholders, and refined execution of the communications plan.

Continuous Improvement Reporting / Management Review Adjustment to Communication Plan Execute Communication Plan

Data Collection

Feedback from stakeholders


Figure 28: Continuous Improvement in Communications Audience skills and education Raising awareness about an issue or topic does not necessarily lead to lasting changes in attitudes and behaviour, especially when people also need specific skills they may not already posses. For awareness campaign to achieve long-term benefits it is also necessary to consider how to provide a specific customer group with the skills and incentives to change. Thus, changing behaviour may also mean, for some

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potential customers, the need to upgrade skills, so that the awareness campaign should be linked to educational and training opportunities whoever provides these (e.g. the public sector, the private sector and possibly also NGOs) and however provided (e.g. traditionally, through intermediary help, or through eLearning courses). Existing educational offers must therefore be mapped to see whether adequate training and support is available and if not, new offers may need to be provided or encouraged in order to fulfil the needs of the campaign. An excellent campaign could fail if it convinces customers of the desirability of using Government services but leaves them without the necessary skills. Advertising Revenue There is also an opportunity for the Country to earn revenues by charging other organizations to advertise on the e-Government portal and the common services centres and other channels being set-up. This revenue could then be used to defray the advertising costs to build awareness for the e-Government Services.

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IV. Standards and policies Introduction During the implementation of the e-Government strategy, a number of the proposed eGovernment initiatives will involve development of new systems for provisioning online services. These new systems, deployed at either a central or a local agency level, are developed with specifications and solutions that match the goals and tasks relevant to a particular department. However, taking the big picture into account, it is important for any such initiative to give adequate attention to surrounding Government institutions and their allied ICT initiatives so as to enhance the compatibility, interoperability and efficiency while also eliminating redundancy. It is important for all Government agencies to make a concerted effort to implement eGovernment initiatives in a collaborative manner which, in addition to meeting the specific needs of the owner agencies, are also in line with the overall Management practices

ICT usage Technical and security issues Web services provisioning Data and information exchange Scalability and Interoperability

Summary of the Current Scenario Based on Stakeholder Assessment the various standards and policies that are already implemented or under progress include Table 35: Regulations, Policies, Guidelines and Standards Regulations/Laws S.No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Name National Electronic Transaction Law National Data Protection Law e-Commerce Law. e-Signature Law. Computer Misuse and Cyber Crime Law. Status Draft document has been prepared completed(draft) document has been prepared completed(draft) document has been prepared Ongoing completed(draft) document has been prepared

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Policies/Framework S.No 1. Name National Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) Framework. Status Ongoing

2.

National Enterprise Architecture Framework for Ethiopia

Ongoing

3.

Government Information Systems Interoperability Framework /Standard (e-GIF).

On ratification process

Standards S.No 1. 2. Name Keyboard Layout, Typeface and OCR standard Critical Localization Standard for Ethiopic languages such as Amharic, Oromifa, Tigrigna, Afaraf and Somali. ICT Accessibility Requirement Standard for People with Disability Information Exchange Standard. ICT Transliteration Standard Ethiopic Soundex (Phonetic Matching) Standard. ICT Content Digitization Standard. Information exchange standard E-Commerce Standard. Ethiopic Collation standard. Contractual Standard Services/Projects. Conditions for ICT Status Completed, ratified and implemented Completed, ratified and implemented

3.

Completed and on the approval process Completed and on the approval process Completed and on the approval process On the Approval Process completed and waiting for approval on going On the Approval Process Completed

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11.

Business Process Re-engineering

Completed

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Guidelines S. No 1. Name Standard Evaluation and Selection guideline for ICT Hardware and Software. Certification Guideline for Consultants and Trainers. ICT Professionals, Status Completed,

2.

Completed

3.

ICT Project management Guideline.

Completed

Recommendation: There are various standards and policies which need to be laid down for the e-Government strategy. Following are the suggested measures for implementing Standards and guidelines required for effective implementation of the strategy 1. Implementation of Standards through a Technical Committee specifically created, comprising Government, Academic, Industry and Outside experts( Section 4- Governance Structure) 2. Engage an external agency for design and implementation of the Standards/Policies 3. Implementation of the existing Enterprise Architecture Framework, E-Government Interoperability Framework and Public Key Infrastructure 4. Adoption of Cyber laws for effective implementation of e-Services

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The policies/standards/guidelines that help to support the implementation of various e-Government initiatives are provided in the figure below:

Figure 29: Policy/Standards/Guidelines Framework

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The policies/standards/guidelines that MOCIT needs to develop for further implementing e-Government is provided in the following tables. The year-wise implementation of the Standards and Policies has been designed keeping the following considerations: Current e-readiness of the Ministries/Agencies in Ethiopia Alignment with the Overall e-Government Strategy Dimensions and Components Initiatives already undertaken in terms of laws, policies and standards Phasing is also based on priority of the Standards/Policies/Guidelines, so as to facilitate effective eGovernment implementation. It has been envisaged that the Policies/Standards/Guidelines framework should be completed within the next 3 Years for timely implementation of e-Government in the Country.

Figure 30: Implementation Plan for Standards and Policies

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V. Public Private Partnerships (PPP) Introduction A Public Private Partnership, or PPP, involves government and private sectors working together to deliver infrastructure or services that are traditionally provided by government. It involves private financing, construction and management of key infrastructure with the primary objective of improving public services. PPPs focus on service outcome, not assets.

Basic principles for PPP PPPs are concerned with services, not assets o o o o o The government does not need to own infrastructure to deliver services PPP policy sits alongside other procurement methods i.e. conventional, outsourcing, leasing etc. Suitable to some public projects, not all projects Service outputs must be paid for, whether directly (e.g. user charges) or by appropriation Must therefore be affordable either to users (user charges) or to the budget PPPs are a procurement option, not a novel method of developing public infrastructure

PPPs are not new money

PPP mode of project implementation is a necessity for the following reasons: To enhance public services management and expedite the implementation To accelerate infrastructure provision and bridge the huge infrastructure gap To provide opportunity to local private sector to gain experience and work with the government To address national inequalities To overcome barriers of social, economic and geographical isolation To increase access to information and education To enhance the government capacity to manage the relationship with the private partner as well as manage the changes associated with the shift from traditional to digital paradigm.

PPP in Ethiopia PPP forums have been established by the Ethiopia Chamber of Commerce and the previously combined Ministry of Trade and Industry for addressing PPP related issues. For the dialogue platforms, the forum promotes and strengthens the existing public-private platforms (PPP) in the regions and at federal level. Presently, the Ministry of Trade and Industry organizes regular forums with the Chamber of Commerce both at national and regional levels. Following are the two forums that have been established to foster public and private partnerships:Public and Business Community Joint Consultation Forum Objective: To create awareness concerning government development vision; to provide support for business communities; to discuss and comment on draft business and investment laws and regulations; to

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discus on implementation problems of laws and regulations and to create smooth relationship between government and business community. Current activities: Creating common understanding concerning government development policies/vision: giving ideas and opinion before the issuance of business laws; creating an enabling environment for business communities; provide suggestions/comments by identifying implementation problems and finding solutions for the same., Addis Ababa Investment and Industry Development Consultation forum Objective: To create enabling environment for investment and industrial development based on transparent and free market economic policy; to ensure fast and sustainable industrial development by creating common understanding and coordination between government and the business communities/partners; to promote development endeavor of those actors which have key roles in urban development;: to improve quality and price of industrial products by integrating all development partners. Current activities: Finding ways and means to promote the investment and industrial development of Addis Ababa City Government; improving industrial development by providing necessary support; conducting studies to solve development problems; working together with investors to introduce large investment opportunities; and providing training to improve efficiency of human resources. Besides the above two forum established by the government, some of the successful PPP initiatives in Ethiopia in the ICT sector are discussed below: ICT Community Centres 92 ICT Community centers are currently operating across Ethiopia. These centers are mainly driven by the local communities with support from the ICTAD. A laudable feature of this initiative is the self sustainable nature of the ICT community centers while the initial funding has been provided by ICTAD for one year, these centers need to manage their operations after the first year on their own. Most of these centers are generating enough revenues to meet their operating costs by providing services such as training facilities, internet access facilities, photocopying and printing etc. A comprehensive Monitoring and Evaluation Framework and a repository of learnings of the various centers needs to be created to ensure that this initiative can be expanded and improved. The use of these centers for the delivery of eServices will further strengthen the business case of these centers by providing an additional revenue stream. Unified Billing System (UBS) The Unified Billing System (UBS) is one of the flagship projects in ICT sector that is being implemented on the Build Own Operate Transfer (BOOT) model. The Private partner shall Build Own and Operate Utility Bill collection centers and will eventually transfer the entire system to the Government at the end of the PPP contract. 40+ UBS centers are planned to be established as part of the project, to act as one stop shops for payment of bills for power, water and telecom. It is recommended that these centers may be upgraded to offer all the e-Services as Common Services Centers after the pilot has been successfully accomplished.

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ICT business incubator in Ethiopia Incubation Centers have been setup by the ICTAD to encourage and support entrepreneurs of Ethiopia in ICT related ventures. Currently there are 4 Incubation centers which are supporting 47 startup companies. Following are the main objectives of the incubation centers: Provide shared Workspace and Facilities Facilities typically include conference rooms, phone system and broadband connectivity, security, etc.

Provide Business Advisory Services Basic assistance provided by incubator staff (business plan) Mentoring/coaching by staff and outside entrepreneurs Access to external network of service providers (e.g.,accountants, lawyers), plus universities, tech parks, private enterprises, etc.

Ensure Access to Capital in-house seed equity or small loan fund on a case to case basis Affiliated angel investors and venture capital funds

Relationships with banks The main focus of the Incubation centers is to create strong companies that can sustain themselves after a period of initial assistance. Government provides policy and financial support, but does not run the incubator directly. ICTAD Project contributes significant resources to develop the incubator. PPP opportunities for implementation recommendations for their realization of the e-Government program and

Table 36: PPP opportunities and Recommendations S.No. 1. Area Program and project implementation 1. Recommendations Ethiopian Telecommunication Company could partner the e-Government program in roll out of various channels for services delivery. E-Government implementation across the country will help the company in increasing its revenues through increased usage of its ICT infrastructure. ETC could in turn contribute by lowering bandwidth and mobile tariffs / making SMS and calls to some of the predesignated service delivery numbers free etc.. 2. Banks such as the Bank of Ethiopia could develop the payment gateway and charge a nominal fee from the government for the use of payment gateway. This will benefit the bank as number of transactions through its payment gateway would increase. Furthermore, use of debit cards and credit cards issued by the bank is likely to increase once payments for government services are facilitate electronically. Another way the banking sector could contribute is by the way of facilitating payment of fees for government services using their ATM machines and branch outlets for free / nominal fees. 3. Feasibility of all projects for private partnership must be

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S.No.

Area

Recommendations examined during the design stage and in case the same is established then that PPP should be preferred mode of implementation. This should be done in a manner to ensure that the private sector brings in the initial investment and runs the project and recoups its investment through levy of user charges / transaction fees. This will ensure that the risk of the project is shared with the private sector, efficiencies of the private sector are leveraged and the model is sustainable. The provision of viability gap funding, where-ever possible (to provide subsidies / one time funds for making PPP feasible) should also be explored whereever required. 4. The government could develop course curriculum aimed at increasing computer literacy and to train people in using eServices while the private educational institutes could take the onus of imparting the courses at a reasonable cost.

2.

Generation of funds and resources for the implementation of the eGovernment program

1.

The government could allow the private sector to utilize its service delivery channels such as the portal and the Citizen Service Centers for advertising their products and services. This could become a steady revenue stream for the eGovernment program while the companies could gain trust and goodwill due to their association with a program of national significance. 2. The industry in general could provide funds as well as used computers as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives so that the same may be used at CSCs and training centers. 1. The number of ICT community centers needs to be increased from the present 65 for a better coverage of the population. Furthermore, once these centers are allowed to offer Services as Common Service Centers their revenue stream would also grow. Entrepreneurs, individuals and companies should be made aware and encouraged to take up the establishment of new ICT community centers. 2. The infrastructure and funds available at the 4 ICT incubation centers that are currently operational needs to be enhanced so that they can offer better services to the entrepreneurs. This number also needs to be increased to at least 10 incubation centers spread across the country for better results.

3.

Encouragement to entrepreneurs for setting up companies in the ICT sector

Strategies to promote ICT development through Public Private Partnerships Following are a brief of illustrative strategic initiatives to enable the expansion and growth of the ICT sector and the Private sector companies as a whole using PPP as a tool.

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Revise Policies to attract Investments: Foreign Investments into ICT Sector: Foreign investment is required to supplement local investment in the local ICT Sector, in order to stimulate the desired growth within the sector. It is therefore necessary to explore creation of a consortium-driven agency or policies dedicated to attracting foreign investment in ICT. Develop and/or revise tax and other incentives for individuals and firms to encourage investment in ICT. There are incentive schemes in existence and these need to be reviewed in terms of directing and effectively supporting the ICT Sector.

Promote Private sector Collaborations: A key aspect of developing a stable and growing trade environment in ICT Sector is the establishment of linkages between the larger companies and the SMMEs. Ownership/investment/mentoring linkages between large companies and new entrant SMMEs. Outsourcing arrangements of non-core functions of larger companies to other companies in the sector. Supply/Distribution arrangements between large companies and SMMEs. Partnerships and alliances, especially between local companies and Multi National Enterprises.

eKiosks installation on PPP model The Kiosks are another ICT initiatives which help in reengineering several Public and Private sector processes and making the citizen self sufficient in accessing information and performing certain key day to day operations.Kiosks need to be set up across the country to enable information dissemination at the grass root level. Private sector partnerships need to be encouraged to expedite the rollout of kiosks.

Country wide rollout of ICT Community Centers on PPP model The lack of ICT usage and PC penetration keeps a large section of the population out of ICT reach. In order to integrate this section into the mainstream of ICT beneficiaries there is a pressing need for ICT facilitators who will assist the ICT illiterate citizens in not only availing the Government services but also will guide them through relevant information. Additional ICT centers need to be implemented on mechanisms such as the Public Private Partnerships engaging the private sector. Currently there are 65 community driven ICT Centers with different levels of ICT infrastructure and services. There needs to be Government Driven ICT centers with uniformity in infrastructure access and citizen services. ICT Trade Fair/ Forums: In order to create an ecosystem for Public and Private collaborations, the Government must establish and encourage networking events that permit face-to-face discussion and sharing of information and knowledge. These networking events can take the form of ICT Sector focused exhibitions, conferences and workshops.

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Table 37: ICT Events Sr# 1 Events Workshops Frequency Stakeholders ICT Workshop for students in Universities to build skills in ICT ICT workshop Ministries, Agencies for e-Governance ICT workshop for Private sector to enable better business operations using ICT Trade fair to show case the ICT technologies to build a stronger domestic demand Exhibition to attract Foreign investments in Ethiopian ICT to promote IT and IT enabled industry in Ethiopia. Private Sector conference to pursue public private partnerships ICT Trade conference to address business related issues and concerns International ICT Conference to build stronger ICT trade relations with other countries and address issues related to International ICT Trade Establish a stakeholder group or groups to foster collaborative projects and networking events, e.g. projects such as building a broadband community network.

Every Month

Exhibitions

Half Yearly

Conference

One Every Month

Establish SME Centers SME Centers need to be established for supporting and nurturing the Ethiopian SMEs. SME Centers would act as "one-stop-shops" located in various parts of the country that provide information, advisory and consulting services in the following areas: productivity, improvement, technology upgrading, market information, product and market development, trade promotion, credit, financing and entrepreneurship Development of SME databases providing easy access to buyers and suppliers. Imports, customs and tariff rates, etc.

All the ICT Agencies across the regions must set up SME Support Centers in their offices to promote SME development. There must be clear mandate to the ICT Agencies to incorporate and Implement SME focused initiatives in their Annual Plans. A central ICT SME Cell must be established in the MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & IT to coordinate with all the regional SME Centers in working towards a common goal to support SMEs.

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Promote trade through E-Commerce The growth of the local ICT Sector cannot be promoted through addressing the local market alone. Ecommerce is a solution to tap potential markets across the world in a very cost effective manner. Ethiopia with its diverse cultural backgrounds of its people and varieties of natural resources has a rich heritage of crafts skills. Handicraft, Leather and textiles are one of the important and widely spread occupations of most Ethiopians next to agriculture. Thus it would be important to design appropriate mechanisms that will help SMEs participate in product modernization and export market development especially in leather and leather products, textiles, horticulture, etc., in which the country has comparative advantages. ICT Information Centers (IICs): Facilitating access to information and skills Ethiopia suffers from in information asymmetry. Relevant information is difficult to obtain and it is often outdated, very expensive or only available from isolated institutions. The main objective of the ICT Information Centres (IICs) programme would be to use ICT and relevant business information for the development of local skills and public usage of ICT. The IICs can be set-up as a joint venture between public and private sector institutions and provide a central information access point for citizens. These Information centers need to be located in every city. Mobile Phone Solutions on PPP model Mobile phones have a huge impact in developing countries like Ethiopia, substituting for scarce fixed connections, reducing transaction costs, increasing mobility, broadening trade networks, and facilitating searches for employment. Currently there is a Mobile Governance initiative wherein a Private partner shall provide SMS based informational services to the citizens. Government should collaborate with private sector to utilize mobile telephony and take the ICT enabled services out into the remote communities, enabling: Women entrepreneurs to build a business as village phone operators Farmers to make good choices based on market conditions Rural poor to receive banking services they otherwise couldnt access

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PPP Implementation Plan: Table 38: PPP Implementation Roadmap Sr # 1 Strategy Unified Billing System on PPP Model Implementation Plan RFP Evaluation and Contracting of Unified billing System (UBS) project in Addis Ababa for the following Utilities: The Addis Ababa Water & Sewage Authority (AAWSA); The EEPCO (Ethiopia Electric Power Company); and The ETC (Ethiopia Telecommunications Corporation) Program Management Unit of UBS to be setup Pilot of UBS in 5 centers in Addis Ababa Pilot of UBS across 70 centers in Addis Ababa Initiation of UBS across multiple cities in Ethiopia. EOI and RFP process to be initiated across 4 regions- Diredawa,Mekelle, Awassa and Bahir Dar Initiation of UBS in rural areas Expansion of Utilities in UBS Government housing Rent city and federal government Housing Loan repayments to Govt Broadcasting Payment Transport related payments School fees Timeline 1 month

3 months 6 months 1 year 6 months

1 year 2 years

Exploring PPP Opportunities

Identification of 3 ICT Services project to be rolled out on PPP Model Schedule and Action plan for ICT Interventions for Private sector PPP Guidelines for National Level Establishment of International ICT Trade panel to revise policies to support Foreign investment into ICT in Ethiopia. Formulation of Preferential Taxation for Rural ICT Development Establishment of Special Economic Zones to attract both domestic and Foreign ICT companies with incentives Implementation of payment gateway Development of National Trade portal

3 months

6 months 1 year 3 months

Policies and Guidelines to enable PPP

6 months

Business enablers to support partnerships

1 year

2 years 1 year

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integrating all the businesses in Ethiopia Integration of SMEs, Banks and Micro finance institutions, NGOs and donor organizations through ICT for effective funding and project executions Integration of the Inventory of all the goods, Warehouses and building trade channels for Ethiopia both at domestic and foreign market Establishment of SME Support centers 5 Development of Delivery Channels for both Citizens and Business on PPP Model Informational and transactional Trade Portals PPP in implementing Citizen Service Electronic Kiosks to enable public and private e-services for citizens at national level Establish ICT Information Centers in all the Regions with coordination from the regional ICT Agencies SMS based public services on PPP model Establishment of additional ICT Centers to deliver Citizen Services Mobile Solutions on PPP Model Training for professionals/Students in ICT ICT business training for SME in order to relate their business with ICT

1 year

1 Year

1 Year December 2011 2 Year

1 Year

6 months 1 year 1 year Every 3 Months Every 3 months

11

Training and Capacity Building with Partnerships from ICT Companies and Educational Institutes Establishment of Centers of Excellence on PPP model

12

ICT Research and Development Center Setup of De-manufacturing centers e-Waste Management Center: Development of Regulation document and Implementation plan for e-Waste Management Establishment Incubation centers in all the remaining regions Refurbishment Centers for more ICT goods to provide affordable access to ICT

1 Year 1 Year 1 Year

1 Year 1 Year

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Guidelines for leveraging PPP in Ethiopia 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. PPP projects should be initiated only after the same are examined by the technical committee and approved by the high committee. An indicative format in which such requests should be sent to the Technical Committee is placed below. All projects proposed for PPP mode of implementation should undergo a comprehensive feasibility check and the value added by the private partner should be clearly articulated and quantified. The proposed user charges and tariffs should be checked for appropriateness and acceptability of the users. The process for the selection of the private partner should be clearly defined and notified to ensure that there is transparency in the selection process and the e-Government program does not get tarnished by allegations of corruption and partisanship. A comprehensive Master Services Agreement with unambiguous timelines and service levels and penalties in case of non-adherence to the same must be signed with the private partner before initiating the project. An annual review of the performance of the private partner must be conducted at the level of the high committee. Table 39: Guidelines for leveraging PPP 1. 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 2. 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 General Name of the Project Type of PPP (BOT, BOOT, BOLT, OMT etc.) Location (State/District/Town) Administrative Ministry/Department Name of Sponsoring Authority Name of the Implementing Agency Project Description Brief description of the project Justification for the project Possible alternatives, if any Estimated Capital costs with break-up under major heads of expenditure. Also indicate the basis of cost estimation. Phasing of investment Project Implementation Schedule (PIS) Financing Arrangements Sources of financing (equity, debt, mezzanine capital etc.) Indicate the revenue streams of the project (annual flows over project life). Also indicate the underlying assumptions. Indicate the NPV of revenue streams with appropriate discounting Who will fix the tariff/ user charges? Please specify in detail. IRR Economic IRR (if computed) Financial IRR, indicating various assumptions (attach separate sheet if necessary)

2.5 2.6 3. 3.1 3.2

3.3 3.4 4. 4.1 4.2

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1. 5. 5.1 5.2 5.3 6. 6.1 6.2 7. 7.1 7.2 8. 8.1

General Clearances Status of environmental clearances Clearance required from the State Government and other local bodies Other support required from the State Government Government of Ethiopia Support Viability Gap Funding, if required Guarantees being sought, if any Concession Agreement Details of Concession Agreement Service levels and penalties Criteria for short-listing Indicate the criteria for short-listing (attach separate sheet if necessary) Others Remarks, If any

9. 9.1

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Section 7 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN & TIMELINES

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VII. I.

Over all Implementation Plan and Timelines

Overall Implementation Plan Table 40 Overall Implementation Plan Implementation plan Year 2 Year 3 Year 4

S.No.

Yr. v/s Project Agency Priority Projects

Year 1

Year 5

Agriculture Services All information services Agricultural Services Management System Portal for all Agricultural services and information Benefits Management system Social Benefits Portal with information regarding all welfare schemes Pension Management system Social Benefits Management System

Education Education portal Exam Management system Student Management System Education Administration system eHealth Hospital Management Portal Hospital Information Management System Drug Information Management System Integration of hospitals and pharmacies

E-Trade All information regarding G2B services Investors Management system


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S.No.

Yr. v/s Project Trade Management System Enterprise Management System Integrated G2B portal Employment Employment portal with all information services Employment Management System Transport Transport ministry portal including all information services and drivers licenses related services Vehicle Registration Information system Online ticket booking system Government Vehicles Insurance Management System Tourism All information related to travel attraction, hotels etc. Travel Licenses Management System Hospitality Management System Tour Management System Disaster Management system GIS enabled Portal for Tourists

Year 1

Implementation plan Year 2 Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Tax Custom and Revenue Authority Portal (CRAP) Tax Management and Information System

10 e-Courts eCourt portal to provide informational services Case Management system Property and Land Management system Integration with Regional court and property
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S.No. systems 11

Yr. v/s Project e-Municipality Portal with all information services of the Municipality

Year 1

Implementation plan Year 2 Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Modules for certificate generation, tax collection, accounts and license GIS application Project Systems (for Water/Sewerage / Roads /Building etc.) Fleet Management System Asset and Material Management system 12 Passport & Visa Passport & Visa Management System

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S.No.

Yr. v/s Project Enablers Marketing and Awareness Campaign Design of annual plan for Marketing and awareness activities Internal Awareness Campaign, Feelers Targeted Customer Campaigns Capacity Building Establishment of the Knowledge Management System Design of Change Management Plan, Training Curricula Operationalization of the ITSG Courses for leadership, customer orientation, IT and project management etc.

Year 1

Year 2

Implementation plan Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Monitoring and Evaluation Setting up the M&E framework Baseline survey of government organizations and customers Annual survey of government organizations and customers Standards and Policies Selection of a consultant for setting up Standards and Policies

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S.No.

Yr. v/s Project Identification of Standards, policies and guidelines required for implementation of the eGovernment strategy Phase - I of standards and policies implementation Phase - II of standards and policies implementation Phase - III of standards and policies implementation

Year 1

Year 2

Implementation plan Year 3 Year 4

Year 5

Core Projects National Data Set National Enterprise Service Bus National Integrated Authentication Framework National Payment Gateway Public Key Infrastructure National Data Center Woredanet

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II. Sample Detailed Implementation Plan and RACI Chart for Education Priority project Table 41 Education Project Implementation Plan Year 1 S.No. Activities Formation of the project team and selection of a project manager Meetings between the Project team and PMO to discuss the way forward Preparation of Detailed Project Report including As-Is processes, To-be processes, detailed costing and implementation timelines Review of the DPR and approval Development of Benefits management portal to put all informational services related to benefit schemes online and for the development of Pension Management System Preparation of the RFP for the selection of vendor Review and finalization of RFP Bid process management leading to selection of the vendor Project implementation kickoff Application Development Testing Training of the Staff Go live Sub-project closure and learning report Development of comprehensive Social Benefits Management System
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0-6 mon

Implementation plan - SBMS Year 2 Year 3 18-24 30-36 6-12 mon 12-18 mon mon 24-30 mon mon

1 2

3 4

5 5.1 5.2

5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9

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S.No. 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4

Activities Preparation of the RFP for the selection of vendor Reviezxw and finalization of RFP Bid process management leading to selection of the vendor Project implementation kickoff Application Development and integration with Pension Management System Testing Training of the Staff Go live Sub-project closure and learning report Project Closure Report

Implementation plan - SBMS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 18-24 30-36 0-6 mon 6-12 mon 12-18 mon mon 24-30 mon mon

6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 7

Implementation Plan detail for Education Ministry priority project Education Ministry priority project has 4 main components or sub-projects Education Portal, Exam management System, Student management System and Education Administration System. As per the proposed implementation plan the portal implementation may be spread out over years 1 and 2, while the Exam management system may be implemented in 1 st Year and the Education Administration System implementation (automating the entire functioning of the ministry) is proposed over years 2 and 3. A RACI chart is detailed below clearly showing the implementation plan for the Exam management system project. The same chart may be followed for all projects. The RACI Chart is used to clarify roles and responsibilities in the project implementation. It is a table that provides the list of activities and information about roles different people have in relation to those activities. For each activity, different people are assigned different roles as per RACI. This acronym stands for (i) Responsible, or the person doing the work; (ii) Accountable, or the person responsible for making sure the work is done adequately; (iii) Consulted, or the person(s) who is asked for their input; and (iv) Informed, or the person(s) who must be told about the work.
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No

Activity/Task

Responsible

Accountable

To Consult

To Inform

Remark/Comment

Guidelines documents/templates reference(s)

Formation of the project team and selection of a project manager Meetings between the Project team and PMO to discuss the way forward Preparation of Detailed Project Report including As-Is processes, To-be processes, detailed costing and implementation timelines Review of the DPR and approval

Education Ministry

E-Gov. Strategy PMO

Ministry project team

E-Gov. Strategy PMO

Ministry project team

E-Gov. Strategy PMO

E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

DPR format provided in the E-Gov. Strategy Report

E-Gov. Strategy PMO

E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

Project Sponsor / Council of Ministers

E-Gov. Strategy High committee will approve the report

Development of Exam management System Preparation of the RFP for the selection of vendor

Ministry project team

E-Gov. Strategy PMO

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

Depending on the funding source of the project, the RFP may be prepared in the applicable format
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- RFP Best practices document provided by PwC - World Bank or other funding Institution RFP template

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No

Activity/Task

Responsible

Accountable

To Consult

To Inform

Remark/Comment

Guidelines documents/templates reference(s)

Review and finalization of RFP

E-Gov. Strategy PMO

Bid process management leading to selection of the vendor

Ministry project team

E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee E-Gov. Strategy PMO

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

Example If it is funded by Govt. funds, the RFP best practices document template may be used or If project is funded by World bank or other such Institution then the RFP template of the funding institution will need to be used. E-Gov. Strategy High committee will approve the RFP The technical committee may approve the vendor selection The High committee will be informed about the vendor selection and give final approval

Selection criteria as per approved RFP Model Template (Excel Sheet) for evaluation of proposals submitted by PwC

Project implementation
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Ministry

E-Gov.
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No

Activity/Task

Responsible

Accountable

To Consult

To Inform

Remark/Comment

Guidelines documents/templates reference(s) Software Project Management Guidelines provided by PwC Project Management Guidelines templates provided by PwC

kickoff Application Development

project team Selected vendor

Strategy PMO Ministry Project Team E-Gov. Strategy PMO

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

Direct supervision of Application development will be done by Ministry project team and PMO

Technical committee will be closely guiding this activity and will resolve any technical issues in implementation and also be responsible for approving final sign off of all documentation like SRS, test plan, acceptance test reports, etc. The High committee will be kept informed of the progress and resolve any administration issues like scope
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No

Activity/Task

Responsible

Accountable

To Consult

To Inform

Remark/Comment

Guidelines documents/templates reference(s)

Testing

Selected vendor

Ministry Project Team E-Gov. Strategy PMO Ministry Project Team E-Gov. Strategy PMO Ministry Project Team E-Gov. Strategy PMO E-Gov. Strategy PMO

E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee E-Gov. Strategy Technical Committee

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

Training of the Staff

Selected vendor

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

Go live

Selected vendor

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

increase, cost increase etc. High-Committee may be kept informed about testing progress and reports High-Committee may be kept informed about training plan & progress High-Committee will be kept informed about project go-live date The high committee will be kept informed about any special lessons learned from the project implementation like in case of any scope increase or cost increase which may have been better controlled

Testing guidelines document provided by PwC

Training plan and material prepared by vendor and as approved by Technical Committee

Project closure and learning report

Ministry project team

E-Gov. Strategy High Committee

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III. Portal Implementation Plan and Timelines Table 42 Portal implementation Plan S.No 1 1.1 1.2 Key Activities Design of portal and content management Identify a team to upgrade the existing e-Government portal Develop portal charter RFP for the selection of a vendor for development of a new portal and to develop content for the portal Appointment of the vendor for portal design and content Requirements gathering by the vendor Conference room pilot Development of FRS and SRS Development of the new portal and content Development of Standard operating procedures and content management processes for the portal Testing and review of content Go-live Development of 46 e-Services for first year Requirements gathering by SDA Preparation of SRS and FRS by the SDA
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e-Government Portal for Ethiopia Year I

Year II

Year III

Year IV

Year V

1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8

1.9 1.10 1.11 2 2.1 2.2

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S.No 2.3

Key Activities Development of the e-Services Portal Infrastructure augmentation for new eServices Testing of the Services Training of the government employees that provide these services Go-Live of the portal Closure of the sub-project Development of Grievance Redressal System Identification of team of officials from various departments for development of the grievance redressal system Meeting between PMO and the identified team to understand the requirements for Grievance redressal system Identification of officials in every department to whom the grievance redressal requests of their departments would be directed to Development of FRS and workflow for the Grievance Redressal system Approval of the FRS and workflow Development of the Grievance redressal system by the programmers at MoICT

e-Government Portal for Ethiopia Year I

Year II

Year III

Year IV

Year V

2.4 2.5

2.6 2.7 2.8 3

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4 3.5

3.6

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S.No 3.7 3.8

Key Activities Testing Go-Live of the Grievance Redressal System Addition of e-Services to the eGovernment Portal as per the go-live of e-Services through the Agency Priority Projects

e-Government Portal for Ethiopia Year I

Year II

Year III

Year IV

Year V

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IV. ICT Center Implementation Plan and Timelines Table 43 ICT Centre Implementation Plan e-Government ICT Centres S.No 1 2 3 4 Key Activities Identify a team to upgrade the existing ICT Centres for delivering the e-Services Study the existing ICT Community Centre and Unified Billing Centre Study the existing services delivered through the 65 ICT Community Centres and 70 UBS Study the existing infrastructure in the Centres Undertaking a Feasibility Study on the type of services that could be delivered these Channels Identification of the extra number of centres required to cover all the regions Design a Business Model for the Centres for delivering the services Design the Standardization requirements in terms of Services, Infrastructure and Staff cross the Centres Year I Year II Year III Year IV Year V

5 6 7

Design a RFP for selection of an agency for establishing the extra channels or 9 identify community partners for the same Design the funding requirements of the 10 Centres Establishment of the new ICT Centres and upgradation of the existing for delivering 11 the e-Services 12 Training of the employees of the ICT
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e-Government ICT Centres S.No centres 13 Operationalization of the ICT Centre 14 Delivery of the e-Services - Informational 15 Delivery of the e-Services - Transactional Establishment of a Monitoring and 16 evaluation Framework 17 Monitoring the SLAs of the ICT Centres 18 Monitoring the Channel Uptake Incremental upgradation of the Channel based on the uptake and Feedback 19 received Conduct Customer satisfaction survey for 20 the ICT Centre Revised the Channel Strategy based on 21 survey results 22 Study the Impact of the Channel Key Activities Year I Year II Year III Year IV Year V

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V. Contact Center Implementation Plan and Timelines Table 44 Contact Center Implementation Plan e-Government Contact Centre for Ethiopia Key Activities Year I Year II Year III Identify a team to upgrade the existing Contact Centre for delivering the e-Services Study the learnings from the existing Contact Centre Design a Business Model for a Private Sector Participation Identify the services that needs to be delivered through the Channel

S.No 1 2 3 4 5

Year IV

Year V

Design the scope of work for a private agency sector for development of the Contact Centre Design the workflow for delivering the e-services 6 through the Contact Centre Conduct a Cost benefit Analysis for creation of the 7 Channel Conduct Customer satisfaction survey for the 8 Contact Centre Channel Bid process Management for selection of the 9 Agency Design the requirements of the Contact Centre 10 Inbound/outbound Software 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Design the SRS for the Contact Centre Software Develop the Contact Centre Software Installation of the Contact Centre Software Training of all the Contact Centre Employees Operationalization of the Contact Centre Delivery of the e-Services - Informational Delivery of the e-Services - Transactional
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Establishment of a Monitoring and evaluation 18 Framework 19 Monitoring the SLAs of the agency 20 Monitoring the Channel Uptake Incremental upgradation of the Channel based on 21 the uptake and Feedback received Conduct Customer satisfaction survey for the 22 Contact Centre Channel Revised the Channel Strategy based on survey 23 results 24 Study the Impact of the Channel Design the Sustainability Options after the term 25 of the Agency is completed

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VI. Mobile Implementation Plan and Timelines Table 45 Mobile Implementation Plan Mobile Portal for Ethiopia S.No 1 2 3 4 5 Key Activities Identify a team responsible for the implementation of the mobile gateway Contact ETC to appoint a nodal officer to assist in the implementation of this initiative Identify the services to be delivered through the mobiles Capture the learning from the pilot project Design the scope of work for a private agency sector for development of the Contact Centre Develop Terms of Reference and issue an Expression of Interest seeking solution design, architecture, bill of materials and services enablement plan for the mobile gateway Shortlist the vendors based on the quality of the EoI response Use the EoI responses to draft an RFP with well defined scope of work Issue the RFP to the shortlisted bidders Bid process Management for selection of the vendor Assessment of the services for feasibility and any changes in processes for phase 1 Development of content for the mobile gateway
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Year I

Year II

Year III

Year Year IV V

5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7

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Mobile Portal for Ethiopia S.No 5.8 5.9 5.10 5.11 6 7 Key Activities Testing Go-live Capture learning of phase 1 Closure of phase 1 Phase 2 for introduction of additional services Phase 3 for introduction of additional services Year I Year II Year III Year Year IV V

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VII. Capacity Building Implementation Plan and Timelines Table 46 Capacity Building Implementation Plan S.No 1 2 2.1 2.2 2.3 Implementation plan - Capacity Building Key Activities Year I Identify a team responsible for the implementation of capacity building initiatives within the Government Creation of a IT Services group Framing the roles and responsibilities of the ITSG Defining the organization structure, no. of resources, qualifications required and job descriptions Identification of the staff within government that can fill up these positions Permission from relevant authorities to explore the option of forming a joint venture company for ITSG to source resources that are not available within the government Development of an EoI to invite private partners for the JV Shortlisting of vendors based on their responses RFP and bid process management for the selection of private partner Formation of the JV and incorporation as a separate company Training Needs Assessment and preparation of training curriculum Identification of various categories of officials as per their needs for using IT, project management, customer service skills and providing leadership Survey to understand the present level of proficiency of the target groups in the skill areas identified as relevant for performing their jobs
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Year II

Year III Year IV Year V

2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 3

3.1

3.2

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S.No 3.3 3.4 3.5 4 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 5 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8

Implementation plan - Capacity Building Key Activities Year I Design of course curriculum based on survey results Development of e-learning modules for delivery to augment instructor led training Training based on the training modules Strengthening of IT Training infrastructure Identification of training institutes to be leveraged for providing training Define minimum infrastructure and other facilities to be available at these training institutes Assessment of the present infrastructure of the identified institutes Provisioning funds to these institutes for strengthening infrastructure Development of the requisite infrastructure Augmentation of infrastructure for scaling up the operations and any required improvements Development of Ethiopian Government Knowledge Management Portal Development of a DPR for the project by PMO Approval of the DPR Issue of RFP for the selection of an implementation agency to develop the KM portal Bid process management leading to appointment of an agency for implementing KM portal Development of the portal Procurement of hardware for the portal Testing Go-Live

Year II

Year III Year IV Year V

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S.No

5.9

Implementation plan - Capacity Building Key Activities Year I Project closure and learning report along with recommendations and best practices to ensure that the KM portal serves its purpose as one single source of information for government staff Awareness campaign within the government departments for contributing towards and using the KM portal Arrangement of Tours, seminars and conferences Identification of countries, institutions, conferences and events across the world that can be studied to improve the understanding of e-Government amongst officials Identifications of officials for these tours Compendium of learning from each of these activities

Year II

Year III Year IV Year V

5.10 6

6.1 6.2 6.3

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VIII.

Marketing and Awareness Plan and Timelines Table 47 Marketing and Awareness Implementation Plan Implementation plan - Marketing and Awareness Key Activities Year I Year II Year III Identify a team responsible for the implementation of Marketing and awareness campaign Development of RFP for the selection of Marketing and PR partner Issue of the RFP after approval from authorities and bid process management leading to the appointment of the marketing and PR partner for e-Government strategy implementation Development of a distinctive theme, branding and symbol for e-Government Workshops with all government organizations to make them aware regarding the branding guidelines for e-Government strategy Discussions with the owner agencies of Agency priority projects whose services will be enabled online during the year Development of annual plan for Marketing and Awareness Development of marketing material for new services including content for bill boards, newspapers, TV and Radio ads etc. Identification of private partners and other innovative means for funding the marketing and awareness program Year IV Year V

S.No 1 2

3 4

6 7

8 9

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IX. Public Private Partnership - Plan and Timelines Table 48 Public Private Partnership Plan S.No Activities Formation of the project team in charge of PPP Initiatives and selection of a project manager Meetings between the Project team and PMO to discuss the key PPP Initiatives with ETC, Banks, Educational Institutes, Private Sector and Healthcare Institutions Preparation of Detailed Project Report including AsIs processes, To-be processes, detailed costing and implementation timelines. Review of the DPR and approval. Funding road shows and Workshops for generating the required funding. Development of e-Procurement portal to put all informational services related to Public Private Partnerships and Government Tenders Preparation of the RFP for the selection of vendor Review and finalization of RFP Bid process management leading to selection of the vendor Project implementation kickoff Application Development Testing Training of the Staff Go live Sub-project closure and learning report Development of ICT Centers Preparation of the RFP for the selection of vendor Review and finalization of RFP Year 1 0-6 mon 1 6-12 mon Year 2 12-18 mon 18-24 mon 24-30 mon Year 3 30-36 mon

3 4

5 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 6 6.1 6.2

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S.No

Activities Bid process management leading to selection of the vendor Project implementation kickoff ICT Center Development and integration with eGovernment Services Testing Training of the Staff Go live Sub-project closure and learning report Development of ICT Incubation Centers Preparation of the RFP for the selection of vendor Review and finalization of RFP Bid process management leading to selection of the vendor Project implementation kickoff ICT Incubation Center Development and initial setup of Entrepreneurial Ventures at the Center Testing Training of the Staff Go live Sub-project closure and learning report Implementation of key PPP Projects in collaboration with ETC, Banks, Educational Institutes, Private Sector and Healthcare Institutions. Note: The period of the Partnership and the term of the contract shall depend on the type of PPP Models. Generally the PPP BOOT Model shall be implemented for a period of 35 Years. Preparation of the RFP for the selection of vendor Review and finalization of RFP Bid process management leading to selection of the vendor

Year 1 0-6 mon 6-12 mon

Year 2 12-18 mon 18-24 mon 24-30 mon

Year 3 30-36 mon

6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 7 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9

8 8.1 8.2 8.3

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S.No 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9

Activities Project implementation kickoff Project implementation and Tracking Testing Training of the Staff Go live( This period would depend on the duration and Type of the PPP Contract) Sub-project closure and learning report

Year 1 0-6 mon 6-12 mon

Year 2 12-18 mon 18-24 mon 24-30 mon

Year 3 30-36 mon

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Section 8 FUNDING

D Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

VII. Cost Estimation & Funding I. Budgetary Estimates

The proposed e-Government Strategy budget of Birr 3.33 billion for 5 years or Birr 0.67 billion / year compares with Birr 2.13 billion/ year and Birr 10.13 billion / year for Health and Education sector respectively. The proposed budget for the e-Government strategy will entail less than 1% of the overall budget of Government of Ethiopia Summary of the Cost Estimates of the various initiatives proposed is as below Table 49 e-Government Strategy Summary of Costs Ethiopia eGovernment Strategy - Costing Summary S.N o. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 13 14 15 16 17 Initiative s Agriculture Services Benefits Manageme nt System Education eHealth G2B Portal Employme nt Transport Tourism Tax e-Court Municipalit ies Passport eGovernme nt Portal Contact Center Mobile Gateway Common Service Center Capacity Building Marketing & Awareness Year 1 (In Birr.) 15,514,298 17,442,654 23,829,430 23,529,430 4,759,002 17,287,346 20,203,136 15,502,509 21,420,680 14,758,509 17,767,346 16,228,048 10,097,895 29,199,123 4,520,000 718,243,842 14,716,421 10,163,170 Year 2 (In Birr.) 4,893,316 4,269,715 7,420,991 7,090,991 1,197,989 4,946,355 5,553,724 5,427,716 5,889,513 4,609,316 5,474,355 5,672,355 4,197,158 29,240,352 4,235,509 326,899,053 6,329,996 10,810,802 Year 3 (In Birr.) 4,466,779 3,954,873 6,080,086 5,717,086 1,223,221 4,335,524 5,166,787 5,056,619 5,344,682 4,156,379 4,916,324 5,134,124 4,537,137 32,112,471 3,226,291 355,121,309 6,702,958 11,504,763 Year 4 (In Birr.) 4,687,683 4,124,957 6,337,290 5,937,990 1,303,081 4,527,388 5,431,251 5,338,507 5,609,146 4,348,243 5,166,268 5,405,848 4,910,285 35,270,474 3,489,082 386,036,106 7,204,999 12,248,764 Year 5 (In Birr.) 4,294,225 3,833,491 5,036,393 4,597,163 1,343,558 3,944,091 5,085,709 5,012,131 5,105,709 3,922,841 4,646,859 4,910,397 5,319,877 38,742,883 3,776,991 419,906,215 7,750,824 13,046,842
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18 19 20 21 22 23

Standards & Policies Enterprise Architectur e NIAF NSEB NDS NPG PKI( Design and implement ation as per the design by external consultant) HRMS eProcureme nt System e-Office System Financial Manangem ent Informatio n System Email Manageme nt System ITSG Manpower costs PMO staffing costs Total Grand Total Grand Total (in USD)

5,021,754 5,081,667 33,788,816 20,595,316 36,676,316 28,076,316

5,509,684 435,000 500,000 -

6,045,695 257,000 500,000 -

6,634,558 257,000 500,000 -

7,281,523 257,000 500,000 -

24 25 26 27

124,754,500 16,243,211 15,022,158 15,022,158 1,473,684 252,632 252,632 1,473,684 252,632 252,632 1,473,684 252,632 252,632 1,473,684 252,632 252,632

28 29 30 31

4,319,058 14,769,526 1,500,000 1,860,000 1,317,913,633 3,328,181,379 201,463,764

3,300,000 2,706,000 458,588,838

3,630,000 2,976,600 484,145,65 2

3,993,000 3,274,260 524,015,128

4,392,300 3,601,686 558,287,65 4

Details of the Costing is provided in Annexure XVII

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II. Funding Framework To enable proper implementation of the Strategy Program, a proper funding and spending system needs to be developed, approved and implemented to ensure that the funds are sufficiently allocated for the different development domains. Funding options need to be considered carefully to ensure that Transparency and accountability is maintained in allocation and utilization of funds Adequate funds are available for the implementation of the project utilization of allocated funds is monitored Strategic control of the government is maintained E-Government Strategy funding and spending process and the life cycle across the different stages of IT initiatives are explained in the pages that follow. More specifically the following areas have been addressed: Funding options identified during the Assessment Phase and the planning activities. Funding and Spending Framework including percentages distribution and link to Governance Structure Fund allocation and utilization process for core, common, Ministry/Agency specific and Ministry/Agency owned initiatives. The annual procedure for short-listing vendors. The key options available for MOCIT to fund the Strategy are:

Figure 31: Key Options for MOCIT OPTION 1 (Conventional) - Government Funded: The source of the fund is the Government annual budget, where the Government of Ethiopia invests the whole project/initiative amount as capital expenditure OPTION 2 - International Funding Agencies: Several international donor agencies provide financial support to development projects in developing countries. Bilateral development agencies facilitate the provision of grants and loans from one national government to other governments or NGOs in order to help implement development projects. Multilateral development agencies also provide resources and carry out development projects with governments and NGOs and include numerous UN agencies (such as UNDP, UNFPA, UNIFEM), development banks (such as the World Bank, African Development Bank), and other inter-governmental bodies OPTION 3(PPP) - Public Private Partnerships: Government and Private sector can collaborate on different models for the implementation and success of the model

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(BOT) Build Operate and Transfer (BOT): For some of the initiatives the private sector can build the infrastructure, own the operations for a fixed period of time and transfer it to government once the fixed period is over. OPTION 4 (Privatise) In a longer timeframe when the system is mature and basic infrastructure is in place, some of the services can be completely privatised where Government funding will not be done and it will be controlled by parties in private sector The various funding options mentioned above differ in terms of the ownership by Government and the risk transferred to the private sector as shown in the diagram below

Figure 32: Government Control/Risk Some of the key factors to be considered during the design include: The e-Government Program will be initially funded through Government funds. Other funding options (mainly BOT and Funding Agencies) can be explored in parallel PPP can be consider at a later stage once PPP models become more mature in Ethiopia Privatization is a long term target that can start once services have taken a mature shape or became well defined.

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III. Program funding Options The E-Government Strategy implementation may be funded by a combination of funding sources including Governments own budgetary allocations, finance from multilateral institutions like the World Bank or by partnering with the private sector. Partnering with the private sector would provide a two-fold benefit in terms of providing finance as well as it will help the development of the private sector and develop indigenous capacity and skills.

Funding Source
Funding Agency PPP Government

20%

20%

60%

The above diagram depicts the probable quantum of funding of the E-Government strategy program from different sources, including Government funds, institutions like the World Bank and through the PPP (Public-Private Partnership) route. The table below provides the amounts which could be funded by the different entities. Table 50 Funding Options

Funding Options Funding Agencies PPP Government

Amount( in Birr) 1,996,908,827 665,636,276 665,636,276

Amount(in USD 120878258 40292753 40292753

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Savings through PPP- Indicative As mentioned earlier, partnering with the private sector for implementation of the program will not only help in funding but will also develop the indigenous private sector. The different projects including the identified priority projects and the channels could be implemented in PPP mode. Assumption: Since the number of transactions for the Ministries/Agencies was not available, it has been assumed that in projects related to development sectors such as health, education, social and labor etc, where Government has a larger and more important mandate, and the there will low or no service charges the PPP participation may be around 10%. However in projects such as E-Trade, Tax, Municipalities, Tourism where transactions are more and service charges could be collected the PPP participation may be around 20%. Based on above assumptions, following table depicts some of the possibilities of PPP funding of the program, including savings in investment, which may accrue to the Government. Table 51 PPP Options Sr. No. Project Estimated Cost (Mil. Birr) PPP Investment (i.e. savings in investment for Government) 3.39 3.36 4.87 4.69 3.50 3.18 1.96 8.29 7.27 8.67 7.59 7.47 14.77 106.13 14.73 1103.11 1302.98

PPP Participation of 10% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Agriculture Benefits Management Education Health Employment E-Court PPP Participation of 20% E-Trade Transport Tourism Tax Municipalities Passport Portal Contact Centre Mobile Gateway Common Service Centres Total 9.80 41.44 36.34 43.37 37.97 37.35 29.06 164.57 19.25 2206.21 2855.26 33.86 33.63 48.70 46.87 35.04 31.80

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PPP participation in Channels development: The cost estimates for the development of the different channels have been made, as in other cases, for a five year period. However, it is expected that private participation would commence from year 3 in case of Portal and Call centre and from year 2 in case of Mobile gateway. The CSCs are proposed to be implemented on PPP model itself though implementation would start from year 2 after completion of tendering and selection. The PPP investment contribution for the channels in above table, has accordingly been estimated for - Years, 3,4,5 in case of Portal & Call centre - Years 2,3,4,5 in case of Mobile Gateway - Years 1,2,3,4,5 in case of CSCs Thus it can be observed that out of total funding requirement of 3.33 Bil. Birr almost 40% amounting to 1302.98 Mil. Birr, could be funded by partnering with the private sector. It is important that the Government consider this approach for implementation, because as mentioned earlier, partnering with private sector is expected to provide multi-fold benefits for the countrys development.

IV. Fund Management Framework (FMF) In developing the FMF several variables were discussed and analysed. The major variables are mentioned below: 1. The size of the fund 2. The distribution of the fund among the different initiatives (central/Ministry/Agency) 3. The approval process To recommend the target framework, the following factors were taken into consideration: Governments across the world are spending 3 to 5 per cent of their total annual budget on modernization efforts; these Governments are of varying levels of maturity and thus require different budget allocations. Modernizing Government of Ethiopia requires work on the center level and on the Ministries/Agencies level as well, the investment for the center will be larger during the Program initial stages As the Program develop, tendency will be towards automating work in the Ministries/Agencies, this will mandate allocating more fund to the center where the center would have reached a good level of maturity There will be expenses associated with allocating resources to do designs and evaluations for implementations to come, studies will have to be conducted to evaluate the need and the shape of certain projects. These resources can be MOCIT internal resources or external third party resources In general fund will be utilized for approved projects as detailed in the e-Government Strategy, however, there will be instances where new requirements might arise and these will need to be tackled properly. There should be a system for allocations approval that complies with the Government policies and procedures.

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The diagram below describes the FMF, in which it was assumed that 1% of the annual budget will be allocated for e-Government Strategy Implementation.

Figure 33: Fund utilization framework The diagram above describes the framework that is proposed for the fund allocation for the e-Government Strategy. Important points include: It has been assumed that the process for approval of budget will follow the normal cycle within Ethiopian financial year. There will be a fraction of total budget which will be allocated for the implementation of eGovernment Strategy. As mentioned previously it is assumed this fraction will be 1% of the total Ethiopia budget. Once the fund is approved it will be allocated under two separate categories as described below: 1. Central Fund: This fund will be allocated for the implementation of core and common initiatives which include the shared infrastructure components and the common applications. These components will be used by the different Government Ministries/Agencies. 2. Ministries/Agencies Fund: This fund will be allocated specifically for the initiatives to be implemented by Ministries. The fund under this category will be allocated to Ministries for the implementation of new or approved initiatives. A pre approved list of initiatives will be within the Entity roadmap and annual IT plan, however, the need for other non-planned deployments might arise during the year, these new requirements will be assessed and if given high priority will be allocated a fund from the Entity fund if sufficient amounts are available. Note: The process of utilization of fund or spending processes will follow the existing Ministry of Finance and Economic Development procedure. However, the process will be

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managed by MOCIT for Core and Common initiatives and by Ministries/Agencies for specific initiatives. The Central and Ministry/Agency funds will be divided under the following categories for administrative and accounting purposes Table 52: Categories of fund S.No. 1. Category Research and Development Details Ministries/Agencies may need support from experts outside the Government to analyze new initiatives and to prepare DPR for the fund allocation. This fund can be utilized by Ministries/Agencies to hire an external agency with support from PMO This fund will be allocated for the implementation of core and common initiatives. This fund will be allocated for the implementation of the new initiatives that were not pre-planned. This fund will be allocated to Ministries/Agencies for the implementation of approved initiatives

2. 3. 4.

Core and Common Initiatives New Initiatives Approved Initiatives

Considering the Governance Structure, the approval for allocation of fund and the review of proposal will be owned by different organizations within the structure for control purposes, these are described in the table below. Table 53: Approval for allocation S.No . Initiative Category Initiativ e Value Implementati on Owner Monitoring role Supportin g Role Approval for allocation of fund High Committee Technical Committee /MOCIT Ministry/Agency MOCIT(PMO) Technical Committee High Committee Technical Committee /MOCIT Ministry/Agency MOCIT(PMO) Technical Committee Technical Committee/ High Committee

Core and common

1 value>X Value< X

MOCIT

MOCIT(PMO)

Technical Committee

Ministries/ 2 Value > X Agencies Specific Value< X

Ministry/Ag Value > X 3 ency Owned

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Value< X

MOCIT

V. Fund Allocation Process Allocation of Funds for implementation of the 31 Projects will be done Centrally Ministries/Agencies to prepare Detailed Project Report with the assistance from ITSG. The various details to be covered under DPR are mentioned in the following sections and the Detailed Project Report Template has been provided in Annexure V. Funding Approval will be done by the High Committee Responsibility for Implementation of the Projects lies with the Implementation Ministry/ Agency Fund Management and Review will be done by the PMO The proposal/DPR will be reviewed by PMO and the recommendations/review comments will be shared with the owner of initiative for further refinement will approve/reject the allocation of fund. High Committee will consolidate the list of approved initiatives and will finalize the fund allocation. The consolidated report will be shared with High Committee and fund approval process will follow the existing Budgeting procedures

Guidelines Project Case Formulation Compliance with Guidelines and Procedures - The DPR to be submitted by the Implementation Entity should contain the following details: Project Description, including clear definition of the citizen/business need that it is fulfilling and service standards sought to be achieved How the project is leveraging existing and proposed infrastructure created by other initiatives Project Funding sought Breakdown of costs including Hardware, Software, Systems Development, Communications Connectivity, Personnel, Training, Civil Works, Materials and supplies, Taxes, Contingency Costs and Other Significant costs. Projected Cash Flows (if any) Ability to support PPP and Initiatives taken Proposed Implementation Plan including Timeline Key risk factors

Appraisal and Approval of Project Proposals The Project DPR would be prepared by the implementing Ministry/Agency along the guidelines established by MOCIT The PMO would assist the implementing Ministry/Agency in filling the DRP

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The PMO would assist the High Committee in reviewing the projects and facilitating approval for both Central and Ministry/Agency initiatives The factors that need to be considered while evaluating projects include: Purpose and context -reflects e-Government strategy objectives Cost-benefit analysis Analysis of benefits in terms of envisaged citizen/business services The solution is practical and cost effective The project envisages infrastructure built by existing/proposed projects The project leverages Government funding with private resources The project leverages private sector skills

Proposed implementation plan is realistic and reasonable Project management capacity Requisite skills to manage the project implementation as well as ongoing operation Risks perceived and mitigation measures (E.g. issue of political and Government staff acceptability, statutory consents- whether risks are justified by the potentially high outcomes) The way forward: Whether the decision is adequate to ensure continuation of services including availability of O&M budgets in case e-service charges are not available or are not adequate to cover these expenses The approval process would be detailed to ensure that this is the only approval that the implementing Entity requires.

A Fund Allocation prioritization framework is provided in the figure below

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Figure 34: Fund allocation prioritization

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ANNEXURES

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Annexures Annexure I: Concept of Service Life Cycle The concept of Life Cycle Event, service enablement and agency services, i.e. transaction, is explained in the following table: Table 54: Lifecycle Event Description Category Definition Example

Life Cycle Event

An event comprises the major categories through which any customer carries out his activities and interactions with the Government. These events are a combination of Life Cycle functions and service based Refers to provisioning of a complete service offering; it comprises of many transactions.

Birth of a child Starting a business

Service Enablement

Registering of business Obtaining driver license

Agency Services transaction

Refers to individual transactions provided by multiple agencies/ departments within an agency for service enablement

Ministry of Trade and Industry Business License Ministry of Health Drug Registration Certificate

The desired end result of enabling services for delivery via alternate channels is to facilitate the customers to access the services in an easier and faster manner. Life cycle based representation of services is a powerful tool towards this end. As per this concept, all services for a particular event say starting a business should be available under a single umbrella and the customer should not be required to have multiple touch points for the same. In addition to classifying and prioritizing services, services must be integrated at the back-end based on customer lifecycle approach. The services can be grouped by their customer base, and these can further be mapped onto the various customer lifecycle events, where they each respond to a particular need of the customer at a given time. Hence existing services can be identified based on life-cycle services approach for the various customer groups citizens/residents, businesses, visitors and government employees. The figures below provides an illustration for the life-cycle of events for the citizens/residents, business, visitors and government employees.

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Figure 35: Life-Cycle Services


Citizen/ Resident
Lifecycle events
Birth

Business
Lifecycle events
Exploration

Key services
Birth Certif icate; Immunization certif icate, others Registration; Scholarship; Results; Certif icates Work permit; employment benef its
Marriage; Divorce; Family Counseling

Key services
Economic data; business environment; regulations; Registration; license; of f ice setup

Education

Starting Business

Employment

Funding

options, loans
Approvals; Advertising; license; etc.

Youth and Family

Operations

Old Age

Social Assistance; Pension


Death Certif icate; Wealth Distribution

Regulatory
Closure/ selling of business Recruitment

Returns; taxes; laws of land etc.


cancellation of license; etc.

Death

Housing

Building Permit; Sewerage; Electricity and Water, Permits


Debt Collection; Civil Suits

Work permit; visa; etc.

Legal Services

Legal Services

Debt Collection; Civil Suits

Public Utilities

Electricity; Water; Telephone

Public Utilities
Expanding business

Electricity; Water; Telephone Opening braches; adding activities

Grievance Redress

All Services and Agencies Passport; Student; Pilgrim; Scholarship Inf ormational Services; Fines; Registration

Travel

Grievance redress

All Services and Agencies


Real estate; environment; compliance

Others

Others

Government Employee
Lifecycle events
Recruitment Joining Recurring

Visitors
Lifecycle events
Exploration Enquiry

Key services
Application; interview; offer work permit; ID creation; personal details; training Salary transfer; time and attendance; performance appraisal Training/ Promotion/ Transfer) Cancellation of work permit; pension; grant Loans; further studies Leave management; employee grievances

Key services
Information on Ethiopia; brochures Visa rules; travel agencies; destinations; weather; events; accommodation, flight information Currency exchange; car rentals Entertainment; food options, emergency contacts, local customs Licensing; online services provisioning Leave management; employee grievances

Career Advancement Resignation/ retirement Employee Welfare Others

Travel to Ethiopia Travel within Ethiopia

Tourism service providers Others

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Annexure II: PMO Staffing Requirements Considering the roles and responsibilities defined for various teams within PMO the table below proposes the profiles of various members and the staffing strength for five years. The strength will be reviewed by the end of every year. Table 55: PMO staffing Requirements S. No . 1. Team Title Numbers Y1 Project Coordination team (technology , process, application, Informatio n Security) Team Leader 1 Y2 1 Y3 1 Y4 1 Y5 1 Key Roles and Responsibilities Monitoring the progress of various initiatives under eGovernment Strategy with the help of team members. Managing the co-ordination between various Project Managers Monitoring the initiatives from technology perspectives. Monitoring the initiatives from business process perspectives. Monitoring the development of various applications and ensuring the coherence with framework defined under the application architecture Monitoring the initiatives for Information Security compliance. Facilitate information exchange and knowledge sharing across Project Communications Management Knowledge Areas (PMI) Project Integration Management Project Scope Management Project Time Management

Member (Technology ) Member (Process)

Member (Application )

Member (Information Security)

2.

Knowledge Manageme nt Team

Team Leader

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entities projects.

and

Member

Manages databases of various initiatives being implemented under Strategy Ensure standards are shared with PMs. Use best practices in project management to update standards as needed Confirm the compliance of RFPs with the procurement policies. Maintain a tracker for procurement activities and share the same with identified stakeholders Review and approve the evaluation done by team for received requests and share the recommendatio ns Share Detailed Project Report standard template with Entities and provide necessary awareness and support. Evaluate the project request to verify applicability Project Scope Management Project Cost Management

Member

3.

Appraisal Team (technical and financial)

Team Leader

Member Technical

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and compliance with technical requirements. Member Financial 1 1 1 1 1 Ensure sufficient financial details and breakdown is included in the request. Confirm availability of fund and identify sources and alternatives. Identify a pool of resources to support with implementation s across the Ministries/Age ncies. Interact with various entities to maintain a demand tracker for various kinds of resources. Identify external providers for resources Maintain a database of skilled resources and companies Respond to the demand of resources raised by Ministries/Age ncies. Review Marketing Awareness Strategy Design Implement Marketing Awareness Campaigns the and and and Marketing and Public Relations Project Human Resource Management

4.

ITSG experts

Team Leader

Member

5.

Marketing and Awareness

Team Leader

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Team Member

Design and Implement Marketing and Awareness Campaigns Monitoring the Project Progress Review the M&E Framework Conduct Evaluations Monitoring the Project Progress Conduct Evaluations Control Promotion, transfers Control Promotion, transfers

Design and Implement Marketing and Awareness Campaigns M&E of large eGovernment Projects

6.

Monitoring and Evaluation

Team Leader

Team Members

M&E of large eGovernment Projects Administrativ e and HR functions Administrativ e and HR functions

7.

Cadre Control

Team Leader

Team Member

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PMO Staffing Requirements Background and Qualifications Table 56: PMO Staffing Requirements No. 1. Title Team Leader (Project Coordination) Member (Technology) Background and Qualifications Post graduate in Management with PMP certification. Minimum 8 years of experience in IT industry with 3 years in a Project Manager role Graduate in Computer Science or IT related field with technical certifications in infrastructure and computer hardware Minimum 6 years of experience in IT industry Post graduate in MIS, Management or related field. Minimum 4 years of experience in business processes Graduate in Computer Science or IT related field with security certificates and/or technical infrastructure certifications. These can include CISSP, CISA, CISM, and other vendor specific certificates. Minimum 6 years of experience in IT and Information Security. Graduate in Computer Science or IT related field with certifications in enterprise architecture and/or software development. Minimum 6 years of experience in IT industry Graduate in MIS, Management or related field with certification in Project Management Minimum 8 years of experience in industry with 3 years as a KM team leader Graduate in MIS, Management or related field. Minimum 2 years of relevant experience Post graduate in Management with certifications. Minimum 8 years of experience in industry with 3 years in a Program Management Office of large implementation Post graduate in Management with certifications. Minimum 4 years of experience in industry with 3 years in a Program Management Office of large implementation Post graduate in Finance or qualified Chartered Accountant with certifications. Minimum 4 years of experience in industry with 2 years in a Financial Analysis role. Post graduate in Human Resources Management with certifications. Minimum 8 years of experience in industry with 3 years in leading recruitment division of a big IT organization. Graduate in Computer Science/IT with certifications. Minimum 2 years of experience in industry

Member (Process) Member (Information Security)

Member (Application)

2. Team (Knowledge Management) Leader 4. Team Leader Experts) (ITSG

Member (Knowledge Management) 3. Team (Appraisal) Leader

Member (Technical)

Member (Financial)

Member

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Team Leader (MIS )

Post graduate in MIS, Management or related field. Minimum 8 years of experience in industry with 5 years in a similar position Post graduate in Human Resources Management with certifications. Minimum 8 years of experience in industry with 3 years in leading HR division of a big IT organization. Graduate in HR. Minimum 2 years of experience in industry Post graduate in Marketing and Public Relations Minimum 8 years of experience in industry with 5 years in leading Marketing division of a big IT organization. Post Graduate in Marketing Minimum 2 years of experience in Marketing in industry Post graduate in IT/MIS with relevant certification Minimum 8 years of experience in industry with 3 years in handling large e-Governance Project as M&E Expert Minimum 3 years of experience in e-Governance

Team Leader (Cadre Control)

Member 6. Team (Marketing Awareness) Member Team (Marketing Awareness) Member Leader and Leader and

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Annexure Training and Levels

III: Courses Course

Table 57: Courses Course

Training and Levels

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Training Areas

Available course curriculum Basic Competent Advanced

Technology Management Training 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Basic Computer Training Network Design and Management Web-Designing and Management Setup and Management Hardware/ Server Sizing and Management BCP/ DR Configuration Management Quality Management SDLC Database and Storage Administration Information Security Emerging ICT Technologies Open Standards/ Interoperability Monitoring Knowledge Management IT Standards, Guidelines and Procedures Application Development (Languages: VB, C, C++, Java, etc.) Specialized Packages (e.g. AutoCAD, Tally, etc.)

Project Management Training 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 IT Project Management Program Management Outsourcing Management Vendor Management General Management Strategic Management IT Project Evaluation/ Audit

Basic

Competent

Advanced

Change Management 1 Managing Change Basics

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2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Human Resource Management Leadership Skills Intellectual Property Rights IT Acts, Policies and Regulations Application end-user Training Government Process Re-engineering Risk Analysis Champions Training Program Legal Reforms Business Process designing & detailing; BPM

Training Areas

Include in which syllabus Basic Competent Advanced

Financial Management 1 2 3 4 5 Defining and Understanding Ownership (TCO) Total Cost of

Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Skills Procurement Process (especially licensing cost) Financial Management PPP Modeling

Soft Skills 1 2 3 4 5 6 Communication and Presentation Skills Relationship Management Team Building Technical Report Writing Skills Personal effectiveness Skills Publicity and Awareness/ PR Skills

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Annexure IV: Detailed Marketing and Awareness Strategy Design of the marketing and awareness campaign will include five key components, each of which should be defined and described in as much detail as possible during the planning and design stage: Identifying target market segments Channel (media mix) selection Timing Message development Audience skills and education

Target market segments One marketing medium cannot reach all segments of the diverse community that makes up the Country of Ethiopia. Marketing campaigns do best when they define specific target markets and deliver a tailored marketing programme for each market. Our prior experience with e-Government awareness campaigns indicates that billboards and traditional media such as television and radio alone will not be sufficient to penetrate the target market with news of the e-Government services. We also recommend presentations at schools, community organizations and events to supplement billboards and traditional advertising. Additionally we could also look at the mosques for distribution of flyers and leaflets. These marketing outlets will provide an opportunity for the Country to tailor specific messages to individual communities. One way of segmenting the potential users for e-Government services is into four groups as illustrated in Table 21 below. Table 58: Target Market Segments Audience categories Business Citizens and residents Segmentation basis Size of business Industry Education levels Age o o Elderly Younger generation

Further segmentation based on

Visitors Government employees

Income groups People with special needs Socially underprivileged Business travellers Tourists For all personnel (awareness of the overall eGovernment strategy) Agency personnel (agencys eGovernment programme)

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At a finer level of granularity, within the residential segment there are several specific segments of the Countrys population that are traditionally harder to reach: Elderly Uneducated Socially underprivileged People with special needs

Within the business community, there may be particular groups that will require special targeting. For example, if the Country launches a web application that enables applications for scholarships to be submitted online, it may be necessary to market this service to the students and their parents. In the case of both specific residential and business segments, the Country should consider using specially targeted media. For example, a greater use of personal communications channels, such as outreach through community organizations, working with opinion leaders, and developing word-of-mouth, may be more appropriate to reach the elderly and non-Ethiopian communities. In contrast, methods such as direct mail may be the best way to get messages across to segments of the business community. Communication and media channel mix An appropriate communication and media channel mix is critical to ensure that everyone in the target audience receives and understands the campaign messages. Given customer diversity, any awarenessraising campaign that relies too heavily on just one medium or type of communication is unlikely to achieve its goals. However, there could be services which might be targeted at only a small segment of the society which would require targeted campaign through the channels and media of the choice of that segment. E.g. Pensions is one service that will only be targeted at the people in the old age, so the campaign will have to be directed through the medium which is most appealing to the old age segment. Suggested channels for different segments are illustrated in the table below. Table 59: Effectiveness of Media Channels by Marketing Segments Direct Mailers Schools Newspapers Telephone Books Billboards Hospitals Mosques Events Malls TV Buses / Shelters Agency Offices Business Publications Workshops Libraries

Citizens and Residents

Chambers of Commerce

Elderly

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Younger Generatio n

Arabic Speaking

Uneducated

Business

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Annexure V: Detailed Project Report - Template Some of the important Areas to be included in Detailed Project Report are as follows 1. Background of initiative and other basic information 2. Initiative overview or summary Overview Input and output costing source of funding Goal and objectives of initiative Stakeholder analysis Service and service levels Implementation strategy Key activities (As Is Study, Process Re-engineering, Change Management etc.) Infrastructure requirements including technology Sustainability Plan

3. Initiative details including implementation model

4. Way forward 5. Plan for implementation A Sample Detailed Template for preparation of a DPR is given below TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2 INTRODUCTION 2.1 ABOUT MINISTRY IMPLEMENTING THE PROJECT 2.2 IT INITIATIVES, PLANS OF MINISTRY 2.3 About Project 3 PROJECT OBJECTIVES 3.1 E-GOVERNMENT STRATEGY INITIATIVE OF GOVERNMENT 3.2 PROJECT OBJECTIVES 3.3 SCOPE OF WORK 4 SERVICES ENVISAGED PRESENT AND FUTURE 5 SERVICES CURRENTLY OFFERED AND AS - IS IT SCENARIO 5.1 PRESENT IT SCENARIO IN MINISTRY 5.2 SERVICES CURRENTLY OFFERED 6 TARGET BENEFICIARIES 7 STAKEHOLDERS - ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

8 STAKEHOLDERS EXPECTATION 8.1 CITIZEN

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8.2 ADMINISTRATION 8.3 FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 9 BUSINESS MODEL 10 BUSINESS PROCESS RE-ENGINEERING 10.1 REQUIREMENT FOR BPR 10.2 BPR METHODOLOGY 11 SERVICE LEVELS AND MEASUREMENT 12 CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 13 OPERATING EXPENSES 14 CAPACITY BUILDING, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS 15 CONTRACTING ARRANGEMENTS 16 RISK MANAGEMENT 17 KEY SUCCESS FACTORS 18 SERVICE DELIVERY MECHANISM 19 IMPLEMENTATION METHODOLOGY & STRATEGY 20 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING 20.1 PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY 20.2 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING STRUCTURE 21 MILESTONES & ESTIMATED PROJECT TIME SCHEDULE

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Annexure VI: Services Prioritization Framework The implementation of the e-Services has been phased out as part of the phasing out of the sub-projects under the various Agency Priority Projects. However, during the implementation phase, there may be unforeseen exigencies that may warrant a further prioritization and phasing of the services planned during a given year. In order to address the same, a services prioritization framework has been designed so that the Government of Ethiopia can leverage the same to conduct this prioritization and phasing in a scientific manner. The list of services to be electronically enabled should be prioritized using the criticality-feasibility model. This model facilitates the prioritization and phasing of services and initiatives based on their importance (criticality) and the ease of implementing them through electronic channels (feasibility). Criticality should be evaluated though an assessment of: Strategic Fit Does this service fit into Ethiopian e-Government strategy? Visibility Will creating this service promote a positive image of Government of Ethiopia to constituents and businesses? Cost Savings -- Does providing this service over the alternate channels generate cost savings for Ethiopia? Revenue generation Could electronically-enabling this service potentially provide a new revenue source for the Government?

To determine feasibility, following would be assessed: Market Readiness What is the number of customers that use the service? Are customers demanding this service? Operational Readiness Are the ministries and agencies ready from a technology and capability standpoint, to undertake this project? Development Cost - Are development costs relatively low or high? Leveragability Can the service leverage an existing application? If a new application must be built, will other applications be able to leverage it?

The criticality and feasibility framework will allow the Government of Ethiopia to determine the phasing and prioritization of the initiatives in the following manner Defer If there is low criticality and low feasibility, the application should not be undertaken. Low criticality implies little gain and low feasibility implies relatively high risk. So such services should be taken up in the end. Permit If there is low criticality but high feasibility Government of Ethiopia should allow the development of the application as long as it follows the Standards and Guidelines and uses the overall infrastructure. Low criticality implies little gain, but high feasibility implies relatively few risks. This type of project should be allowed. Pursue If there is high criticality but low feasibility, Government of Ethiopia should allow the application to be built. High criticality implies that there is customer demand for such a service or

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that significant benefits could be realized from this application, but low feasibility implies that there may be significant risks. Target If there is high criticality and high feasibility, Ethiopia should build this application. High criticality implies customer demand and benefits to the organization and high feasibility implies relatively few risks in pursuing this application. Such services should be taken up at the earliest as they would provide maximum gains with least amount of effort.
High Criticality

Pursue
Low Feasibility

Target
High Feasibility

Defer

Permit

Low Criticality

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Annexure VII: ICT Standing of Ethiopia Some international Rankings UN e-Readiness Index Ethiopia has consistently been ranked around 170 marks on the UN e-Readiness Index in the past few years as shown in the table below. Year 2005 2008 2010 Ranking 171 172 172

The UN e-readiness Index is evaluated based on the Web maturity, Infrastructure and Human Capital available in the country. Ethiopia has made significant progress in the web measure index over the years but the Infrastructure component of the index has been relatively low as seen in the Chart below. 0.45 0.4 0.35 0.3 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 e-readiness Index Web measure index Infratrucure Index Human Capital Index

2005 2008 2010

Ethiopia must target to break into the 150 mark on the countries ranking by the next UN Rankings by targeting a Web Measure Index of 0.3, Infrastructure Index of 0.05 and Human Capital index of 0.39.

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The Web Measure Index The Web Measure Index is based upon a five-stage model, which builds upon the previous levels of sophistication of a countrys online presence. As a country migrates upwards through the various stages, it is ranked higher in the web measure index.
Connected

Transactional

Interactive

Enhanced

Emerging

Current State of Ethiopia

Figure - Stages of UN Web Measurement Index The Telecommunication Infrastructure Index The Telecommunication Infrastructure Index is a composite index of five primary indicators relating to a countrys infrastructure capacity as they relate to the delivery of eGovernment services. These are: 1. Internet Users /100 persons 2. PCs /100 persons 3. Main Telephones Lines /100 persons 4. Cellular telephones /100 persons 5. Broad banding /100 persons The Human Capital Index The Human Capital Index is a composite index of the adult literacy rate and the gross enrolment ratio (including primary, secondary and tertiary enrollment), with two thirds weight given to the adult literacy rate and one third to the gross enrolment ratio.

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ICT DEVELOPMENT INDEXES - 2008 RANKING: International Telecommunication Union (ITU) places Ethiopia 154th in Global IT Development Index. The best and the worst performing countries in ICT Development as per ITU are illustrated below Economy Sweden Singapore United States India Tanzania Ethiopia Niger Chad Rank 2008 1 14 19 117 149 154 158 159 IDI 2008 7.85 6.95 6.54 1.75 1.17 1.03 0.9 0.79 Rank 2007 1 15 17 116 151 153 157 159 IDI 2007 7.27 6.47 6.33 1.62 1.05 0.97 0.86 0.73

The following section illustrates the three major Methodologies to assess the ICT status of Ethiopia. I. II. III. I. ICT Opportunity Index ICT Development Index ICT Price basket ICT Opportunity Index:

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In this method, the evaluation is broadly categorized into Information density and Information Usage. Information Density comprises of the ICT Networks which is further broken down into sub index of Fixed Telephone lines, Internet Bandwidth and Mobile subscriptions and ICT Skills which is a basic requirement for accessing and comprehending the Information. The ICT Skills basically comprises of the literacy indicators and School enrolment indicators. Information Usage is further broken down into ICT Usage intensity comprising of Broadband subscription and International outgoing telephone traffic and the ICT Usage uptake comprising of PC, TV and Internet usage as illustrated in the diagram below.

Ethiopia - ICT Opportunity Index Analysis: 250

200

150 SKILLS 100 UPTAKE 50 INTENSITY 0 index 104.7 South Africa 8.7 Ethiopia 26.2 103.6 229.6 LOW MEDIUM UPPER AVERAGE AVERAGE AVERAGE (63 (63 (28 economies) economies) economies)

ICT-OI

As seen in the above graph, Ethiopia is much below the Low Average in the ICT Skill Levels. The ICT Uptake which is the usage of PC, TV and Internet is strikingly lower than the Low Average of 63 Countries. The ICT Intensity which is mainly driven by the telephone traffic is relatively better at the same level as the Low average of countries.

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II.

ICT Development Index

The ICT Development Index method mainly helps to assess the ICT Impact and Outcomes by evaluating the ICT Access, ICT Usage and ICT Capability of the country. Following is the ICT Index status of Ethiopia benchmarked against Average values for Indicators. ICT INDEX 2008 Average Value Ethiopian Values 1.03 1.33 0.01 2.43 Ethiopian Rank (out of 159 Countries) 154 148 157 153

ICT Development Index Access Usage Skills

3.58 4.07 1.7 6.37

Parameters for ICT Development Index: Following is the description of key parameters used in deducing the ICT Development Index. Ethiopia which is ranked 154th in this Index needs to focus and improve these parameters in order to go up the ranking table. A. Access sub-index: This index captures ICT readiness and includes five infrastructure and access indicators fixed telephony, mobile telephony, international Internet bandwidth, households with computers, households with Internet

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B. Use sub-index: This index captures ICT intensity and includes three ICT intensity and usage indicators Internet users, fixed broadband, mobile broadband

C. Skills sub-index: This index captures ICT capability or skills as indispensable input indicators and includes three proxy indicators adult literacy, gross secondary and tertiary enrolment

The skills sub-index therefore has less weight in the computation of the IDI compared to the other two sub-indices. ICT Development Index: Benchmarking with Average values Ethiopian ICT Development has a huge gap to bridge in order to reach the minimum average global standards of ICT as indicated in the graph below: 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Average Value Ethiopian Values

III.

ICT Price Basket Analysis:

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The third approach of ICT Assessment is the ICT Price Basket Analysis where the affordability and pricing of the ICT services is benchmarked against global standards as indicated in the picture below.

Ethiopia - ICT Price Basket Ranking and key statistics: Ethiopia is ranked at 140th position out of 161 countries evaluated for ICT Price basket as indicated in the following table. When compared to a developing country like India, Ethiopia fares similar to India in Fixed Telephone rates and 6.5 times higher rate than in India for Cellular rates. But the major obstacle to the Ethiopian ICT Development is the broadband rate which is 360 times higher than that in India and 3600 times higher than that in Singapore. Details Rank Economy(out of 161 Countries) ICT Price Basket Fixed telephone subbasket as a % of GNI per capita(2009) Mobile cellular sub-basket as a % of GNI per capita(2009) Fixed broadband subbasket as a % of GNI per capita(2009) GNI per capita, US$, 2008 Ethiopia 140 India 81 Singapore 3

37.98 3.76

3.64 3.5

0.33 0.27

10.19

1.57

0.14

2085.05

5.84

0.58

280

1'070

34'760

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ICT Price Basket Analysis


Singapore India Ethiopia

Fixed broadband sub-basket as a % of GNI per capita(2009) Mobile cellular sub-basket as a % of GNI per capita(2009) Fixed telephone sub-basket as a % of GNI per capita(2009) ICT Price Basket

0.58 5.84 0.14 1.57 10.19 0.27 3.5 3.76 0.33 3.64 37.98

2085.05

AFRICAN ICT STATISTICS: Even amongst the African countries, Ethiopian ICT status falls much below the rest of the countries as illustrated in the following table and graphs. Country Fixed telephon e lines per 100 inhabita nts 1.1 0. 7 0. 9 14. 9 1.1 9. 6 Mobile cellular subscriptions per 100 inhabitants 1.5 30.2 21.3 39.8 27.3 87.1 International Internet bandwidth per Internet user(bit/s) 842 112 3800 1023 69 852 Proportion of households with computer 0.2 5.5 4.3 16.1 5.1 14.8 Proportion of household s with Internet 0.1 2.2 1 9.1 3.6 4.8

Ethiopia Kenya Sudan Egypt Nigeria South Africa

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100 90 80 70 16 60 14 50 12 40 10 30 8 20 6 10 4 20 0

Mobile cellular subscriptions per 100 inhabitants Fixed telephone lines per 100 inhabitants
Mobile cellular subscriptions per 100 inhabitants Fixed telephone lines per 100 inhab EthiopiaKenya Sudan Egypt Nigeria Africa South

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Proportion of households with Internet


10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Ethiopia Kenya Sudan Egypt Nigeria South Africa Proportion of households with Internet

Source: ITU World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators Database

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Annexure VIII: Risk in E-Government Strategy Implementation Implementation of such a large program such as the National E-Government Strategy will naturally involve many risks and it is important to identify and plan for the management of the different kinds of risks which will arise in course of the Program Implementation. The risks may be categorized broadly under two heads i.e. Program Level and Project Level Program level Risks These, among others will include Change in Government priorities or requirements due to unexpected circumstances Budgetary constraints Change in Leadership at top levels leading to disruption or modifications Issues in Governance structure in terms of lack of PMO or inadequate coordination between stakeholders, etc Project level Risks At the project level, the risks would include Shortage of required human resources Lack of availability of required skill sets for implementation Poor project management processes and practices Inadequate detailed documentation whether DPR or RFP etc, which will lead to delays and problems in implementation Inadequate capacity of selected vendors and vendor management issues The above are a few of the envisaged risks while implementing a large program. It is hence important that the required Governance structure to oversee and monitor this kind of a program is created and standard practices and processes are followed. It is important that a risk identification and management strategy is created at start of adoption of the strategy and is continuously tracked and updated. Project management, including risk management templates are provided in the following Annexure. Risk Management will one of the important activities of PMO

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Annexure IX: Sample Project Management templates

1. Minutes of meeting Format {insert name of meeting} meeting agenda and minutes

Meeting Date: Facilitator: Location:

Time: Recorder : Number of Pages:

Distribution and Attendee List: (X indicates that the member was present; T indicates present via teleconference, A - Absent)

***VisitorsAgenda:

Item Category: note Nb r. 1. 2. 3. 4.

A - action Topic

D - decision

R - action rolled over C - complete N Time Frame Start Time Responsibl e

A/C/ D/N/ R

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Annotated Agenda & Minutes:

Topic 1. Discussion:

Topic 2. Discussion:

Topic 3. Discussion:

Team

Future Meeting Schedule

Date

Time

Location

Facilitator/Scrib e

Future Agenda Item(s)

Agenda Item

Planned Date(s)

Priorit y

Time

Responsib le

Action Items Open Action Items

# 1 2 3 4 6

Create Date

Action Item

Assigned

Target Date

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Closed Action Items

# 1

Create Date

Action Item

Assigned

Target Date

Issues Opened

Open Date

Issue Description

Assigned

Target Date

Category (1/2/3)

Priority (H/M/L)

Risks Opened

# Open Date

Title

Assigned Target Category Impact Probability Cost to Date (1/2/3) (1/2/3/4/5) (0-100%)

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2. Project Charter Template VERSION: [VERSION NUMBER] Pre-Requisites for this Document None

Review and Approval of the Project Charter indicates an understanding of the purpose and content described in this document. By signing this deliverable, each individual agrees work should be initiated on this project and necessary resources should be committed as described herein. Title Name Signature Date Owner Ministry/Agen cy PMO Head PMO Programme Manager PMO Finance Revision Any revision of content in this document needs approval as per the below table. Review and Approval of the Project Charter indicates an understanding of the purpose and content described in this document. By signing this deliverable, each individual agrees work should be initiated on this project and necessary resources should be committed as described herein

Revision SNo. Title Owner Ministry/Agen cy PMO Head PMO Programme Manager PMO Finance

1 Name

Revision Date Signature Date

Revision SNo. Title Owner Ministry/Agen cy PMO Head PMO Programme

2 Name

Revision Date Signature Date

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Manager PMO Finance Contents Section 1. Project Overview 1.1 Problem Statement 1.2 Project Goals and Objectives 1.3 Project Scope 1.4 Assumptions 1.5 Constraints 1.6 Risks Section 2. Project Authority and Milestones 2.1 Funding Authority 2.2 Project Oversight Authority 2.3 Major Project Milestones Section 3. Project Organization 3.1 Project Structure 4 3.2 Roles and Responsibilities Section 4. Points of Contact Section 1. Project Overview

1.1 Problem Statement Describe the business reason(s) for initiating the project, specifically stating the business problem. Problem Statement

1.2 Project Goals and Objectives Describe the business goals and objectives of the project. Sno Problem Goals and Objectives

1.3 Project Scope Describe the project scope. The scope defines project limits and identifies the products and/or services delivered by the project. The scope establishes the boundaries of the project and should describe products and/or services that are outside of the project scope.

Sno

Project Includes

Sno

Project Excludes

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1.4 Assumptions Describe any project assumptions related to business, technology, resources, scope, expectations, or schedules. Sno Assumptions

1.5 Constraints Describe any project constraints being imposed in areas such as schedule, budget, resources, products to be reused, technology to be employed, products to be acquired, and interfaces to other products. List the project constraints based on the current knowledge today. Sno Constraints

1.6 Risks Describe any events or conditions that may occur, and whose occurrence, if it does take place, has a harmful or negative effect in your project Sno Risks

Section 2. Project Authority and Milestones 2.1 Funding Authority Funding Authority Estimated Budget ETB/USD 2.2 Project Oversight Authority Describe management control over the project. Mention any external oversight bodies, Programme Management office, etc Oversight Authority Owner Directorate 2.3 Major Project Milestones List the expected duration of the project and its major milestones and deliverables and the planned completion dates for delivery. This list should reflect products and/or services delivered to the end user as well as the delivery of key project management or other project-related work products. Expected Total Duration of project Milestone/Deliverable Planned Completion Date

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Section 3.

Project Organization

3.1 Project Structure Assign a Project Manager and describe the initial organizational structure of the project team and stakeholders, preferably providing a graphical depiction. Project Manager Initial Project Organization Structure

3.2 Roles and Responsibilities Summarize roles and responsibilities for the project team and stakeholders identified in the project structure above. Role Responsibility

Section 4.

Points of Contact

Identify and provide contact information for the primary and secondary contacts for the project. Primary Contact Name/Title/Organization Phone Email Secondary Contact Name/Title/Organization Phone Email

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3. Project Closure Template PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT

[PROJECT NAME] VERSION: [VERSION NUMBER]

Pre-Requisites for this Document

None

Title Project Manager Owner Ministry/Agen cy Programme manager PMO Head

Name

Signature

Date

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Prepared By
Document Owner(s) Project/Organization Role

Project Closure Report Version Control


Version Date Author Change Description

TABLE OF CONTENTS PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT [PROJECT NAME] 1 PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT PURPOSE 2 PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT GOALS 3 PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT SUMMARY 3.1 Project Background Overview 3.2 Project Highlights and Best Practices 3.3 Project Closure Synopsis 4 PROJECT METRICS PERFORMANCE 4.1 Goals and Objectives Performance 4.2 Success Criteria Performance 4.3 Milestone and Deliverables Performance 4.4 Schedule Performance 4.5 Budget Performance 4.6 Metrics Performance Recommendations 5 PROJECT CLOSURE TASKS 5.1 Knowledge Management 5.2 Issue Management 5.3 Risk Management 5.4 Quality Management 5.5 Communication Management 5.6 Asset Management 5.7 Lessons Learned 5.8 Post project Tasks 5.9 Project Closure Recommendations

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PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT PURPOSE Project Closure Report Purpose The Project Closure Report is the final document produced for the project and is used by senior management to assess the success of the project, identify best practices for future projects, resolve all open issues, and formally close the project.

PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT GOALS Project Closure Report Goals [Replace this text with your own statement of goals, or use the following sample.] This Project Closure Report is created to accomplish the following goals: Review and validate the milestones and success of the project. Confirm outstanding issues, risks, and recommendations. Outline tasks and activities required to close the project. Identify project highlights and best practices for future projects.

PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT SUMMARY Project Background Overview Project Background Overview [Replace this text with a brief description of the project background. What were the original goals, objectives, and success criteria? Refer to project overview statement and/or project charter for this information.]

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Project Highlights and Best Practices Project Highlights and Best Practices Project Highlights: [Highlight] [Highlight]

Best Practices: [Best practice] [Best practice]

Project Closure Synopsis Project Closure Synopsis [Replace this text with a brief description of why the project is being closed. Is it being closed because all project objectives and deliverables have been met? Or is it being closed for other reasons (loss of funding, shift in strategy, etc.)?]

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PROJECT METRICS PERFORMANCE Goals and Objectives Performance Goals and Objectives Performance [Replace this text with a comparison of actual project performance to project objectives.] Success Criteria Performance Success Criteria Performance [Replace this text with details of project performance in terms of targeted success criteria. Were all criteria achieved? To what level of success? If some criteria were not achieved, what were the reasons? Is achievement anticipated at a later date? Who is responsible for measuring continued progress?]

Milestone and Deliverables Performance Milestones and Deliverables Performance [Replace this text with an outline of actual performance of project milestones and corresponding deliverables. Were all deliverables achieved with high quality and customer acceptance? If not, what were the reasons? Is achievement anticipated at a later date?]

Schedule Performance Schedule Performance Project Schedule Overview: [Replace this text with the overview.] Project Schedule Corrective Actions: [Replace this text with the corrective actions.]

Budget Performance Budget Performance Project Budget Overview: [Replace this text with the overview.] Project Budget Corrective Actions: [Replace this text with the corrective actions.] Metrics Performance Recommendations

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Metrics Performance Recommendations [Replace this text with an outline of metrics performance recommendations for the future.]

PROJECT CLOSURE TASKS Knowledge Management Knowledge Management [Replace this text with an explanation of how knowledge can be managed. Explain how project knowledge (IP) from project team members will be captured and retained for future projects.]

Issue Management Issue Management [Replace this text with a list of any issues still outstanding at the end of the project. Will each issue be resolved? Who will continue to report on each issue's progress?]

Risk Management Risk Management Project Risks Mitigated: [Replace this text with the risks mitigated.] Outstanding Project Risks: [Replace this text with the outstanding risks.] Quality Management Quality Management [Replace this text with a description of how quality management processes were used and integrated into the project, and how quality control measures provided quality assurance.] Communication Management Communication Management [Replace this text with an outline of the project communication process. How effective was the process? What changes were made during the project?]

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Asset Management Asset Management [Replace this text with a list of assets remaining at the end of the project. How will those assets be dispositioned? Who will manage the disposition process?]

Lessons Learned Lessons Learned [Replace this text with a list of successes and shortcomings to remember for the future. Which activities and processes worked well? Which could have been improved, and how?]

Post project Tasks Post project Tasks [Replace this text with a list of outstanding issues for this project. What actions are not yet completed? Who is responsible for them? Which success criteria are not yet met? Which deliverables are not yet achieved? Which training requirements are still outstanding? This information can be summarized from details in the preceding sections.]

Project Closure Recommendations Project Closure Recommendations [Replace this text with a list of recommendations arising from review of closure tasks. The main recommendation would usually be to gain project closure approval from the Project Sponsor, including agreement that the project has fulfilled all of the requirements as documented and that the Project Sponsor is satisfied that all outstanding items have been satisfactorily addressed.]

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4. Project Status Report Template

Project Name Project Manager Owner Ministry/Agency PMO Representative name Project Start Date Estimated Date of Go-Live

Modified? (Mark Modified if there is any change in the date from last week.) Modified?

SNo. 1

Estimated Project End Date

SNo. 1 (Indicates the SNos of tasks that resulted in change of dates)

Project Status Meeting details Date & Place of Meeting MoM Status of Planned activities SNo. Activity description Activity type Project Task / Action Task Status Completed / In Progress / Delayed / Not Started Remark s

Targets for next week SNo. Activity description Activity type Project Task / Action Task Status Completed / In Progress / Delayed / Not Started Remark s

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5. Project Snapshot Template

PROGRAM

SNAPSHOT

eGovernment Program Start Date PMO Creation Date Expected Program End Date

QUARTERLY OUTCO MES Number of services online Number of transactions through alt. channels Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI) Government Transformation Index (GTI) United Nations Global eGovernment Readiness Africa Ranking

PQ

TQ

Change

Project Name

Stage Status C-D-I

Priority H-M-L

End Date (Expected / Actual)

Financial Progress Allocated Actual

Services Support Responsible online Required Directorate Y-N

PROJECT VIEW Channel Name

Stage Status Date for Pilot Date for rollFinancial Support Required Responsible (Expected / out Progress Directorate Actual) (Expected / Allocated Actual C-D-I Y-N Actual)

CHANNEL VIEW

eGovernment Portal National Call Centre Common Service Centres Mobile Portal Kiosk

E N A B L E R V I E W

Enabler Name

Status

Financial

Deliverables

Support

Responsible

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Progress Allocated Actual Marketing and Awareness eGovernment Awards eGovernment Benchmarking M&E - CSI Evaluation M&E - GTI Evaluation Standards and Policies Customer Charter Framework Government Process Reforms (GPR) Capacity Building PQ TQ Required Directorate Y-N

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6. Risk Management Template

Project Name: Date: Author: Owner: Client: Document Number: Note:

Release:

Draft/Final

This document is only valid on the day it was printed

Revision History Date of next revision: Revision Previous Date Revision Date

Summary of Changes

Changes Marked

Approvals This document requires the following approvals. A signed copy should be placed in the project files. Name Signature Title Date of Version Issue

Distribution This document has been distributed to: Name

Title

Date of Issue

Version

Overview Purpose A Risk Management Strategy describes the specific risk management techniques and standards to be applied and the responsibilities for achieving an effective risk management procedure.

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Contents

The Risk Management Strategy should cover the following topics. Introduction 288 Risk Management Procedure 288 Tools and Techniques 288 Records288 Reporting 288 Timing of Risk Management Activities 288 Roles and Responsibilities 288 Scales 289 Proximity 289 Risk Categories 289 Risk Response Categories 289 Early-warning Indicators 289 Risk Tolerance 289 Risk Budget 289 The Risk Management Strategy is derived from the: Project Brief; Business Case; The corporate or programme managements risk management guide, strategy or policy. A Risk Management Strategy can take a number of formats, including: Standalone document or a section in the Project Initiation Document; Entry in a project management tool. The following quality criteria should be observed: Responsibilities are clear and understood by all parties The risk management procedure is clearly documented and can be understood by all parties Scales, expected value and proximity definitions are clear and unambiguous The chosen scales are appropriate for the level of control required Risk reporting requirements are fully defined.

Advice

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Introduction (States the purpose, objectives and scope, and identifies who is responsible for the strategy)

Risk Management Procedure (A description of (or reference to) the risk management procedure to be used. Any variance from programme management standards should be highlighted, together with a justification for the variance.)

The procedure should cover activities such as: Identify

Assess

Plan

Implement

Communicate

Tools and Techniques (Refers to any risk management systems or tools to be used, and any preference for techniques which may be used for each step in the risk management procedure) Records (Definition of the composition and format of the Risk Register and any other risk records to be used by the project) Reporting (Describes any risk management reports that are to be produced, including their purpose, timing and recipients) Timing of Risk Management Activities (States when formal risk management activities are to be undertaken - for example, at end stage assessments) Roles and Responsibilities (Defines the roles and responsibilities for risk management activities)

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Scales (Defines the scales for estimating probability and impact for the project to ensure that the scales for cost and time (for instance) are relevant to the cost and timeframe of the project. These may be shown giving the criteria for each level within the scale, e.g. for very high, high, medium, low and very low) Proximity (Guidance on how proximity for risk events is to be assessed. Proximity reflects the fact that risks will occur at particular times and the severity of their impact will vary according to when they occur. Typical proximity categories will be: imminent, within the stage, within the project, beyond the project)

Risk Categories (Definition of the risk categories to be used (if at all). These may be derived from a risk breakdown structure or prompt list. If no risks have been recorded against a category, this may suggest that the risk identification has not been as thorough as it should have been)

Risk Response Categories (Definition of the risk response categories to be used, which themselves depend on whether a risk is a perceived threat or an opportunity)

Early-warning Indicators (Definition of any indicators to be used to track critical aspects of the project so that if certain predefined levels are reached, corrective action will be triggered. They will be selected for their relevance to the project objectives) Risk Tolerance (Defining the threshold levels of risk exposure, which, when exceeded, require the risk to be escalated to the next level of management. (For example, a project-level risk tolerance could be set as any risk that, should it occur, would result in financial loss. Such risks would need to be escalated to corporate or programme management.) The risk tolerance should define the risk expectations of corporate or programme management and the Project Board)

Risk Budget (Describing whether a risk budget is to be established and, if so, how it will be used)

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Annexure X: List of Services


Projects eAgriculture Total Services Informational Services Provision of data on the Agroprocessing Industry. G2C Yes G2B Yes Total Services Transactional Services Agricultural Product Inspection and Certification Services for Investors or any Business man who is engaged in import and/or export of plant and animals products for commercial purpose Application for python sanitary inspection on export and import. Application for the import or export pesticide for commercial purpose G2C G2B Yes

Crop Failure Reports Provision of information on Enabling Environment, Financing, and Infrastructure in the agroprocessing industry. Provision of Information on Market Fragmentation and Investment Potential. Provision of Information on Quality Standard Implementation and Certification. Provision of Information on Competition Indicators in the Agricultural sector. Provision of Information on Investment Incentives in the Agro-processing Industry. Information on prices of Fertilizers, Pesticides, Seeds, and Crops. Technical services and support for farmers. Information on livestock disease control & surveillance

Yes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Application for plant import permit,

Yes

Yes

Application form to obtain the land

Yes

Yes

Provision of Information on the potential Agricultural land Technical and Administration support

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Continuous follow-up and support on the land use, Land management

Yes

Yes

Yes

Custom clearance certificate for agriculture imports Certificate of competence on agriculture

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects Total Services Informational Services Information on animal infrastructure distribution & personnel Information on quarantine inspection and certification Information on rural land admin. Policies, procedure & guidelines Information on natural resources conservation Provision of information on import and export statistics by product value, quantities destination 15 Social Benefit Management Web-based information publishing Benefits eligibility calculator Yes Yes G2C G2B Yes Total Services Transactional Services Certificate of import & export of animal & crop products Irrigation Request by farmers. Yes Loan services for crops G2C G2B Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Fertilizer Service/ purchase

Yes

14 Applications for availing benefits Pension Services (Pensioner registration, and pension payment) Support Letter (for unemployment; free health treatment, scholarships) 3 National Exam results Student placement results Teacher placement results Publish education statistics Report student performance results Yes Yes Student registration Certificate for completion of high school (original & replacement) Certificate for completion of degree (original & replacement) National exam candidate registration Teaching permit for employment Education certificate to be sent abroad Re-issuance of national exam certificates upon request Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2 e-Education

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects Total Services Informational Services G2C G2B Total Services Transactional Services Scholarships 5 e-Health Hospital Information Drug pricing information Drug Availability Information Doctors profile information Yes Yes Yes Yes 8 Issuance of Drug Marketing license Issuance and renewal of Certificates of competence to drug establishments Issuance, Renewal and cancellation of drug registration certificate Issuance of certificate of competence to health professionals Request of Medication/ medical supplies for citizens Issuance of licenses to hospitals Request for Vaccination Issuance, Renewal and cancellation of license to conduct clinical trials Booking of Appointments Notification of Test results Business Licensing and Registration services(Issuance, Renewal and cancellation) including professional, contractors and construction machines licensing Trade name and trade mark registration and renewal Collection of fines if businesses operate without license or outdated license Requesting for Business area Yes Yes G2C Yes G2B

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

4 e-Trade Provision of Investor Information Yes

10

Policies on Business Loans Provision of Export/Import Trade Information to the business community Dissemination of market research to Exporters for investing in existing as well as new markets Provision of Information on SMMEs and Large Industries

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Application for Subsidies and Duty relaxations

Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects Total Services Informational Services Encouraging businesses engaged in export trade to utilize he export trade incentive scheme of the country G2C G2B Yes Total Services Transactional Services Issuing commercial representative license G2C G2B Yes

Giving licenses to forwarders and shipping agents Amendment of business license Registration of commercial representative Issuance of broadcast license Issuance of press licenses Alteration and modification of principal registration 6 Employment Management System Information on employment opportunities within the government Labour Market Information Job Matching Yes 12 Unemployment Registration/ Unemployment Certificate Overseas employment registration for Ethiopian Nationals Employment Agency License Renewal Employment Agency Licensing (New) Foreign Nationals work permit Teacher placement Registration of labour unions, Employment unions Registration of work places Registration of Collective Agreements Registration of Safety & health Committees Registration of work place accidents Registration of Institution & partner organisations Issuance/ Renewal of drivers license (National/ International) Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

3 e-Transport Generic information on the application process, work Yes Yes

12

Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects Total Services Informational Services flow, timelines, documents needed, ministry offices, work timings Notification of expiry/ renewal of insurance, licenses Information on Public transport timings, tickets availability, routes, stops etc. Information on the traffic movement, special events, road works, Parking areas, detour information etc. Notification of traffic violations and penalties Information on regulation, policies, and import duty for vehicles G2C G2B Total Services Transactional Services G2C G2B

Yes

Yes

Application for change of ownership of vehicles Application and renewal of vehicle Insurance Application for request of special numbers

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes

Online notification and collection of fines for traffic violation Online booking of tickets for inter state government transport Vehicle Registration Vehicle Inspection

Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

6 e-Tourism Information on Tour Operators, Travel Packages, Itinerary, Fee Information about the Accommodations Information regarding various resources , Cultural and heritage centers Information on Various GIS Mapping statistics Yes

8 Registration of private tour operators Registering for a Tour Registration of Hotels, Resorts, Guest Houses and Local Accommodations Yes Booking a Hotel, Resort etc Registering with the DMS for alerts Supporting letter for film-makers ,Tourists to go abroad Application for Tourist VISA on Arrival Driving license Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects Total Services Informational Services G2C G2B Total Services Transactional Services equivalence for foreign citizens Issuing Birth, Death and Marriage Certificates to foreign nationals Permission to visit Heritage sites G2C G2B

Yes

Yes

4 e-Tax View Pending messages View Registration Data Yes Yes Yes Yes

10 Online application of Registration as a Taxpayer Online filling of Tax Return (Land tax, Rental Housing tax (paid by owner), Turnover tax, TV tax, VAT, and Excise tax) File a declaration Tax clearance certificate TIN Number Registration Application for a tax holiday Yes Yes Yes Yes

View Field assessments View list of decelerations not filed List previous Tax returns Show filed declaration Budgetary information dissemination 7 e-Court Management System

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

6 Buying & Selling Property Agreement Construction permit Land Ownership Rental Agreement(Transfer) Rental agreement (renewal/ownership) Land transfer Property Registration Application for a Pleading Document Transfer Case Filing 11 Adjourning Cases Request for Archives of News, Television Programs, Radio Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

eMunicipality Management

Information Provision about A.A. City

Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects System Total Services Informational Services Administration Download of Radio Program Download of News Information on determination of design standards and preparation of design for construction of roads Give information about court case such as adjournment date. Information on creating awareness for protecting the city from different pollution and natural resource degradation Distributing Organizational Structure for sub cities and center Offices Distributing directives, guidance, rules and regulation concerning with promotion, allowance, transfer, requirement of employment discipline. Collect data about employees profile form all offices Provision of statistical analysis about employees profile. Distribution of laws Educational management information for researchers Yes Yes Yes G2C G2B Total Services Transactional Services Programs Application for sponsorship of News, Communications Request to post News Request for Advertising different bids and names etc. Yes Yes Yes G2C G2B

Yes

Appeal to damaged roads

Yes

Yes

Requests for the permission of blocking of the road temporarily

Yes

Yes

Application for change of name.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Application for declaration of absence.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Application for succession Certificate. Application for marriage certificate.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes

Application for certificate of guardianship. Issuance of Marriage Certificate

Yes Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects Total Services Informational Services Information on how to get examinee ID News Release Press Release Documentation and dissemination of information Dissemination of declaration ratified by the council Information on safety inspection and certification Information on safety consultancy Information on training and awareness Request for park and recreation center/hall Information on how to get funeral service Information on the provision of ornamental seedlings Information on green area adoption and outsource service Information on public relation mobilization and awareness G2C Yes Yes Yes Yes G2B Total Services Transactional Services Issuance of Divorce Certificate Issuance of Birth Certificate Issuance of NonMarried Certificate Issuance of Death Certificate Issuance of license for mining Yes Environmental Impact Assessment Permit. Request for environmental Lab test Yes Request for disposal of solid waste Receiving appeals from employees (Administrative court) Recruit new employees for all sub cities and center offices Registration of complaints investigation and litigation sub process Registration of Tax appeal Request for new water line Request for maintenance of Water/Sewerage lines Request for sewerage service Bill collection Registration of Private ECLSE examinees Request for summer course registration Request for grade 8 report card when they lost it Request for buying laws Receiving appeal G2C Yes Yes Yes Yes G2B

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Projects Total Services Informational Services G2C G2B Total Services Transactional Services Preparing Structural Plan Preparing Local development Plan Collecting land and land related data Request for land and land related data (has transaction fee) G2C Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 25 ePassport Status Check of ID Cards Status Check of Passports Yes Yes 37 Application for Resident ID Renewal of Resident ID Replacement of Resident ID Application for Passport Renewal of Passport Replacement of Passport ID card issuance for foreign nationals Issuing diplomatic and service visas Verification of incoming and outgoing documents 2 9 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes G2B Yes

Total Informational Services

Informational

Total Transactional Sevices

Transactional

Total Services

G2C 79 61

G2B 41 140

G2C 102

G2B 68 219

List of services for Agencies


Sr. No. 1 Agencies Ethiopian Investment Agency Services Information Services Licensing and Registration services Investment Registration Requesting for Business area Type of Service Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan 2 General Education Quality Assurance and Examination Agency(GEQAEA) Registration of national examinees for examinations Examination Result Scoring Download of Certifications Replacement certificates Authentications of certificates 3 Transport Authority Annual Vehicles Inspection Drivers penalty management New Driver license Issuance Driver license renewal Driving license Transfer to Region New vehicles Registration Vehicles ownership transfer Annual Vehicles Inspection Vehicles body change Vehicles service change Vehicles Transfer to Region Garage Licensing and Renewal Vehicle Importers and Assemblers Licensing and renewal Vehicle Inspection Organizations Licensing and Renewal Get Pass of (Drivers and Vehicles for neighboring countries) Membership Registration letters for operators to Associations Issuance for Transport Associations and Companies Competency Certificate Renewal for Transport Associations and Companies Competency Certificate Passenger Transport Dispatching and fleet management Vehicle Import Permit 4 Social Security Agency Web-based information publishing Pension services (Pensioner registration, and pension payment) Services to business(regarding to goods and services) 5 Revenue and Customs Online application of Registration as a Taxpayer Transactional Informational Transactional Transactional Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Informational Transactional Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Authority Online filling of Tax Return (Land tax, Rental Housing tax (paid by owner), Turnover tax, TV tax, VAT, and Excise tax) File a declaration View Pending messages View Registration Data View Field assessments View list of decelerations not filed View list of assessment View list of transactions List previous Tax returns Show filed declaration Tax clearance certificate TIN Number Registration 6 Federal Supreme Court Application for a Pleading Document Transfer Case Filing Adjourning Cases 7 Ethiopia Commodity Exchange Market Data Dissemination Payment transfer Membership registration Commodity deposit 8 Department of Postal Service Electronic money transfer Domestic mail transfer Money transfer and payment system Box rental Pension services (Pensioner registration, and pension payment) 9 Micro and Small Enterprise Development Agency ETC Registration of SMEs; Transactional

Transactional Informational Informational Informational Informational Informational Informational Informational Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Informational Informational Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional

10

New Service (VPN, Internet) Upgrade Downgrade Cancellation

Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan CPE Change Bill settlement Online data service management 11 Addis Ababa City Administration Download of Radio Program Download of News Vacancy Application Application for sponsorship News Communications Determine design standards for roads & prepare design for construction of roads or prepare it through qualified consultants. Plan and study ways and means that have to prevent roads from damage and implement same upon approval. With the cooperation of the city government. Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional

Informational

Give permit to requests to temporally block or to use roads for some purposes. Application for change of name. Application for declaration of absence. Application for succession Certificate. Application for marriage certificate. Application for certificate of guardianship. Give information about court case such as adjournment date. Resident ID Marriage Certificate Divorce Certificate Birth Certificate Non-Married Certificate Death Certificate Permit mining and related activities to those who are in need of investing on mining development in accordance with sustainable environment.

Transactional

Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Expand environmental education and awareness creation for different time, places and levels. Exerts to pass development projects through the rules and procedures of environmental impact assessment. Receiving appeals from employees (Administrative court) Transactional

Informational

Transactional

Recruit new employees for all sub cities and center offices Transactional Registration of complaints investigation and litigation sub process Registration of Tax appeal Request for new water line Request for maintenance Request for sewerage service Bill collection Educational management information for researchers Information on how to get examinee ID Registration of Private ECLSE examinees Request for summer course Request for grade 8 report card when they lost it Information on business areas/opportunities Business requirement Information Registration of MSEs Registration of tax payers Prepare Tax Identification number Preparation and distribution of VAT Certificate Preparation and distribution of assessment notification Auditing and preparing assessment paper Collection of Tax Giving clearance paper Collecting local and foreign transaction of taxpayers News Release Press Release Transactional

Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Informational Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional Informational Informational Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Transactional Informational

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan Documentation and dissemination of information Dissemination of declaration ratified by the council Receiving appeal Informational Informational Informational

Four Ministries that have not been included in the e-Government Strategy include Ministry of Defence Ministry of Federal Affairs Ministry of Mines Ministry of Science and Technology

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Annexure XI: Overview of Stakeholder Assessment The following chart gives a snapshot of the key findings of the Stakeholder Assessment across various dimensions and parameters.

Note: Methodology and analysis of the assessment was designed by PwC. The details of each of the dimensions/parameters and Ministries/Agencies is provided in Stakeholder holder Assessment Report. However a summary is provided in the next few pages

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Ministries and Agencies Hardware and Networking

During the interaction with Ministries and Agencies it was found that most of the ministries and Agencies are well equipped with the Hardware and LAN environment. The availability of the Hardware and presence of LAN in the ministry/agencies is a good indication for the e-Government implementation. This also indicated that the resources are at-least familiar with technology and only strategic planning is required for the effective implementation of the e-Government. However some of ministries such as the Ministry of Youth and Sports and the Ministry of Urban works seem to be lagging behind in terms of availability of basic IT infrastructure, nevertheless inventory of such ministries/ agencies can be easily upgraded. Software

Analysis of survey responses indicate that most of the ministries have some specialized software developed for their internal use, which will benefit only the Employees/Staff of that organization. Ministries pertaining to Agriculture, Finance, Foreign Affairs et is also a necetera have HRMS and Inventory management system in place, similarly other ministries have different applications developed for their internal use. While it is good to have such applications, an exercise may be conducted to identify common applications that can be implemented in all the Ministries and Agencies which can be developed by a central agency, rather than each Ministry developing them individually There is also a need to identify the citizen centric applications which could be implemented across different Ministries/Agencies. e-Services

Interestingly most of the ministries have recognized the importance of e-Services and delivering some of the services online to the citizens of Ethiopia. The Ministry of Transport and Communication provides two online services, similarly the Federal Supreme Court and Ethiopian Commodity Exchange also provides online services to benefit the citizens. However, most of the ministries and agencies are still their planning phase of going online with the services. Efforts have been made by the Ministries and Agencies in this direction and they have identified the services that can be rolled out in phased manner over a period of 2-3 years. Capacity building

Most of the ministries and agencies feel the biggest challenge to implement e-Government in Ethiopia is the availability of the technical manpower and capacity building. Almost all ministries such as The Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Ministry of Youth and Sports et cetera, have raised a concern about the lack of technical manpower in their respective organization. Policies, Standards and Guidelines

In the feedback given by the ministries / agencies one of the key components Standards and Guidelines is completely missing. Only The Ministry of Transport and Communication has shown some level of maturity in terms of the relevant policies defined for the organization for the effective implementation of the e-Government. However most of the ministry/agency have one or two policies defined in place. There is a need to design a policy framework with guidelines across the Ministries for implementation of e-Government.
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Security

The Ministry of Justice and The Ministry of Youth and Sports have raised concern on the security of the data and applications. It is extremely necessary for the e-Government applications to be secure and hack-proof from any attack. During the discussion with the ministries it is evident that a framework is required to ensure the security of Government Data and Transactions. Integration

The survey indicates that Ministries are interacting with each other and sharing information. But there is no interface for the information interchange. Ministries are not concentrating on the information sharing with other ministries by means of electronic channel. However some of the Ministries (Ministry of Education, Ministry of Trade and Industry, Ministry of Finance) have raised the issue of forming a framework at a ational level for such an integration. Focus Area

The success of e-Government across the world is increasingly being measured by the benefits it creates for Customers (constituents, citizens and business communities). However, the survey data indicated that the focus of the business applications purchased or developed by Ministries/Agencies is mainly on improving internal efficiency rather than focusing on delivery of Customer services. While internal operational efficiency is a necessity, this emphasis on internal business applications indicate an inward-looking emphasis by Ministries/Agencies, rather than a more strategic and integrated approach to e-Government, where on-line Customer services are identified for implementation and internal applications support this. ICT infrastructure Usage

The Ethiopia ICT infrastructure is well equipped with a Data centre which is highlighted with the presence of Woreda Net. Also the call centre facility is in operational condition. The survey findings indicate that the shared ICT infrastructure is under-utilized and there is scope to make these facilities more popular among the ministers and agencies. Donors World Bank Major initiatives: Poverty Reduction, Infrastructure Transport and ICT, Water Supply, Education, Health, Agriculture, Private sector development Anti Malaria Campaign, Rural water supply, Food Security Initiative, Sustainable Land Management, Basic education, Post secondary education. Challenges for Citizen Services: Being a Federal Government, there are challenges in building capacities and implementing e-Government solutions at isolated regions. United Nations Major initiatives: Build Local Capacity, Millennium Development Goals such as Poverty Reduction, Crisis Prevention, HIV/AIDS treatment, Environment, ICT and EnergyMillennium Development Goal too reduce poverty, provide primary education, Empower Women, Reduce child mortality, Anti HIV and malaria initiatives Challenges for Citizen Services: There is a need to strengthen the local capacity to implement e-Government in the Country.

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Spanish Development Corporation Major initiatives: Sectoral Development, Health, Food Security, Agriculture, ICT Infrastructure, Gender Issues, Culture Public Basic Services to provide basic health and education , ADG- Agri Growth Program, ,Infrastructure and Capacity Building Challenges for Citizen Services: Need for incentive schemes to the citizens, to increase the usage of IT services African Development Bank Major initiatives: Socio Economic development for Africa, Poverty Reduction, Living Conditions Improvement, ICT, Technical and Financial Assistance to the local Government. Fertilizer Financing, Water facilities, Women Entrepreneurship, Small scale Industries, Agro Industries, Sanitation, Ethiopia-Djibouti Linking infrastructure Challenges for Citizen Services: access to resources Mobilization of Resources, Uneven distribution and

Business The survey of private companies reveals that the Access to the ICT infrastructure in terms of availability of computers and peripherals; network connections both internal and external; and connectivity are the major ICT challenges that these companies face in their operations. The other major challenges expressed by the private companies are the high cost of ICT access. An ADSL connection of 2 Mbps costs more than 45,000 ETB per month in tariffs. But voice data and wireless telephone tariffs are very cheap (0.20 Birr/6 Min for calls within same city and 0.40 Birr/ Min for calls within same tariff zones) and are the major means for communication in private companies. Companies also find the import duties on ICT equipments to be exorbitant. The peripherals and additional equipments such as printers etc do not fall under ICT goods and hence the companies spend large sums of money on such equipments. The private ICT companies also find a lack of domestic demand since the ICT Market in Ethiopia is yet to mature to a self sustainable state. as almost all the ICT equipments are imported. The companies in the ICT equipments sector mainly operate as resellers, dealers or maintenance and services. The duties and the taxation on products are passed on to the customers this reduces the margins for these companies The major demand for ICT in Ethiopia comes from the Government but the procurement policies of Government make it almost impossible for the local companies to compete or participate in the bidding process. Firstly, the private companies do not have the experience that the procurement guidelines stipulate due to which the local companies get disqualified. Secondly the local companies do not have resources in terms of staff or infrastructure to carry out large projects of the Government. Hence it is essential for a collaboration of the Public and Private sectors of the country to mutually help each other in building a stronger domestic market.

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Customers Based on the Survey responses and interaction with the citizens the overall key observations are as follows: a) The table below specifies the most commonly used Services / Service Organization by the Citizens of the Ethiopia. 1. Census 2. Commercial bank of Ethiopia 3. Education 4. Electricity / Power 5. ERTA (Radio / Television) 6. Health services 7. Internet 8. Mobile / SMS 9. Municipality services 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Passport Police Taxpaying Telephone Transportation Water

b) The table below specifies the most commonly used Government Website by the Citizens of Ethiopia. Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Site Address http://www.erta.gov.et/ http://www.ethionet.et/ http://www.ena.gov.et/ http://www.amhcbb.gov.et/ http://www.ethiopianairlines.com/ http://www.mu.edu.et/ http:// www.bdu.edu.et/ Ministry / Agency / Bureau Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency Ethiopian Telecommunications Corporation The Ethiopian News Agency Amhara National Regional State Capacity Building Bureau Ethiopian Airlines Mekelle University official Website Bahir Dar University website

c) The table below specifies the feedback received and analysed for some of the key questions that is useful for planning of the future roadmap of the e-Government in Ethiopia. Sr. No. Question Analysis 1. Do you know / have you heard about e- Only 30%-35% people heard about such Government initiatives of Government of initiatives Ethiopia? 2. 3. Have you ever used internet to access the website of a government agency? What are the key benefits that you expect from e-Government? Only 20%-30% people use internet as a medium to access the Government services Most of the people want Faster Delivery of Services Then people prefer to avail services through One Stop Shop for Services Lower cost of obtaining Service Citizens of Ethiopia suggested to Reduce cost of internet access, including hardware /software and the second on priority will be Make services easy to use and then to Increased awareness of availability People want the government services to be

4.

What could the Government do to encourage you to use online Government Services?

5.

For users convenience, the Government

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plans to use alternate channels for providing Public Services.

delivered through Mobile then Internet and then by Call Centre

by

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Annexure XII: Scope of work for Baseline Survey Agency The survey will be designed to establish a baseline against which the accrued benefits in terms improvements in the governments services delivery mechanism and the increase in satisfaction levels the customers due to the ongoing e-Government program can be compared. Further, the survey envisaged to be a tool to capture some of the key issues, opportunities and challenges for the Government program as it moves into its next phases of development. The project will consist of four phases as follows: Survey Design phase Information Gathering phase Data Analysis phase Output and Reporting phase of of is e-

1. Survey Design phase Survey objectives The key objectives of the e-Government Satisfaction Survey are to understand the following: Awareness regarding e-Government and its activities among major groups of users. Detailed Usage and Accessibility of all e-Government Services. Satisfaction with various services among the major stakeholders.

Target Population The e-Government users are divided into three broad segments: citizens, business and government; thus three separate modules will be conducted to collect the required information: The sample size for residents should be such that it is a true representative sample of residents of Ethiopia in terms of Nationality (Citizens and Residents), Age and Education. Target respondents for Business and Government Responsible for e-Government needs in the organization (Decision makers or Influencers) Following sectors will be included in survey: o Agriculture o Education o Health o Municipalities o Labor and Social affairs o Justice o Tax o Trade o Transport & Communication

The pretest The pretest is crucial because it allows field-testing the questionnaire on a selected small sample of the population. The results of the pretest usually suggest that some modifications must be made before a full-scale sampling is undertaken.
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2. Information Gathering Phase Citizens sample design The Vendor will draw a sample from the citizen's population with the following criteria: Cluster sampling: Classifying target population into seven regions. Strata sampling: Stratify each region according to citizens or residents with corresponding proportion for each type obtained from population census. The sample will be drawn by simple random sample method.

Business and Government Sample design The Vendor will draw a sample from the business population with the following criteria: Cluster sampling: Classifying target population into three groups of establishments according to the size. Stratify sampling according to industry type with proportionate representation for each type obtained. The sample will be drawn by simple random sampling method.

Sample size for Residents The sample size for residents should be such that it is a true representative sample of residents of Ethiopia in terms of Nationality (Citizens and Residents), Age and Education as per census. Sample size for Business The indicative sample size for Business is illustrated below in Table Table: Sample size of Businesses Industry Agriculture Financial, Insurance, Real estate & Business services Health care Hotels + Restaurants Manufacturing industries Transport, IT and Communication Wholesale and Retail trade Business Services (Ad agencies / Consultants) etc Total Sample Size 29 42 6 40 26 8 31 18 200 Sample Propositions 14% 21% 3% 20% 13% 4% 16% 9% 100

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Methods of measurement For the citizens' survey,900 face to face interviews and 600 telephonic interviews for residents and 200 face to face interviews for Businesses and the Government respectively will be conducted using a structured questionnaire. The interviews will be performed in English or Amharic as convenient to the respondent. Interview length will be determined from pre test procedure. Selection and training of field workers The field-workers must carefully be trained in what measurements to be made and how to make them during the interviews. Training is especially important if interviews because the rate of response and the accuracy of responses are affected by the interviewers personal style and voice. Data Validation and Quality Control Daily checks on the collected questionnaires will be made after collecting them from the field to ensure that data are correct and clean. Every questionnaire will be reviewed in order to insure the quality of the collected data. Data Entry The vendor shall use SPSS Data Entry software or any appropriate software 3. Data analysis phase Describing Data The vendor will describe data through the following techniques: Count responses compute descriptive statistics compare groups plot data

Index Number The Vendor will create index number for e-Government Satisfaction with respect to international definitions and maintain background documentation on sources and methods. The Satisfaction Index will be composed from the following sub-indices: Government Satisfaction Index Citizens Satisfaction Index Businesses Satisfaction Index

Cluster Analysis Clustering is the classification of audience and stakeholders into different groups, or more precisely, the partitioning of respondents into subsets (clusters), so that the data in each respondents subset (ideally) share some common trait - often proximity according to some defined distance measure. This will be done in order to explore the heterogeneity of the different stakeholders and audiences.
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4. Outputs Phase The Report The report should cover the following elements: The beneficiary and the applied methodology. The poll objective Population of the research Sampling techniques Pre-test procedure Evaluation of the poll outcome Full description of results. Concluding remarks A draft report 10 weeks after the signature of the contract. Final report, in draft form 1 weeks prior to the end of the contract to allow for comments by the beneficiary and the donor (if any) to be incorporated. Number of reports copies will be three hard copies & one electronic copy. The final report will be presented in English and Amharic with translation provided by the POC.

Reports will be generated as follows:

Presentation Summary conclusion and summary of e-Government Satisfaction Survey will be presented.

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Annexure XIII: Scope of work for Marketing and Awareness Agency The scope of work of the consultant will be: To review the media plan for the proposed Public awareness campaign. To recommend a comprehensive communications strategy and creative for all mass media, viz. television, radio, print etc. This should include a comprehensive media plan, media schedules based on prioritisation of different mass media taking note of different target groups. A comprehensive strategy, including a media plan for both the campaigns needs to be evolved. To suggest concept design for production of TV commercial (60/30/10 seconds) To suggest concept design for production of radio jingle (60/30/10 seconds), To suggest concept design for production of print advertisements of different sizes. To recommend a public relation/ publicity strategy covering the entire gamut of the media. To recommend the need for and assist in organising Events/ Rallies /Exhibition for effective outreach. To suggest the modalities of outdoor publicity. To suggest the concept and design of Internet Advertising/ campaigns using mobile phones. To recommend the use of Direct Marketing in this endeavor. Additionally the consultant would be responsible for the following: Preparing a comprehensive Media Strategy Plan (MSP) that could help leverage the maximum outcome from the Communications campaigns. Review and implementation of the Communications plan while also help supplement the efforts to create awareness amongst the larger section of stakeholders. It must prepare a Media Implementation Plan (MIP) for this purpose. The plan must take note of the complementarily of the different target groups and ensure that there is no overlap amongst various different kind of communications. Prepare, based on the respective requirements of the campaign, separate creatives for print, audio, video, internet and other related Communications. It must prepare a Media Creative Plan (MCrP) for this purpose. The plan must highlight different creatives to address different target groups to effectively communicate the message. Develop time frame for insertions time releases / media initiatives for sustained visibility at key centres and liaise with target media to bring out special reports on activities / events. It must prepare a Media Scheduling Plan (MSP) for this purpose. Examine the replicability of the media plan to cover all stakeholders and media. It must prepare a Media Replicability Plan (MRP) for this purpose. Strategically and proactively develop the theme / concept for advertisements, press meets, news releases, articles and other promotional initiatives targeting local, national & international Communications. It must prepare a Media Thematic Plan (MTP) for this purpose. Communications Scanning / Feedback from across a minimum of 10 centres: Maintain Communications watch / Communications intelligence for any development that may impact the Government; and provide reports of press clippings, TV, online news items, etc. It must prepare a Media Feedback Plan (MFP) for this purpose. Undertaking media training at various levels including refresher modules for relevant spokespersons, basic communication process flows & skills equipping media workshops for all
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public access points within the organisation and Crisis Communication i.e. help prevent negative news and counter such news if at all it appears and develop a crisis communication module at the outset. It must prepare a Media Training Plan (MTrP) for this purpose. Create a positive mindset, inculcate a sense of ownership among employees and instill customer orientation by undertaking suitable programmes / interactive sessions. This must also be a part of the MTP. Undertake Influencer / Opinion Leader Outreach by highlighting the objectives and relevance of Stakeholders Efficiency with a view to positively influencing opinion leaders through initiatives like Seminars, Conferences and Presentations. This must also be a part of the MTP.

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Annexure XIV: Job Descriptions of the IT Officials at the Ministry No. 1. Title Chief Information Officer (CIO) Background and Qualifications Masters degree in Information Technology, Management Information Systems, Business Administration, or related field Minimum of 8 years of senior management experience in managing a large organizations information technology strategic plan Undergraduate/Masters degree in engineering/Computer Science Project Management Certification 10+ years of relevant work experience MBA with focus on Capacity Building/Change Management 8+ years of experience Desirable to have additional certification or training in eGovernance, change management, change psychology or mass communication Degree in economics, accounting, information technologies, business or public administration or similarly relevant discipline; At least 10 years of working experience in business process management and change within Government organizations. At least 5 years international experience in undertaking similar assignments within a Government environment where processes are subject to laws, rules, habit, conservatism, patronage and a long history of total reliance on multi-stage, multi-authorization manual, paper-based processes involving people at all levels of Government Masters Degree in Business Administration/Engineering Over 15 years of experience in the relevant area of expertise At least 10 years of hands-on experience in the relevant areas Masters Degree in Computer Science or Engineering 8+ years of experience with at least three years as a Technology Architect in multiple full life cycle software development projects Certified as an Architect Undergraduate/Masters degree in engineering, preferable Computer Science 8+ years of work experience, at least 4 years in technical program management Should have certifications such as ITIL certification / BS7799 auditing certification, CCNP/PIX/CCSA etc. Undergraduate/Masters degree in engineering, preferable Computer Science 8+ years of work experience, at least 4 years in technical program management Should have CISA / CEH / ITIL certification.
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2.

Project Champion (s) (Domain)

IT Capacity Building Expert

Government Process Re-engineering Expert

Domain Experts

3.

Technical Architect

Solution

IT Expert

Infrastructure

IT Security Expert

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Application Expert

Undergraduate/Masters degree in engineering, preferable Computer Science 8+ years of work experience, at least 4 years in technical program management and software development Should have experience in IT application development/ Software Development/ Enterprise-Wide systems integration.

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Annexure XV: Job Descriptions of the ITSG to support in the Ministries No. 1. Title Project Coordinator Background and Qualifications Post graduate in Management with PMP certification. Minimum 8 years of experience in IT industry with 3 years in a Project Manager role Master's degree in Business Administration/social science Minimum of ten years experience in design, implementation, and evaluation of overseas development projects Knowledge and experience of different social science techniques including focus group research, key information interviews and surveys Minimum Masters Degree in Business Administration/Public Administration/ Rural development and Communication or any related field from a reputed institute. Minimum ten years of experience in providing technical assistance in developing and implementing PPPs or related activities resulting in for profit infrastructure investment Proven track record of successful capacity building and association with PPP transactions that have reached closure. Familiarity with PPP best practices. Post graduate in Management/Information Technology Minimum 8 years of experience in developing standards and policies Post graduate in Management with PMP certification. Minimum 8 years of experience in IT industry with 3 years in a Project Manager role B.E. (Computer/E&C)/MCA from a premier institute with minimum 10 years of experience. Ability to define functional / technical architecture with good understanding of non-functional requirements & technology risks Hands on experience on various technologies including Open Standard Platforms

Project Design Expert

PPP Expert

Standards and Policies Expert Project Management Expert Solution Design Expert

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Annexure XVI: Key Considerations during Procurement Process Donor agencies, worldwide, are increasingly demanding transparency in the manner in which their funds are utilized by the implementing agencies. This is mainly to ensure that the funds are used for the purposes intended, with due attention to economy and efficiency; mitigating risk of misuse. One of the key aspects that the donors look at is procurement. Different donors have their own guidelines which need to be followed while carrying out the activities under a project, include those related to procurement. Some donors (such as The World Bank) do not finance expenditures for contracts which have not been procured in accordance with the prescribed procedures/guidelines and would normally not reimburse such amounts to the implementing agencies. Type of procurement activities of the borrowers may include procurement of goods, works and consultancy & other services.

Procurement life-cycle Assessment of need Indenting by User department Request for proposal/quotati on Receipt & Evaluation of bids Award of contract

Recei goods

Significant Issues in Procurement

Invitation of bids

Bidding

Evaluation of bids

Inadequate needs analysis Bid specifications too narrow or too vague Unduly short supply period Unreasonable prequalification requirements Unreasonably short time to submit bids

Same (few) vendors bidding Re-bid results identical to original bids Similarities in bids Persistent high bid prices Apparent connection between bidders Changes in the bids made after their formal receipt Successful contractors use competitors as subcontractors Exceptions to tender deadlines

Selection of other than the lowest bidder Selection of a bidder followed by change in price or scope Disqualification of winning bidder and re-bidding Contracts repeatedly awarded to one contractor/ repeat solesource awards Rotating Awards to different bidders Evaluation criteria not consistent for different bidders Project official insisting on award to certain suppliers

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Basic rules for vendor Short listing Vendors during Procurement of IT Services Individual companies or consortium of companies operating in different domains identified for short listing process (Application Development, Hardware Procurement, IT Infrastructure Management, Networks, Telecommunication, Training, and Technical Helpdesk Operations) can bid. Consortium with representatives from maximum number of domains will be preferred. In the event of a consortium, one of the partners shall be designated as a Lead Partner. However, every member of the consortium shall be equally responsible and jointly and severally liable for the successful completion of the entire project .The prime bidder is encouraged to form consortium with companies operating in or based in Ethiopia. The prime bidder and all consortium members should have ISO 9001: 2000 certification or equivalent. Preference shall be given to bidders with business specific latest versions of certifications like CMMi, PCMMi, and ISO and Environmental & Corporate Governance accreditations. The Prime Bidder has to be an Information Technology Company registered under the existing rules and regulations in the respective country since last 5 years. Bidder can also submit if they have any country specific registrations as Technology Company. The bidder need to have an office in the African Region for past 5 years or at least one of the consortium partners should comply with the condition. The Prime Bidder should have positive annual turnover of more than <<USD 100 Million>> from all the domains for each of the last three Financial Years ending. If bidding for single track out of three tracks, the bidder should have a positive turnover of more than <<50 Million>> in the particular track. For 2 tracks, the turnover should be <<USD 75 Million>> An undertaking (self certificate) that the bidder and all consortium partners are not blacklisted by a Government institution and there has been no litigation with any government department on account of similar services. The prime bidder can submit the same on behalf of other consortium partner also, However, MoC&IT, on its discretion, can ask for individual declarations also. The bidder is required to provide detailed information on the projects executed by them, regional/country presence and resources to establish their credentials for evaluation

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Annexure XVII: Costing details of Individual Projects

Costing Assumptions Assumptions and Unit Rates - General Key Assumpti ons General Salary Growth Rate IT Equipment Rate Hardware Unit Costs (In Birr.) 200,0 00.00 17,00 0.00 Salarie d/ Contra ct Staff Project Manage r Solution / Applicat ion Architec t Domain Expert Unit Costs (In Birr.) 180,0 00.00 180,0 00.00 Other s Items User Traini ng per person Chang e Manag ement Office Maint enance (Electr icity, water, mainte nance, diesel cost etc) per office Consu mable s (Paper , station ery, toners etc.) per office Unit Costs (In Birr.) 10,52 6.32 3,508. 77

0.10

Servers ( with System Software) Personal Computers( with OS, MS office and Antivirus solutions) Multifunction al Printer/Scann er/Photocopie r

0.10

Hardware/ Software AMC

0.10

45,00 0.00

180,0 00.00

84,21 0.53

Maintanen ce Cost

0.05

Networking and cabling( Router, Switch, Cabling)

140,3 50.88

Databas e adminis trator

180,0 00.00

4,210. 53

Number of employees to be provided with PCs

0.75

Generator Set (5KVA)

26,31 5.79

Support Staff

120,0 00.00

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Number of Printers for Total PCs Software developme nt cost per manmonth Percentage of total employees to be trained Percentage of total employees Targetted for change manageme nt Per record digitization cost

0.50

Digital Camera

7,017. 54

Web adminis trator S/w Develop er Editoria l Team Editor Editoria l Team Asst Editors

120,0 00.00 120,0 00.00

Softw are Data Digitiz ation Softwa re

87,719 .30 0.90

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 1754. 39

120,0 00.00

0.90

168,0 00.00

3.51

Editoria l Team Support

144,0 00.00

Ethiop ian Birr (In. Rs.)

2.85

Team Leaders 180,0 - PMO 00.00 Team member 120,0 s - PMO 00.00 Assumptions and Unit Rates - Priority Project-wise Agricultu re Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized Num ber 200.0 0 20.00 Benefits Managemen t Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized Num ber 150.0 0 20.00 Educat ion Total No. of employe es Number of offices Total number of records to be digitisd Num ber 500.0 0 20.00 eHeal th Total No. of emplo yees Numb er of offices Total numbe r of record s to be digitis Num ber 500.0 0 20.00 500,0 00.00

100,0 00.00

500,0 00.00

500,0 00.00

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Software

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 5,263, 157.89

Software

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 7,017, 543.8 6

Softwa re Educati on Informa tion and Manage ments System Number of manmonths for develop ment of Softwar e Transp ort Total No. of employe es Number of offices Total number of records to be digitize d Softwa re Transpo rt Informa tion and

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 7,017, 543.8 6

Softw are Health Infor matio n and Manag ement s Syste m Numb er of manmonth s for develo pment of Softwa re Touri sm Total No. of emplo yees Numb er of offices Total numbe r of record s to be digitiz ed Softw are Touris m Infor matio

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 7,017, 543.8 6

Agriculture Informatio n Manageme nt System

Benefits Information and Managements System

Number of manmonths for developme nt of Software

60.00

Number of man-months for development of Software

80.00

80.00

80.00

G2B Portal Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized

Num ber 15.00

Employmen t Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized

Num ber 250.0 0 20.00 5000 00.00

Num ber 250.0 0 20.00 5000 00.00

Num ber 200.0 0 20.00

1.00 0.00

10,00 0.00

Software

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 3,508, 771.93

Software

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 5,263, 157.8 9

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 7,894, 736.8 4

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 5,263, 157.8 9


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G2B Portal

Employment Information and Managements

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System

Manage ments System

Number of manmonths for developme nt of Software

40.00

Number of man-months for development of Software

60.00

Number of manmonths for develop ment of Softwar e Munici palitie s

90.00

Tax

Num ber

eCourt

Num ber

Num ber

Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized

250.0 0 20.00

Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized

200.0 0 20.00

700,0 00.00

10,00 0.00

Software

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 7,894, 736.8 4

Software

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 5,263, 157.8 9

Total No. of employe es Number of offices Total number of records to be digitize d Softwa re Municip alities Informa tion and Manage ments System Number of manmonths for

250.0 0 20.00

500,0 00.00

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 5,263, 157.89

n and Manag ement s Syste m Numb er of manmonth s for develo pment of Softwa re Minis try of Forei gn Affair s Total No. of emplo yees Numb er of offices Total numbe r of record s to be digitiz ed Softw are Passpo rt

60.00

Num ber

250.0 0 20.00

10,00 0.00

Unit Costs( In Birr.) 5,263, 157.8 9

Tax Informatio n and Manageme nts System Number of manmonths for developme

eCourts Information and Managements System Number of man-months for development

90.00

60.00

60.00

Numb er of manmonth

60.00

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nt of Software

of Software

develop ment of Softwar e

s for develo pment of Softwa re

Assumptions and Unit Rates - Other projects eGovern ment Portal Num ber Contact Center Num ber Capaci ty Buildi ng Number of PCs per Trainin g Center Number of Trainin g Centers Number of Employ ees 12. 00 96. 00 Salarie d/ Contra ct Staff Busines s Process Reenginee ring Expert PPP Expert Unit Costs (In Birr.) 771,92 9.82 Salari ed / Contr act Staff IT Admin Unit Costs (In Birr.) 526,3 15.79 Num ber Com mon Servi ce Cente r Total Numb er of CSC Numb er of Operat ors in each CSC Total Numb er of Operat ors Num ber

8.00

Maximim number of calls per day

3000. 00

800.0 0

20.00

Hardwar e High-end Server

Unit Costs (In Birr.) 2,807, 017.54 Unit Costs (In Birr.)

Number of Hours in a Shift Number of calls handled in one 1 hour by an Agent, Assuming 5 minutes per call Total number of Calls handled by an agent in a day Total number of Agents required

8.00

4.00

44.00

320 0.00

31.2 5

Software

Directory Services

526,31

Supervisors Required Number of offices

2.00 1.00

771,92

Site Inspec

385,9
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5.79

9.82

tion and Audit Manag er CSC Front Staff HR&A dmin Manag er Financ e Manag er

64.91

Integration services

350,8 77.19

Salaried / Contract Staff Call Center Shift Manager

Unit Costs (In Birr.) 385,9 64.91

Upgradatio n costs

175,43 8.60

Content Developme nt

175,43 8.60

Call Center Team Leader Call Centre Executives Hardware

315,7 89.47 231,57 8.95 Unit Costs (In Birr.)

Advance d Technol ogies Expert Softwar e Develop ment Expert Trainers

771,92 9.82

42,10 5.26

771,92 9.82

578,9 47.37

350,8 77.19 Unit Costs (In Birr.)

578,9 47.37

Softwa re CBT Trainin g content develop ment Central Knowle dge Manage ment Portal Other Cost Leaders hip Orientat ion (4 batches of 10 people each) Project Manage

1,578, 947.3 7

Calling Equipment

8,771. 93

IVRS & Call Routing Site Preparation

350,8 77.19 175,4 38.60

526,31 5.79 Unit Costs (In Birr.)

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Software

Unit Costs

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(In Birr.)

Call Centre Software (eg Clarity)

1,578, 947.3 7

Other Cost

Unit Costs (In Birr.)

Lease cost per year

526,3 15.79

ment (4 batches of 10 people each) Vendor Manage ment (4 batches of 10 people each) SLA Design and Monitor ing (4 batches of 10 people each) Custom er orientat ion and support (4 batches of 20 people each)

.00

1,666. 67

1,666. 67

666.6 7

Standard s& Policies Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized Salaried / Contract Staff

Num ber 20.00 1.00 0.00

Marketing & Awareness Total No. of employees Number of offices Total number of records to be digitized Salaried / Contract Staff

Num ber

Mobile Gatew ay WAP Server Content Convert er

Num ber 3508. 77 3508. 77

Unit Costs (In Birr.)

Unit Costs (In Birr.)


Page 328

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CIO Data & Process Expert Technology Expert Service Delivery Expert Security Expert Legal Expert

87719 2.98 77192 9.82 77192 9.82 77192 9.82 77192 9.82 77192 9.82

Marketing Director Manager - PR Marketing/PR Professional Cost of Hiring Marketing/PR agency Other Cost

771,92 9.82 473,6 84.21 385,9 64.91 385,9 64.91 Unit Costs (In Birr.) 26,67 9.67 32,00 0.00 33,69 6.00 56,40 0.00 99,00 0.00 66,67 9.67 66,67 9.67 33,33 9.67 200,0 00.00

Direct Mailers Billboards Advertisement s in Print Media Radio Advertisement s Television Advertisement s Online Marketing Events Branded Gifts / Paraphanelia Content Development

Priority Project -Agriculture S.n Item Unit o. Cost (Cost in Birr.


PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Quanti ty/ Numbe r of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)


Page 329

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers (Includes AMC for 5 years) Personal Computers (Includes AMC for 5 years) Printers/Scanner/Phot ocopier Networking and Cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software Agriculture Information and Management System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management

2000 00 17000 4500 0 14035 1 26316 7018

2 50 25 20 20 20

40000 0 85000 0 112500 0 28070 18 526316 140351 58486 84

40000 85000 0 0 0 0 12500 0

4000 0 40000 40000 85000 0 0 0 0 12500 0 85000 0 0 0 0 12500 0 85000 0 0 0 0 12500 0

(B)

52631 58 35087 7

526315 8 35087 1 7 561403 5 1

52631 6 0 52631 6

52631 6 0 52631 6

52631 6 0 52631 6

52631 6 0 52631 6

II (C)

18000 0 0 18000 0 0 12000 0

1 1 2 1 4

18000 0 0 36000 0 0 48000 0 10200 00 94736 8 315789

19800 0 0 39600 0 0 52800 0 11220 00 94736 8 31578 9

21780 0 0 43560 0 0 58080 0 12342 00 47368 4 15789 5

23958 0 0 47916 0 0 63888 0 13576 20 47368 4 15789 5

26353 8 0 52707 6 0 70276 8 14933 82

(D)

10526 3509

180 180

0 0
Page 330

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D)

84211 4211

20 20

168421 1 84211 303157 9 155142 98

17684 21 88421 31200 00 48933 16

18568 42 92842 25812 63 44667 79

19496 84 97484 26787 47 46876 83

20471 68 10235 8 21495 27 42942 25

Priority Project II - Benefits Management S. Item Unit no Cost . (Co st in Birr .) I Capital Expenditure (A ) Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photocopier Networking and Cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) (B ) Software Benefits Managements System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Experts
PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Quan tity/ Num ber of units

Year 1 (Cos t in Birr. )

Yea r2 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r3 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r4 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r5 (Cos t in Birr .)

200 000 1700 0 450 00 1403 51 2631 6 7018

2 38 19 20 20 20

4000 00 6375 00 8437 50 2807 018 5263 16 1403 51 5354 934

400 4000 4000 00 0 0 6375 6375 6375 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1037 50 7017 54 0 7017 54 0 0 0 0 1037 50 7017 54 0 7017 54 0 0 0 0 1037 50 7017 54 0 7017 54

400 00 6375 0 0 0 0 0 1037 50 7017 54 0 7017 54

7017 544 1754 386

70175 44 17543 1 86 87719 30 1

II (C )

1800 00 0 1800 00

1 1 1

1800 00 0 1800 00

1980 00 0 1980 00

2178 00 0 2178 00

2395 80 0 2395 80

2635 38 0 2635 38
Page 331

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Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D)

0 1200 00

1 2

0 2400 00 6000 00

0 264 000 660 000

0 2904 00 7260 00 3552 63 1184 21 1856 842 9284 2 2423 368 3954 873

0 3194 40 7986 00 3552 63 1184 21 1949 684 9748 4 2520 853 4124 957

0 3513 84 8784 60

(D)

1052 6 3509 8421 1 4211

135 135 20 20

7105 7105 26 26 2368 2368 42 42 1684 1768 211 421 884 84211 21 27157 280 89 4211 1744 4269 2654 715

0 0 2047 168 1023 58 2149 527 3833 491

S.n o.

I (A)

Priority Project III - Education Item Unit Quanti Cost ty/ (Cost Numbe in r of Birr. units ) Capital Expenditure Hardware 2000 Servers 00 2 Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Phot ocopier Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software Education Management System Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational 17000 4500 0 14035 1 26316 7018 125 63 20 20 20

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

40000 0 212500 0 281250 0 280701 8 526316 140351 881118 4 701754 4 175438 6 877193 0

4000 0 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250 0

40000 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250 0

4000 0 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250 0 70175 4 0 70175 4

4000 0 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250 0 70175 4 0 70175 4

(B)

70175 44 17543 86

1 1

70175 4 701754 0 0 70175 4 701754

II

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 332

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

(C)

Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Priority Project IV eHealth Item 10526 3509 84211 4211 450 450 20 20 1800 00 0 1800 00 0 1200 00 1 1 3 1 5 18000 0 0 54000 0 0 60000 0 132000 0 236842 1 789474 168421 1 84211 492631 6 238294 30 19800 0 0 59400 0 0 6600 00 14520 00 23684 21 78947 4 17684 21 88421 50147 37 74209 91 21780 0 0 65340 0 0 72600 0 15972 00 118421 1 39473 7 18568 42 92842 35286 32 60800 86 23958 0 0 71874 0 0 79860 0 17569 20 11842 11 39473 7 19496 84 97484 36261 16 63372 90 26353 8 0 79061 4 0 87846 0 19326 12

(D)

0 0 20471 68 10235 8 21495 27 50363 93

S.n o.

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr. )

Quanti ty/ Numbe r of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr. )

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photo copier Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) 2000 00 17000 4500 0 14035 1 26316 7018 2 125 63 20 20 20 40000 0 212500 0 281250 0 280701 8 526316 140351 881118 4000 0 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250 4000 0 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250 4000 0 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250 4000 0 21250 0 0 0 0 0 25250
Page 333

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4 (B) Software Health Management System Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Priority Project V- E-Trade S.n Item Unit o. Cost (Cost in Birr.) I (A) Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Personal Computers Quantit y/ Numbe r of units 10526 3509 84211 4211 450 450 20 20 1800 00 0 1800 00 0 12000 0 1 1 2 1 4 70175 44 17543 86 701754 4 175438 6 877193 0

0 70175 4 0 70175 4

0 70175 4 0 70175 4

0 70175 4 0 70175 4

0 70175 4 0 70175 4

1 1

II (C)

18000 0

19800 0

21780 0

23958 0 0 47916 0 0 63888 0 13576 20 11842 11 39473 7 19496 84 97484 36261 16 59379 90 Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

26353 8 0 52707 6 0 70276 8 14933 82

0 0 0 36000 39600 43560 0 0 0 0 0 0 48000 52800 58080 0 0 0 10200 11220 12342 00 00 00 236842 1 789474 168421 1 84211 492631 6 235294 30 Year 1 (Cost in Birr.) 23684 21 78947 4 17684 21 88421 50147 37 70909 91 Year 2 (Cost in Birr. ) 11842 11 39473 7 18568 42 92842 35286 32 57170 86 Year 3 (Cost in Birr. )

(D)

0 0 20471 68 10235 8 21495 27 45971 63 Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

20000 0 17000

1 4

20000 0 63750

2000 0 6375

2000 0 6375

2000 0 6375

2000 0 6375
Page 334

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Printers/Scanner/Phot ocopier Networking and cabling Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) (B) Software Application Development of G2B Portal Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Web administrator Solution / Application Architect S/w Developer Support staff Sub-Total ( C) (D) Others User Training Change Management Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Priority Project VI Employment Item

45000 14035 1 7018

84375

0 0 0 26375

0 0 0 26375

0 0 0 26375

0 0 0 26375

1 140351 1 7018 49549 3 1

35087 72

35087 72 35087 72

35087 7 35087 7

35087 7 35087 7

35087 7 35087 7

35087 7 35087 7

II (C )

18000 0 12000 0 0 12000 0 12000 0

1 1 1 1 2

18000 0 12000 0 0 12000 0 24000 0 66000 0 71053 23684 94737 47590 02

19800 0 13200 0 0 13200 0 2640 00 72600 0 71053 23684 94737 11979 89

21780 0 14520 0 0 14520 0 2904 00 79860 0 35526 11842 47368 12232 21

23958 0 15972 0 0 15972 0 31944 0 87846 0 35526 11842 47368 13030 81

26353 8 17569 2 0 17569 2 35138 4 96630 6 0 0 0 13435 58

10526 3509

14 14

S. no .

Uni t Cos t (Co st in Birr .)

Quan tity/ Num ber of units

Year 1 (Cos t in Birr. )

Yea r2 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r3 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r4 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r5 (Co st in Birr .)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware


Page 335

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photocopier Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) (B) Software Employment Management System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) 5 Total (A+B+C+D)

200 000 1700 0 450 00 1403 51 2631 6 7018

1 63 31 20 20 20

2000 00 1062 500 1406 250 2807 018 5263 16 1403 51 6142 434 5263 158 1754 386 7017 544

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

5263 158 1754 386

1 1

II (C )

180 000 0 180 000 0 1200 00

1 1 2 1 2

1800 00 0 3600 00 0 2400 00 7800 00

1980 2178 00 00 0 0 396 4356 000 00 0 0 264 290 000 400 858 9438 000 00 5921 05 1973 68 1856 842 928 42 2739 158 4335 524

2395 80 0 4791 60 0 3194 40 1038 180 5921 05 1973 68 1949 684 9748 4 2836 642 4527 388

2635 38 0 5270 76 0 3513 84 1141 998

(D)

1052 6 350 9 8421 1 4211

225 225 20 20

1184 1184 211 211 3947 3947 37 37 1684 1768 211 421 8421 884 1 21 3347 3435 368 789 1728 4946 7346 355

0 0 2047 168 1023 58 2149 527 3944 091

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 336

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

S. no .

Priority Project VII - Transport Item

Uni t Cos t (Co st in Bir r.)

Qua ntity / Num ber of units

Yea r1 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r2 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r3 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r4 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r5 (Co st in Birr .)

I Capital Expenditure (A) Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photocopier Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) (B) Software Transport Information & Management System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation (Includes AMC for 5 years) Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others 180 000 0 180 000 0 120 000 1800 00 0 7200 4 00 1 0 4800 4 00 1 1 1380 000 198 000 0 792 000 0 528 000 2178 00 0 8712 00 0 580 800 239 263 580 538 0 0 958 1054 320 152 0 0 638 7027 880 68 183 202 678 045 0 8 789 473 7 1754 386 1 1 200 000 170 00 450 00 140 351 263 16 701 8 1 63 31 20 20 20 2000 200 200 00 00 00 1062 106 106 500 250 250 1406 250 0 0 2807 018 0 0 5263 16 0 0 1403 51 0 0 6142 1262 1262 434 50 50 200 200 00 00 106 1062 250 50 0 0 0 0 126 250 0 0 0 0 1262 50

7894 737 1754 386 9649 123

789 474 0 789 474

789 474 0 789 474

789 474 0 789 474

789 474 0 789 474

II (C )

1518 1669 000 800

(D

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 337

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

) User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Priority Project VIIITourism Item 105 26 350 9 842 11 4211 180 180 20 20 9473 68 3157 89 1684 211 8421 1 947 368 3157 89 473 684 1578 95 473 684 0 1578 95 0 194 968 204 4 7168 974 1023 84 58 267 874 2149 7 527 508 5431 570 251 9

1768 1856 421 842 884 928 21 42

3031 3120 2581 579 000 263 2020 5553 3136 724 5166 787

S. no .

Unit Cost (Co st in Birr .)

Quan tity/ Num ber of units

Year 1 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 2 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r3 (Cos t in Birr .)

Year 4 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r5 (Cos t in Birr .)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photocopier Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software Tourism Management System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure 200 000 1700 0 450 00 1403 51 2631 6 7018 1 50 25 20 20 20 2000 00 8500 00 11250 00 2807 018 52631 6 1403 51 5648 684 52631 58 3508 8 5298 246 2000 2000 0 0 8500 8500 0 0 0 0 0 0 1050 00 5263 16 0 5263 16 0 0 0 0 1050 00 5263 16 0 5263 16 2000 0 8500 0 0 0 0 0 1050 00 5263 16 0 5263 16 200 00 850 00 0 0 0 0 1050 00 5263 16 0 5263 16

(B)

5263 158 3508 8

1 1

II

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 338

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

(C )

Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Editorial Team - Editor Editorial Team - Asst Editors Editorial Team - Support Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) 1052 6 3509 8421 1 4211 180 180 20 20 1800 00 0 1800 00 0 1200 00 1200 00 1680 00 1440 00 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1800 00 0 3600 00 0 2400 00 1200 00 3360 00 2880 00 1524 000 9473 68 31578 9 1684 211 84211 3031 579 15502 509 Year 1 (Cost in Birr. ) 1980 00 0 3960 00 0 2640 00 1320 00 3696 00 3168 00 1676 400 9473 68 3157 89 1768 421 8842 1 3120 000 5427 716 Year 2 (Cos t in Birr .) 2178 00 0 4356 00 0 2904 00 1452 00 4065 60 3484 80 1844 040 4736 84 1578 95 1856 842 9284 2 2581 263 5056 619 Year 3 (Cos t in Birr. ) 2395 80 0 4791 60 0 3194 40 1597 20 4472 16 3833 28 2028 444 4736 84 1578 95 1949 684 9748 4 2678 747 5338 507 Year 4 (Cos t in Birr. ) 2635 38 0 5270 76 0 3513 84 1756 92 4919 38 4216 61 2231 288

(D)

0 0 2047 168 1023 58 2149 527 5012 131 Year 5 (Cos t in Birr. )

S. no.

Priority Project IX - Tax Item

Unit Cost (Cos t in Birr .)

Quan tity/ Num ber of units

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photocopier Networking and cabling 2000 00 1700 0 4500 0 1403 51 2 63 31 20 4000 4000 00 0 10625 1062 00 50 14062 50 0 2807 018 0 4000 0 1062 50 0 0 4000 0 1062 50 0 0 4000 0 1062 50 0 0
Page 339

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software Tax Management System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D)

2631 6 7018

52631 6 14035 20 1 63424 34 20 78947 37 24561 40 10350 877

0 0 1462 50 7894 74 0 7894 74

0 0 1462 50 7894 74 0 7894 74

0 0 1462 50 7894 74 0 7894 74

0 0 1462 50 7894 74 0 7894 74

(B)

7894 737 2456 140

1 1

II (C )

1800 00 0 1800 00 0 1200 00

1800 1 00 1 0 7200 4 00 1 0 4800 4 00 13800 00 11842 11 39473 7 16842 11 84211 33473 68 21420 680

1980 00 0 7920 00 0 5280 00 1518 000 1184 211 3947 37 1768 421 8842 1 3435 789 5889 513

2178 00 0 8712 00 0 5808 00 1669 800 5921 05 1973 68 1856 842 9284 2 2739 158 5344 682

2395 80 0 9583 20 0 6388 80 1836 780 5921 05 1973 68 1949 684 9748 4 2836 642 5609 146

2635 38 0 1054 152 0 7027 68 2020 458

(D)

1052 6 3509 8421 1 4211

225 225 20 20

0 0 2047 168 1023 58 2149 527 5105 709

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 340

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

S.n o.

Priority Project XeCourt Item

Unit Cost (Cos t in Birr. )

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr. )

Year 3 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 4 (Cost in Birr. )

Year 5 (Cos t in Birr. )

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photocopie r Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software eCourts System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training 1052 6 1800 00 0 1800 00 0 1200 00 1 1 18000 0 1980 00 0 3960 00 0 2640 00 8580 00 2178 00 0 4356 00 0 2904 00 9438 00 4736 84 2395 80 0 47916 0 0 31944 0 10381 80 4736 84 2635 38 0 5270 76 0 3513 84 11419 98 2000 00 1700 0 4500 0 1403 51 2631 6 7018 1 50 25 20 20 20 2000 00 85000 0 11250 00 28070 18 52631 6 14035 1 56486 84 52631 58 35088 52982 46 2000 0 8500 0 0 0 0 0 1050 00 2000 0 8500 0 0 0 0 0 1050 00 2000 0 8500 0 0 0 0 0 1050 00 2000 0 8500 0 0 0 0 0 1050 00

(B)

5263 158 3508 8

1 1

52631 52631 6 6 0 0 52631 52631 6 6

52631 52631 6 6 0 0 52631 52631 6 6

II (C )

0 36000 2 0 1 0 24000 2 0 78000 0

(D)

180

94736 94736 8 8

0
Page 341

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D)

3509 84211 4211

180 20 20

31578 9 16842 11

31578 9 17684 21

84211 88421 30315 3120 79 000 14758 4609 509 316

15789 15789 5 5 1856 19496 842 84 9284 9748 2 4 2581 26787 263 47 41563 4348 79 243

0 2047 168 1023 58 2149 527 3922 841

Priority Project XI - Municipalities S. Item no .

Uni t Cos t (Co st in Birr .)

Quan tity/ Num ber of units

Year 1 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r2 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r3 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r4 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r5 (Cos t in Birr .)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photocopier Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software Municipalities Management System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager 180 000 1 1800 00 1980 00 2178 00 2395 80 2635 38
Page 342

200 000 1700 0 450 00 1403 51 2631 6 7018

1 63 31 20 20 20

2000 00 1062 500 1406 250 2807 018 5263 16 1403 51 6142 434 5263 158 1754 386 7017 544

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

200 00 1062 50 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 5263 16

(B)

526 3158 1754 386

1 1

II (C )

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Priority Project XII - Passport and Visa S.n Item Unit o. Cost (Cos t in Birr. ) I Capital Expenditure (A) Hardware 2000 Servers 00 1700 Personal Computers 0 Printers/Scanner/Photocopie 4500 r 0 1403 Networking and cabling 51 2631 Generator Set 6 Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software Passport System (Includes AMC for 5 years) Data Digitisation 7018

0 180 000 0 120 000

1 2 1 6

0 3600 00 0 7200 00 1260 000

0 3960 00 0 7920 00 1386 000

0 4356 00 0 8712 00 1524 600 5921 05 1973 68 1856 842 928 42 2739 158 4916 324

0 4791 60 0 9583 20 1677 060 5921 05 1973 68 1949 684 9748 4 2836 642 5166 268 Year 4 (Cost in Birr. )

0 5270 76 0 1054 152 1844 766

(D)

1052 6 350 9 8421 1 4211

225 225 20 20

1184 1184 211 211 3947 3947 37 37 1684 1768 211 421 8421 8842 1 1 3347 3435 368 789 1776 5474 7346 355 Year 2 (Cos t in Birr. )

0 0 2047 168 1023 58 2149 527 4646 859 Year 5 (Cos t in Birr. )

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cos t in Birr. )

1 63 31 20 20 20

20000 0 10625 00 14062 50 28070 18 52631 6 14035 1 61424 34 52631 58 35088

2000 0 1062 50 0 0 0 0 12625 0 52631 6 0

2000 2000 0 0 1062 10625 50 0 0 0 0 0 1262 50 5263 16 0 0 0 0 0 12625 0 52631 6 0

2000 0 1062 50 0 0 0 0 12625 0 52631 6 0


Page 343

(B)

5263 158 3508

1 1

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

8 Sub-Total (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Solution / Application Architect Domain Expert Database administrator Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training Change Management Office Maintenance Consumables Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Channels I- eGovernment Portal S.no Item Unit Quantity . Cost / (Cost Number in of units Birr.) I Capital Expenditu re (A) Hardware Servers 280701 8 2 Sub-Total (A) (B) Software Directory 526316 Services 1 Integration 350877 1
PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

52982 46

52631 6

5263 16

52631 6

52631 6

II (C )

1800 00 1800 00 1800 00 0 1200 00

1 1 2 1 6

18000 0 18000 0 36000 0 0 72000 0 14400 00

1980 00 1980 00 3960 00 0 7920 00 1584 000

2178 00 2178 00 4356 00 0 8712 00 1742 400

2395 80 2395 80 47916 0 0 9583 20 19166 40

2635 38 2635 38 5270 76 0 10541 52 2108 304

(D)

1052 6 3509 8421 1 4211

225 225 20 20

118421 11842 5921 59210 1 11 05 5 0 39473 3947 19736 19736 7 37 8 8 0 16842 17684 1856 19496 20471 11 21 842 84 68 8842 9284 9748 1023 84211 1 2 4 58 33473 3435 27391 2836 21495 68 789 58 642 27 16228 5672 51341 5405 4910 048 355 24 848 397 Year 2 (Cost in Birr.) Year 3 (Cost in Birr.) Year 4 (Cost in Birr.) Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

5614035 5614035

561404 561404

561404 561404

561404 561404

561404 561404

526316 350877

17544 17544

17544 17544

17544 17544

17544 17544
Page 344

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

II

(C)

(D)

services Upgradation costs Content Developmen t Sub-Total (B) Operation al Expenditu re Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager Database administrato r S/w Developer Support Staff Sub-Total ( C) Others User Training for Portal Managemen t Team of MoCIT - 20 Persons Sub-Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D )

175439 175439

1 1

175439 175439 1228070

17544 17544 70175

17544 17544 70175

17544 17544 70175

17544 17544 70175

180000 180000

1 2

180000 360000 180000 0 600000 294000 0

198000 396000 198000 0 660000 323400 0

217800 435600 217800 0 726000 355740 0

239580 479160 239580 0 798600 391314 0

263538 527076 263538 0 878460 430445 4

120000 120000

15 5

10526

30

315789 315789 1009789 5

331579 331579 4197158

348158 348158 453713 7

365566 365566 491028 5

383844 383844 531987 7

Channels II - Contact Center S.n Item Unit o. Cost (Cost in Birr. ) Capital I Expenditure (A) Hardware
PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Quanti ty/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

Page 345

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Servers Personal Computers Calling Equipment IVRS & Call Routing Networking and cabling Printers/Scanner/Pho tocopier Site Preparation Sub Total (A) Software Call Centre Software (eg Clarity) (Includes AMC for 5 years) SubTotal (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager HR&Admin Manager Call Center Shift Manager Call Center Team Leader Call Centre Executives Support Staff Sub Total ( C ) Other Costs Lease Cost User Training Office Maintenance Consumables (for 3 shifts) Sub Total (D)
PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

2000 00 1700 0 1667 6666 7 14035 1 7018 3333 3

2 31 31 1 1 3 1

40000 0 531250 52083 66667 140351 21930 33333 124561 4

40000 53125 2604 0 0 0 0 95729

40000 53125 2604 0 0 0 0 95729

40000 53125 2604 0 0 0 0 95729

40000 53125 2604 0 0 0 0 95729

(B)

15789 47

157894 7 157894 7

157895 157895

157895 157895

157895 157895

157895 157895

II ( C)

1800 00 5789 47 3859 65 31578 9 23157 9 4736 84

2 2 2

36000 0 115789 5

39600 0 127368 4 849123 34736 84 20378 947 20842 11 28455 649

771930 315789 10 5 185263 80 16 189473 4 7 25868 772

43560 0 479160 527076 140105 154115 169527 3 8 4 93403 102743 113018 5 9 2 38210 420315 462347 53 8 4 22416 24658 271243 842 526 79 22926 252189 27740 32 5 84 313012 344313 378744 14 35 69

(D)

8000 0 10526 84211 4211

1 31 1 3

80000 84000 32894 7 345395 84211 88421 12632 50578 9 13263 531079

88200 36266 4 92842 13926 557633

92610 38079 8 97484 14623 585515

97241 39983 8 102358 15354 614790


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Total (A+B+C+D) Channels III- Mobile Gateway S.n Item Unit o. Cost (Cost in Birr.) Capital I Expenditure (A) Hardware 28070 Servers 18 Sub Total (A) Software WAP Server Content Converter Application Development SubTotal (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager IT Architect Support Staff/Content Developer DB Administrator S/w Developer Sub Total ( C ) Other Costs Training and Awareness of the mobile mananmenegt team of MoCIT Change Management of the mobile mananmenegt team of MoCIT Sub-Total (D)
PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

291991 23 Quanti ty/ Numbe r of units Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

29240 352 Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

321124 71 Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

35270 474 Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

38742 883 Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

14035 09 14035 09 357719 357719

15438 60 15438 60 35772 35772

29473 7 29473 7 35772 35772

29473 7 29473 7 35772 35772

29473 7 29473 7 35772 35772

(B)

3577 100 3577 100

715439

71544

71544

71544

71544

II (C)

18000 0 1 18000 0 12000 0 18000 0 12000 0

1 6 1 6

18000 0 18000 0 72000 0 18000 0 72000 0 19800 00

19800 0 19800 0 79200 0 19800 0 79200 0 21780 00

21780 0 21780 0 87120 0 21780 0 87120 0 23958 00

23958 0 23958 0 95832 0 23958 0 95832 0 26353 80

26353 8 26353 8 10541 52 26353 8 10541 52 28989 18

(D)

10526

30 315789 10526 3 42105 3

33157 9

34815 8

36556 6

38384 4 12794 8 511792


Page 347

3509

30

11052 6 116053 44210 5 464211

121855 48742 1

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Total (A+B+C+D) Channels IV- Common Service Center S.n Item Unit Quant o. Cost ity/ (Co Numb st in er of Birr units .) I Capital Expenditure (A) Hardware 1700 Personal Computers 0 6400 Printers/Scanner/Phot 450 ocopier 00 6400 Biometric Device (per operator) 667 3200 Smart Card Reader (per operator) 1000 3200 Digital Camera (per operator) 7018 3200 Sub Total (A) (B) Software Billing Software Desktop Audit Software Sub Total (B) II (C ) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Project Manager HR & Admin Manager Finance Manager IT Admin Site Inspection and Audit Manager CSC Front Staff Support Staff 1800 00 5789 47 5789 47 5263 16 3859 65 4210 5 1200 00 1 1 1 1 1 3577 3577 5 5

45200 00

42355 09

32262 91

34890 82

37769 91

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

108800 000 288000 000 213333 3 320000 0 224561 40 424589 474

10880 000 0 0 0 0 10880 000

10880 000 0 0 0 0 10880 000

10880 000 0 0 0 0 10880 000 224561 4 224561 4 449122 8

10880 000 0 0 0 0 10880 000 224561 4 224561 4 449122 8

17886 17886 35772

224561 224561 4 4 224561 224561 4 4 449122 44912 8 28

180000 198000 578947 578947 526316 636842 636842 578947 424561 148210 526 105600 000

385965 134736 3200 842 960000 800 00

21780 0 70052 6 70052 6 63684 2 46701 8 163031 579 116160 000

23958 0 770579 770579 70052 6 513719 179334 737 127776 000

26353 8 847637 847637 770579 565091 197268 211 140553 600


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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

(D)

Sub Total ( C) Other Costs Lease Cost - Per CSC office User Training - Per CSc operator Office Maintenance Per CSC office Consumables - Per Office Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D)

232987 018 5333 3 3509 4211 4211 426666 67 112280 70 336842 1 336842 1 606315 79 718243 842

256285 719

281914 291

310105 720

341116 292

800 3200 800 800

44800 47040 000 000 336842 33684 1 21 353684 371368 2 4 353684 371368 2 4 552421 578357 05 89 326899 355121 053 309

49392 518616 000 00 33684 33684 21 21 38993 40943 68 37 38993 40943 68 37 605591 634186 58 95 38603 419906 6106 215

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

S.n o.

Enablers- Capacity Building Item

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr. )

Quanti ty/ Numbe r of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Personal Computers Printers/Scanner/Photo copier Networking and cabling Generator Set Digital Camera Sub-Total (A) Software CBT - Training content development Central Knowledge Management Portal SubTotal (B) Operational Expenditure Salaried / Contract Staff Business Process Reengineering Expert PPP Expert Advanced Technologies Expert Software Development Expert Trainers Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Leadership Orientation 2000 00 17000 4500 0 14035 1 26316 7018 1 160 20 20 20 20 10000 0 27200 00 90000 0 28070 18 52631 6 14035 1 71936 84 15789 47 52631 6 21052 63 11000 0 27200 0 0 0 0 0 38200 0 21000 27200 0 0 0 0 0 29300 0 21000 27200 0 0 0 0 0 29300 0 21000 27200 0 0 0 0 0 29300 0

(B)

15789 47 52631 6

1 1

52632 52632 10526 3

52632 52632 10526 3

52632 52632 10526 3

52632 52632 10526 3

II (C)

77193 0 77193 0 77193 0 77193 0 35087 7

1 1 1 1 40

77193 0 77193 0 77193 0 77193 0 30877 19

84912 3 84912 3 84912 3 84912 3 33964 91

93403 5 93403 5 93403 5 93403 5 37361 40

10274 39 10274 39 10274 39 10274 39 41097 54

11301 82 11301 82 11301 82 11301 82 45207 30

(D)

13333

53333

56000

58800

61740

64827
Page 350

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Programme Project Management Vendor Management SLA Design and Monitoring Customer orientation and support Office Maintenance Per Training Insititute Consumables - Per Training Insititute Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Enablers - Marketing and Awareness Item Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.) Salaried / Contract Staff 77193 Marketing Director 0 47368 Manager - PR 4 Marketing/PR 38596 Professional 5 Cost of Hiring of a Marketing and PR 38596 Agency 5 Sub Total (A ) Other Costs Direct Mailers Billboards Advertisements in Print Media Radio Advertisements Television Advertisements Online Marketing
PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

3 3000 1667 1667 667 84211 4211 4 4 4 4 20 20

3 12000 6667 6667 2667 16842 11 84211 23297 54 147164 21

0 12600 7000 7000 2800 17684 21 88421 24462 42 63299 96

0 13230 7350 7350 2940 18568 42 92842 25685 54 67029 58

0 13892 7718 7718 3087 19496 84 97484 26969 82 72049 99

0 14586 8103 8103 3241 20471 68 10235 8 28318 31 77508 24

S.n o.

Quanti ty/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.) 93403 5 57315 8 18680 70

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.) 10274 39 63047 4 20548 77

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

(A)

1 1 4 1

77193 0 849123 47368 4 521053 15438 16982 60 46 38596 5 27894 74 424561 30684 21

113018 2 693521 22603 65 565091 40840 68

46701 8 513719 33752 371278 63 9 35297 2 42336 0 44579 8 74617 2 13097 70 88217 2

(B)

26680 12 32000 12 33696 12 56400 12 99000 12 66680 12

32015 6 336164 38400 40320 0 0 40435 42457 2 0 67680 71064 0 0 11880 124740 00 0 80015 84016 6 4

37062 1 389152 44452 46675 8 4 46808 8 491492 78348 82265 1 5 137525 14440 9 21 92628 1 972595
Page 351

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Events Branded Gifts / Paraphanelia Content Development Sub Total (B) Total (A+B) S.n o.

66680 12 33340 12 20000 0 12

80015 84016 88217 6 4 2 40007 42008 44108 6 0 4 24000 25200 26460 00 00 00 73736 774238 81295 96 1 00 101631 10810 115047 70 802 63 Year 1 (Cost in Birr.) Year 2 (Cost in Birr.) Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

92628 1 972595 46313 48629 8 5 27783 291721 00 5 85359 89627 75 74 12248 13046 764 842 Year 4 (Cost in Birr.) Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

(A)

Standards & Policies Item Unit Cost (Cos t in Birr. ) Salaried / Contract Staff CIO 87719 3 Data & Process 77193 Expert 0 Technology Expert 77193 0 Service Delivery 77193 Expert 0 Security Expert 77193 0 Legal Expert 77193 0 Sub-Total ( C) Others Training and Awareness of Standard and Poilicies department Change Management of Standard and Poilicies department Consumables Sub-Total (D) 5 Total (A+B)

Quantit y/ Numbe r of units

1 1 1 1 1 1

877193 771930 771930 771930 771930 771930 47368 42

964912 849123 849123 849123 849123 849123 521052 6

106140 4 93403 5 93403 5 93403 5 93403 5 93403 5 573157 9

116754 4 102743 9 102743 9 102743 9 102743 9 102743 9 63047 37

12842 98 113018 2 113018 2 113018 2 113018 2 113018 2 693521 1

(B)

1052 6

20

210526

221053

232105

243711

25589 6

3509 4211

20 1

70175 4211 284912 502175 4

73684 4421 299158 55096 84

77368 4642 314116 60456 95

81237 4874 32982 2 66345 58

85299 5118 346313 728152 3


Page 352

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

S.n o.

Ethiopia - Core projects - EA Item

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr. )

Quanti ty/ Numbe r of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr. )

Year 3 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 4 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 5 (Cos t in Birr. )

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers Sub-Total (A) Software EA Tool Central Knowledge Management Portal SubTotal (B) EA development Expenditure Consultant cost EA Architect Team members Trainers Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Ethiopia - Core projects NIAF Item 3500 00 52631 6 1 1 2000 00 2 2000 00 2000 00 21500 0 52631 6 74131 6 2200 00 2200 00 21500 0 0 21500 0 4200 0 4200 0 2150 00 0 2150 00 4200 0 4200 0 2150 00 0 2150 00 4200 0 4200 0 2150 00 0 2150 00

(B)

II (C)

77193 0 77193 0 35087 7

1 3 3

77193 0 23157 89 10526 32 41403 51

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

(D)

0 50816 67

0 4350 00

0 2570 00

0 2570 00

0 2570 00

S.n o.

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.)

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 3 (Cos t in Birr. )

Yea r4 (Cos t in Birr .)

Yea r5 (Cos t in Birr .)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware


Page 353

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Solution development Cost Maintenance & support Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Training cost Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Ethiopia - Core projects NSEB Item

4000 000

4000 000 4000 000 4200 000 4200 000 25262 500 25262 500

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

(B)

4200 000

II (C )

25262 500

0 500, 000 5000 00

0 500, 000 5000 00

0 500 000 500 000

0 500 000 500 000

(D)

2000 00 4211

1 30

2000 00 12631 6 32631 6 33788 816

0 0 0 5000 00

0 0 0 5000 00

0 0 0 500 000

0 0 0 500 000

S.n o.

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.)

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Yea r2 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r3 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r4 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r5 (Co st in Bir r.)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance 74500 00 1 3000 000 1 30000 00 30000 00 74500 00 74500 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(B)

II

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 354

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

(C )

Consultancy & Solution development Cost Infrastructure set up Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Training cost Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Ethiopia - Core projects NPG Item

94600 00 55900 0

1 1

94600 00 55900 0 10019 000 0 126316 126316 20595 316

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

(D)

4211

1 30

0 0

S.n o.

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.)

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Yea r2 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r3 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r4 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r5 (Co st in Bir r.)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Consultancy & Solution development Cost Maintenance & support Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Training cost Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) 64500 00 1 10750 000 1 10750 000 10750 000 64500 00 64500 00 10750 000 10750 000 1 0 30 126316 126316 28076 316 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(B)

II (C )

10750 000

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

(D)

4211

0 0

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 355

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

S.n o.

Ethiopia - Core projects NDS Item

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.)

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Yea r2 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r3 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r4 (Co st in Bir r.)

Yea r5 (Co st in Bir r.)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Consultancy & Solution development Cost Maintenance & support Sub Total ( C ) Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Common Applications HRMS Item 64500 00 1 86000 00 1 86000 00 86000 00 64500 00 64500 00 21500 000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(B)

II (C )

21500 000

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

4211

21500 000 30 126316 126316 36676 316

S.n o.

Unit Cost (Cos t in Birr. )

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 2 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 3 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 4 (Cos t in Birr. )

Year 5 (Cos t in Birr. )

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) 70175 44 1 2807 018 1 2807 018 2807 018 70175 44
Page 356

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

(B)

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

II (C )

SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Consultancy & Solution development Cost Infrastructure set up Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Training cost Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Common Applications - eOffice Item

70175 44 4385 965 5590 00 4385 965 5590 00 4944 965

1 1

0 0 0 1052 632 4210 53 1473 684 1473 684 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0

(D)

4211

1052 632 4210 100 53 14736 84 16243 211 100

1052 632 4210 53 1473 684 1473 684

1052 632 4210 53 1473 684 1473 684

1052 632 4210 53 1473 684 1473 684

S.n o.

Unit Cost (Cos t in Birr. )

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr. )

Yea r2 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r3 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r4 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r5 (Co st in Birr .)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Consultancy & Solution development Cost Infrastructure set up Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Training cost 70175 44 1 2807 018 1 28070 18 28070 18 70175 44 70175 44 43859 65 55900 0 49449 65 21052 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(B)

II (C )

4385 965 5590 00

1 1

0 0 0 2105 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0

(D)

20

2105

2105

2105
Page 357

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) Common Applications - eProcurement Item

4211

10

26 26 4210 4210 42105 5 5 25263 2526 2526 2 32 32 15022 2526 2526 158 32 32

26 26 4210 4210 5 5 2526 2526 32 32 2526 2526 32 32

S.n o.

Unit Cost (Cos t in Birr. )

Quant ity/ Numb er of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr. )

Yea r2 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r3 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r4 (Co st in Birr .)

Yea r5 (Co st in Birr .)

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Consultancy & Solution development Cost Infrastructure set up Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Training cost Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D) 4211 70175 44 1 2807 018 1 28070 18 28070 18 70175 44 70175 44 43859 65 55900 0 49449 65 21052 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(B)

II (C )

4385 965 5590 00

1 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0

(D)

20 10

2105 2105 26 26 4210 4210 42105 5 5 25263 2526 2526 2 32 32 15022 2526 2526 158 32 32

2105 2105 26 26 4210 4210 5 5 2526 2526 32 32 2526 2526 32 32

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 358

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

S. no .

Common Applications - Financial Management and Information System Item Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.)

Quan tity/ Num ber of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Ye ar 2 (C ost in Bir r.)

Ye ar 3 (C ost in Bir r.)

Ye ar 4 (C ost in Bir r.)

Ye ar 5 (C ost in Bir r.)

I (A)

(B)

II (C )

(D)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Upgrdation Costs -Servers + all related H/w Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Consultancy & Solution development Cost Infrastructure set up Sub Total ( C ) Training and Other Costs Training cost Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D)

842105

842105 842105 2105263 2105263

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

2105263

1315789 55900

1 1

1315789 55900 1371689 0 0 0 4,319,057. 89

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

4211

0 0

S. no .

Ethiopia - Common Applications - Email Management and Information System Item Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.)

Qua ntity / Num ber of units

Yea r1 (Cos t in Birr .)

Ye ar 2 (C ost in Bi rr. )

Ye ar 3 (C ost in Bi rr. )

Ye ar 4 (C ost in Bi rr. )

Ye ar 5 (C ost in Bi rr. )

I (A)

Capital Expenditure Hardware Servers + all related H/w 2807018 1 2807 018 0 0 0 0
Page 359

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

(B)

Sub-Total (A) Software Software (all softwares) SubTotal (B) Solution development Cost & Maintenance Consultancy & Solution development Cost Infrastructure set up Sub Total ( C ) 7017544 1

2807 018 7017 544 7017 544 4385 965 5590 00 4944 965

II (C )

4385965 559000

1 1

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

(D )

Training and Other Costs Training cost Consumables Sub Total (D) Total (A+B+C+D)

4211

0 0

0 0 0 1476 9526

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

S. no .

ITSG Salary of manpower Item

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr. )

Qua ntity / Num ber of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

Manpower costs Solution / application 1 architects Database 2 Administrators Software Developers 3 Web Administrator 4
PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

180,0 00.00 180,0 00.00 120,0 00.00 120,0 00.00

360,000. 4 00 540,000. 6 00 480,000. 8 00 120,000. 2 00

792,000 .00 1,188,00 0.00 1,056,0 00.00 264,000 .00

871,200. 00 1,306,80 0.00 1,161,60 0.00 290,400 .00

958,320. 00

1,054,15 2.00

1,437,480 1,581,22 .00 8.00 1,277,760 .00 319,440. 00 1,405,53 6.00 351,384. 00
Page 360

Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

Total PMO Staff Costs Item

1,500,0 00.00

3,300, 000.00

3,630,0 00.00

3,993,0 00.00

4,392, 300.00

Unit Cost (Cost in Birr.)

Quan tity/ Num ber of units

Year 1 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 2 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 3 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 4 (Cost in Birr.)

Year 5 (Cost in Birr.)

Manpowe r costs Team Leaders Team Members

180,00 0.00 120,00 0.00

1,260,000. 7 00 600,000.0 10 0

1,386,00 0.00 1,320,00 0.00

1,524,600. 00 1,452,000 .00

1,677,060. 00 1,597,200. 00

1,844,766 .00 1,756,920 .00

Total

1,860,000 .00

2,706,0 00.00

2,976,60 0.00

3,274,26 0.00

3,601,6 86.00

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

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Development of e-Government Strategy and Implementation Plan

www.pwc.com

PricewaterhouseCoopers Confidential

Page 362