You are on page 1of 19

here is a classic example of the well-known 9mm MARS.

It was the most successful of the “Mars” series of cartridges made for the Gabbett-Fairfax automatic pistols. Although “success” is a relative term; very few were manufactured. Most likely a product of Eley Brothers, this is a great example, with drawn brass case, copper Berdan type primer and cupronickel jacketed bullet tightly roll-crimped at the case mouth. With the headstamp “MARS.9.M’M Rd 367748”, it shows general surface finger and grease stains on the brass. estimate: $150-200 this little guy matches nothing we have seen before. It is roughly an 11.5mm / .450 but its true designation eludes us. It is made with a slightly tapering brass case which is formed rimless / grooveless. There is a separate SCREW-IN BASE which is generally made of brass. There is a STEEL washer or disk on the inside face of the screw-in base against which is riveted the brass battery cup of the Boxer-type copper primer. This specimen is clearly missing the rim (we guess that it had one, but we are not sure). It would seem that the rim would screw on to the base insert. We can not determine if the base is currently in its proper position or not–it will not move, however, the priming system is such that the cartridge would go “bang” as it sits. This may be a fired specimen, as it shows a dented copper primer. There are no markings or other identification marks we can find. The only other bit of information we have is that it came from the remnants of the FUSNOT factory of Belgium. It is in very good condition. estimate: $90-120 here is a fairly typical looking 11.35 DANISH SCHOUBOE example. It employs a normal drawn brass case with small brass primer. The bullet used is, although typical for the type, quite odd. It has a cupronickel jacket with a light weight, wood or aluminum core. A product of the Danish Rifle Syndicate, it bears their “DRS 1913” headstamp. What makes the round unusual is that it is indeed dated “1913” and not the “1912” as normally seen. it is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 here is a good example of the early 11mm DANISH ORDNANCE REVOLVER. Produced for use in the centerfire conversion of the Danish Model 1865 pinfire revolver, this example is typical of the type. It had a drawn brass case, without headstamp, showing a large brass Berdan type primer. It is factory loaded with a heavy roundnose lead bullet. With some freckles of oxidation on the lead, it remains in very good condition. estimate: $45-60 this is a fine example of the 11.5 WERDER PISTOL-CARBINE. Designed and made for both the Werder pistol as well as the Carbine, it is believed that this is an Bavarian military example. Unheadstamped, it shows a drawn brass case with large brass Berdan type primer and distinct raised ring towards the rim. Factory loaded with a roundnose lead bullet, it is in very good condition. estimate: $35-50 considered to be the largest production revolver cartridge, here is the huge 15mm FRENCH REVOLVER. This is an early example, showing the brass and copper GAUPILLAT STYLE battery cup type primer. It is otherwise typical of the type, with flatnose lead bullet, drawn brass case and SMALL “GG 15 m/m” headstamp. It shows a layer of oxidation on the lead and the brass is general bright in color. estimate: $45-60 considered to be the largest production revolver cartridge, here again is a huge 15mm FRENCH REVOLVER round. This is a later example, showing a conventional small brass primer. It is otherwise typical of the type, with flatnosed lead bullet, drawn brass case and LARGE “GG 15 m/m” headstamp. With a light dusting of oxidization on the lead bullet, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $45-60 here are TWO different .276 PEDERSEN PROOF cartridges from the LONDON PROF HOUSE. Each employs a standard-looking drawn brass case, with brass ringed-in primer, “K.31 .276” headstamp and PURPLE base stripe. The first is without bullet, showing a waxed card wad at the case mouth to contain the powder. The second has a pointed gilding metal jacketed bullet with single exposed knurled cannelure. Both are in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75

539.

541.

542.

543.

544.

545.

546.

547.

this is an uncommon EXPERIMENTAL .276 PEDERSEN CLIP. An English example, it is constructed of a single piece of galvanized steel—there is no separate spring or retaining tab. The base has double projecting lugs along with the raised "X". It is in very good condition and FULL of ten original "K30 .276" headstamped cartridges. estimate: $60-75 73

548.

Volume XII, Number 3

this is a super ALUMINIUM CASED example of the .280/.30 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL. The round shows typical case profile, with "RG 49 280/30" headstamp and brass ringed-in primer with purple annulus. However, the case is BRIGHT ORANGE colored aluminium. Factory loaded with a gilding metal jacketed TYPE "A" bullet, the base of the round shows a RED BLOB signifying an in-house test. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 this is an unusual round about which we know very little. For want of a better name we will call it a 7x49.3 EXPERIMENTAL. It appears to consist of a U.S. F.A.T 1E1 case necked down to accept the British 7mm or .280 TYPE “B” ball bullet, loaded to give the same overall length as the 7mm Compromise cartridge. We assume that these rounds were loaded at Frankford Arsenal in about 1953 for comparative trials with some of the United Kingdom long cased 7mm types. Typically constructed, with brass case and nickel primer, the round is loaded with a GREEN TIPPED bullet with plain cannelure and shows a simple “F A 51” headstamp. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 here are TWO early .30 PEDERSEN DEVICE examples. Both are typical in construction and profile, with drawn brass case, copper "U" marked primer and gilding metal jacketed bullet. Both are early examples, made with COMMERCIAL headstamps in the hopes that they would not be recognized as military experimentals. (Another aspect is that in the early stages using an existing headstamp die was cheaper than creating a new one, and of course the headstamping process greatly strengthens the cartridge's base and head.) The first example here has a "REM-UMC 9m/m BS" headstamp while the second has a "REM-UMC 32 ACP" headstamp. Both are in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $90-120 we can find no printed reference to this .30 KRAG cartridge with PAPER FILLED BASE. The case is sectioned at the base so that the interior construction can be seen. It is an early BALLON HEAD (not folded head) case where the primer pocket balloons or extends into the powder chamber. At the time of the .30 Krag most cartridges were made with a solid head design, where the topmost face of the primer pocket was flush with the base of the powder chamber. What is odd is that here the balloon or gap around the primer pocket is filled with a PAPER WAD. The round appears otherwise typical, with remnants of the “U.M.C.” headstamp and factory cupronickel jacketed bullet. The brass shows more than typical surface finger stains. This specimen was lot “0491” of the 1981 auction of the PETE BIGLER collection. estimate: $90-120 this is a great example of the .30 KRAG, SCOTT PATENT MULTIBALL. The drawn brass case is designed in a unique manner to support TWO BULLETS. The first bullet is in the normal position at the mouth of the case, however, the second is held within the elongated neck of the case. In other words, the cartridge case is formed with a very low shoulder. To bring the case back to "normal" profile, a turned brass sleeve is fitted over the base of the neck to form the new and "standard"-height shoulder. This example employs a typical brass Boxer type primer, has a cupronickel jacketed forward bullet and a "W.R.A.Co. 30 U.S.G." headstamp. With typical crack in the brass sleeve, it is in very good condition. estimate: $50-65 here are TWO good examples of the .30 KRAG DUMMY. The first is a so-called SECOND MODEL dummy, without case flutes. The other is a THIRD MODEL (1904) with case flutes. Both show four factory original case holes above the rim. The Second Model example is without headstamp and has an inert (dented) primer. The Third Model has a "F A 4 04" headstamp and normal copper primer. The second model has a gilding metal jacketed bullet and shows a neck dent. The Third Model is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75

549.

550.

551.

552.

553.

554.

here is a scarce .30-06 GREENER MULTIBALL case. Like the .321 examples shown in the British section, the brass case has a series of case flutes which form internal rails which would support two internal nested bullets. This is a new primed empty case, showing three body flutes, a brass primer and a "REM-UMC 1906" headstamp. The case shows some oxidation, otherwise it is in fine condition. estimate: $45-60

555.

74

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

here is a great example of the .30-.24 U.S. EXPERIMENTAL. The round was developed at Frankford Arsenal in the mid-1930s as a high velocity attempt employing the GERLICH-TYPE SQUEEZE-BORE principle. Rather than a normal bullet, this cupronickel jacketed bullet has a central body of about 0.24-in. diameter around which are two "skirts" of approximately 0.30-in. diameter. The idea was that the skirts would contain the expanding gases of the powder to propel the bullet down the barrel but, since the barrel was tapering (from about 0.30-in. to 0.24-in.) the skirts would be squeezed down. This would produce a great deal of pressure which, in turn, would result in high or very high velocities. The example is employs a drawn brass case which is based upon the .30-06, but lengthened. It has a brass primer and a simple "F A" headstamp. The bullet is seated in the case against a smooth cannelure just above the shoulder. It appears as if this is a new primed empty case fitted with a proper bullet. It is in excellent condition. See Hackley 1967, 1:293. est: $120-150 here is a scarce .303 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL cartridge about which we have no information. The round is typical in profile, with drawn brass case and hollow nose cupronickel jacketed MARK V type bullet secured with three neck crimps. The base shows a normal round copper primer but with the undocumented “K A V” headstamp. It is in very good condition. estimate: $60-75 the first we have seen, here is a great .303 BRITISH loaded with what appears to be the BROCK INCENDIARY bullet. The case is typical, made of brass, with large copper primer and “KN 16 VII” headstamp. The bullet is cupronickel jacketed , showing a distinct round nose and a tiny hollow point. The nose oft he bullet shows some oxidation while the case has some freckles. See Labbett .303, 108-9. estimate: $120-150

556.

557.

558.

here is a scarce example of the .303 POMEROY MARK 2 explosive bullet fitted into what appears to be a used Ball case. The bullet is quite distinct, with roundose copper “warhead” protruding from the otherwise cupronickel jacketed bullet. It appears as if the case is once-fired, showing a dented copper primer and irregular neck crimps. Headstamped “E 16 VII”, the case shows darkening. See Labbett .303, 129-30. estimate: $120-150 here is a classic .303 GREENER MULTIBALL experimental. The round employs a drawn brass case with three flutes at and below the shoulder. These flutes produce internal “rails” upon which the lower bullets are supported and terminate with punch dot crimps to prevent the projectiles from moving backwards in the case. The forward most bullet is of pointed profile, gilding metal jacketed or of solid copper and is secured with a smooth neck cannelure. The remaining bullets are nested nose to base wholly inside the case. The base shows a large brass Berdan type primer and “K-17 VII Z” headstamp. The round is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 although it may appear to be a rather crude SECTIONED example, this .303 GREENER MULTIBALL is indeed from the GREENER ESTATE and comes to us thorugh the Val Forgett collection. It differes from the above by employing much longer case flutes which terminate in a punch crimp. Additionally, there is no smooth neck cannelure to secure the forward gilding metal jacketed bullet. The base shows a large copper Berdan type primer and a “K18 VII Z” headstamp. The oval-shaped case section, although crude, clearly displays the two internal cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullets. The round is in very good condition. estimate: $60-75 here is a good .22 SUBCALIBER ADAPTER SHELL for the .303 VICKERS. It is made of solid blued steel with central chamber in the base presumably for .22 rimfire. Above the chamber is a channel which is smooth. The side of the shell is stamped “EFD” in small letters. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $35-50

559.

560.

561.

562.

Volume XII, Number 3

75

here is a good example of the .450/.303 EXPERIMENTAL. The round was produced in the mid 1930s to test the pressure limits of the .303 Pattern 14 rifle and was designed based upon a commercial .450 Nitro Express case necked-down to .303-inch. This brass cased example shows a large brass Berdan type primer, a cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullet friction-fitted in the case and a “KYNOCH .450 NITRO” headstamp. It is in excellent condition. See Labbett 1991, 38. estimate: $200-250 the first and only example we have see, here is a great .50-.30 T5 HIGH VELOCITY EXPERIMENTAL. The cartridge is designed based upon a .50 Browning case necked-down to accept a Cal. .30 M1 Armour Piercing bullet. Although there exists numerous .50 cases necked down to .30, this is a proper and true governmental experimental designed in 1942 with the hopes of producing an appropriate high-volcity anti-tank cartridge (along the lines of the German 7.92/13mm). This example has a fired brass case with struck primer and “F A 42” headstamp. It has been fitted with an original black-tipped bullet, although the case mouth shows a severe flake. A steel wire helps to keep the bullet in place. This round, with steel wire, is purported to have come from Aberdeen Proving Grounds through Val Forgett. It is in very good condition. See Hackley 1967, II:236-7. est: $150-200 here is a fine WINCHESTER BLACKENED CASE DUMMY loading of the scarce .345 MACHINE RIFLE. Although the base of the round is headstamped “W.R.A.Co. .351 S.L.”, this experimental round is readily identified from the commercial .351 by its long, pointed cupronickel jacketed bullet which is factory loaded into the case and secured with three crimps well below the mouth. The drawn brass case has been factory blackened or stained for identification purposes, and features a blind (without flash hole) primer pocket. It is in very good condition. See Hackley 1967, 1:285-6. estimate: $90-120 here is a hard-to-find example of the A.P. SWITCH, No. 8. Most often referred to as the .40 BOOBY TRAP, it is made with a drawn brass rimless/groove less case and a turned steel conical bullet. It was placed in a buried pressure-activated device which, when stepped on or driven over would propel the bullet either through a solider’s foot or through a vehicle’s tire. This typical example is without headstamp, but shows an “(ICI MONOGRAM)” marked brass primer. With typical light surface finger stains it is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $45-60 here is a rare PROTOTYPE example of the .405 BELTED SPOTTER cartridge. The round features a brass case with a wide belt just above the rim. The bullet is a TWO-PIECE type with ALUMINUM NOSE which screws-out of the brass bullet body. The base is without headstamp, showing a brass primer. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $90-120 here are TWO EXPERIMENTAL .410 ALUMINUM shells. Each is made entirely of aluminum, with an approximate 2-3/4’’ case. Both have a BELTED case and “Y 6” headstamp. They vary in their black case wall markings, one a “6L” the other a “9” shot. Both are in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $45-60 the one and only we have had to offer, here is a great ELEY .600/.500 A EXPERIMENTAL. The cartridge was made in the 1918-20 period as a potential British air-service and antitank cartridge, however, initial tests found it to be lacking in basic strength. The designation “.600/.500” comes from its predecessor carridge which was nothing more than a standard .600 Nitro Express case necked-down to Cal. .50. It was soon discovered that the rimmed cartridge profile was a distinct disadvantage when used in automatic weapons, so this belted, rimless design was developed. This is a factory loaded example, with brass case, copper Berdan type primer with BLACK annulus and gilding metal jacketed bullet secured in the case with three neck crimps. The base shows the wonderful “ELEY 600/500 A” headstamp, with the “A” portion thought to signify an increased case web thickness. Apart from some finger stains, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $600-500

563.

564.

565.

566.

567.

568.

569.

76

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

here is a great PROOF example of the .5 VICKERS MARK II BALL. The round employs what appears to be a standard brass case, with brass primer and “K37 II” headstamp. It is factory loaded with a Mark II cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullet which has one exposed cannelure and is firmly held in the case with three neck crimps. Readily identified as a proof with its PURPLE base stripe, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 here is an early .50 BALL, MODEL 1919 cartridge. In profile and basic construction it differs little from later examples. It employs a drawn brass case, UNCRIMPED brass Berdan type primer and cupronickel jacketed bullet with single exposed knurled cannelure at the mouth. Showing the early “F A 20” headstamp, this round shows some age with a cracked neck and general surface stains and appears to be a new primed empty (or dummy?) with proper bullet. estimate: $25-40 here is an odd .50 MACHINE GUN with WIRE WOUND BULLET. It seems that these were produced to check the level of barrel erosion. The soft wire would easily deform and, when recovered after firing, could be easily measured to determine barrel condition. The brass case is normal, with “F A 47” headstamp, brass staked-in primer and red primer annulus. The steel or cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullet is grooved to accommodate several wraps of steel wire. With typical surface finger stains it is in very good condition. estimate: $50-65 here are TWO different FRANKFORD ARSENAL ALUMINUM case experimental .50 MACHINE GUN cartridges. Neither are headstamped, showing only a staked-in brass primer with purple annulus formed in a fourspot pattern. The first has a SILVER tipped gilding metal jacketed bullet while the second has a RED tipped gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet. Both contain powder, however, neither have a discernable crimp. They are in very good to excellent conditon. estimate: $50-65 here is a scarce FLECHETTE loading of the .50 MACHINE GUN. The case used is narmal, of drawn brass with ringed-in brass primer showing a red annulus. The bullet is a long steel arrow or flechette held in the case with a tan or off-white colored four-piece plastic sabot which itself is held within a white cup or ring visible just above the case mouth. Headstamped “L C 7 8”, the case shows some staining and what appears to be acid-etching on one side. estimate: $50-75

570.

571.

572.

573.

574.

here is an uncommon ROLL CRIMP BLANK loading of the .50 MACHINE GUN. The round is comprised of a standard brass case, with staked-in nickel primer and “REM-UMC 50 CAL” headstamp. The nose of the case is roll-crimped over what appers to be a lacquered card or cork wad.. Thought by some to have been produced for England, it is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $25-40 ungainly looking, here is a BOMB DISPOSAL BLANK loading of the .50 MACHINE GUN case. The round is simply a standard .50 Machine Gun case, with “4 5 T W” headstamp. However, it is fitted with an ELECTRIC PRIMER as evidence by the two long, insulated wire leads. The nose of the case is closed with a hard red-lacquered wad. As we understand, two opposing blanks were used in a special contraption which, when remotely fired, would harmlessly spin-off the nose fuze of a bomb. This is in excellent condition.

575.

576.

estimate: $20-35

here is a set of FOUR .50 MACHINE GUN DISPLAY BOARD DUMMY cartridges. The cartridges themselves were produced by Frankford Arsenal and when they left Frankford there were no inerting holes nor other features which outwardly identified them as dummies. However, they were produced on contract and and delivered to Reflectone which had a Navy contract to produce educational identification display boards. The set here includes two with “F A 44” headstamp, one BALL cartridge which is sectioned and coverd with clear plastic, the other an INCENDIARY examples with blue tip. The other two cartridges have “F A 4” headstamp, one a TRACER with orange colored tip the other an AP-I with silver colored tip. All four show twin mounting holes and some discoloration of the old, original lacquer. estimate: $35-50

577.

Volume XII, Number 3

77

here is a rare PRESSURE GUN TEST loading of the .50 MACHINE GUN. Not to be confused with a proof cartridge which was loaded to high pressure to prove that a weapon could withstand the load, this cartridge was used in a pressure test gun which, with a special apparatus, measured the pressure developed. It is readily identified by the INDEXING NOTCH in the rim which is opposite the factory case hole where the pressure reading would be taken. The round is otherwise typical, with brass case, brass staked-in primer showing a purple annulus, and “F A 41” headstamp. Factory loaded with a black tipped gilding metal jacketed bullet, it is in very good condition. estimate: $50-65 here is a scarce PROOF loading of the .50 VICKERS ARMSTRONG-COLT. The cartridge is typical in construction and profile, with brass csae, ringed-in brass primer and gilding metal jacketed bullet . The headstamp reads “K31 .5.V.A-C” and the base shows the PURPLE stripe of the LONDON PROOF HOUSE. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $90-120

578.

579.

here is a PROOF loading of the .50 MACHINE GUN. In profile and general construction the cartridge is typical, with brass case, brass ringed-im primer and gilding metal jacketed bullet. However, this example has a COPPER WASHED case, a “K 76 L12A1” headstamp and a PURPLE bullet tip color. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $25-40 nothing more than an elongated .50 Machine Gun case, here is a scarce example of the .50 T1 E X P E R I M E N TA L . Developed in 1937, it was part of a program to investigate high velocity armour piercing bullets and ammunition. Indeed, the case is nothing more than a long .50 Machine Gun case, so designed to increase powder capacity. This appears to be a new primed empty example, with brass staked-in primer and “CAL 50 FA 38” headstamp fitted with a representative gilding metal jacketed (M1?) bullet. It is in very good condition. See Hckely 1967, 1:284. estimate: $150-200 slightly later, but part of the same series, here is the .50 T2 EXPERIMENTAL. Here, rather than increase the case length, additional powder capacity is realized by increasing the diameter of the case. The rim diameter and case length remained the same as the standard .50 Machine Gun. Again, it was part of a project which investigated high-velocity armour-piercing bullets. This is a new primed empty case, with brass staked-in primer and “F A 40” headstamp. It is in very good condition. See Hackley 1967, 1:284-5. estimate: $150-200 to further facilitate high velocity bullet investigations this .50 HIGH VELOCITY (.50-20mm) was developed. It is really nothing more than a 20mm Hispano-Suiza case necked to Cal. .50. Although there were examples made from exiting 20mm cases, this round is an example of the contract let to Bridgeport Brass Company for .50 H.V. cases, as witnessed by the “B (in diamond) 43 50HV” headstamp. This is a loaded example, with staked-in brass primer and gilding metal jacketed bullet. It is in very good condition with some case stains. See Hackley 1967, 2:239. estimate: $90-120

580.

581.

582.

583.

reportedly ONE OF ONE-HUNDRED here is a rare 20/.50 EXPERIMENTAL. The cartridge, here an empty case, is similar to the 1944 .60/.50 Frankford Arsenal cartridge, but is readily identified by its STEEL case and LONG NECK. The case is unheadstamped, showing and empty Boxer type primer pocket. Reportedly made in the late-1970s, this case is in excellent condition.

584.

estimate: $150-200

here is a scarce PROOF loading of the .5 VICKERS V/664. Not to be confused with the normal .5 Vickers, this employs a much longer case with a semirimmed base. This example is normal in profile and construction, with brass case, brass ringed-in primer and long gilding metal jacketed bullet. The base shows a “K.36 .5V-664” headstamp along with the PURPLE BASE STRIPE of the London Proof House. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75

585.

78

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

here is a good example of the CLASS D BALL loading of the .5 VICKERS V/664. It employs a case similar to the round above, brass, with brass ringed-in primer showing a dark purple annulus. It is factory loaded with a gilding metal jacketed bullet and shows a “K.37 .5.D” headstamp. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $45-60

586.

here is a good .55 BOYS, BALL MARK I example by Kynoch. It is typical in construction and profile, with belted brass case, brass ringed-in primer and cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullet secured in the case with three neck crimps. The base shows the “K.40 I” headstamp along with the purple primer annulus. It is in very good condition. estimate: $30-45 here we have TWO good .55 BOYS variations. The first is a PRACTICE TRACER example, with “K37 P.G.I” headstamp and red primer annulus. The second is an odd DUMMY example, with conventional brass case showing an empty primer pocket and normal “K.40 I” headstamp, but having FOUR body holes through which the internal WOOD ROD can be seen. Both are factory loaded with cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullets secured with three neck crimps. estimate: $70-85 here we have TWO INSPECTOR DUMMY loadings of the .55 BOYS. The first has a TINNED brass case and “K.38 U.I” headstamp. The second has a conventional brass case with THREE case holes through which the internal WOOD ROD can be seen. It has a “K.42 UI” headstamp. Both are factory loaded with gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullets held with neck crimps and both have blind (unfinished / undrilled) primer pockets. The “42” has some surface discoloration of the brass. estimate: $60-75 the last of our .55 BOYS examples, this is a great DRILL loading. This type is readily identified by its CHROME plated case which shows three red-painted CASE FLUTES. Further, the base shows a red-painted blind primer pocket and the “R(arrow)L 39 D. I” headstamp. With cupronickel jacketed bullet, it is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $45-60 here is a scarce 4mm MAUSER CASELESS. Produced on an experimental basis, the round is comprised of a cylindrical compressed powder charge, reddish-brown in color and colored silver over the forward half. The base shows a small silver colored primer and the round is factory loaded with a pointed steel jacketed bullet. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 this appears to be a FACTORY DUMMY version of the 4mm MAUSER CASELESS. The round is made with what appears to be a moulded plastic case, green in color with tiny yellowish “dimples” or bumps. The base has a small cavity, presumably for the priming, which is now occupied by small piece of clear plastic. The bullet is cupronickel clad steel jacketed and firmly seated in the case. Without markings, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 here is an odd example of the 4x37 I.W.K. experimental. Of those we have seen, the round is typical in profile and construction. It has a drawn brass case, a small staked-in nickel primer and a pointed steel (jacketed?) bullet. However, the base here is UNHEADSTAMPED rather than marked “IWK” as we have seen. With typical light surface freckles on the brass, it is in very good condition. estimate: $60-75 here is an odd example of what we guess is the 4.7 DM11 CASELESS cartridge. This specimen is a FACTORY DUMMY. It consists of a square plastic body, recessed at the base and closed at the nose with the normal translucent cap over the gilding metal jacketed bullet. The body has an identification hole running near the base. What is odd is that this example is BROWN in color. The round is in near mint condition. estimate: $35-50

587.

588.

589.

590.

591.

592.

593.

594.

here is a wonderful SEALED MAGAZINE of 4.73x33 DM11 CASELESS cartridges. It is comprised of a molded green plastic magazine closed on both ends with green painted tinfoil. One side of the magazine is marked as shown, while the other side shows a profile outline of the cartridge (similar to the one above). The magazine is sealed an contains TEN cartridges. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $90-120 79

595.

Volume XII, Number 3

here is a great 5x44 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL. Not to be confused with the longer and later 4.85 type, this is the first of the small-diameter cartridge tested by the British. This example appears typical in construction, with drawn brass case, ringed-in brass primer and gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet showing a PURPLE TIP. Although unheadstamped, the base shows a PURPLE STRIPE representing some undocumented internal code. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $120-150 here is another great 5x44 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL cartridge. It is similar to the example above, with brass case, brass ringed-in primer and gilding metal jacketed bullet. This example, however, has a BLACK OVER PURPLE color tipped bullet and a BLUE-GREEN colored base blob or stripe. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $120-150 this is our fourthe 5x44 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL cartridge. It is similar to those above, with brass case, brass primer and gilding metal jacketed bullet. Here the bullet has a GREEN OVER PURPLE tip color and the base has a GREEN blop or stripe. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $120-150 this is apparently a DUMMY loading of the 5mm (5x44) BRITISH, but it is unlike any we have see before. The case is typical in construction, with brass ringed-in primer showing a purple annulus. However, the case shows a single CASE HOLE between the base and shoulder. The bullet is likewise unusual, appearing to be plain STEEL rather than cupronickel jacketed. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $150-200 here is an odd DUMMY example of the later, 4.85 (4.85x49) BRITISH. the case here is UNHEADSTAMPED and is WITHOUT case holes. The ringedin primer is inert (struck) and shows a purple primer annulus. The bullet appears to be a standard gilding metal clad steel jacketed type, tightly crimped into the case at the mouth. There is NO POWDER in the case, and judging from the factory-looking crimp, it was made that way. It is in good condition, but does show some denting of the case at and below the shoulder. estimate: $60-75 here is a scarce BLANK design of the 4.85x49 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL. The round employs a short brass case without neck or shoulder, loaded with a translucent, milk-white colored plastic nose piece, secured in the case by two smooth cannelures below the mouth. This nose piece is formed with a shoulder, neck and bullet thus bringing the round to “standard” profile. The base is unmarked, showing a brass ringed-in primer. There is a single hole which may or may not be original. estimate: $70-85 here is a fine PROOF loading of the 4.85x49 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL. It is typical in profile and basic design, with brass case, brass primer gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet and “RG 76 485” headstamp. What is unusual is that the whole of the base, including the extractor groove, is RED STAINED. It is in excellent condition. est: $35-50 here is a similar PROOF loading of the 4.85x49 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL. It is identical to the example above, except here the RED STAIN is only found in the extractor groove. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $35-50 here is a scarce HIGH SPEED EXPERIMENTAL loading of the 5.45x39 SOVIET. The round is normal in profile and basic construction, with lacquered steel case, brass primer with red annulus and gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet. What is odd is the PURPLE case mouth seal. Headstamped “17 94” it is in excellent condition. estimate: $30-45 although we have no definitive information, this must be a COMMERCIAL 5.45x39 SOVIET example. It is typical in construction and profile, with lacquered steel case, brass primer and gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet. What is unusual is the bullet has a small-diameter HOLLOW POINT and the headstamped reads “RWS .215”. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $35-50

596.

597.

598.

599.

600.

601.

602.

603.

604.

605.

80

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

here is an uncommon example of the 5.56 HUGHES “LOCKLESS”. The round is made with an olivecolored plastic case which is flat or box-like rather than cylindrical. The case is divided into three internal chambers. The center chamber contains the gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet atop a small quantity of powder while the other two house the main powder charges. When the conventional nickel primer is fired, the powder behind the bullet begins to move it forward and as the bullet travels vents to the lateral powder chambers are exposed, igniting the full charge. The idea was to develop an efficient cartridge which was lighter and took-up less volume than a conventional cartridge. This example shows a fired primer in the bent-over aluminum battery cup however the case, bullet and powder appear unfired. Overall it is in very good condition. estimate: $90-120 we can find no printed reference to this YOUTH-SIZED (5.5mm) 6.35 CARCANO cartridge. As we understand, there was a youth-sized Carcano rifle made for some Italian military dignitary which fired special noise-only cartridges. This is supposedly such an example. It is one-piece STEEL which at its base would accommodate a centerfire blank cartridge of about 5mm. As you can see, it is designed to simulate the profile of a “real” cartridge, complete with “bullet.” The base shows a ring-spring used to secure the blank. The cartridge here is CHROME plated and appears unfired. It is unmarked and in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $200-250 there are two versions of the above 5.5mm ITALIAN MINIATURE cartridge, this being the second type. Produced either for the same rifle or its twin, it is again STEEL, here with simple bright finish. It employs a different chamber in the rear, although it was still designed for a centerfire blank cartridge. The “bullet” of this cartridge is channeled so it is conceivable it fired some sort of projectile. Again, it is unmarked and appears unfired. It is in good to very good condition. estimate: $200-250 here is a scarce example of the 5.6x45.5 RUSSIAN. Unfortunately, we have little information to offer, apart from the fact that it is designed from as 7.62x39 case, lengthened and necked-down to .22. This is a factory DUMMY example, with large case hole and inert (struck) staked-in brass primer. It is factory loaded with a gilding metal jacketed bullet and is without headstamp. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 here is an unusual 5.56x45 DUMMY FLECHETTEexample. It employs what appears to be a normal brass case, one with nickel primer and “FC 223 REM” headstamp. It is loaded with a grey plastic-like sabot which is WITHOUT FLECHETTE. In other words, this looks like a flechette cartridge but is lacking the internal flechette itself. It is in excellent condition. est: $35-50 here is a great DUMMY FLECHETTE loading of the 5.56x45. The cartridge employs a standard brass case, with empty one-hole Boxer type primer pocket and “R-P 223 REM” headstamp. It is loaded with an oddly-shaped gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet which was used to simulate the dimension, profile and weight of a flechette sabot with flechette. A product for or by COLT, this was part of the experimental work conducted in the 1960s.It is in excellent condition. estimate: $35-50

606.

607.

608.

609.

610.

611.

here is a set of FOUR 6mm SAW cartriges in their original MACHINE GUN LINKS. The cartridges themselves are typical, each with lacquered steel case, brass primer and “F A 7 3” headstamp. Of the four, three are BALL cartridges with plain gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullets while one is a TRACER with orange colored tip. The links are are plain steel stamped “6MM” on the edge of the “ears.” The set is in very good condition. estimate: $45-60

612.

here is a fine example of the 6.25x43 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL cartridge. The predecessor to the 4.85/5mm series described above, the 6.25 was used more as a test vehicle for bullet design than as a practical small arms cartridge. The specimen offered here is typically constructed, with drawn brass case, brass Berdan type primer and gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet. The round is headstamped “RG 69 6.25x43”, shows an in-house marking of a BROWN BLOB on the base and has a BLACK bullet tip. It is in very good condition. estimate: $120-150 another 6.25x43 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL round, this time with a plain gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet. Again the base has a “RG 69 6.25x43” headstamp, but here with a ONE RED BLOB and ONE BLACK BLOB on the base. These marks were internal indicators of an undocumented special load or test. The round is in excellent condition. estimate: $120-150

613.

614.

Volume XII, Number 3

81

here is a scarce SOLID BRASS DUMMY example of the 6.25x43 BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL. Designed and produced as an in-house dummy for reference and basic gun-function tests, it is comprised of solid brass, turned to proper profile. It shows no marks like a headstamp, nor primer or primer pocket. Absolutely factory original, this example is in very good condition with some light scratches. estimate: $150-200 here is an unusual 6.35 CARCANO, SUB CALIBER device. It employs what appears to be a surplus brass 6.35 cartridge case which has been modified to accept a brass-cased centerfire “G.F.L. 7.65mm” headstamped blank cartridge in its base. The “bullet” is a hollow steel tube used to replicate the profile of a standard Ball cartridge. The bullet shows some surface rust while the brass has normal finger stains. estimate: $35-50 here are TWO good examples of the 7MM COMPROMISE round. Known also as the 7x51 BRITISH both here employ a typical drawn brass case with brass primer and gilding metal jacketed bullet. The first has a “D A (C ARROW) 52” headstamp while the second has a “F N 52” heasdtamp. Both are in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $30-45 this is an uncommon headstamp on the 7MM MK 1 Z or .280/30 round (renamed in August 1951). In 1970 there was one last small batch made for test and demonstration firing by R.O.F. Radway Green. The cartridge is easily distinguishable by virtue of its “RG 70 1Z” headstamp and by the small PURPLE tip on its gilding metal clad steel bullet. The round is in excellent condition. estimate: $35-50 one of few that we have seen, this is a very unusual 7x57 MAUSER example. The round is remarkable due to its “CRINKLED” or “CORRUGATED” CASE. Seemingly employing a standard brass case, between the shoulder and base is a series of six rows of short horizontal case flutes, five flutes in each row. Although theories have ranged from case flexibility tests through to someone’s garage past-time, it seems as if the corrugations were added for “feel” identification of this GUARD loading. The round is otherwise typical, with brass primer, cupronickel jacketed bullet and “REM-UMC 7m/m” headstamp. Showing old lacquer, it is in very good condition. estimate: $45-60 here is an unusual WOOD BULLET BLANK loading of an early 7x45 CZECH. The round employs a brass case with brass primer and is loaded with a pointed wooden bullet of 7.35mm diameter. The base shows a “* 5 49 (triangle)” headstamp and the case does not appear to contain powder. est: $120-150 this is an unusual 7.62x51 NATO cartridge which has an ALUMINIUM case. The round is otherwise typical in profile and construction, with gilding metal jacketed bullet and brass primer. The base shows a very faint impressed “T 9” headstamp. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 here is a WINCHESTER DISPLAY DUMMY example of the 7.62 NATO DUPLEX. Factory dissected, the drawn brass case is cut in such a manner so as to clearly display not only the GREEN tipped gilding metal clad steel jacketed forward bullet, but also the gilding metal clad steel jacketed rear bullet. The base has a pierced, nickel dummy primer and shows a “(NATO) WRA 66” headstamp. Apart from some surface discoloration due to the old factory lacquer, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 here is an odd 7.62x54R MOISIN-NAGANT DUMMY example, the likes of which we have not seen before. It is made in two piece, one of which is a steel base piece which is unmarked but does show a recess to accommodate the firing pin. The rest if the cartridge is made of BLACK AND BROWN MOTTLEDPLASTIC which is both shiny and quite hard. The mottling or patten of the case almost resembles that of a burled woodgrain. There is some minor, essentially insignificant chipping of the case at the very base. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65

615.

616.

617.

618.

619.

620.

621.

622.

623.

82

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

exceedingly rare, this is a 7.9x30 POLTE STURMGEWEHR EXPERIMENTAL cartridge. Developed during the German search for the ideal Assault rifle round, it could be regarded as the predecessor of the 7.9 Kurz. The round is constructed in a normal fashion, with drawn brass case, brass primer and short jacketed gilding metal clad steel bullet. It shows “P 7.9 1 40” stamped on its base. The round has been recovered from water and shows a little pitting on the case and bullet as well as a small hole in the base. estimate: $250-300 the one and onyl example we have seen, this 7.9 KURZ cartridge is factory loaded with a SINTERED IRON BULLET. Although we lack the information, it seems that sintered iron was at least tested by the German’s during World War II as a potential replacement or substitute for the normal steel-jacketed lead-cored bullet with the hopes of conserving what they deemed a strategic material, lead. The case appears typical, made of lacquered steel, with “aux 31 44 St” headstamp and steel primer cup with blue annulus. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $200-300 here is an old 7.62x39 EAST GERMAN DUMMY example which should not be confused with the more modern examples. It is made with a one-piece steel base which is recessed to accommodate the firing pin. The body of the cartride is made of BLACK PLASTIC which is rather dull in sheen. Unmakred, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $35-50 this is a an example of the 7.92x57 NAHPATRONE cartridge. Produced as a sub sonic load for use in silenced weapons, it is easily identified by its ALL GREEN lacquered steel case. Headstamped “cg St+ 25 43”, the round is otherwise conventional in construction and appearance with staked in brass primer, green primer annulus and gilding metal clad steel bullet. It is in super condition. estimate: $45-60 here is a great 7.92x57 MAUSER example. In profile and general construction it appears much like a typical S Model Ball type, with brass case, brass Berdan type primer and pointed, nickel clad steel jacketed bullet secured in the case with a tight factory crimp. What is unusual is the MILLED RIM, indicating a PROOF LOADING. Of Czechoslavakian origin, it carries the “Z/19/VII/38/” headstamp of Cs. Zbrojovka Brno. Cartridges of this type appear to be unrepresented in even the most advanced of collections. Showing a little freckling on the bullet, it is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $75-90

624.

625.

626.

627.

628.

here is a great WWII GERMAN 7.92 EDUCATIONAL DISPLAY. These sets were issued to schools or training units to familiarize students with the various loadings, and identification means of the 7.92x57 Mauser cartridge. This is a l.S. L’spur. display, showing one green striped “aux St (?) 41” headstamped full cartridge and one similar but sectioned so as to display the internal structure. The display is made of reddish press board, with black on white information label; on the back. The cartridges are attached by small steel screws at the back and are under a clear plastic cover. The plastic shows normal light scratches and the rear label shows scuffs and flaking. estimate: $70-85

629.

although we lack the historical references, here is a super example of the 8x64 CZECH SNIPER cartridge. The round is based upon what appears to be a lengthened 7.92 Mauser case and it shows the typical Czech Arsenal headstamp of “(*) * 7 50”. It is factory loaded with a gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet and shows a staked-in brass primer. ith tight factory bullet crimp fo the case mouth, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $90-120 here is a great 7.92 MG 131/8 example. Designed based upon the 13mm MG 131 case necked-down to 8mm, it is readily identified from the standard 7.92x94 Panzerbuechse by the use of a BELTED brass case with ELECTRIC primer. The example here appears to be factory loded with a BANDED STEEL bullet held firmly in the case with a tight roll crimp of the mouth. The base shows the unfired brass primer and the “avu (monogram) 41 23g” headstamp. The case is clean but it does show some irregular pitting and likely has been recovered from water. It is in very good to excellent condition overall. estimate: $250-300 83

630.

631.

Volume XII, Number 3

here is a classic anti-tank round of the late 1930s, for the 7.92x94 GERMAN PANZERBUECHSE antitank rifle. Headstamped “aux (Waffenampt WaA109) 41 12g”, the cartridge has a case of drawn brass, a brass, staked-in primer with red annulus and a black tipped gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet. The round is in excellent condition.

632.

estimate: $45-60

here is what appears to be a BOARD DUMMY example of the 7.92x94 PANZERBUECHSE. It is typical in profile and gnereal construction, with lacquered steel case, staked-in brass primer with green annulus and gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet. What is odd is the set of MOUNTING HOLES on one side of the case. We can not tell if the holes are “factory,” and it would be highly unusual if they were, however, they are expertly done. Headstamped “aux (waffenampt) 42(triangle) 5b”, it shows wear of the lacquer. estimate: $60-75 one of the classics, this is a 7.9x107 MAROSZEK ANTI TANK RIFLE cartridge. Developed in POLAND during the 1930s, the round saw limited use in the early part of the war. This specimen consists of a drawn brass case with staked-in brass primer and green annulus and is loaded with a sharp pointed cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullet. The base of the round shows the “(Eagle) 37 N 67” headstamp. The case shows general darkening, otherwise it is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 here is the GERMAN MADE version of the above 7.9x107 MAROSZEK ANTI TANK RIFLE cartridge. It is similar in profile and construction, with brass case, staked-in brass primer and gilding metal clad steel jacketed bullet with black tip. Here the base shows the “P490 (Waffenampt WaA201) 40 3k” headstamp. With some discoloration of case due to old lacquer, it remains in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $70-85 here is one of those cartridges which is generally something it is not. Best we can determine, most folks call this the 8x54R LEE NAGANT, however, it is not the Lee Nagant referenced by D.W.M. (case number 336) nor is the one referenced by Datig (1956, 1). One thing we do know, however, is we do not know its proper designation. It seems similar to the .236 Remington cartridge, so perhaps it is indeed some type of Lee. It has an unheadatmped drawn brass case, showing a beveled rim-edge and a beveled primer pocket edge. The primer itself is small and of brass. The round is loaded with a roundnose steel jacketed bullet. Thoguht to be American, the bullet shows some old rust pitting and the case shows some beginnings of neck crakcs (like the .236 Remington). estimate: $300-500 we have not a clue as to the correct designation of this “7.62x63 ROUND BASE” cartridge. It is made of brass, showing a bottleneck and a tapered rear. The base itself is without headstamp, showing an empty two-hole Berdan type primer pocket. the case appears to have been fired, showing some staining of the interior and primer pocket. We are told it is a “real” military experimental and comes to us from the Val Forgett collection. estimate: $90-120

633.

634.

635.

636.

637.

here is a great example of the 14/9 GERMAN GERLICH cartridge. The round is based upon the 13x94 Panzerbuesche slightly enlarged to accept the nominal 14mm projectile. This projectile, however, is certainly not normal, featuring two skirts and a central, small diameter core. The idea was that the chamber-end of the barrel was 14mm in diameter, while the muzzle was approximately 9mm. When fired, the tapering bore of would fold-up or crush the skirts which increase both pressure and velocity. This is a super example, with brass case showing a brass primer and a “P 39 P.N211d” headstamp. There are several pebble dents in the case, otherwise it is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $300-500 84

638.

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

unfortunately we can offer you little information on this 12.5x165 CZECH ANTI-TANK ZW. From what we known, it is not based on another, existing round but rather is its own unique size. The base is unmarked, showing a large, empty Berdan type primer pocket. The itself appears to have been once fired, however, we are unsure because it also shows evidence of being recovered from water. There is general light pitting and several minor dents. estimate: $150-200 here is a good 12.7x81 BREDA as made on contract by Kynoch. The round is typical of the type, with brass semirimmed case, brass primer with purple annulus and cupronickel clad steel jacketed bullt secured with neck crimps. Headstamped “K31 .5”, it is in very good condition with some dents at the mouth. estimate: $30-45

639. 640.

here are TWO different JAPANESE HE-I 12.7x81 BREDA cartridges. Both, now totally inert, employ a standard brass case each with a tiny Japanese character headstamp. The first is a Ma 102 type, with long screw-off nose piece. The second is the Ma 103 type, with screw-off nose fuze. Both show a hole in the case and both have now-inert projectiles. estimate: $60-75 here are TWO different 13mm MG131 types. Both have lacquered steel case. The first has an empty percussion-type primer, “dnf 44 32” headstamp and normal AP-T bullet with the paint removed. The second has an electric primer, a “wg X 42 27e” headstamp and an AP-T bullet withj almost all of the paint intact. Both are without powder, the second shows a case hole.

641.

642.

estimate: $35-50

this is a scarce example of the 13x92 MAUSER EXPERIMENTAL. It was a German World War II aircraft machine gun experimental cartridge with the hope of increasing the effectiveness of the MG215. The round has a belted, electric primed steel rebated-rim case without headstamp. It is loaded with a banded steel bullet. which is marked “PVZ 187/44”. It shows general staining on the case and bullet. estimate: $150-200 here is a scarce example of the 16mm VEGA .MACHINE CANNON experimental. Developed outside of the U.S. military, it was an attempt by Lockheed Aircraft to utilize the small sized machine cannon designed by Alfred Corte in the 1930s. The case is designed based upon a .50 Machine Gun case which has a turned-down rim, more forward shoulder and of course necked-out to take the 16mm projectile. The projectile is a special design, with screw-off nose piece and “16 M/M / VMC-MX-4” markings. Totally inert, this example shows an empty primer pocket anda “R A 42” headstamp. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $80-95 here is a bizarre looking cartridge which is a 12-GAUGE BARRAGE BALLOON CABLE CUTTER. As we understand, this cartridge was used in a special funnel-like device at the nose or wings of some British aircraft during World War II. The idea was that when the plane flew under balloons the balloon cables would be funneled to the mouth of a that device which housed this cartridge. Somehow, the device would trigger and fire this steel cable cutter thus severing the cable. The cartridge is a shortened 12-GAUGE brass shotgun shell, with ELEY-KYNOCH 12 12 (ICI)” headstamp. The projectile appears solid steel, with sharp forward edge. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75

643.

644.

645.

Volume XII, Number 3

85

here is a great example of the 18.5mm (12-GAUGE) L-L1 FLECHETTE cartridge. It employs what apepars to be a typical “REMINGTON 12 GA EXPRESS” headstamped shotgun shell with green colored ribbed paper and brass base cup. It shows normal black “Remington Express” case wall markings as well as silver “AIRCRAFT ARMAMENTS...” markings. Rather than standard lead shot this is loaded with a good number of steel arrows or flechettes, contained below the simple black Bakelite topwad. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 here is someone’s SECTIONED example of the above 18.5mm (12GAUGE) L-L1 FLECHETTE cartridge. It is without primer or topwad, but clearly shows the interior construction and flechettes. The dissection is attractive, but certainly not factory. estimate: $35-50

646.

647.

here is the WINCHESTER XM258 version of the 18.5 (12-GAUGE) FLECHETTE. It is similar to the examples above, except here the shotgun shell case is RED plastic and the brass base cup is headstamped “WESTERN (MIU) No 12 SUPERX”. The case wall is unmarked and the mouth is closed with a simple “pie” crimp. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $45-60 here is a fine example of the 12-GAUGE CLOSE ASSAULT WEAPONS SYSTEM (CAWS) cartridge. The shell was part of an experimental project to develope a weapon system for infantry use in close-quarter situations. Loads ranged from high explosive through to flechette. This is a BUCKSHOT load example, with CLEAR topwad through which can be seen the white-colored granular shot buffer. The case is drawn brass, with brass battery cup type primer. To prevent the 12-gauge shell from chambering in any standard shotgun, the case is BELTED at the base. Unheadstamped, it shows a GREEN colored primer annulus and base marking. Save for a dent at the mouth, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $45-60 here is a similar 12-GAUGE CLOSE ASSAULT WEAPONS SYSTEM cartridge. In profile and dimension it is identical to the example above, complete with belted base profile. However this specimen has a RED PLASTIC case along with an ALUMINUM BASE. It is unheadstamped, but it shows the same GREEN primer annulus and base marking as the one above. It is loaded with what appears to be copper-washed lead shot which is visible through the clear topwad. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $90-120

648.

649.

650.

here is a scarce box for 7.92x94 GERMAN PANZERBUECHSE antitank rifle cartridges. The one-piece flap-style box is buff in color, with a black, white, yellow and red printed toplabel. Emtpy, it once contained 5 cartridges identical to the one shown in lot 638 above. The box shows some wear and was at one time slightly flattened. estimate: $60-75

651.

here is a super 37mm CANNON TO 11mm GRAS ADAPTER or SUB-CALIBER DEVICE. The intent was to allow practice firing of the 37mm Cannon without expending expensive 37mm ammunition. Rather, this device would be fitted with a 11mm Gras cartridge in the base. There is a short internal steel “barrel” which is rifled. The base is steel, the body is black plastic and the nose or “bullet” is brass. The markings on the bullet include “MANUFACTURE FRANCAISE D’ARMES ET CYCLES DE St ETIENNE”. It is in very good to excellent, seemingly unused condition. estimate: $120-150 86 Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

652.

here is a similar 6-POUNDER CANNON TO 11mm GRAS SUB-CALIBER DEVICE. It is designed and executed as the example above, with steel rifled “barrel,” steel base, black plastic body and brass nose. Again the markings on the nose include “MANUFACTURE FRANCAISE D’ARMES ET CYCLES DE St ETIENNE”. It is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $120-150

653.

M.B.A. GYROJETS
here is a scare 1.5 “LANCE-JET” or mass-stabilized Gyrojet. It is comprised of a hollow aluminum tube, with tiny BRASS bullet secured in the mouth with a single smooth cannelure. This example appear to be without powder or priming. These small rounds were deployed either individually in cigarettes or en-mass. Included is an UNFINISHED CASE without bullet. estimate: $90-120 here is a scarce MBA FIN-JET cartridge. It is made of BLACK colored nylon, formed with four rear fins. It is loaded with a steel flechette or needle at the nose, although the whole cartridge is actually fired. It was conceived that these would have not only an anti-personnel application but also anti-materiel when fired en-mass. This specimen is not loaded and is in excellent condition. estimate: $120-150

654.

655.

here is an unusual look at an MBA FIN-JET as it was made. This is an ATTACHED NYLON MOULD piece as the jet came from the injection mould machine. This is UNCOLORED or translucent white in color. It shows a complete Microjet case, complete with central cavity fro propellant and projectile. Unmarked, it is in excellent condition. estimate: $90-120

656.

here is a similar MBA FIN-JET as it came from the mould. This one, also UNCOLORED or translucent white, came from a circular-framed injection mould while the one above employed a square frame. Like the one above, it has a complete Microjet case with central cavity fro propellant and projectile. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $90-120

657.

here is a rare example of the ELECTRIC PRIMED .25 GYROJET. The round is comprised of an anodized aluminum case, here without color. The base is closed with a fiber wad which has two clockwise-canted vents. We have seen a similar example, in green, but it had a straight-sided base. This example has a BOAT TAIL base. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $200-250 here is an unfinished ELECTRIC PRIMED .25 GYROJET round. It is similar to the one above, except this has a GOLD anodized aluminum case. The case is empty and straight-sided, ready to accept a propellant charge and vented base. It is in excellent condition estimate: $50-65 here is a scarce ELECTRIC PRIMED 7.62 GYROJET. The round is made with a gilding metal clad steel case which was borrowed from a Cal. .30 bullet jacket. It features a separate, inserted steel base which has four square-sided punched-in vents. There is a long central wire projection with which the electric contact is made. Included is one factory loaded example along with two case draw pieces. estimate: $90-120 here is a scarce PRESENTATION DUMMY example of the 13mm SHORT GYROJET. It is comprised of a NICKEL plated steel case with separate steel base insert. The insert features three punched-out vents which retain their external “tangs” so as to impart a clockwise spin when fired. This dummy is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 Volume XII, Number 3 87

658.

659.

660.

661.

here is an unusual 13mm RED SMOKE FLARE GYROJET example. It is unlike most in that it employs a gilding metal clad steel base along with a simple turned aluminum body. There are FOUR factory vent holes in the case body, while the base insert shows a familiar twin-vent configuration. There is some slight swelling of the aluminum portion of the case above the base. estimate: $50-65 here is a similar 13mm SMOKE FLARE GYROJET cartridge. This example likewise has a gilding metal clad steel base and vented aluminum body. This round, however, produces ORANGE colored smoke. Again the base insert is a standard two-vent type and there is some swelling in the aluminum body forward of the base. estimate: $50-65 here is a very odd 13mm GREEN-CASE GYROJET FLARE. The round is made similarly to those above, at least as far as the gilding metal clad steel base and aluminum body. However, here there is a single NOSE VENT in the case, rather than four vents in the body. The case here is GREEN anodized while the base is typical with twin vents. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 here are TWO different 13mm RED GYROJET FLARE cartridges. Both are made with a steel base and an aluminum body. Unlike those above, these have a CADMIUM PLATED base. The first has a totally RED PAINTED case, body and base-piece, while the second has the forward portion coated with thin RED PLASTIC. Each has a normal steel base insert showing twin vents. They are in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 here are TWO different 13mm RED GYROJET FLARE cartridges. Both are made with a gilding metal clad steel base and an aluminum body. Each once had the forward portion of the case red painted but, over time, the case oxidized and produced what looks like a “parkerized” finish we see here. Each has a normal twin-vent steel base insert, one of which is contained with a CRIMPED base the other with a CANNELURED base. estimate: $30-45 here is a scarce13mm LONG or CARBINE GYROJET cartridge. This example appears to be a PRESENTATION example, with CHROME or nickel plated case. The base shows a nickel-plated steel insert with four vent holes which is secured with an external cannelure. Please note, although this is chrome or nickel plated, it is a FACTORY LOADED cartridge. It is in excellent condition. estimate: 120-150 this is a fine example of the 13mm “SHARP POINT” GYROJET round. Although the round has been called a .50 by many sources (us included), that is not what M.B.A. called it. In factory literature a 13mm “High Power” is reference which may be this type. The cartridge here is a FACTORY DUMMY example with a single inerting hole in the case wall. The case itself is gilding metal clad steel with a bright-polished nose. The base insert has two cents and is held in the case with a cannelure. Included is the single dummy cartridge as well as a gilding metal clad steel case draw piece. estimate: $120-150 here is an unusual FRENCH “GYROJET” cartridge. Reportedly a flare type for use on the railroad, it appears to be a direct copy of the U.S.-made MBA Gyrojet. However, to our knowledge, MBA did not license the French—or others—to produce cartridges under their patents. The round employs a steel body onto which is crimped a roundnose aluminum piece which forms the forward portion of the case. This aluminum piece has a WHITE band near the nose (presumably indicating color), the red stenciling of “2-RMS-11-91” and a red star. The base of the cartridge is steel, showing two round vents and a tiny red-stained primer. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $45-60

662.

663.

664.

665.

666.

667.

668.

669.

here is a neat 25x147 CHAFF GYROJET. The round is comprised of a long steel case with two external cannelures. The lower cannelure secures the steel base insert which has four drilled vents and a standard primer. The more forward cannelure secured an internal device which would contain the propellant gasses until such time that the forward chaff payload would need to be released. This is a FIRED TEST-BED PROTOTYPE example which was fired from a test bed without chaff payload. The idea was to confirm the design without expending chaff. It is in excellent condition. (See photo top of next page) estimate: $90-120

670.

88

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

Lot 670. (see text preceeding page)

here is an uncommon FULL box of 12mm GYROJET. The one-piece flap-style box is white in color without markings. It contains TWENTY FOUR original gilding metal clad steel cased rounds, each with THREE SLOT VENT and copper primer. The box shows typical light surface soil and some external handwriting otherwise it is in excellent condition. estimate: $150-200

671.

DARDICK “TROUNDS”
this is a very rare, absolutely factory original example of the .32 ALUMINUM-CASED DARDICK “TROUND”. The cartridge is designed similarly to the known .38 type (see below), with a case made of two aluminum pieces. The first piece forms nearly all of the outer body and includes the nickel Boxer-type primer in its base. The other piece is visible just at the nose of the cartridge and forms an internal sleeve which supports the roundnose lead bullet. These aluminum types were essentially the hand-made prototypes of the later commercial plastic examples, and this in fact shows the stamped “14” factory assembly mark on both case piece at the nose. This specimen is in excellent to near-mint condition overall and is the first of the .32 types we have seen. estimate: $250-300 although still quite rare, we have seen several other examples of this .38 ALUMINUM-CASED DARDICK “TROUND”. The cartridge is similarly constructed of two aluminum pieces; one which forms nearly all of the outer body and includes the nickel Boxer-type primer in its beveled-edge base. The other piece is visible just at the nose of the cartridge and forms an internal sleeve which supports the flatnose wadcutter type lead bullet. This example has the “14” factory assembly mark on the upper and lower body pieces. It appears to be a misfire or a dummy, with a struck nickel primer. estimate: $150-200 in profile this looks like any old .38 DARDICK “TROUND” cartridge. It is in fact typically constructed, made of Celanese Fortiflex plastic with roundnose lead bullet and nickel primer held in a faintly “38 DC” marked brass battery cup. What makes this example unusual is its ORANGE colored case. It is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $45-60 here is a fairly scarce PROMOTIONAL .38 DARDICK “TROUND” cartridge. It is typical in profile and construction, with green colored case, roundnose lead bullet and nickel primer held in a “DC 38” marked aluminum battery cup. What is uncommon is the GOLD “DARDICK” stamp on the case wall. It is in very good condition with the typical crack at the case mouth. estimate: $35-50 here is an uncommon PRESSURE TEST .38 DARDICK “TROUND” example which employs the scarce DEEP BLUE / PURPLE case. The round is typical in profile and basic construction, with roundnose lead bullet and nickel and brass battery cup type primer. However, there is a factory hole in the case wall which is factory sealed with cellophane tape. This hole was used to vent internal gasses to a special device which would measure the pressure. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $50-65 here is a set of SEVEN different .38 DARDICK “TROUND” cartridges. All are typical in profile and general construction. Three have a WHITE case, one an empty case, one with empty primer pocket and lead bullet the last a loaded round. There is one LIGHT BLUE cartridge, with cracked case. There is one GREY or black colored loaded round. The last two have a BLUE colored case with different bullets. estimate: $35-50 here is a set of NINE different .38 DARDICK “TROUND” cartridges. Each is typically made with GREEN colored case. Two are PRESSURE TEST cartridges, one is an empty case and the remaining have either a lead or jacketed bullets. All nine are different and are in very good condition. estimate: $35-50 Volume XII, Number 3 89

672.

673.

674.

675.

676.

677.

678.

here is a FULL BRICK of .38 DARDICK “TROUND”. The onepiece flap-style sleeve is white, blue and black printed showing a “158-gr. Lead Bullet” load marking on the end. It contains FIVE similarly printed boxes of twenty Dardick, making a total of ONE-HUNDRED cartridges. One of the internal boxes is a proper replacement, the other four are original to the sleeve. It is in very good to excellent condition. estimate: $90-120

679. 680.

here is an unusual .310 DARDICK ROCK DRILLING cartridge. The round employs a two-piece clear plastic case which is triangular in cross-section. It is loaded with THREE CERAMIC projectiles, one next to the other. The case is made in two pieces, this showing a seam very near the base. When drilling an oil well if the standard rock drill hit an especially hard rock formation this cartridge would be used in a special gun which would be dropped down the well and fired. The three ceramic projectiles are positioned at slightly different angles and therefore would impact the rock formation at fractionally different times. These multiple impacts would create a shock wave which would fracture the rock. This seems to be unfinished, showing no powder. What is unusual is that each of the projectile chambers are SEALED at the nose–a feature we have not seen before. estimate: $60-75 here is a more conventional .310 DARDICK ROCK DRILLING cartridge. It employs a clear plastic case dimensionally identical to the one above, except here the seam between the front and back portions is in the middle, not near the base. It is factory loaded with three ceramic projectiles and has a brass primer held in a copper battery cup. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $60-75 an example we have not seen before, this too is a .310 DARDICK ROCK DRILLING cartridge. It is loaded with three ceramic projectiles, like those above, and has a copper primer with copper battery cup. What is unusual is that the case is OPAQUE GREY plastic rather than the normal clear. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $70-85

681.

682.

the only example we have seen, this is an ALUMINUM CASE .50 DARDICK round. Obviously quite early, the case appears to be of one-piece construction, showing a milled primer pocket and large-diameter mouth. Unlike aluminum cased Tround’s of smaller size, this is unmarked. It appears to never have been fired or loaded. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $150-200

683.

here is a scarce .50 DARDICK “TROUND”. Its design is similar to the other in the series, with triangular cross section. This example has an opaque BLACK colored rear case piece along with a CLEAR plastic forward case piece. The base shows a brass primer which is staked-in to a brass battery cup. It is in very good to excellent condition.

684.

estimate: $120-150

here is a similar .50 D A R D I C K “TROUND”. It is similar to the example above, except that the two piece case is ALL BLACK. Additionally, the seam between the two sections is not in the middle of the case, but very near the mouth. Again it has a brass primer staked into a brass battery cup. The gilding metal jacketed bullet is visible just flush with the mouth. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $120-150 90

685.

Robert T. Buttweiler, Ltd.

here is a scarce .50 DARDICK “TROUND” variation. it is identical in profile and construction to the example above. Here, however, the nose of the cartridge has a WHITE PLASTIC SEAL which was added presumably to prevent environmental damage to the bullet. It is in excellent condition. estimate: $120-150

686.

here is a similar .50 DARDICK “TROUND” cartridge. Like the above, it has a BLACK colored plastic case and a white plastic nose cap. This one additionally has a WHITE PAPER STICKER over the base which seals the primer. estimate: $120-150

687.

SHOTGUN SHELLS
the onlyexample we have had the pleasure to offer, here is a super 00 STRONG YACHT CANNON shell. Used for signaling purposes on a ship, this was the largest of the series produced by or for Strong. It measures just over 7-inches in length, with an outside case diameter of 2.50-inches at the mouth. It has TWO-PIECE construction, with a turned body and a case base. The base is unheadstamped, showing a small copper Boxer type primer which looks tiny in comparison to the base. This seems to have been fired, showing some oxidation onthe inside. However, the exterior is nicely colored and the primer looks proper. It is a super shell. estimate: $500-700

688.

here is a great 1-GAUGE SALUTING CANNON. It seems to have been desgined based upon an artillery or cannon shell, however, it can be readily distinguished from a military cannon shell by its simple Boxer type primer pocket. The shell is 5.50-in. in length and has an outside diameter of 2.20in. a the mouth. The base shows a “U.M.C.Co * * 7-07 BRIDGEPORT, CONN. U.S.A.” headstamp. It appears to have been fired, showing some internal oxidation. The exterior shows general finger and grease stains. estimate: $300-400

689.

this is thought to be an ENGLISH version of the 1-GAUGE SALUTING CANNON. The shell is about 4.5-in. in length and measures 2.23-in. at the outside of the mouth. It has a large-diameter primer pocket which would accommodate a large battery-cup type primer. This shell has been fired, showing general darkening of the brass. estimate: $200-300

690.

Volume XII, Number 3

91