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VOL. 20 ISSUE 5 DECEMBER 12-18, 2012 • THEWEEKENDER.COM
weekender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*
NEPA’S
Revealed
Sexiest 2012
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staff
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Marie Burrell, Kait Burrier, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Stephanie DeBalko,
Janelle Engle, Tim Hlivia, Michael Irwin, Amy Longsdorf, Matt Morgis, Kacy Muir, Ryan O’Malley, Jason Riedmiller, Lisa
Schaeffer, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Estella Sweet, Bill Thomas, Noelle Vetrosky
Interns
Megan Lange • Bill Rigotti • Tom Taraszewski • Jolisa Tokar
Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
Fax 570.831.7375
E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com
Online theweekender.com • myspace.com/weekender93 • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Twitter: @wkdr
Circulation
The Weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania.
For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7398 • To place a classified ad call 570.829.7130
Editorial policy
The Weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
The opinions of independent contributors of the weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff.
Rating system
WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable
* Scarborough Research
John Popko
General Manager • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
“Me. In a Speedo. Yeah, enjoy
that image for the rest of the
day.”
Kieran Inglis
Account Executive • 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
“Yoga pants.”
Amanda Dittmar
Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401
adittmar@theweekender.com
“I don’t; I hate the word sexy. I think
there are better words to describe
someone who is genetically
privileged.”
Mike Golubiewski
Production Editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
“Angela Lansbury, Margaret
Thatcher... Really, any wealthy,
powerful, elderly woman.”
Rich Howells
Editor • 570.831.7322
rhowells@theweekender.com
“Intelligent, independent women.
That outfit doesn’t hurt, either.”
Sara Pokorny
Staff Writer • 570.829.7132
spokorny@theweekender.com
“Michael Fassbender.”
When you hear ‘sexy’,
you think of...
Tell @wkdr
what you think
of when you
hear ‘sexy’...
Paul Shaw
Digital Specialist • 570.829.7204
pshaw@theweekender.com
“Honesty.”
social
Stephen Colbert @StephenAtHome
Online comment
of the week.
Kate Middleton is pregnant!
Prince Charles is gonna be so
jealous when that baby starts
crowning.
The Weekender has 10,540
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
Why are you even reading this
letter?
Seriously, why am I even writ-
ing this letter?
There’re people in their under-
wear starting on page 35!
It’s been a tradition at The
Weekender to highlight some of
the sexiest people in NEPA every
year, but never have we high-
lighted so much of them. They
show no more skin than a bath-
ing suit would, sure, but it takes a
lot of guts to pose in your skiv-
vies no matter how good you
look. My hat goes off to them,
but not much else – I like hiding
my steadily increasing beer gut
as best I can.
But like Playboy, you should
read us for the articles, too.
We’ve got a nice mix of stories
this week that cover everything
from movies to television to
comic books to theater to music
to art, a variety that we strive to
offer every week. After all, we
can’t offer you scantily clad
models all the time.
At least until our swimsuit
issue.
-Rich Howells, Weekender
Editor
Letter from the editor W
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SKATE (PARK) OR DIE
Skaters band together
for video premiere
32
EPIC TEAM-UP
Scranton Comic Con benefts
artist and hurricane victim
inside
Online
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only at www.theweekender.com
WATCH LIVE CONCERT FOOTAGE FROM TWELVE-TWENTY FOUR LATER THIS WEEK ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL. W
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COVER STORY
SEXIEST … 35-38, 40-41, 43-44, 46
LISTINGS
THIS JUST IN ... 7
SPEAK & SEE ... 13
CONCERTS ... 20-21
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ... 22
AGENDA ... 28, 34, 39, 42
THEATER ... 31
MUSIC
ASTORIAN STIGMATA …10
LESSER ANIMALS …14
MARK O’CONNOR …18
ALBUM REVIEWS ... 24
CHARTS ... 24
INVISIBLE SWORDSMEN … 45
MUSICIAN SHOWCASE … 48
STAGE & SCREEN
SKATEBOARDING MOVIE … 25
CHRISTMAS CAROL … 25
MOVIE REVIEW... 27
RALPHIE REPORT ... 30
STARSTRUCK ... 30
INFINITE IMPROBABILITY … 33
VISUAL & LITERARY ARTS
NOVEL APPROACH ... 31
J.K. WOODWARD … 32
FIRST FRIDAY SCRANTON … 56
HEALTH & STYLE
SHOWUS SOME SKIN ... 33
GREEN PIECE … 45
WEEKENDER MAN ... 69
WEEKENDER MODEL ... 70
HUMOR & FUN
PET OF THE WEEK …18
PUZZLE ... 28
I’D TAP THAT … 47
NEWS OF THE WEIRD ... 53
GIRL TALK … 55
SIGN LANGUAGE ... 57
SORRY MOM & DAD ... 59
GAMES & TECH
GET YOUR GAME ON … 55
TECH TALK ... 58
MOTORHEAD ... 59
ON THE COVER
DESIGN BY AMANDA DITTMAR
VOLUME 20 • ISSUE 5
index
Dec. 12-18, 2012
this just in
By Weekender Staff
weekender@theweekender.com
SOUL OF THE CITY
Aaron Brown is having a good
week. The former frontman of
the now-defunct Scranton funk
band Alien Red was just recog-
nized by NPR was one of the “10
Artists You Should Have Known
In 2012,” posted Dec. 10 on its
website. Beating out well-estab-
lished names like Dr. Dog, War
On Drugs, Work Drugs, Lushlife,
and Strand of Oaks, the Philadel-
phia-based singer/songwriter was
praised as “an exciting new name
to add to the lineage of the city’s
expressive and emotionally in-
tense soul singers” by Bruce
Warren, WXPN program director
in the City of Brotherly Love.
“His self-released his album,
‘Sing,’ recorded with some Philly
scene up-and-comers backing
him up and performing as The
Spell, is an excellent new addi-
tion to the musical landscape,”
Warren continued.
Aaron & The Spell was nomi-
nated soon after for Indie/R&B/
Soul Band of the Year in the 2nd
Annual TriState Indie Music
Awards. We wish him luck in the
awards and can’t wait to see who
recognizes his talent next, but
just so Philly knows, we had him
first.
HE’S COME A LONG WAY
FROM THE NUTHOUSE…
…on “It’s Always Sunny in
Philadelphia,” that is. How could
anyone forget the legendary
comedian’s appearance alongside
Matchbox 20 singer Rob Tho-
mas? (When you’re in Sinbad’s
house, you’re his bitch, after all.)
That’s right, the acclaimed
comedian that also found fame as
“Necessary Roughness,” “Jingle
All The Way,” and his own televi-
sion series is returning to the area
at 8:30 p.m. Jan. 27 at Cove
Haven Resort.
Tickets are free with an all-
inclusive stay at Cove Haven
resort and event-only admission
is $75. Tickets can be purchased
by calling 1.800.972.7168.
“IDOL” COUNTRY STAR
MAKES KIRBY DEBUT
Yet another American Idol will
bring his talents to a local stage.
Country star Scotty McCreery,
season 10 winner of the hit real-
ity show, comes to the F.M. Kirby
Center April 20 at 8 p.m.
Tickets for the show go on sale
Dec. 14 at 10 a.m. and will be
available at the Kirby Center Box
Office, charge by phone at
570.826.1100 and online at
www.kirbycenter.org.
A special Kirby Member Pre-
Sale begins Wednesday, Decem-
ber 12 at 10:00 a.m. Join today by
calling (570) 823-4599, ext. 225.
Tickets are $49, $75, and $99
VIP package with meet and
greet.
CHAT WITH A CHAMPION
Football legend Ottis Anderson
is taking part in a free signing
event at Breakers at Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs Dec. 16 at
1:30 p.m.
Anderson was named the NFL
Offensive Rookie of the Year by
the Associated Press with the St.
Louis Cardinals in 1979, and the
MVP of Super Bowl XXV in
1991 when he played with the
New York Giants. He played
college football at the University
of Miami.
W
Aaron Brown, the former frontman of Scranton funk band Alien Red, was just
recognized by NPR was one of the ‘10 Artists You Should Have Known In 2012.’
P
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Dennis Condusta loves making
music, but it isn’t so much a de-
sire as it is a need.
“When I was about 20 in 2006,
I just decided that I really needed
to start writing songs. I just had
things that I had to say. I’ve al-
ways been interested in writing
and stuff, but I felt like it was
something I needed to do,” the
26-year-old Wilkes-Barre resi-
dent explained.
“I do it non-stop, constantly,
and I have so much stuff we
haven’t put out. It’s just some-
thing I have to do.”
Inspired by an episode from
short-lived HBOshow“Carni-
vale” called “The Road to Asto-
ria,” he created the abstract mo-
niker Astorian Stigmata, a name
he has been making music under
ever since.
“Alot of people think we’re
like a metal band or a European
band because that’s kind of what
(the name) sounds like, but no,
we’re a boring American band,”
he joked.
“I ended up writing a short
comic book thing for school when
I was in college, and the name of
the town was called Astoria, and I
just kind of kept the name. The
‘stigmata’ part – well, I just al-
ways liked that word. I think it’s a
strong word, not really for its
religious connotation, but it’s kind
of a dark word. I like that.”
With a peculiar mix of influen-
ces like Modest Mouse, The
Cure, and The Gaslight Anthem,
Condusta is entirely self-taught,
writing and recording his own
music and playing all his own
instruments until he formed a full
band in 2009. Many members
have come and gone since then,
but lyrically, his work remains
consistent.
“Alot of the songs that I write
are real introspective and have
kind of dark imagery, but the
messages of the songs are pretty
positive. They’re more singer/
songwriter style; there’s pretty
heavy content in them. I try to
keep the message of the song
really complicated, where if
someone wanted to dig, they
could really enjoy the lyrics, but
then the music is usually rather
simple with and atmospheric,” he
noted.
The ever-changing line-up has
influenced Stigmata’s energetic
live performances the most, he
feels.
“Some of (the songs) we write
as a group, and different people
bring in their different influences.
Our drummer now, Al (Martino),
is influenced by early pop punk
and indie rock, but faster, so he
comes up with some unique stuff
fromthat era,” Condusta de-
scribed.
“Our newguitar player, D.J.
(Laury) is very influenced by
heavier punk, so he brings that to
it, the harder guitar sound and
everything, which is good. I love
playing different styles. We’ll
take a song and rework it with the
newpeople and change it up a
little bit.”
With no backing fromany
record label, he has created five
full-length albums and seven EPs
independently, handling every
aspect of production, including
the recording, mixing, and mas-
tering, only recently receiving
help froma distributor to ship
CDs as far as Europe and South
America.
“I love doing all aspects of it
because you have full control, and
it makes it a lot more personal an
experience for people who get it
too because they knowyou ac-
tually made it. It’s pretty cool,” he
pointed out.
The group’s latest EP, “ADark
Summers Sunrise,” was just re-
leased in August, a synth-heavy
record that strays fromthe band’s
past complexity to deliver sim-
pler, catchier songs.
“Nowit’s become more atmo-
sphere instead of showing off,
like, ‘This is strange,’ or ‘This is
what we can do,’ or ‘That’s an odd
time signature.’ I was into that for
years, and nowI’mjust totally
over that and just want it to be
simple and more about the words
and the message than the musi-
cianship. There’s no showing off
anymore!” he admitted with a
laugh.
“I was going through a tough
time in the summer personally,
and that’s kind of what it’s all
about. …The lyrics are very
much about being in your
mid-20s, just discontent and kind
of realizing that life isn’t exactly
what you thought it was going to
be when you were younger or like
what you were promised, but also
being OKwith that, just realizing
that that wasn’t everything any-
way.”
While he feels their dark indie
sound has yet to catch on locally,
Condusta has incorporated much
of the area into their pictures and
videos, such as shots of the Ash-
ley Coal Breaker and Black Dia-
mond Bridge, and he is looking
forward to playing with some
“equally unique” local bands at
The Vintage Theater (326 Spruce
St., Scranton) on Dec. 14.
“We always do our theatrical
performance…We dress crazy.
The music we play a little harder
and faster than the records. We
like to put on a little bit of a
show,” he emphasized. “It’s just
the music I enjoy and chose to
make.” W
Handmade goth rock
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
Astorian Stigmata, Grip of the
Gods, Eye On Attraction, Dec.
14, doors 7 p.m., show 8 p.m.,
Vintage Theater (326 Spruce
St., Scranton). $7.
Wilkes-Barre’s Dennis Condusta founded Astorian
Stigmata independently and since produced five
full-length albums and seven EPs.
Music W
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$1 DOM DRAFTS • $1.50 IMPORT DRAFTS
$1.50 FLAVORED VODKA
$2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES
$2 CHERRY BOMBS/TIC TACS/
PINNACLE WHIPPED VODKA
HAPPY HOUR 9-11
$1.50 DOM. PINTS
$2 DOM. BTLS.
$2.50 CHERRY BOMBS
ANDTICTACS
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WHAT’S GOIN ON DUO
EVERY THURSDAY 10-12
HAPPY HOUR 9-11 P.M.
$1.50 DOM. PINTS • $1.50 DOM. PINTS
$2 DOM. BTLS. • $2.50 CHERRY BOMBS ANDTIC
TACS • $3 IMPORT BTLS.
OPEN AT NOONWITH NFLTICKET
HAPPY HOUR 3-5,$1.50 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS ALL DAY
CHRISTMAS PARTY DECEMBER 20TH
35¢ WINGS • $4.50 1/2 TRAY
$8 FULLTRAY PIZZA • $2 BOTTLES. 9-11PM
$2 MILLER LITE BTLS
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653 North Main Street
Plains, PA 18705
(570) 822-4443
Thursday
CAN NIGHT
8oz. Cans .75¢ miller lt. coors lt and bud lt
$3.50 bombs
Hilldale Burger platter 8.95 1/2 lb burger
(MTO) w/ lett,to, onion,chz, hilldale sauce
w/ fries, coleslaw & pickle
$1.50 MUGS ALL DAY EVERYDAY
Wednesday
8-10 pm $2 Stegmaier Pumpkin Ale Btl
$2 Mich Ultra and Labatts Bottles
All you can eat pasta night $8.95
comes w/ soup or salad 5-9
Friday
$1.50 Tangerine Crush Shot
12 in pizza $5.95 fish&chips platter $7.95
Sunday
NFL TICKET
$2 Bud Lt Pints All Day • $2.50 Bar Pie
Game Specials - .40¢ Wings • $12.50 1/2
Tray + 12 Wings w/ bc & celery • $7.50
Bar Pie + 6 wings
Saturday
DJ TONY K AND KARAOKE @9
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION NIGHT
All Night $4 Well mixers & $2 SamAdams drafts
$1.50 Cotton Candy or Jolly Rancher shots
Tuesday
ALL YOU CAN EAT WING NIGHT $8.95
$2.00 twisted tea bottles and
$2.00 blue moon bottles
Mon - Sat: 3:00 p - 2:00 a • Sun: 12:00 p - 2:00 a
Kitchen Hours: Tues - Sat 5 pm - 12 am • Sun 1 pm - 10 pm
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lots of drink specials & giveaways all night long
THE 22ND - 1ST ANNUAL CHRISTMAS
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END OF THE WORLD....
Ugly Christmas Sweater Contest at midnight.
Drink specials all night long
CHARLIE B’S DINING ROOMIS
AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES
AND BENEFITS
L.T. VERRASTRO INC * IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR * 1-800-341-1200
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DICKSON CITY
570-344-4744
WILKES-BARRE
570-235-1484
HAZLETON
570-861-8161
SCRANTON
570-342-0123
NEPATATTOO.COM
$120 Gift card for ONLY $100!
ONLINE or IN STORE! NO LIMIT!
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On
Harveys Lake
639-3474 (FISH)
10 Beers On Tap
OPEN
Daily at 4PM
Sunday at Noon
No Cover
WEDNESDAY
Whiskey Wednesday
½ Price Whiskey Cocktails
14 oz. Ribeye w/ Crab Cakes
$18.99
THURSDAY
Thirsty Thursday
$2.00 Coors Light Pints
All You Can Eat Pasta $7.95
FRIDAY
Diamond Cutter
Classic Rock 8-11pm
Happy Hour 5-7
Lump Crab Patties $13.99
22 oz. Ribeye $28.99
Find Us On
Facebook for
Great Daily Deals
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Call Or Visit Us On Facebook For Details
SATURDAY
Daddy Dex
8-11pm
Mixologists Choice $3 Cocktails
Linguini w/ Clam Sauce $10.99
Seafood Medley $13.99
SUNDAY
& MONDAY
NFL Football
$1 Bud Light Drafts
$1 Chili Dogs
40¢ Wings
TUESDAY
South of the Border Night
$3 Margaritas • 2 For $3 Tacos
Corona Bottles
Happy Hour: Mon-Thurs 5 - 7 • 50¢ Off Dom Btls/Drafts • $2 Well Mixers 650 south main street, Wilkes-Barre, PA. • 570. 822.2160 • Mon-Sun 11am - 2am
Saturday
$5 PERSONAL STROMBOLI’S
$3 HEINEKEN & CORONA’S
Tuesday
$5.50 TURKEY HAM CLUB/FF
$1.50 BUD LIGHT DRAFTS
Monday
Friday
$1 SICILIAN SLICES ALL DAY
$1.50 MILLER LT DRAFTS
$5.50 WRAPS/FF
$1.50 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS
Thursday
YUENGS & WINGS
.45¢ WINGS ALL DAY
$1.50 YUENGLING
Wednesday
$4.95 DOZEN CLAMS
$1.50 MILLER LITE DRAFTS
$3 BOMBS 10-12
Sunday
Steelers vs cowboys
$7.95 BAR PIE + 1/2 DOZEN WINGS
$1.50 BUD LIGHT DRAFTS
pizza
special
$12 TRAY SICILIAN
$10.25 LRG RND PIE
Outsiders
Saloon Inc.
Open
11am-2am
everyday
2nd floor
Open Wed,
Fri, and Sat
73” tv pool
table...
Thursday
Dec 20th
END OF
THE WORLD
PARTY W
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speak and see
POETIC
Barnes & Noble Booksellers
(421 Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-
Barre, 570.829.4352)
• “Wartz and All,” children’s
book reading by Jeannine Luby
of Laugh to Live: Dec. 14, 6:30
p.m.
Barnes & Noble Wilkes-
King’s Booksellers (7 S. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700)
❏ Events/Book Clubs:
• Open Mic Night: last Tues.
of every month, 6:30 p.m.
• Writer’s Workgroup: Wyom-
ing Valley Wordsmiths: first/third
Tues. monthly, 7 p.m.
❏ Children’s Events:
• Weekly Sat. morning story
time, 11 a.m.-noon.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500)
• Writers Group: Thurs.,
7-8:30 p.m. 18+. Celebrates all
types of writing styles, formats.
Join anytime. Free. Call to regis-
ter.
The Osterhout Free Library
(71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
www.osterhout.info,
570.821.1959)
• Open Computer Lab: Mon./
Wed., 5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m.
Pages & Places
• Cafe Programs every Thurs.
Happy hour 6 p.m., programs 7
p.m. (Platform Lounge at Trax in
Radisson Lackawanna Station
Hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave.,
Scranton)
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565,
pitmemlib@comcast.net)
• Craftastic Kids Craft Club:
3rd Sat. every month, 10 a.m.
Grades 2-5. Call/email to regis-
ter.
• Crochet Club: Tues., 10
a.m., Thurs., 6 p.m. New mem-
bers welcome.
• Kids Science Club: First Sat.
every month, 10 a.m. Grades 2-5.
Call/email to register.
• Lego Club: Meets Mondays,
4 p.m. Wait list only, call.
• Page Turners Kids Book
Club: First Thurs. every month.
Grades 3-5.
• Story Time: Toddlers Tues.,
10 a.m. or Wed., 1:30 p.m.; Pre-
school Tues., 1:30 p.m. or Wed.,
10 a.m.
Plymouth Public Library
(107 W. Main St., Plymouth,
570.779.4775)
• Looking for volunteers: Call
to sign up.
• Adult computer lessons:
Daily, call to register.
• Story Time: Mon., 11 a.m. or
Wed., 10:30 a.m. Toddlers/pre-
school children.
STACKS Writing Group
Every other Tues., 6 p.m., The
Banshee, (320 Penn Ave., Scran-
ton). Info: stackswriting-
group@gmail.com
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, in-
fo@scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
• Open Microphone Poetry:
Dec. 20, 8:30-11:30 p.m.
West Pittston Library (200
Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
• Book Club: First Tues., 6:45
p.m. Free. Informal discussion of
member-selected books.
• Weekly story time for chil-
dren: Fri., 1 p.m. Free.
VISUAL
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawan-
na Ave., Scranton: 570.969.1040
or Artistsforart.org)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5
p.m.
• Life Drawing sessions:
every Tues., 7-9 p.m. Contact
ted@tedmichalowski.com for
info.
• Drawing Socials: every
Sun., 6-9 p.m. $5 GA, $2 stu-
dent.
• Winter Members Exhibition:
Through Dec. 28.
Blue Heron Art Gallery (121
Main St., Wyalusing,
570.746.4922, www.bluehero-
nart.org)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sat. by appt.
• “Seeking The Muse-A dec-
ade of Art at the Blue Heron
Gallery:” through Jan. 24. 22
artists. Info: wchamber@epix.net
The Butternut Gallery &
Second Story Books (204
Church St, Montrose,
570.278.4011, butternutgal-
lery.com). Gallery hours: Wed.-
Sat., 11a.m.-5 p.m., Sun., 12
p.m.-4 p.m.
• Gaiety for Giving, Festive
Artisan Creations: Through Dec.
30.
Camerawork Gallery (Down-
stairs in the Marquis Gallery,
Laundry Building, 515 Center
St., Scranton, 570.510.5028.
www.cameraworkgallery.org,
rross233@aol.com) Gallery
hours Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.;
Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “Photographs of the Amer-
ican Vernacular” by D. B. Sto-
vall: Through Jan. 29.
• Accepting submissions for
new shows during 2012-2013.
Photography only; all photo-
graphic methods considered.
Check out submissions procedure
on website for details.
Converge Gallery (140 W.
Fourth St., Williamsport,
570.435.7080, convergegal-
lery.com)
• “Saints and Sinners” feat.
works of 14 artists: Through Dec.
22.
Everhart Museum (1901
Mulberry St., Scranton, PA,
570.346.7186, www.everhart-
museum.org)
Admission $5 adults; $3 stu-
dents/seniors; $2 children 6-12;
members free.
• “Sightlines:” through Dec.
31.
• “Stitching a Story:” through
Dec. 31.
• “Titanic exhibit:” through
Dec. 31.
Hazleton Art League (225 E.
Broad St., Hazleton, hazletonar-
tleague.org)
• Member exhibition and
Holiday “Affordable Art” Sale:
Through Dec. 30.
• Two of Us, The Good Spirits
Club and Friends concert: Dec.
16, 1 p.m. $5, members; $10,
non-members.
Lizza Studios (900 Rutter
Ave., Suite 10, Forty Fort,
570.991.6611, betsy@lizzastu-
dios.com)
• On display: A private collec-
tion of work by Czech artist
Colini.
Luzerne County Historical
Society Museum (69 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.6244,
lchs@epix.net)
• “The Miracle of the Bells”
exhibit: Through March 15.
Mahady Gallery (Marywood
University, 570.348.6211 x 2428,
marywood.edu/galleries.)
Gallery hours: Mon., Thurs.-
Fri., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed., 9
a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 1-4 p.m.
• Graduate students exhibit
with works by Master of Fine
Arts candidate Cathy Noto (ce-
ramics) and Master of Arts can-
didates Jenna Casaldi (art educa-
tion) and Clarissa Jan Ward
(painting). Through Dec. 14.
Misericordia University (301
Lake St., Dallas, 570.674.6286)
❏ Pauly Friedman Art Gallery,
Tues.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri.,
10 a.m.-5p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 1-5 p.m.
• “Norman Rockwell’s 323
Saturday Evening Post Covers:’’
Jan. 14 to Feb. 28.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine St., Scranton,
www.newvisionstudio.com,
570.878.3970)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun.,
noon-6 p.m. and by appointment.
• “Give the Gift of Art This
Holiday Season” Sale and Exhib-
it: Through Dec. 24.
Sordoni Art Gallery (150 S.
River St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.408.4325)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun.,
noon-4:30 p.m.
• “Advancing Tradition:
Twenty Years of Printmaking at
Flatbed Press:” Through Dec. 16.

Schulman Gallery (2nd floor
of LCCC Campus Center, 1333
S. Prospect St., Nanticoke,
www.luzerne.edu/schulmangal-
lery, 570.740.0727)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9
a.m.-5 p.m.
• Annual Faculty/Alumni
Exhibit: Through Jan. 3
- compiled by Sara Pokorny,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
Scranton author and owner of Laugh to Live Jeannine Luby will read her recently
published children’s book, “Wartz and All,” Dec. 14, 6:30 p.m. at Barnes and Noble
Arena Hub Plaza in Wilkes-Barre.
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HAPPY HOUR TUES-THURSDAY, SAT. & SUN 9-11
FRIDAY 5-7 & 9-11
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829.
7204
“Whenever I show my friends
this music, the first question they
ask me is, ‘What would you call
this?’ I’m really at a loss. You
can call it millions of kinds of
things. You can call it rock and
you pretty much call it every
single subgenre,” bassist Zach
Bilson replied when asked to
describe the sound of Lesser
Animals.
“But it’s music. It’s rock, I
guess. It’s pop. I really don’t
know.”
With six members citing influ-
ences ranging from metal to
hip-hop to indie to electronica,
it’s easy to see why the band
can’t exactly pinpoint where they
fit in, but any attempts to do so
would be missing the point.
Formed in 2008 by former
Awkward Silence singer James
Sanderson, Lesser Animals start-
ed in Scranton but grew expo-
nentially when he and drummer
Roland Greco left for Berklee
College of Music in Boston. By
2011, they had formed what
Sanderson refers to as “the offi-
cial line-up.”
“Lesser Animals, I’ve got to
say, is the most cohesive and
easiest band to perform and write
with. It flows very naturally,”
Bilson said.
“We started writing new songs.
The creative cohesion has been
amazing,” Sanderson agreed.
“Everyone comes from very
different musical backgrounds,
but we all sort of have this have
this shared aesthetic apprecia-
tion,” Bilson continued. “We just
sort of developed as friends real-
ly. We took influence from differ-
ent people in the band, our differ-
ent lives and stuff, and the music
sort grew by itself. It is what it is
because it is.”
What they are became “Parasa-
lene,” the group’s debut EP,
which was recorded at The Re-
cord Company in Boston during
an all-night 12-hour session with
mixing and producing by Pat
McCusker and mastering by
Nolan Eley, both local musicians
they admire.
“I think all (the tracks) compli-
ment each other very well. They
all revolve around that central
theme of overcoming. I think the
big thing I write lyrics about is
how difficult it is to grow up, for
no particular reason. I guess I
have this weird fear of getting
older, and I think it comes across
in a lot of songs,” Sanderson
explained.
“Music is very emotive, and I
put a lot of myself, literally as
much as I can, into what I write.
…We all try to put as much of
our personalities and each of our
tics into the songs and into the
feel.”
While the album is only three
songs, each delivers a full wall of
sound that can only come from
six dedicated members.
“We wrote most of ‘Beast
Blood’ on the spot. We had most
of it going in, but the ending was
written 15 minutes before we got
in the car to drive to the session.
To me, that’s a testimony to how
amazing these dudes are that I’m
playing with. We just click on
such a chemical level,” Sand-
erson noted. “‘Rare Candy’ is
probably the least serious, but it’s
also the most intense at certain
points.”
While they’ve played many
house shows in Boston, the 22-
year-old singer/guitarist is look-
ing forward to coming home to
play on an actual stage at The
Vintage Theater (326 Spruce St.,
Scranton) on Dec. 15.
“We’re playing with A Fire
With Friends at this show, and
I’m so excited to be back home
and be back on that stage. …The
reception is normally positive
because people just want to be
enjoying it as much as you are
when you’re playing it. I guess
the scenes aren’t that much dif-
ferent when you get down to it,”
he said, comparing the two cities.
“I just want to know how
(these songs) are going to affect
other people. I want to know how
I did. I want to see how my
friends feel and how these bands
that I grew up with feel because
their opinions and criticisms are
really important to me.”
“Whether it’s in Boston or
Scranton or anywhere else, peo-
ple come not knowing your mu-
sic and still just really enjoy it
and want to talk to you about it,”
Bilson added.
“It’s great to see your friends,
but even if there’s just one person
who comes and checks it out and
didn’t know anything beforehand
and now are a fan, that’s a feeling
that’s really hard to beat.” W
Formed in Scranton and expanded in Boston, Lesser Animals has just released its
debut EP, “Parasalene.”
Lesser means more
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
Lesser Animals and A Fire With
Friends, Dec. 15, doors 7 p.m.,
show 8 p.m., Vintage Theater
(326 Spruce St., Scranton). $6. W
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OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 3PM-2AM
OPEN @ NOON ON WEEKENDS
Wed • 12th
ERIC RUDY
ACOUSTIC
Fri • 14th
THE CHIXI
DIX
Thur • 13th
JACKSON VEE
ACOUSTIC
Sat • 15th
JOKER
Sunday • 16th
NFL TICKET 8 SEXY FLAT SCREEN TV’S
GONG SHOW KARAOKE
AFTER 9PM • PRIZE IS A BUD LIGHT
TAILGATING PRIZE PACK
$6 DOMESTIC PITCHERS & FOOD SPECIALS
WWW.VSPOTBAR.COM
570-963-7888 • PROVIDENCE RD. & ALBRIGHT AVE.
Mon • 17th
AJ’S MICROBREW MON
$4 BONELESS BITES
Tues • 18th
WING NIGHT
49¢ WINGS
“Home
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“Yeah ... You Found It”
“I THINK YOU
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.30¢ wings all day/night
& $1 cans 9-11
$1 Cans • $2 Btls • $3 Well Mixers,
Bombs & Pitchers • 10-12
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$3 Bombs & Well Mixers
Non- Free Pool & Jukebox
Amy Mcdermott 21st
Jay (Mac)Mcevoy 40th
$2 shots of Old Grandad & Jim Beam Good Music & Free Pizza
MONDAY & THURSDAY
BEER PONG
$100 prize • $8 & $4 pitchers
$6 pizzas • $2 shots
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When violinist, fiddler, com-
poser, and teacher Mark O’Con-
nor saw the response to his first
Christmas album, “An Appa-
lachian Christmas,” he couldn’t
believe it.
“It made several ‘Top 5’ and
‘Top 10’ lists nationally, and it
charted on five different Bill-
board charts at the same time. I
had never even been on an album
that did that, let alone have it be
my own album,” he said.
It’s because of the compila-
tion’s success that the Grammy-
winning artist has embarked on a
Christmas tour, which comes to
the Scranton Cultural Center and
F.M. Kirby Center Dec. 14 and
15, respectively.
O’Connor’s album, which
features collaborations with
Renee Fleming, Alison Krauss,
Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, and
more, will be the focus of the
concert. He’ll perform with the
Northeastern Pennsylvania Phil-
harmonic, local violin students,
and his own band of two musi-
cians, female singers Carrie
Rodriguez and Cia Cherry-
holmes, along with his 24-year-
old son, Forrest, who will sing
and play the mandola.
We caught up with O’Connor
to chat with him about the up-
coming show, for which his ex-
citement grew after hearing how
decked out Public Square was in
Christmas lights.
The Weekender: This album
is unique in that it’s not just a
one or two-year process.
Mark O’Connor: It took
practically my entire career to put
this together. They’re different
Christmas cuts from different
eras of my music making with
different guests along the way,
and it ended up as my one and
only Christmas album.
W: How did you choose who
would perform on each song?
MO: It sort of happened song
by song along the way, with the
very earliest recording being 25
years old. I came into contact
with separate guests over the
years, and the way my career
worked with the record labels I
was with, like Warner Brothers
and Sony and others, is that they
would often have the artist per-
form, record, or arrange a Christ-
mas song. Well, 25 years later, I
finally have enough to make an
album. It was sort of like a neat
career retrospective through
Christmas songs.
W: You’re well-known for
your way of playing and teach-
ing, the O’Connor Method.
What is that exactly?
MO: It’s a series of books that
teach young people, or beginners
of every age, how to play the
violin using American music,
culture, and history; that’s never
taken place before in the history
of violin.
W: How did you figure out
that was a successful method?
MO: It was through a lot of
things, one being my own educa-
tion. I was very immersed in
fiddle music, jazz, writing, ar-
ranging, improvising – all the
things people associate with me.
The big game changer was 20
years ago when I established my
own string camps in the summer.
Over those years, I’ve had 5,000
unique enrollments, so I’ve seen
firsthand what’s working, what’s
not, what could be better, and
what’s completely missing. In
theory, I’d been putting the pieces
together for two decades, and the
actual physical work on the
method has gone on for seven
years. I’ll probably have another
four years to finish the advanced
part of the books.
W: You’re used to teaching
others. Is it true you had a full
studio of students when you
were 12?
MO: I did. I was already very
accomplished when I was young-
er; I had won a national fiddle
championship and people began
to request that I teach them.
W: How did you know you
had a knack for strings? Do
you come from a musical fam-
ily?
MO: I come from a family of
dancers, so it was an artistic
bunch; they really appreciated
music. My problem was that we
were just absolutely dirt poor, so
the opportunities I had I really
had to create. We lucked out and
didn’t even pay for most of my
lessons. The only access we had,
ultimately, was through my tal-
ent. People would hear me and
want to help. I realized how
powerful music was, that I could
play and somebody could change
their mind about me or accept me
in a different way. I had students
so young because my mother
would say, “You’ve received so
much in your life with your mu-
sic, and you should give back,”
so I was giving back at age 12.
It’s that spirit that really informs
most everything I’ve done. W
Violinist Mark O’Connor will bring not only his own band, which includes his son
Forrest, to play alongside the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic, he’s
arranged a version of ‘Frosty the Snowman’ for local youth violinists to play.
The spirit of giving year-round
By Sara Pokorny
Weekender Staff Writer
Mark O’Connor’s Appalachian
Christmas: Dec. 14, 7 p.m.,
Scranton Cultural Center (420
N. Washington Ave., Scranton);
Dec. 15, 7 p.m., F.M. Kirby
Center (71 Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre). W
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ALICE C. WILTSIE
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER
(700 N. Wyoming St., Hazle-
ton)
570.861.0510, wiltsiecenter.org
• Joe Maddon’s 2nd Annual
Family Christmas Celebration:
Dec. 15, 7 p.m. Free
• The Righteous Brothers’ Bill
Medley: Feb. 10, 7 p.m., $27-57
• Michael Bolton: Feb. 24, 7
p.m., $53-85
• Fiddler on the Roof: April 17
16TH ANNUAL BRIGGS
FARMBLUESFEST
(88 Old Berwick Hwy., Ne-
scopeck)
570.379.3342, briggsfarm.com
• Featuring Lurrie Bell, more:
July 12-13. $28-$90. Discounts
available through Jan. 1.
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
(71 Public Square, Wilkes-
Barre)
570.826.1100, kirbycenter.org
• The Cake Boss Buddy Va-
lastro’s “Homemade for the Holi-
days:” Dec. 14, 8 p.m., $25-$45
• NEPA Philharmonic: “Holi-
day POPS: Appalachian Christ-
mas:” Dec. 15, 7 p.m., $34-$65
• A Chorus Line: Jan. 11, 8
p.m., $30-60
• NEPA Philharmonic: “I’ll
Take Romance:” Feb. 9, 8 p.m.,
$34-$65
• Rock of Ages: Feb. 15, 8
p.m., $35-62
• Buddy Guy and Jonny Lang:
Feb. 23, 8 p.m., $49-$99
• Irish Tenors: March 8, 8 p.m.,
$39-$59
• America’s Got Talent Live:
March 16, 8 p.m., $49-$89
• Pirates of Penzance: March
22, 8 p.m., $29-58
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA
HOUSE
(14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe)
570.325.0249, mauchchunkop-
erahouse.com
• Season Celebration with
Cabinet and MiZ: Dec. 14, 8:30
p.m., $20
• Craig Thatcher and Friends
Rockin’ Christmas: Dec. 15, 8
p.m., $23
• The Tartan Terrors: Dec. 30,
8 p.m., $28
• Dancin’ Machine: Jan. 12, 8
p.m., $20
• Billy Cobham’s Spectrum 40
Band: Jan. 18, 8:30 p.m., $38
• Evening with Savoy Brown:
Jan. 19, 8 p.m., $27
• Eilen Jewell Band: Jan. 25,
8:30 p.m., $22
• Fred Eaglesmith Travelling
Steam Show: Jan. 26, 8 p.m., $24
• “It Was a Very Good Year:”
Frank Sinatra Tribute: Jan. 27, 5
p.m., $18
• Great White Caps: Feb. 2,
8:30 p.m., $15
• Vagabond Opera: Feb. 8, 8:30
p.m., $20
• TUSK: The Ultimate Fleet-
wood Mac Tribute: Feb. 15-16,
8:30 p.m., $23
• The Allentown Band: Feb. 17,
7 p.m., $5-15
• “The Last of the Boomers:”
Comedian Jimmy Carroll: Feb.
22, 8:30 p.m., $20
• Jeanne Jolly Band: Feb. 23, 8
p.m., $18
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
(255 Highland Park Blvd.,
Wilkes-Barre)
800.745.3000, mohegansuna-
renapa.com
• WWE Supershow: Dec. 15,
7:30 p.m. $15-$95
• Disney on Ice: 100 Years of
Magic: Jan. 16-21, TIMES VAR-
Y, $25-$55
• AMSOIL Arenacross: Feb.
8-10, 7 p.m., $25\
• Harlem Globetrotters: Feb.
24, 3 p.m., $29-$110
• Monster Jam: March 8-10,
TIMES VARY, $34.55-$50
MOUNT AIRY CASINO
RESORT
(44 Woodland Rd., Mount
Pocono)
877.682.4791, mountairycasi-
no.com
• Jackie ‘The Joke Man’ Mar-
tling: Dec. 28, 9 p.m., $15-$20
• Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorren-
tino: Dec. 29, 10 p.m., $20.
• Sugar Heat: Dec. 30, 8 p.m.,
$10
• White Hot Dance Party: Dec.
31, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., $40
• Grass Roots: Jan. 12, 8 p.m.,
$20-25
• Melissa Gorga: Jan. 19, 10
p.m., $15
• Andrew Dice Clay: Feb. 2, 8
p.m., $50-65
• Blind Melon: Feb. 16, 8 p.m.,
$40-55
• Everclear: March 2, 8 p.m.,
$40-55
NEWVISIONS STUDIO &
GALLERY
(201 Vine St., Scranton)
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio.com
• Rob Cole / Danny Jackowitz
/ Shop Local / Eloquin / Jane
Demijohn / The Faceless Shad-
ows: Dec. 15, 7:30 p.m., $8
• Feds / Halfling / Bad An-
swers / Mundo: Jan. 5, 7:30 p.m.,
$7
• The Atomiqs / Days In Tran-
sit / Trust Us We’re Doctors /
Atlas Arrows: Jan. 12, 8 p.m., $7
PENN’S PEAK
(325 Maury Rd., Jim Thorpe)
866.605.7325, pennspeak.com
• Rita Coolidge: Dec. 15, 8
p.m., $19-$34
• Hollywood Nights / Human
Wheels: Dec. 28, 8 p.m., $20
• Dickey Bets & Great South-
ern: Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m., $27-32
• Little River Band / Fran
Cosmo: Feb. 1, 8 p.m., $27-$42
• The Pink Floyd Experience,
Feb. 15, 8 p.m., $30-$45
• Bruce in the USA: Bruce
Springsteen Tribute: Feb. 23, 8
p.m., $17-22
• Queensryche: March 9, 8
p.m., $30-35
• Bobby Vinton: March 23, 8
p.m., $35-$50
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
(667 N. River St., Plains)
570.822.2992, riverstreetjazz-
cafe.com
• Kyle Morgan Band: Dec. 13,
9 p.m., $5
• Mother Nature’s Sons per-
forming The Beatles’ “Revolv-
er:” Dec. 14, 10:30 p.m., $5
• Clarence Spady Band: Dec.
15, 10 p.m., $5
• Mystery Fire: Dec. 20, 10
p.m., $5, Free with college ID
• Start Making Sense: Dec. 27,
$10
• Cabinet Christmas Show /
Kyle Morgan: Dec. 21, 10 p.m.,
$10
• Cabinet Christmas Show /
Mike Dougherty: Dec. 22, 10
p.m., $10
• Suze Annual Christmas
Show: Dec. 25, 10 p.m., $5
• Start Making sense: Talking
Heads Tribute: Dec. 27, 10 p.m.,
$10
• Brothers Past / Alpha Data:
Dec. 28, 10 p.m., $10
• Flux Capacitor: Dec. 29, 10
p.m., $5
• Indobox: Dec. 31, 8 p.m., $15
• Miz, Wesley, and Skursky
Trio (acoustic): Jan. 3, 10 p.m.,
$5
• Miz (full band): Jan. 4, 10
p.m., $8
• Ol’ Cabbage performing
Phish NYE 1996: Jan. 5, 10 p.m.,
$5
• Sonic Spank / Suicaudio: Jan.
11, 10 p.m., $5
• Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty
Band: Jan. 12, 10 p.m., $8
• The Woody Browns Project:
Jan. 19, 10 p.m., $5
• Strawberry Jam: Jan. 26, 10
p.m., $5
• Before the Flood: Bob Dylan
& the Band Tribute: Feb. 16, 10
p.m., $8
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
(420 N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton)
888.669.8966, scrantoncultu-
ralcenter.org
• Appalachian Christmas with
NEPA Philharmonic: Dec. 14, 7
p.m., $34-$65
• The Midtown Men: Jan.
18-20, times vary, $37-$57
• “The View” with a Scranton
Attitude: Jan. 25, 7 p.m., $6
• Up & Coming Comedy Se-
ries: Jan. 26, 8 p.m., $16
• The Menu (cooking show):
Jan. 28, 7 p.m., $6
• NEPA Philharmonic: “I’ll
Take Romance:” Feb. 8, 8 p.m.,
$34-$65
• “The Addams Family”: Feb.
15-17, TIMES VARY, $37-$57
• Up & Coming Comedy Se-
ries: Feb. 16, 8 p.m., $16
• S.P.R.I. Ghost Hunting 101:
Feb. 26, 6 p.m., $35
• Dinner By Design: March
1-3, TIMES VARY
• “Stomp:” March 5-6, 7:30
p.m., $27-$47
• Mendelssohn and Mozart
Festival with NEPA Philharmon-
ic: March 8, 8 p.m., $34-$65
• St. Patrick’s Day Party with
Kilrush: March 9, 12 p.m., Free
• The Menu (cooking show):
March 11, 7 p.m., $7
• Up & Coming Comedy Se-
ries: March. 16, 8 p.m., $16
• Celtic Woman: March 19,
7:30 p.m., $59
• “The View” with a Scranton
Attitude: March 22, 7 p.m., $6
SHERMAN THEATER
(524 Main St., Stroudsburg)
570.420.2808, shermantheater-
.com
• Twelve-Twenty Four: Dec. 13,
8 p.m., $22
• Patent Pending: Dec. 21, 6
p.m., $10-$12
• Killswitch Engage: Dec. 28,
7 p.m., $20-$25
• Christmas Jam in the Poco-
nos: Dec. 29, 8 p.m., $15
• Edelweiss: Jan. 12, 6 p.m., $8
• Earl David Reed / Raymond
the Amish Comic: Jan. 19, 8
p.m., $18
• Sherman Rock ‘N’ Ink Tat-
too Expo: Jan. 25-27, $12-$17
• Gin Blossoms: Feb. 2, 8 p.m.,
$35-$45
• The Led Zeppelin Experience
with Hammer of the Gods: Feb.
9, 8 p.m., $30
• Magician Bill Blagg: March
2, 7 p.m., $16-$20
• Vienna Boys Choir: March 8,
8 p.m., $25-$45
VINTAGE THEATER
(326 Spruce St., Scranton)
570.589.0271, scrantonsvinta-
getheater.com• Astorian Stigmata
/ Grip of the Gods / Eye on At-
traction: Dec. 14, 8 p.m., $7
• Lesser Animals / A Fire With
Friends: Dec. 15, 8 p.m., $6
• Breeze: Dec. 21, 8 p.m., $5
• Camp Keesem Benefit: Dec.
22, 8 p.m., $6
• Abi Reimold / Robert Salazar
/ Mitch McCabe / Christine
Oglesby / Luke Shefski: Dec. 23,
6:30 p.m., $5
• Halfling: Dec. 28, 8 p.m., $6
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
(3421 Willow St., Philadelphia)
215.LOVE.222, electricfactory-
.info
• Matisyahu: Dec. 12, 8 p.m.
• Band of Horses: Dec. 14,
8:30 p.m.
• Get the Led Out: Dec. 15,
8:30 p.m.
• Badfish: Sublime Tribute:
Dec. 21, 8:30 p.m.
• The Starting Line: Dec. 26
and 30, 8 p.m.
• Halestorm: Dec. 27, 8 p.m.
• Dark Star Orchestra: Dec. 29,
8:30 p.m.
• Octane: Dec. 31, 8:30 p.m.
• Infected Mushroom: Jan. 18,
8:30 p.m.
• Cody Simpson: Jan. 20, 8:30
p.m.
• Ellie Goulding: Jan. 25, 8:30
p.m.
• Hot Water Music: Jan. 26,
8:30 p.m.
• The xx: Jan. 27, 8 p.m.
• Cat Power: Jan. 30, 8:30 p.m.
• Flogging Molly: Jan. 31, 8
p.m.
• Pentatonix: Feb. 20, 8 p.m.
• Big Gigantic: Feb. 22, 9 p.m.
• Dropkick Murphys: March
8-9, 8 p.m.
• Coheed & Cambria: March
11, 8 p.m.
• Finch: March 15, 8:30 p.m.
• Excision: March 16, 8:30
p.m.
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THE FILLMORE AT THE
TLA
(334 South St., Philadelphia)
215.922.1011, tlaphilly.com
• Tyler Ward: Dec. 13, 7 p.m.
• Streetlight Manifesto: Dec.
14, 8 p.m.
• Lost Tape Collective Holiday
Show with Man Overboard: Dec.
15, 5 p.m.
• Motionless In White / Chel-
sea Grin, more: Dec. 16, 6 p.m.
• Good Old War / Vacationer:
Dec. 20, 8 p.m.
• Chief Keef: Dec. 21, 8 p.m.
• Forever Autumn: Memorial
for Autumn Pasquale: Dec. 22,
2:30 p.m.
• 2nd Annual Philly Hip Hop
Awards: Dec. 23, 5 p.m.
• Chill Moody: Dec. 28, 10
p.m.
• R5: Dec. 28, 3 p.m.
• Rjd2: Dec. 29, 8 p.m.
• The Devil Makes Three /
Brown Bird: Dec. 31, 8:30 p.m.
• Action Item: Dec. 31, 8:30
p.m.
• Skream: Jan. 12, 8 p.m.
• Augustana (solo acoustic):
Jan. 17, 7 p.m.
• G. Love & Special Sauce:
Jan. 18, 8 p.m.
• Emeli Sande: Jan. 19, 8 p.m.
• One More Time: Daft Punk
Tribute: Jab. 26, 8 p.m.
• For Today / Memphis May
Fire: Jan. 28, 5:30 p.m.
• Walk the Moon / Pacific Air:
Feb. 1, 8 p.m.
• Reel Big Fish: Feb. 2, 7:30
p.m.
• Of Mice and Men: Feb. 3, 6
p.m.
• Blackberry Smoke: Feb. 9,
7:30 p.m.
• Whitechapel / Emmure: Feb.
10, 5 p.m.
• Meshuggah: Feb. 14, 6:30
p.m.
• Allstar Weekend: Feb. 15, 6
p.m.
• Gojira: Feb. 16, 7 p.m.
• An Evening with Emilie
Autumn: Feb. 23, 5 p.m.
KESWICK THEATRE
(291 North Keswick Ave.,
Glenside)
215.572.7650, keswicktheat-
re.com
• Manhattan Transfer: Dec. 13,
8 p.m.
• Jay Black / Jay Sigel and the
Tokens: Jan. 19, 8 p.m.
• Elvis Birthday Bash feat.
Mike Albert: Feb. 2, 8 p.m.
• John Denver: A Rocky
Mountain High Concert: Feb. 8,
8 p.m.
• Laurie Berkner Band: Feb.
23, 11 a.m.
• ABBA: The Concert: March
2, 8 p.m.
• The Irish Rovers: March 8,
7:30 p.m.
• George Thorogood & The
Destroyers: March 14, 7:30 p.m.
• Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds:
March 19, 8 p.m.
• Amy Schumer: March 22, 8
p.m.
• The Fab Faux: March 23, 8
p.m.
TOWER THEATER
(19 South 69th St., Upper
Darby)
610.352.2887, tower-theat-
re.com
• Gov’t Mule / Sister Sparrow
and the Dirty Birds: Dec. 28 and
29, 8 p.m.
• Jim Gaffigan: Jan. 26, 8 p.m.
• The Lumineers: Feb. 9, 8
p.m.
• Sarah Brightman: Feb. 16, 8
p.m.
TROCADERO
(10th & Arch St, Philadelphia)
215.336.2000
• Of Montreal: Dec. 13, 7:45
p.m.
• The Polyphonic Spree Holi-
day Show: Dec. 12, 7 p.m.
• Monster Magnet: Dec. 16,
7:30 p.m.
• Papadosio / Dopapod: Dec.
30, 9 p.m.
• Brothers Past / The Heavy
Pets: Dec. 31, 9 p.m.
• The Legwarmers: Jan. 12, 9
p.m.
• Black Veil Brides: Jan. 19,
7:30 p.m.
WELLS FARGO CENTER
(Broad St., Philadelphia)
215.336.3600
• Trans-Siberian Orchestra:
Dec. 14, 4 / 8 p.m.
• Kevin Hart: Dec. 20, 7 p.m.
• Dave Matthews Band / The
Lumineers: Dec. 22, 7 p.m.
• Lady Gaga / Madeon / Lady
Starlight: Feb. 19•20, TIMES
VARY
• Rihanna: March 14, 7:30 p.m.
• P!nk: March 17, 7:30 p.m.
• Maroon 5 / Neon Trees /
Own City: April 5, 7:30 p.m.
• One Direction: June 25, 7:30
p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
BRYCE JORDAN CENTER
(Penn State University, State
College)
814.865.5555
• Tiesto: Feb. 26, 7 p.m.
• America’s Got Talent: March
13, 7:30 p.m.
CROCODILE ROCK
(520 Hamilton St, Allentown)
610.434.460
• Streetlight Manifesto: Dec.
15, 7 p.m.
• Make Me Famous / Get
Scared / Heartist / I Am King:
Dec. 14, 4 p.m.
• Cappadonna: Dec. 26, 6 p.m.
GIANT CENTER
(950 Hersheypark Dr., Her-
shey)
717.534.3911
• Trans-Siberian Orchestra:
Dec. 21, 4 / 8 p.m.
• Jeff Dunham: Jan. 26, 8 p.m.
• Harlem Globetrotters: March
15, 7 p.m.
SANDS BETHLEHEM
(77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem)
• The Fab Four: Dec. 29, 8
p.m.
• George Lopez: Jan. 11, 8 p.m.
• Sarah Brightman: Feb. 13, 8
p.m.
• Tiesto: Feb. 25, 8 p.m.
• Chris Botti: March 3, 7 p.m.
(rescheduled from Nov. 11)
• Brian Regan, May 12, 7 p.m.
STABLER ARENA
(Lehigh University, Bethle-
hem)
610.758.6611
• Harlem Globetrotters: Feb. 7,
7 p.m.
WHITAKER CENTER
(222 Market St., Harrisburg)
717.214.ARTS
• The Bacon Brothers: May 4,
8 p.m.
NEW YORK / NEW JERSEY
BEACON THEATER
(2124 Broadway, New York,
N.Y.)
212.496.7070
• Gov’t Mule: Dec. 30-31,
TIMES VARY
• Lynyrd Skynyrd: Jan. 15, 8
p.m.
• Umphrey’s McGee: Jan. 18, 9
p.m.
• Diana Krall: April 19, 8 p.m.
• Joe Bonamassa: May 17-18, 8
p.m.
BETHEL WOODS CENTER
(Bethel, N.Y.)
bethelwoodscenter.org
• Judy Collins: Dec. 15, 7:30
p.m.
• The Dirty Dozen Brass Band:
Feb. 7, 7:30 p.m.
• Bruce Cockburn: Feb. 23, 8
p.m.
• Solas: March 16, 8 p.m.
• Steep Canyon Rangers: May
3, 8 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT IRVING
PLAZA
(17 Irving Place, New York,
N.Y.)
212.777.6800
• Parov Stelar Band: Dec. 12, 8
p.m.
• Concrete Blonde: Dec. 13, 7
p.m.
• Aaron Lewis: Dec. 14, 7 p.m.
• Motionless in White / Chel-
sea Grin / Stick to Your Guns,
more: Dec. 15, 6 p.m.
• The Starting Line: Dec. 28, 7
p.m.
• Underoath / mewithoutyou /
As Cities Burn / letlive: Jan. 15
and 17, 6 p.m.
• Robert Earl Keen: Jan. 25, 7
p.m.
IZOD CENTER
(50 State Rt. 120, East Ruther-
ford, N.J.)
201.935.3900
• Harlem Globetrotters: Feb.
15-16, TIMES VARY
• Maroon 5 / Neon Trees / Owl
City: Feb. 23, 8 p.m.
• P!nk: March 23, 8 p.m.
• Muse: April 19, 7:30 p.m.
• One Direction: July 2, 7:30
p.m.
MADISON SQUARE
GARDEN
(7th Ave., New York, N.Y.)
212.465.MSG1
• The Killers / Tegan and Sara:
Dec. 14, 8 p.m.
• Leonard Cohen: Dec. 18, 8
p.m.
• Phish: Dec. 28-31, TIMES
VARY
• Passion Pit / Matt and Kim:
Feb. 8, 8 p.m.
• Maroon 5 / Neon Trees / Owl
City: Feb. 16, 8 p.m.
• Lady Gaga / Madeon / Lady
Starlight: Feb. 22, 8 p.m.
• Swedish House Mafia:
March 1, 8 p.m.
- compiled by Rich Howells,
Weekender Editor. Send your
listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
New Visions Studio & Gallery (201 Vine. St., Scranton) will be holding its Winter
Acoustic Concert on Saturday, Dec. 15, featuring six local stripped-down acts. Rob
Cole (pictured) will be opening the evening, and other performers include Danny
Jackowitz, Shop Local, Eloquin, Jane Demijohn, and The Faceless Shadows. Doors are
at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $7 at the door.
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Wednesday:
Bar on Oak: Line Dancing
Bart and Urby’s: The Musicians Showcase – Open Mic – 9:30p
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: 40lb Head
Brews Brothers, Pittston: WPT poker tourney
River Street Jazz Caféé: Open mic
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Dart Night
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Tommyboy’s: Beer Pong
Woodlands: Evolution: w/ DJ Mike The Godfather – EDM and Top
40 Club Music
Vesuvio’s: College Night w/ DJ Mo
V-Spot: Eric Rudy Acoustic
Thursday:
Arturo’s: Mark Maros 9:30-1:30
Bar on Oak: The Tones
Bart and Urby’s: Trivia
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: YMI
Carey’s Pub: Pat Hanlon & Eric Hoffman w/ dance music
Chacko’s: Kartune
Huns Caféé West: What’s Going On Duo
OverPour: Dodge City Trio
River Street Jazz Caféé: Kyle Morgan Band
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Rox 52: Beer Pong $100 Cash Prize
Tommyboy’s: NFL Ticket
Woodlands: Club HD inside Evolution w/ DJ Data & Streamside-
DJ Kev hosted by 97BHT
V-Spot: Jackson Vee Acoustic
Friday:
Anthracite Newstand: Beerpong & Free Jukebox
Arturo’s: Da Blend
Bar on Oak: Who Knows 9-1
Bart & Urby’s: Dustin and A.J. Jump
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: 40 lb. Head
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: 97.9x Not So Silent Night w/ Pop Evil,
Otherwise, The Curse of Sorrow & True Becoming.
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country Night w/ DJ Crocket
Chacko’s: Kartune
Grotto, Harveys Lake: Hyde Park
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: Sperraza Duo
OverPour: DJ Short n’ Poor Karaoke @ 9:30
River Grille: DJ Hersh
River Street Jazz Caféé: Mother Nature’s Sons – An evening of
The Beatles
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Senunas’: Wet Bandits
Stan’s Caféé: Drive
Tommyboy’s: Underworld
Woodlands: Evolution Count Down To NYE, & DJ Godfather in
the Exec Lounge
V-Spot: The Chixi Dix
Saturday:
Anthracite Newstand: Karaoke
Arturo’s: X-Mas Party, Free Buffet after 9pm, Free Jukebox
Bar on Oak: Stand Bac
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Lucky You
Brews Brothers, Pittston: DJ Mike Riley
Chacko’s: Stealing Neil
Charlie B’s: DJ Tony K & Karaoke @ 9
King’s, Mountain Top: Toys for Tots Benefit
Liam’s: Prosody & Ethereal Collapse
River Grille: DJ EFX
River Street Jazz Caféé: Clarence Spady Band
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Senunas’: DJ Hersh
Surf Club: Mr. Echo
Susquehanna Ale House: $500 Ugly Christmas Sweater
Contest
Stan’s Caféé: Stingray 9-1
Tommyboy’s: Stereo Parade
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub - Resident DJ playing Top 40
& Club Music w/ Host “Fishboy” of 98.5 KRZ & Exclusive Soul
w/ DJ Godfather during intermission Streamside & Exec
Lounge.
V-Spot: Joker
Sunday:
Brews Brothers Luzerne & Pittston: NFL Ticket
Carey’s Pub: NFL Ticket, Karaoke w/ DJ Santiago
Charlie B’s: NFL Ticket
The Getaway Lounge: Mr. Echo
King’s, Mountain Top: NFL Ticket
Over Pour: NFL Ticket
River Grille: NFL Ticket
Rob’s Pub: NFL Sunday Football
Rox 52: NFL Ticket
Stan’s Caféé: NFL Ticket
Tommyboy’s: NFL Ticket
Woodlands: Crescenzo’s NFL GameDay, 40 Something
‘Millennium’ w/ DJ Godfather
Vesuvios: NFL Ticket
V-Spot: Gong Show Karaoke
Monday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne & Pittston: NFL Ticket
Charlie B’s: NFL Ticket
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Sands Casino: Mr. Echo
Tommyboy’s: NFL Ticket
Woodlands: Crescenzo’s NFL Monday
Tuesday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic Night w/ Paul Martin
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Open Mic Night W
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PLAYING VINTAGE TUNES AT A BAR NEAR YOU!
ZEPPELIN • BEATLES • DOORS • STONES
AND MANY MORE
WWW.MRECHOBAND.COM
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MRECHOBAND@GMAIL.COM
Sat., 12/15
Surf Club
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Sun., 12/16
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Mon., 12/17
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Bethlehem • 8-11
SPEND NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH US AT
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3370 Scranton-Carbondale Highway
Exit 191A off I-81 • 570-489-7448
• Sexy Lingerie
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Ke$ha’s second studio album,
“Warrior,” follows 2010’s hit-
riddled “Animal + Cannibal.” K$
returns with top Billboard pro-
ducer Dr. Luke and his pop-
producing dream team (Ammo,
Cirkut, Max Martin, and Benny
Blanco) to cast her party girl war
cries, hangovers, and catchy
hooks in gold.
“Warrior” has a few formulaic
electro-pop songs that could
easily be voiced by any of Dr.
Luke’s protégées, but Ke$ha
keeps it in-character for a slew of
standouts. International chart-
topping single “Die Young,”
co-written by fun. frontman Nate
Ruess, is an #instahit with a wild
child message that transcends
clichéd lyrics. “Gold Trans Am,”
an homage to her 1978 ride and
the hair bands of yore, has a
killer hook: “Wham, bam, thank
you man. / Get inside my f-----g
gold trans am.” “C’mon” gets
rowdy with Ke$ha’s signature
quick tempo, super fun lyrics
(“Feeling like a saber-tooth tiger /
Sipping on a warm Budweiser”)
and unapologetic sentiment lay-
ered over EDM beats.
The Strokes enter the world of
Ke$ha with a familiar up-tempo,
bouncy guitar riff and drummer
Fab Moretti’s hip-shaking beats.
Strokes frontman Julian Ca-
sablancas croons, “Just wanna
dance with yoooou,” under
Ke$ha’s bubblegum-and-whis-
key-breathed lamentation. The
drum machine disappears for the
synthy power ballad, “Love Into
the Light,” fueled by drummer
Patrick Carney’s throwback-gated
reverb.
Iggy Pop steals the cameo
show as Crazy Uncle Iggy, the
older guy at the party who makes
hilarious, vaguely racist dirty
jokes in “Dirty Love.” “Dirty
Love” showcases a poppy, rocka-
billy bounce and throw-your-
hands-in-the-air chorus that,
when paired with the high energy
and spoken word of Iggy Pop,
ensure that the briefest track is
among the most memorable.
“Warrior” closes on Wayne
Coin collaboration “Past Lives,”
a wispy bit of sentiment with a
stunning mix of popping, whir-
ring, subtle guitar, and a sym-
phonic string arrangement.
W
-Kait Burrier, Weekender
Correspondent
RATING:
W W V
Ke$ha
‘Warrior’
ALBUM REVIEWS
No sophomore slump
charts
8. Neon Trees: ’Everybody Talks’
7. Rihanna: ’Diamonds’
6. Ke$ha: ’Die Young’
5. Ne-Yo: ’Let Me Love You’
4. Maroon 5: ’One More Night’
3. Alex Clare: ’Too Close’
2. Bruno Mars: ’Locked Out of
Heaven’
1. fun.: ’Some Nights’
Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa
1. Led Zeppelin: ’Celebration Day’
2. Rod Stewart: ’Merry Christmas
Baby’
3. Wiz Khalifa: ’O.N.I.F.C.’
4. Phillip Phillips: ’World from the
Side of the Moon’
5. Pink: ’Truth About Love’
6. Il Volo: ’We Are Love’
7. Alicia Keys: ’Girl On Fire’
8. Rihanna: ’Unapologetic’
9. Trans-Siberian Orchestra:
’Dreams Of Fireflies On A Christmas
Night’
10. Soundgarden: ’King Animal’
Top 10 Albums at Gallery of Sound
Kid Rock’s 2001 country-lite hit, “Pic-
ture,” really changed his game in so many
ways. Until that point, the one-time rhy-
min’ turntable king of Detroit had been
sampling everything from Metallica to
Led Zeppelin over his beats, his acerbic
tongue singling him out as a revolutionary
conduit of post-alternative musical in-
dulgence.
Since that hit, however, Rock has been
a card-carrying member of the redneck/
outlaw country crowd, and he’s been
loving every minute of it. Recent albums
and tours have seen collaborations with
everyone from Zac Brown, Gretchen
Wilson, and Hank Williams, Jr. Rock
continues this theme on “Rebel Soul,” a
set grounded in surprisingly effective
Skynyrd-meets-Solomon Burke Southern
rock ‘n’ gospel grit.
Tracks like “Chickens in the Pen” are
stomping odes to Rock’s affinity for the
stomp ‘n’ clap rhythm perfect for a barn-
burnin’ good time. “Let’s Ride” is a slice
of Mellencamp’s Americana with a hard-
charging Midwest garage backbone and
jangling guitar/fiddle instrumentation.
Rock gives a Motown-era soul shout-out
to his hometown in “Detroit, Michigan,” a
vocally sweetened, horn-accompanied
track.
Elsewhere “God Save Rock ‘n’ Roll” is
a “Some Girls”-era, Stones-influenced
rocker with Rock relishing in lyrics tell-
ing the semi-autobiographical tale of a
musical wild child like “girls and cocaine
seemed to write every song.” Traces of
Rock’s hip-hop beginnings surface in cuts
like “Cucci Galore,” the soft-core rapping
laced with rock guitar riffs, Flavor Flav
samples, and imagery straight out of a
Notorious B.I.G. video.
W
-Mark Uricheck, Weekender
Correspondent
Kid Rock
‘Rebel Soul’
Rating: W W W W
Country
conversion
Katie Kelly has worked hard to put out
her first solo album, and she has certainly
delivered with “Three Dark Days,” a
compilation of tracks that weave a tale of
tougher times backed by a bevy of talent-
ed local musicians who give the album a
robust sound centered on folk that trips
into other genres along the way.
It’s obvious the 27-year-old Wilkes-
Barre musician’s stint in local rock band
The Love Crimes has filtered into her
traditional folk sound. Banjo, drums, and
guitar are present throughout, but compli-
mented by synth and guitar of the electric
persuasion at points.
“Stay, Simply Stay” is a stark contrast
to the melancholy of the beginning tracks,
providing upbeat percussion reminiscent
of a 1960s pop song with Betty Harlot
lending vocals to complete the romantic
melody.
Ray Novitski’s vocals gently underscore
Kelly’s for “Some Kind of Lover,” and
“Never Rested Well” is a song that comes
in quietly and finishes strong, bringing
with it a plethora of locals, including
Ryan Post on guitar, Aaron McCurdy on
vocals, and Matthew Gabriel on upright
bass.
“Jakob,” a song that Kelly has spoken
about as one she treasures most, is a som-
ber cap to the album, a lullaby all its own.
Though it’s apparent Kelly has drawn
from a dark place to produce “Three Dark
Days,” she should find comfort in the
light that is an entrancing, solid album for
her first time out.
W
-Sara Pokorny, Weekender Staff Writer
Kelly's Dark
debut shines
Katie Kelly
‘Three Dark Days’
Rating: W W W W W
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Think back to 1988.
Perhaps you were a child, an
adult raising one, or in your life’s
prime and still reveling in the
big-haired, rock-driven club
lifestyle of the decade. No matter
what you were doing, it’s pretty
obvious: that was quite a long
time ago.
Imagine taking all those years
and, throughout them, dedicating
yourself to a project you’re pas-
sionate about, yet you never see
it come to fruition.
Now you know exactly how
the members of the Northeast
Skate Park Alliance and North
East Skate Crew feel.
There has been a push over
those 20-some years to construct
a skate park in the area, which
may now have a designated spot
in Nanticoke’s Lower Broadway
Recreational Area, but it is still
something that’s kept hanging in
the balance.
“There were certain nights
James and I would stay up talk-
ing, pounding our heads against
the wall because one day we’re
told it’ll be done in six months,
the next it’s two years,” Cameron
Cox, 23, of Nanticoke said of his
talks with 34-year-old James
Gidosh of Wilkes-Barre, both
members of the Northeast Skate
Park Alliance.
As hope was dwindling, a
spark came along in the form of
a skateboard movie premiere at
Wilkes-Barre Movies 14 on Dec.
20, a film of local skateboarding
footage put together by Dallas
residents Trevor Harding and
Jonathan Borthwick. All pro-
ceeds from the event will go
towards the park project.
Though there has been a stall
to the construction, that doesn’t
mean that it’s been due to a lack
of support. Cameron and Gidosh
made it very clear that the city of
Nanticoke has been cooperative,
as have many of the residents.
Just recently, Earth Conservancy
offered to provide 7,000 cubic
yards of topsoil for the whole
park project.
The Lower Broadway Recre-
ational Area is split into two
projects, with the side reserved
for the skate park and other facil-
ities needing financial backing in
order to move forward.
“A skate park is still in the
plans, but right now we are con-
centrating on the soccer fields
and trails,” Nanticoke City Man-
ager Pam Heard said. “If some-
one gave the city the money
today, we would put a skate park
there. It is something we are
working on, but there are no
plans to break ground or an-
nounce funding.”
The Alliance is currently
working towards a non-profit
status; that way, it can secure
grants on its own without relying
on the city. The group has ap-
plied for funding from the Mer-
icle funds from the “kids for
cash” scandal and the Tony
Hawk Skate Park Grant, but they
have yet to see approval.
All the group wants is to pro-
vide a place for those interested
in alternative sports.
“We have football fields, we
have soccer fields – What about
the kids that aren’t interested in
those collegiate sports?” Cox
said. “How do we know we don’t
have a couple professional skate-
boarders or BMXers out there
and they just don’t have the re-
sources to make themselves that
good?”
They want to make sure every-
thing is done right are looking to
build a concrete park that will
last longer than pre-fabricated
pieces.
“There’s no point in building it
if it’s not built right,” Harding
said. “It should be built for skate-
boarders by skateboarders in-
volved in the process from start
to end.”
The film being showed at the
event will showcase just what it
is these athletes do and that
they’re more than just boards and
wheels.
“You’ll see the best skate-
boarding from a handful of dif-
ferent generations, doing the best
they possibly can,” Borthwick
said. “In that mix, you get a lot
of different personalities, even a
lot of side footage from the plac-
es we shot, like random people
on the Square.”
“It’s basically showcasing what
this area has to offer. This video
couldn’t have been made any-
where else.” W
Trevor Harding shoots Matt Kasisky as he pulls tricks on his skateboard. This, along
with many other pieces of footage of locals, will make up a film that premieres at
Wilkes-Barre Movies 14 next week.
Skating with purpose
By Sara Pokorny
Weekender Staff Writer
The Northeast Skatepark
Alliance and North East
Skate Crew skateboard
video premiere: Dec. 20, 7
p.m., Wilkes-Barre Movies 14
(24 E. Northampton St.). $5
suggested donation, all pro-
ceeds go to NEPA Skatepark
Alliance to benefit the Lower
Broadway Skatepark project.
When “A Christmas Carol”
opened to a packed house at the
Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble
two weeks ago, founding BTE
members Elizabeth Dowd and
Rand Whipple stood back in the
standing-room-only section and
watched proudly as their daugh-
ter, McCambridge Dowd-Whip-
ple, brought Mrs. Cratchit to life.
“We both got kind of choked
up,” Dowd said. “We never could
have imagined this day would
come.”
But when you think about it,
“A Christmas Carol” is in Dowd-
Whipple’s genes.
Her dad played miserly old
Ebenezer Scrooge in BTE’s first
production of the Dickens clas-
sic, and over the years her mom
played “every female character
there is,” from Scrooge’s girl-
friend of the past to his mentor’s
wife, Mrs. Fezziwig, and of
course, Mrs. Cratchit.
McCambridge herself, when
she was about eight years old,
played Tiny Tim, the loving little
boy with the crutch in a show in
which Dowd did not appear. “I
thought it would be nice for her
to have the experience without
her mother in the room,” Dowd
said.
Fun as it was to portray the
Cratchits’ youngest child, it
didn’t convince Dowd-Whipple
that she, too, wanted to pursue an
acting career.
That realization came during
her teen years, when she attended
the Pennsylvania Governor’s
School for the Arts, said Dowd-
Whipple, 23, who is living and
working in Chicago but came
back to Bloomsburg for a BTE
internship.
“It’s great,” Dowd-Whipple
said of the opportunity to seek
advice from her mother. “I’ve
always really admired my mom,
as anyone does when they’re a
kid. It’s nice to grow up and still
have all the respect in the world
for her.”
But the young actress has put
her own stamp on the role of
Mrs. Cratchit.
“When I see Mac on stage, I
don’t see myself,” Dowd said. “I
see an individual making her own
choices. A role is like a vase, and
every actor fills the vase differ-
ently. That’s what keeps it fresh
and interesting.”
Dowd doesn’t have a role in “A
Christmas Carol” at BTE this
season, but she is involved with
two other holiday productions.
In “Live From Bloomsburg: A
Very Special Christmas Special”
at The Moose Exchange (203
Main St., Bloomsburg), she plays
a sister to Andy Billiams, host of
a variety show filled with music,
dancing, and skits in the style of
shows put on by the real-life
Andy Williams, Bing Crosby,
and the Osmond Family.
Dowd also is directing “The
Santaland Diaries,” a one-man
show in which a former depart-
ment-store worker reflects on his
experiences as Crumpet the elf.
That show, for mature audiences,
also is at The Moose Exchange.
So both mother and daughter
thespians are busy, though in
different shows. That’s just fine,
Dowd said.
“Much as I would love to be
on stage together, there’s some-
thing really beautiful about being
able to be out in the audience,
just watching and enjoying.”
W
McCambridge Dowd-Whipple, at left, plays mother to
the Cratchit brood in BTE’s production of ‘A Christmas
Carol.’
`Carol' in their genes
By Mary Therese Biebel
Times Leader Features Writer
‘The Santaland Diaries,’ Dec. 14
and Dec. 16, 8 p.m.; Dec. 15, 8
p.m. and 10 p.m., The Moose
Exchange (203 Main St.,
Bloomsburg). $15
‘A Christmas Carol,’ Thursdays
through Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.;
Sundays, 3 p.m.; through Dec.
28. Special matinee Dec. 29,
Alvina Krause Theater (226
Center St., Bloomsburg). Info:
570.784.8181.
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movie review
“Playing for Keeps” is the first
family-friendly sex comedy I
have seen, which is a nice way of
saying that director Gabriele
Muccino and writer Robbie Fox
hedge their bets. Instead of mak-
ing a movie to please a core
audience, the duo has created a
movie that will annoy everybody.
Gerard Butler, whose associ-
ation with “300” grows dimmer
with each cutesy project, plays
George Dryer, a soccer legend
who has fallen on hard times
since his retirement. He now
lives in suburban Virginia, the
better to visit his 10-year-old son,
Lewis (Noah Lomax). But the
broke and unreliable George is
hardly a paragon of fatherhood.
On the pitch is a different
story. Tired of Lewis’ coach
spending more time on his cell
phone than on soccer funda-
mentals, George takes over prac-
tice one day. The impressed
parents demand he take over.
Desperate to please his son and
his ex-wife (Jessica Biel), George
reluctantly puts his sportscaster
aspirations on hold.
He’s thrown into a world of
blabber-mouthed kids and overly
worried parents. But there are
also plenty of foxy, on-the-prowl
moms. That appeals to George,
who finds at least three women
aggressively vying for his atten-
tion, one of whom (a thoroughly
wasted Uma Thurman) is mar-
ried to the team’s gregarious,
backslapping benefactor (Dennis
Quaid, pretty much reprising his
role from “What to Expect When
You’re Expecting”).
This adult look at youth sports
is when “Playing for Keeps”
feels vibrant and a little naughty.
That lasts for maybe 25 minutes.
Muccino soon steers the movie
toward George’s reconciliation
with his family. The plot line is
predictable – Biel’s fiancée is so
ineffectual he might as well be
packing a suitcase while deliver-
ing his lines. And it makes you
wonder how any of this is better
than a sweetly flustered Judy
Greer fumbling her way into
George’s apartment or Catherine
Zeta-Jones, as a sportscaster
turned soccer mom, using her
enthusiastic professionalism as a
tool of seduction.
It’s not, of course. We never
buy George reaching out to his
son and ex-wife because Butler, a
walking erection with a five
o’clock shadow, seems perfectly
content to plow his way through
the suburban Virginia MILF
market. Biel’s limited range
means that George melting her
character’s defenses comes
across as purely functional,
which aligns perfectly with the
movie’s attitude. What’s most
telling is that Fox and Muccino
don’t have George suffer for his
indiscretions. Apparently, there’s
no youth soccer mom grapevine,
no aggressive booty calls that
occur when kids are tucked in, no
vindictive lovers. The fewer
obstacles the protagonist faces,
the less reason we have to care.
Anyone who’s watched more
than five romantic comedies in
their lifetime will know the end-
ing to “Playing for Keeps” within
20 minutes. That’s fine. We don’t
watch these movies for plot
twists. Just don’t insult our in-
telligence.
“Playing for Keeps,” with its
air of “let’s get this over with,”
does this with impunity. Muccino
(“The Pursuit of Happyness”)
forgoes edginess or meaningful
conflicts or emotional jousting so
he can get straight to the heartfelt
clarity and tearful reunion. He is
not concerned with the power of
love. That’s just another scene he
needs to shoot before the Team-
sters start demanding overtime.
W
-Read more of Pete’s
cinematic musings on what
peteswatching.blogspot.com
or follow him on Twitter,
@PeteCroatto.
‘Playing for Keeps’ has a pretty cast, but a predictable plot. Gerard Butler needs to call his agent.
By Pete Croatto
Weekender Correspondent
'Playing for Keeps' lacks kick
reel attractions
It’s the sorta-not-really sequel to ‘Knocked
Up.’
We probably wouldn’t look this relaxed while
on the hunt for Osama bin Laden.
OPENING THIS WEEK
‘Zero Dark Thirty’
‘The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’
‘Monsters Inc., 3D’
OPENING NEXT WEEK
‘This is 40’
’Jack Reacher’
’On the Road’
Rating: W W
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BENEFITS/CHARITY
EVENTS
Anthracite Hi-Railers Model
Railroad Club O Gauge Train
Display: Dec. 15, Jan. 1, 5, 1-
4:30 p.m., Bill’s Shop Rite Plaza,
Rts. 435 and 502, Daleville. Free
admission, collecting donations
of bathroom tissue, bath soap,
facial tissues, multi-purpose
household cleaner, dishwashing
liquid, laundry detergent and
toothpaste to benefit the North
Pocono Dry Goods Pantry.
Christmas at Tanament Sta-
bles - Pony rides and pictures to
benefit the Wounded Warrior
Project: Through Dec. 22, 10
a.m. – noon, pictures with Dan-
dy, 1-3 p.m., pictures with Sadie,
76 Ferry Carrig Lane,Benton. $5.
Info: 570.864-0102.
Core Chiropractic Center,
180 United Penn Plaza, Kingston.
• One Warm Coat drop-off
station: Dec.19, Bring in clean,
gently used coats and receive a
free massage and other gifts as a
thank you. Info: 570.718.1672.
Dupont Hose Company (308
Main St., Dupont, 654.5121,
dupontpafire.com)
• New Year’s Eve Party: Dec.
31, doors 7 p.m., buffet 8 p.m.,
music 9 p.m. $40 per person.
Tickets in advance only: Bill,
570.457.7665 or Gary,
570.654.4222.
Modified K9 Donation Col-
lection for Hurricane Sandy
Animal and Children Victims:
Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Valley
Dog, 213 E. Luzerne Ave., Larks-
ville. Collecting until Dec. 14, 5
p.m. Collecting cat litter, cat and
dog food, dog toys, large dog
beds, new children’s toys. Info:
Karen Olson, 610.704.4499 or
mk9karen@hotmail.com.
Mohegan Sun Arena at
Casey Plaza (255 Highland Park
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Twp.)
• Toys for Tots collection at
WWE Supershow: Dec. 14, 7:30
p.m.
Safe Haven Dog Rescue
(www.SafeHavenPa.org, Safe-
Haven@epix.net)• Pet pictures
with Santa Claws: Dec. 1, 10
a.m.-2 p.m., Berger’s Agway (Rt.
209, Brodheadsville). $8.
• Adoption Day: Dec. 16, Jan.
20, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tractor Sup-
ply, Route 209, Brodheadsville.
• Volunteer Meeting: Dec. 18,
Jan. 15, 6:30 pm., Cherry’s Res-
taurant, Route 209 near Route
534, Kresgeville.
Toys For Tots
• Drop off point conducted by
Sons of the American Legion
Mountain Post 781: Mountain
Post 781 (Church Rd., Mountain
Top); Jannuzi’s Pizza (69 N.
Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top);
The Good 2 Go (36 N. Mountain
Blvd., Mountain Top); Tony’s
Pizza (26 S. Main St., Mountain
Top); and Wychock’s (Rt. 309,
Wilkes Barre). New unwrapped
toys can be dropped off at the
American Legion Mon.-Fri., 1
p.m.-midnight, Sat.-Sun., noon-
midnight. Drop off points open
through Dec. 15. Info:
570.474.2161, alpost781.org.
CAR & BIKE EVENTS
Gunners PA Law Enforce-
ment MC (gunnerspa-
lemc@gmail.com, $20/rider,
$10/passenger unless noted other-
wise)
• Phantom Rider Program: If
unable to make it to ride, donate
$10 passenger fee and new stuff-
ed animal, which will go to chil-
dren in need, any left end of
season go to Toys For Tots. Send
to Gunners 11 Hemlock Dr.,
Tunkhannock, PA18657.
Hi Lites Motor Club
(www.hilitesmotorclub.com, Jack
570.477.2477, John 574.7470).
Events feature door prizes, food,
music, 50/50 drawing, more. No
alcohol permitted.
Uncle Buck’s BBQ Pit Bike
Night Wed., 6-9 p.m., 361 W.
Main St., Plymouth. Food, drink
specials.
CHURCHES
Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church (420 Main Rd., Hanover
Twp., 570.823.6242)
• Christmas Cookie Walk Fun-
draiser: Dec. 15, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Buy a container for $8 and choose
from 15 types of homemade coo-
kies to fill it up. Info:
570.825.5723.
agenda
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 34
puzzles
ACROSS
1 Antiaircraft fire
5 Total
8 “That’s a relief!”
12 Volcanic outflow
13 CAT scan alternative
14 Exceptional
15 Type of tennis stroke
17 Paquin or Faris
18 Allow
19 Brooklyn center fielder
Duke
21 Pismire
22 Novice
23 Blond shade
26 Earl Grey, e.g.
28 Honda model
31 Bartlett or Bosc
33 Carpet
35 Congers, e.g.
36 Discussion group
38 Decked in the ring
40 Marseilles monarch
41 Turns to the right
43 Lawn glistener
45 Loss’ opposite
47 About three miles
51 Adore
52 Eave
54 Addict
55 Existed
56 Hodgepodge
57 Red Planet
58 Type measures
59 Feedbag contents
DOWN
1 Showbiz failure
2 Wash
3 State with certainty
4 Destiny
5 Slight amount
6 Grecian vessel
7 Interior
8 Grassland
9 Relinquish
10 Sea eagle
11 Have on
16 Clue
20 Big Apple letters
23 iPhone download
24 Vast expanse
25 Morning-after woe
27 Diving bird
29 UN workers’ grp.
30 Vegas-based crime
series
32 Close-fitting jackets
34 Atheistic
37 Island souvenir
39 Antelope’s playmate
42 “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”
author
44 “Yippee!”
45 Potential prune
46 Santa -, Calif.
48 Festive
49 One
50 Ids’ counterparts
53 Moving truck
last week W
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**Hosted by Rittenhouse Entertainment, Inc**
OFFICE
rtainment, Incc
Friday, December 14, 2012
7:00 PM to 12:00 AM
Bring You Office Staff
For Karaoke And
Millennium - Open Bar
7-10PM
Genetti’s Wilkes-Barre
Register in advance for Karaoke contest
Featuring Cocktails & Karaoke
Hot & Cold Hors d’oeuvres
Carved Roast Turkey w/ Cranberry Sauce
Carved Roast Beef w/ Horseradish
Caesar Salad Station • Sushi Station
Risotto Station • Pasta Station
Flaming Cherries Jubilee
Coffee Station
Viennese Dessert Table
$
39.95 inclusive per person
Open Bar -
7:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Featuring a Martini Bar, Microbrew
Beer Bar and Premium Liquor.
Cash Bar
10:00 PM to 12:00 AM
Genetti’s
825-6477
If you’re looking
for a great gift or
stocking stuffer,
purchase tickets
for “Chocolate
Decadence:
Chocolate, Oysters
& Roses” February
9th, 2013 or a Gift
Certificate to Oys-
ter Restaurant!
Three
Big
Holiday
Events!
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It has now reached the point
where One Direction’s popularity
is greater in the U.S. than in
England. If the sold-out concerts,
number one album, and mobs of
fans following the boys’ every
move doesn’t point to this, per-
haps the media’s coverage of
Harry Styles’ relationship with
Taylor Swift does.
“It’s all good. We get it,” ex-
plained Liam Payne during a
phone interview with “The Ral-
phie Show” regarding Harry’s
sudden popularity in the press.
“We know how it works.”
Styles’ newfound attention is
the cause of a little joking
amongst the boys though.
“Every so often,” Payne joked.
“He gets a little nudge and we try
to rib at him for some things.”
It’s easy for the band to joke
about such things after the past
year. In March, One Direction
released “Up All Night” in the
States. It debuted at number one.
Last month, the boy band’s fol-
low-up LP, “Take Me Home,”
also topped the charts in its first
week. 1D played sold-out amphi-
theaters all summer and will
return to play sold-out arenas in
2013.
The result is an empire expect-
ed to grow to a $100 million
business by the end of next year.
Oh, and legions of fans who
follow them everywhere.
“It’s difficult to move around
because there’re already loads of
people,” explained Payne of the
band’s attempts, sometimes
failed, to travel in Manhattan. “I
got out of the car the other day
from driving to the hotel. I was
followed by two bikes, a guy
with a video camera, fans… We
were just going to the shops to
buy myself something for the
show. It’s so crazy to think, you
know; you’re in New York, the
place you dreamed about coming
to since you were a little kid, and
not only are you in New York,
but you’re being followed by
loads of people.”
The “loads of people” aren’t
just for them exclusively. Even
the band’s parents can cause a
scene in public.
“I think they were down at
some point. That was probably
them causing a bit of a riot,”
noted Payne of an incident Mon-
day at “1D World” – a pop-up
shop outside of Madison Square
Garden. NYPD were on the
scene after a mob formed when
Payne’s parents decided to visit
the store. The Paynes were not
with their son. “My dad’s more
famous than me,” he joked.
Of course, there was already a
lot of buzz outside of The
World’s Most Famous Arena on
Monday without Payne’s family
there. One Direction would play
a sold-out MSG that night, some-
what of a victory lap for the past
year of success.
“The show couldn’t have gone
anymore perfect,” said Payne. “I
mean, we were well nervous
before we went out but…we
couldn’t ask for more really.”
With two number one albums
and two sold-out tours in one
year, what more could there be to
ask for anyway?
W
-Listen to “The Ralphie
Show” weeknights from 7
p.m.-12 a.m. on 97 BHT.
ralphie report
the
ENTERTAINMENT REPORT
Ralphie Aversa | Special to the Weekender
One Direction told Ralphie about their adventures in
New York City and Madison Square Garden.
Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your pictures for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when
and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail
high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18703.
starstruck
David Marancik of Dupont with movie star Jamie
Lee Curtis at HorrorHound Weekend in Indianapolis
on Nov. 17, 2012.
KIERAN INGLIS
570.831.7321 570.829.7204
PAUL C. SHAW
STEP
UP YOUR
ADVERTISING
Weekender advertising can
help your business grow fast.
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theater listings
Applause Theatre Co. (64
Church St., Pittston, applau-
setheatre.webs.com,
570.430.1149, applauseth-
eatre@gmail.com)
• “Winter Wonderettes:” Dec.
14-16. $15.
The Gaslight Theatre Com-
pany (570.824.8266 or visit
gaslight-theatre.org, gaslight-
theatre@gmail.com)
• “[Title of Show]:” Jan. 4-5,
7:30 p.m., Jan. 6, 2 p.m., Mellow
Theater (501 Vine St. Scranton).
Contains adult language/sit-
uations. Not suited for children.
$10.
Music Box Players (196
Hughes St., Swoyersville:
570.283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY
or musicbox.org)
• Auditions for ‘It’s a Wonder-
ful Life: The Musical,’ all roles
open. Call 570.283.2195 for dates
and times.
• “Our Christmas Gift:” Dec.
12, 7:30 p.m., Catholic Social
Services Family Center, Hazle-
ton; Dec. 16, 2 p.m., Trinity
Lutheran Church, 100 N. Church
St., Hazleton; Dec. 16, 7:30 p.m.,
Most Precious Blood Church, 4th
and Seybert streets, Hazleton.
Free, but donations accepted to
benefit each venue.
• “It’s a Wonderful Life” live
radio play: Through Dec. 16,
Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m. curtain, Sun.
3 p.m. curtain.
Pennsylvania Renaissance
Faire
Auditions for the 33rd season,
mansion at Mount Hope Estate,
Route 72. Callbacks will be held
in the afternoon and will stress
movement. Those auditioning
should wear loose fitting or com-
fortable clothing. By appoint-
ment only, 717.665.7021, ext.
120.
• Blackfryar Auditions: Jan.
12-13, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.. Require-
ments: 1-2 minute monologue
(comedic or dramatic) and 30
second song. Callbacks will be
held in the afternoon and will
stress movement. Those audi-
tioning should wear loose fitting
or comfortable clothing.
• Bacchanalian Auditions:
Jan. 26-27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.. Re-
quirements: Two one-minute
monologues (one comedic, one
dramatic) and 30 second song.
Pennsylvania Theatre of
Performing Arts (JJ Ferrara
Center, 212 W. Broad St., Hazle-
ton, 570.454.5451, ptpash-
ows.org)
• “Nuncrackers:” Begins Nov.
30.
The Phoenix Performing
Arts Centre (409-411 Main St.,
Duryea, 570.457.3589, phoenix-
pac.vpweb.com, phoenix-
pac08@aol.com)
• Auditions:
“Annie:” Jan. 10, 6-8:30 p.m.,
Jan. 12., 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Ages
5-13.
Scranton Cultural Center
(420 N. Washington Ave., Scran-
ton, 570.346.7369)
❏ Broadway Scranton (broad-
wayscranton.com) presents:
• “The Midtown Men:” Jan.
18-20, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8
p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “The Addams Family:” Feb.
15-17, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8
p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “Stomp:” March 5-6, Fri., 8
p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 &
6 p.m.
• Cathy Rigby is “Peter Pan:”
April 5-7, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8
p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
• “Hair:” April 15-16, 7:30
p.m.
• “Dreamgirls:” May 10-12,
Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m.,
Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.
Shawnee Playhouse
(570.421.5093, theshawneeplay-
house.com)
• Holiday Cabaret: Dec. 13, 7
p.m.• “Tiny Tim’s Christmas
Carol:” Through Dec. 14, 15, 22,
8 p.m.; Dec. 14,15, 16, 22, 23, 2
p.m. $28, adults; $25, seniors;
$15, children 12 and under. by
Michael Harron and Rick Cum-
mins
• “A Christmas Wizard of
Oz:” Dec. 14, 15, 21, 22, 10 a.m.
$10.• The Nutcracker Ballet:
Dec. 17, 10 a.m. $10. Dec. 16, 7
p.m. $18, adults; $15, seniors
over 55; $10, ages 12 and under.
• The Messiah 35th Annual
Concert: Dec. 21, 8 pm. Free
event, donations are accepted at
the door.
• Kids Kabaret Slammin’
70’s: Dec. 26-27, 7 pm. $10.
• Chris Ruggiero – The One
Man Variety Show: Dec. 28-29, 7
p.m., Dec. 30, 2 p.m. $18, adults;
$15, seniors; $10, children 12 and
under.
Theatre at the Grove (5177
Nuangola Rd., Nuangola,
570.868.3582, grovetick-
ets@frontier.com, nuangola-
grove.com. $20/musicals, $18/
plays, season pass/$50. BYOB)
• Encore performance of “A
Christmas Carol - the Musical:”
Dec. 15, 8 p.m. $20.
The Vintage Theater (326
Spruce St., Scranton, in-
fo@scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
• “Like No One Ever Was:”
Dec. 16, 6-9 p.m. A staged
“workshop” reading of a parody
of the hit TV/video game fran-
chise “Pokémon.”
- compiled by Sara Pokorny,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
John Baldino and Erin Canedy of John & Erin Cabaret
Productions will present their comeback show, “Our
Christmas Cabaret,” Dec. 15, 7 p.m., Theater at Trinity
Church (58 River St., Carbondale). $10. The show will be
a mix of Christmas favorites and nontraditional
Christmas music from Broadway and pop culture, with
the Ballroom ONE Dancers as special guests.
When one thinks of author Ian
McEwan, three things may come
to mind – depravity, disintegra-
tion, and loss. While some of his
more notable works (“The Com-
pany of Strangers” and “Atone-
ment”) focus on these themes,
his most recent novel, “Sweet
Tooth,” demonstrates a new
phase – tenderness.
Protagonist Serena Frome is a
young woman whose life of
brilliance seems mapped from
birth. While her story begins in
the present, it soon goes down
the rabbit hole of retrospection,
nearly 40 years earlier.
Serena is raised with a subtle
feminist upbringing. She notes:
“But what I hadn’t understood
about my mother was that buried
deep beneath this conventional
exterior was the hardy little seed
of a feminist.” Serena’s mother,
being witness to her vast knowl-
edge from a young age, urges her
to attend the most elite of schools
and focus on her strong suit –
mathematics. Of course, Serena
cannot be bothered with calcula-
tions. She would like nothing
more than to be absorbed by a
book every day for the rest of her
life.
But, to her dismay, Serena
must abandon any notion of
pursuing literature and carry on a
life of mathematics at Cambridge
instead. Beautiful as she is in-
telligent, Serena finds college to
be nothing short of drudgery.
Even considering her excellence
throughout her education, fellow
students are filled with resent-
ment. As if a game of probability,
her peers seem to emphasize that
Serena can only be beauty or
brains.
Whereas Serena’s distinction
alienates her in schooling, upon
graduation in the 1970s, she
gains recognition with the British
Security Service – a happen-
stance that stems from her intim-
ate involvement with professor,
Tony Canning. Without much
hesitation, Serena is recruited as
an official MI5 agent. Serena
thus embarks on her first secret
espionage mission codenamed
“Sweet Tooth.” Her task – infil-
trate the literary world and seek
out Communist propaganda
during the Cold War. Unfortu-
nately for MI5, the brilliant haze
of words and rhyme subdues
Serena.
There, Serena falls in love with
a writer, Tom Haley. It is not only
Serena’s affection for Tom, but
also her connection to literature
that makes the relationship uni-
fied. As the relationship blos-
soms, the two discuss their favor-
ite writers, beckoning Serena
back to her long-lost love for
literature – an aspect that never
languishes within.
In the beginning of the novel,
Serena makes mention of a cru-
cial point that continues to rever-
berate throughout the work:
“Novels without female charac-
ters were a lifeless desert.” This
response is important in that
women play the most pivotal
roles in the work – particularly,
Serena and her mother.
Ultimately, McEwan stays true
to his literary past, making a
connection to his previous works
through the common theme of
atonement. Readers complete the
novel feeling entertained by a
tale of espionage, full of emotion
and literary merit. W
Novel approach
BOOK REVIEWS AND LITERARY INSIGHT
Kacy Muir | Weekender Correspondent
Literary
espionage
Ian McEwan
‘Sweet Tooth’
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It was artist J.K. Woodward’s
third time at Scranton Comic
Con on Dec. 8 at Johnson Col-
lege, but this convention was
particularly special – it was held
just for him.
Joe Figured, owner of Amer-
ica’s Most Wanted Collectibles
(735 Washington Blvd, William-
sport, americasmostwanted-
collectibles.com), organized the
con and an auction of donated
collectibles as a last-minute way
to raise money for the illustrator
of IDW Publishing’s “Fallen
Angel,” “Star Trek,” and “CSI:
NY” after he lost everything in
Hurricane Sandy. The Weekender
caught up with the talented
Woodward afterward to talk
comics, Klingons, and the gene-
rosity of others.
The Weekender: What got
you started in illustration?
J.K. Woodward: Comics and
sci-fi. When I was a child, I was
inspired by Spider-Man, “Star
Wars,” and Doctor Who, and that
never really changed. These
stories would ignite my imag-
ination, and I would think up
stories that hadn’t been told and
draw them. As I got older, all this
practice started to pay off and
eventually I looked for commer-
cial work as a freelance illustra-
tor. After that, I turned my atten-
tion back to my real love – com-
ics. Drawing comics is really all I
ever wanted to do since the age
of seven. I talked about nothing
else.
W: Who are some of your
favorite characters to illus-
trate?
JKW: The gang from “Star
Trek: The Next Generation” and
“Doctor Who” were a lot of fun!
I also really enjoy painting Klin-
gons in battle. But really I’d
rather invent my own characters.
I think I have the most fun doing
that.
W: You’ve relocated a few
times over the years, to Los
Angeles and Germany and
then eventually New York.
JKW: I actually lived in a
great many more cities than that.
I move every two years. I find
staying in one place too long can
make you stagnant. A person
tends to just accept their reality
after a while and starts viewing
the world through the filter of
their specific environment. Mov-
ing to a new environment helps
clear your mind of preconceived
notions. It wakes you up. You
learn a lot more and a lot faster
this way. It’s like being young
again.
W: What made you settle in
Queens?
JKW: I actually haven’t. I’ve
been here four years now, which
admittedly is longer than any-
where else, but my wife and I
had already planned a move
before the hurricane hit. In fact,
she sold her condo in Queens and
we took up temporary residence
in Long Beach, which is how we
lost everything. If we had stayed
in Queens, we would have been
just fine. Our old neighborhood
was not hit too badly at all.
We lived in Long Beach for
only a month and the house we
lived in was utterly totaled. The
flood took everything I owned,
including most of my art. I would
never go back there.
W: What has that been like
for you and your wife, and do
you plan on rebuilding?
JKW: We have no choice but
to rebuild. The question is how.
Having all your possessions
taken away is horrible, of course,
but also liberating. I lost every-
thing and it’s really not that big a
deal. I’m still standing. I have a
lot less to worry about. It some-
times feels like a great weight
has been lifted. It also means it
will be much easier to move. My
wife and I can go anywhere now
and there is very little we have to
cart with us. We are going to rent
a place in the Mount Washington
Valley in Maine/New Hampshire
until spring, and then we are
thinking of going back to Cali-
fornia.
W: You had to sell a lot of
your original Star Trek/Dr.
Who artwork. Was that tough
to do?
JKW: No, not really. I sell it
anyway. I do at least 22 pages
and one cover every month; there
is no way I could hold onto that.
It just builds up and I’d run out of
room. I always sell my art even-
tually. I just sold this stuff sooner
rather than later so the wife and I
could raise money to get a new
place. I actually have an agent
who sells the work for me atca-
dencecomicart.com.
W: What was your reaction
when you got that call and they
said they were raising some
money and doing an auction
for you?
JKW: Joe’s a great guy… I
was thrilled and moved by the
generosity of it. The comics
community in general have been
very generous to me, and I con-
sider myself to be extremely
lucky to be a part of it, but put-
ting on a convention is no simple
task. I am extremely grateful for
all the donations and hard work
everyone has done. It’s a bit
overwhelming.
In all, I would say it was a
great success. Not only was there
the auction, but I also did com-
missions all day, sold some
prints, etcetera. This con has
gone a long way to getting me
back on my feet.
W: Do you plan to be back at
the next Scranton Comic Con?
JKW: I will go for as long as
Joe wants me as a guest. All he
has to do is call and I’ll be there.
W
Picking up the pieces
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
WEDNESDAY — KARAOKE with DJ BOUNCE WEDNESDAY — KARAOKE with DJ BOUNCE
ACOUSTIC TUESDAY — AARON BRUCH • $2.50 IMPORTS
WEDNESDAY — $1 MILLER LITE DRAFTS, 10-12
THURSDAY — $1 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS, 10-12
PICK UP PICK UP
YOUR GIFT YOUR GIFT
CERTIFICATES FOR CERTIFICATES FOR
YOUR HOLIDAY YOUR HOLIDAY
GIFT GIVING! GIFT GIVING!
ANNUAL UGLY SWEATER
CHRISTMAS PARTY!
DECEMBER 19TH
DJ BOUNCE 9-2
SPECIALS & GIVEAWAYS!
2
9
2
7
9
5
WWW.GROTTOPIZZAPA.COM
FRI, DECEMBER 14
HYDE PARK
FRI, DECEMBER 14
SPERRAZA DUO
GROTTO PIZZA IS YOUR FOOTBALL HEADQUARTERS.
$2 COORS LIGHT PINTS SATURDAYS
$2 MILLER LITE PINTS SUN & MON
GROTTO PIZZA AT
HARVEYS LAKE
THE GRAND SLAM SPORTS BAR
(639-3278)
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAYS
STARTING AT 9:30
GROTTO PIZZA AT
WYOMING VALLEY MALL
THE SKYBOX SPORTS BAR
(822-6600)
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
DURING HAPPY HOUR,
FRIDAYS 5-7
35 E. South St. • Wilkes-Barre
(570) 820-7172 • Open Mon.-Fri. 10 am - 6 pm
35 E S th lk B
Taking orders for Food,
Appetizers and Dessert
Trays for the Holidays.
Ono’s Bar & Grill
236 Zerby Ave.
Kingston, PA 283-2511
EVERY
WEDNESDAY
8pm. - 10pm.
$1.00 Mugs
760 N. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre • 822-2154
SATURDAY
LIAMS IS AVAILABLE FOR BENEFITS & PRIVATE PARTIES
PROSODY AND
ETHEREAL
COLLAPSE
J.K. Woodward found help from fellow artists and con-goers at Scranton Comic Con,
an event organized just for the artist who lost everything during Hurricane Sandy. W
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So now that you’ve had a few
weeks to digest everything, I
think it’s safe to talk about “The
Walking Dead” Season 3 Mid-
season Finale. Or squeal with
delight, rather.
Yes, that was your spoiler
warning, so if you’re one of the
three people left on Earth who
haven’t been following the re-
cord-setting AMC program, then
you must be dead. In which case,
15.2 million viewers may try and
bash your head in – this show has
a tendency to encourage paranoid
delusions about fictional apoc-
alypse scenarios.
This season, it’s easy to see
why it’s garnering such ratings –
they transformed a decent show
into essential viewing. I say
“decent” because Season 1 pulled
us all right in with its engaging
story and intriguing mix of char-
acters, then Season 2 stuck them
all on a farm for about 12 epi-
sodes. Granted, I am not one of
these people who thinks zombie
films (or, in this case, zombie
television shows) are about the
zombies and not the survivors,
but what lasted a few short issues
in the original comic books turn-
ed into hours and hours of melo-
drama.
It wasn’t as painful as many
fans made it out to be, but it
definitely slowed the momentum
down quite a bit, quickly devolv-
ing into memes online that poked
fun at overused plot points, like
Carl’s refusal to just stay in the
damn house. Season 3 opened
with a bang, correcting many of
its predecessor’s flaws almost
instantly – more blood, more
guts, more action, and, most
importantly, more scenarios
where bad stuff could happen.
Suspense isn’t hard to conjure
up when there’s a flesh-eating
ghoul around every corner, but
like any good zombie story, it’s
the humans you have to worry
about. This season it’s the Gover-
nor, a ruthless and manipulative
cult leader who may be protect-
ing a group of clueless survivors,
but he’s doing so by murdering
any others. Finding the perfect
way to tie up this loose end,
Merle, the racist redneck brother
of Daryl who went missing in
Season 1, returns as his hench-
man, making it hard to decide
which one you love to hate more
– they steal every scene they’re
in.
Meanwhile, our heroes, taking
over a creepy, claustrophobic
prison, have developed into the
badasses we were all hoping
they’d be – Rick is no longer
taking anyone’s crap, not even his
nasty wife’s; Daryl has stepped
into the right-hand man role
while still standing well on his
own; Glenn and Maggie have
become a real power couple you
can root for; Carol and T-Dog are
actually given something to do,
which mostly involves killing
stuff; Hershel suffers the loss of
his leg; and Andrea teams up
with Michonne, the sword-wield-
ing fan favorite character from
the comics who isn’t falling for
the Governor’s charms the way
her friend has. Even little Carl
hits puberty and can leave home
without an escort!
If you were one of those peo-
ple complaining on Facebook
and declaring your one-man
boycott, stop typing and start
watching again – the producers
were actually listening this time
around, checking off major issues
one by one with each increasing-
ly dark and twisted episode. No
one liked Lori, so they just off
her in one emotional swoop – bet
you didn’t expect to feel sorry for
her on her deathbed.
The smartest thing the writers
did was let some months pass
between the second and third
seasons. Instead of a whiny and
divided group of strangers, they
are now a tight-knit band of
warriors fighting in formation
and with confidence. Rather than
try to maintain ratings by keep-
ing the status quo, they upped the
budget and the ante by pitting
them against worthy adversaries
rather than just their own angst.
While it still has yet to top its
source material, it continues to
keep things fresh by establishing
its own identity and taking risks
by seeing just how much they
can get away with. This usually
involves driving characters to
their breaking points.
There are two things the comic
still does better. One, it’s willing
to take those risks a bit higher
since it doesn’t face television
censorship, and two, it’s much
more willing to do away with
stereotypes of all kinds. Minority
characters are still marginalized
with shorter lines and even short-
er life spans on the show (though
Michonne and Tyreese may
hopefully change that), or their
races are changed completely,
like in the case of the Governor.
Women often play second fiddle
to the dominant male characters.
Relationships like Dale and a
much-younger Andrea are elim-
inated completely. If it truly was
the end of the world, unwritten
rules about race, gender, and age
would break down or fade almost
completely, so while television
seems ready to show entrails
being ripped out of bodies and
consumed, it’s still not quite
prepared to let go of outmoded
movie tropes. Maybe next sea-
son.
It makes up for it in viral mar-
keting, which may be the real
reason “The Walking Dead” has
turned us all into mesmerized
zombies – with constant trailers,
sneak peeks, social media posts,
game adaptations, and even its
own talk show, you can’t stop
thinking or talking dead. And
who ever heard of a “Midseason
Finale” before this show came
along? The longer they keep you
in anticipation, the bigger the
guarantee you’ll tune in.
I know I’ll be on my couch
Feb. 10. The fact that I remember
that says it all.
W
-Rich Howells is a lifelong
Marvel Comics collector,
wannabe Jedi master, and cult
film fan. E-mail him
atrhowells@theweekender.com.
Infinite Improbability
GEEK CULTURE & MORE
Rich Howells | Weekender Editor
‘The Walking Dead’ Season 3 has really picked up the
slack from last season.
show us some skin
Name: Yolanda Rodriguez
Town: Wilkes-Barre
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Ss. Cyril and Methodius
Ukrainian Catholic Church
(135 River St., Olyphant)
• “Favorite Recipes from our
Best Cooks” Cookbook sale:
Until Dec. 12. Hardcover set of
two volumes, $25; single hard-
cover volume, $15. To order:
Lauren, 570.383.0319 or any
committee members. Send check
to St. Cyrils Church at 135 River
St., Olyphant.
St. Mary’s Byzantine Cathol-
ic Church of Scranton
• International Dinner Club.
“Christmas Around the World:”
Dec. 13, sittings at 5:30 and 6:30
p.m., St. Mary’s Center, 320
Mifflin Ave, Scranton. $24.95 per
person. Reservations by Dec. 7,
570.342.5151.
St. Michael’s Ukrainian
Orthodox Church (540 N. Main
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)
• Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11
a.m.-5 p.m.
St. Nicholas Catholic Church
(226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre)
• Christmas Love Concert:
Dec. 16, 4 p.m., featuring Wyom-
ing Valley Harmony Chorus,
Sounds Abound Quartet, GAR
Young Men in Harmony, Dallas
Middle School Barbershop En-
semble. $5. Info: 570.287.2476.
St. Stephens Episcopal Pro-
Cathedral (35 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.346.4600)
• Food Pantry open Mon.-Fri.,
noon-4 p.m.
• Clothing Closet: free cloth-
ing for men, women, children.
Open Tues., 4-6:30 p.m., Wed.,
noon-3:30 p.m.
St. Thomas More Society (St.
Clare Church, 2301 N. Washing-
ton Ave., Scranton,
570.343.0634, stthomasmoreso-
ciety.org)
• Guardian of the Redeemer
Fellowship: First, third Mon. of
month for men interested in adult
discussion of Catholic faith.
• YOUCAT Teen Group wel-
comes post-Confirmation youth
from all parishes for discussion
of Theology of the Body for
Teens. Meets first, third Thurs. of
month, 5:30 p.m.
Thomas More Anglican
Parish at St. Joseph’s Church
(N. Main Ave. & Theodore St.,
Scranton)
• Festival of Nine Lessons and
Carols: Jan. 6, 5 p.m., followed
by potluck supper and 3 Kings
Celebration. Info: 570.343.0634.
Trucksville United Methodist
Church (40 Knob Hill Rd.,
Trucksville, 570.696.3897, of-
fice@trucksvilleumc.com)
• All Gods Children special
needs program: every Sun. 9:45-
10:45 a.m.
Unity of NEPA: A Spiritual
Center (140 S. Grant St., Wilkes-
Barre)
• Candle lighting service:
Dec. 19, 7 p.m.
EVENTS
Browndale Fire Co. (Route
247, 620 Marion St., Browndale,
43fire.com)
• Homemade Pierogi For Sale:
donation $6/dozen. Potato and
cheese. To order, contact any
member, call 570.499.4908,
e-mail jdoyle@nep.net, go on-
line.
Camp Papillion Pet Adoption
and Rescue (570.420.0450,
camppapillion.org)
Adoption Days:
• Jan. 6, 11 a.m.-3p.m., Tractor
Supply, Route 209, Brodhead-
sville.
• Jan. 20, 11 a.m.-3p.m., Pet-
co, 3895 Dryland Way, Easton.
• Jan. 27, 11 a.m.-3p.m.,
Washington Pet Store, 1310 Blue
Valley Drive, Pen Argyl.
Chicory House and Folklore
Society (www.folkloresocie-
ty.org, 570.333.4007)
• New England Contra Dance:
Jan. 5, 7 p.m., Church of Christ
Uniting, 776 Market St., King-
ston. $9.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
Street, Tunkhannock,
570.996.1500, www.dietrichthea-
ter.com)
• Quilting for Everyone: “Car-
penter’s Wheel”: Wed. through
Dec. 12, 6-7:30 p.m. $6 per class.
• Quilting for Kids - “Birds in
the Air”: Wed. through Dec. 12,
3:30-5 p.m. $6 per class.
• “It’s a Wonderful Life”: Dec.
18, 2, 7 and 8 p.m. Free.
• “Birds in the Air” quilting
for kids: Wed., through Dec. 12,
3:30-5 p.m. $6 per class.
• “Carpenter’s Wheel” quilt-
ing for everyone: Wed., through
Dec. 12, 6-7:30 p.m. $6 per class.
• Holiday Camp: Dec. 27-28,
9:30-11 a.m. $25. For ages 5-12.
Eastern Pocono Animal Alli-
ance Spay/Neuter Clinic in need
of volunteers, one day/week to
check in clients, more; arrive by
8:15 a.m., commit to every week.
Positions to help w/ vaccination
clinics, substitute desk work.
Stop in to office in back of Rain-
bow Plaza, Route 209, Brodhead-
sville, visitepaaonline.com, call
570.994.5846.
The Friends of the Scranton
Public Library Winter Book
Sale: Dec. 14-15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.;
Dec. 16, 2-4 p.m., Library Ex-
press in the Mall at Steamtown,
second floor. Info: Tina Thomas,
570.348.3000.
The Greater Scranton
Chamber of Commerce (222
Mulberry St., Scranton)
• Holiday Business Card
Exchange: Dec. 12, 5 p.m.
• Women’s Network Lun-
cheon: Dec. 19, noon.
Irem Clubhouse (64 Ridge-
way Drive, Dallas)• New Year’s
Eve Party: Dec. 31, 7 p.m. to
midnight, in the Grand Ballroom.
B.Y.O.B. cocktail hour, where
Irem Clubhouse will provide
sodas, mixers and hors
d’oeuvres. Dinner at 8 p.m., with
prices starting at $35. 9 p.m.
entertainment with NEPA Soul.
Reservations: 570.675.1134, ext.
100 or 106. Payment due by Dec.
26,
Justus Volunteer Fire Co.
(159 Fieldstone Dr., Scott Twp.,
570.587.4545)
• Santa on the fire truck: Dec.
21, 5-9 p.m.
Leadership Lackawanna
• “Mix, Mingle and Jingle”
Holiday party: Dec. 12, 5:30-7:30
p.m., Electric City Trolley Mu-
seum, Scranton. $15, Alumni and
Friends Association members;
$20, general admission. Tickets
Info: Karen at 570.342.7711 or
www.LeadershipLackawanna-
.com.
The Mall at Steamtown (300
Lackawanna Ave., Scranton,
570.343.3400)
• Live music and/or magic
and children’s entertainment:
Every Tues., Thurs., noon-2 p.m.;
every Sun. 12:30-2:30 p.m.
• Open Mic with Sarah Yz-
kanin or Janice Gambo Chesna:
Every Wed., 6-8 p.m.
Mohegan Sun Arena at
Casey Plaza (255 Highland Park
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Twp.)
• Disney on Ice celebrates 100
Years of Music: January 16-18, 7
p.m.; Jan. 19, 11 a.m., 3 and 7
p.m.; Jan. 20, 1 and 5 p.m.; Jan.
21, 1 p.m. $25 to $55; opening
night, $15.50. Tickets available at
www.ticketmaster.com or charge
by phone at 800.745.3000.
Noxen Volunteer Fire Co.
(Stull Road, Noxen)
• Breakfast buffet: Dec. 16, 8
a.m.-1 p.m. $8, adults; $4, chil-
dren 12 and under. Bring a non-
perishable food item and receive
a free raffle ticket for a turkey.
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565,
pitmemlib@comcast.net)
• Crochet club, Tues., 10 a.m.,
Thurs., 6 p.m.
• Kids’ craft club: Third Sat.,
10 a.m. For grades 2-5.• Kids
Science Club, first Sat. of each
month, open to students in grades
2-5.
• ‘Page Turners’ kids’ book
club, first Thurs. of each month,
4 p.m., grades 3-5.
• Family Story Time for pre-
schoolers and toddlers: Sat-
urdays, 1:30 p.m.
Plymouth Public Library
(107 W. Main St., Plymouth,
570.779.4775)
• Christmas Sing-a-long: Dec.
13, 6:30 p.m., Barnes and Noble
Arena Hub.
South Side Senior Center
(425 Alder St., Scranton)
• Christmas Party: Dec. 20,
10-11:30 a.m. Entertainment by
the “Reflections,” snacks and
refreshments. $1.25 day of the
party.
Wyoming Valley Orthodox
Choir
• Christmas Concert: Dec. 16,
3 p.m., Holy Resurrection Ortho-
dox Cathedral, 591 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Info:
570.822.7725.
Your Dog’s Place, LLC
(570.729.8977, yourdog-
splace@yahoo.com)
• K9 Nose Work: Intro to
Nose Work, Sat., 11:30 a.m.;
Wed., 10 a.m. Intro to Odor,
Mon., 8:15 p.m. Intro to Vehicles
and Exteriors, Mon., 7 p.m.
Continuing Nose Work, Mon., 5
p.m.
• Kinderpuppy: Wed., 6 p.m.,
Sat., 10 a.m. Puppy parenting
101.
• Canine Life & Social Skills:
Thurs., 5:30, 6:30, 7:30 p.m.
• Reliable Recalls: Fri., 6-7:30
p.m.
LOCAL HISTORY
Electric City Trolley Mu-
seum and Coal Mine Tour
Want to give a child a chance to toss around the pigskin with Penn State quarterback
Matt McGloin and teammates? Head to ‘Tailgate for Kids,’ a Children’s Advocacy
Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania event Dec. 15, 1-4 p.m. at St. Mary’s Center in
Scranton. $10, kids 12 and under free.
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 28
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weekender’s
Sexiest
OF NEPA
2012
timid fitness buff, a mother of a seven-month-old, and a professional model offering to drop trou altogether – these are some of the
people who make up Weekender’s 2012 “Sexiest.”
Not only did we seek out the sexiest people in the area, we pushed the envelope and made things racier than years past. We asked them
to open up to us in intimate ways, from being photographed in barely a stitch of clothing to questions that explored their minds.
A gorgeous suite at The Woodlands Inn & Resort (1073 Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre) was the backdrop where things got hot, and wet, as
our models showed off on the couch, bed, and even the shower.
Some were shy, some were forward, but all showed us a side of sexy that’s true to who they are, proving the word means much
more than a hot body.
It’s confidence, a lacy bra, an English accent, humor, nervousness, and much more than we could express here. Take a look and
see for yourself why Sarah, Em, Taylor, Jeremy, Kristin, Mark, Emma, and Brent represent all that is provocative.
-Sara Pokorny, Weekender Staff Writer
Photos By Amanda Dittmar
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AGE: 31 HOMETOWN: SCRANTON OCCUPATION: MODEL
TO ME, SEXY IS... CONFIDENCE.
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AGE: 28 HOMETOWN: PHILADELPHIA OCCUPATION: ADDICTION THERAPIST
TO ME, SEXY IS... A NICE SMILE AND A FIT BODY.
Em Manual
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AGE: 27 HOMETOWN: DURYEA OCCUPATION: DENTAL HYGIENIST
I FEEL SEXY WHEN... I HAVE A GOOD WORKOUT OR ACHIEVE A GOAL.
SEE P. 40
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(Cliff Street, Scranton
570.963.6590) Museum open 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Excursions: Wed.-
Sun. 10:30 a.m., noon, 1:30 p.m.,
3 p.m. Rides: $10 adults, $9
seniors, $7.75 ages 3-12. Mine
open daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tours
hourly, $8 adults, $7.50 seniors,
$5.50 ages 3-12.
Everhart Museum (1901
Mulberry St., Scranton,
570.346.7186, www.everhart-
museum.org)
• European River Cruise:
April 8-15, 2013. From $2,549/
member, double occupancy, plus
air. Info: 570.504.7575, Ever-
hartRiverCruise.com
The Houdini Museum (1433
N. Main Ave., Scranton)
Every weekend by reservation.
Open 1 p.m., closes 4 p.m. Also
available weekdays for school
groups, bus, hotel groups.
$17.95/adults, $14.95/11 and
under.
• Ghost Tours: Scheduled
daily, 7 p.m., reservations re-
quired. Secret time/meeting place
divulged upon reservation, call
570.383.1821.$20/adults, $15/11
and under. Rain or shine, year-
round. Daytime walks also avail-
able on limited basis. Private
tours can be arranged for groups.
Info: scrantonghosttours.com,
magicus@comcast.net.
Lackawanna Historical So-
ciety (The Catlin House, 232
Monroe Avenue, Scranton,
570.344.3841)
❏ Downtown Walking Tours
(free and open to the public):
• Custom Tours: 7-8 blocks,
about 2 hours. Routes selected
based on interests of participants
Most days, noon-6 p.m. $5/per-
son, min. 4 people, max. 30. Call
955.0244.
• Step-on bus tours, Costume
Tours: Call for info.
Pennsylvania’s Anthracite
Heritage Museum (McDade
Park, Scranton: 570.963.4804,
www.phmc.state.pa.ust) Open
year round, Mon.-Sat. from 9
a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., noon-5
p.m.
Scranton Iron Furnaces (159
Cedar Ave., Scranton, www.an-
thracitemuseum.org)
For guided tours, call Anthra-
cite Heritage Museum at
570.963.4804 for schedule/fees.
St. Ann’s National Basilica
Shrine and Monastery (Scran-
ton: 570.347.5691) Group tours
available by appointment. Open 9
a.m.-8 p.m. daily.
Steamtown National Historic
Site (I-81 to Exit 53, Scranton:
570.340.5200 or 888.693.9391,
www.nps.gov/stea)
• Ongoing: Interpretive pro-
grams, visitor center, theater, a
history museum. Open daily, 9-5
p.m. $7 adults, $6 senior citizens,
$2 children ages 6-12.
• The “Scranton Limited”
train ride: Wed.-Sun. 30 minute
rides depart from Roundhouse
boarding area Wed., 10:30 &
11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 2:15 p.m. A
historic steam locomotive oper-
ates Thurs.-Sun. 10:30 &11:30
a.m., 1:30 & 2:15 p.m. $3 per
person, all ages 6+. Visit
www.nps.gov/stea for train
schedule or call 570.340.5200.
Tripp House (1011 N. Main
Ave., Scranton: 570.961.3317).
The oldest structure in Lacka-
wanna County. Tours are con-
ducted by appointment.
LEARNING
Art Classes at the Georgiana
Cray Bart Studio (123 Brader
Dr., Wilkes-Barre, 570.947.8387,
gcraybart@aol.com, gcraybart-
artworks.com)
❏ Painting, drawing, creative
arts/pencil, charcoal, oil, acrylic,
pastel, colored pencil, mixed
media:
• Adults (Ages 13+): Mon.-
Tues., noon-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed.,
6-9 p.m. Student may choose
length of time from1-3 hrs. for
evening class
• Children (Ages 8-12): Week-
days, 4:30-5:30 p.m.
Ballroom Dancing taught by
certified members of Dance
Educators of America. Available
for private groups, clubs, orga-
nizations, senior centers, more.
Call 570.785.9459.
Bridge. Beginning or Interme-
diate Lessons, playing time for
regular games and tournaments.
Jewish Community Center (River
Street, Wilkes-Barre). Call Rick
Evans at 570.824.4646 or Rev.
Ken McCrea at 570.823.5957.
Downtown Arts at Arts
YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787,
www.artsyouniverse.com)
• Kids Craft Hour with Liz
Revit: Sat., 10:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m.
Make jewelry, paper mache,
more. $15, includes supplies. For
info or to register, call 817.0176.
Drawing and Painting Les-
sons: Realist painter teaches
techniques of old masters. Private
lessons Fri.-Sun. To schedule,
call 570.820.0469, e-mail beksh-
ev@yahoo.com or visit www.ar-
tistvs.com.
Endless Mountains Nature
Center
• Bird Feeding Basics: Dec. 8,
1:30-3:30 p.m., Nature Center
Lodge inside Camp Lackawanna,
1309 Vosburg Road, Tunkhan-
nock. Info: 570.836.3835.
Everhart Museum (1901
Mulberry St., Scranton,
570.346.7186, www.everhart-
museum.org)
• “Everybody’s Art” New
Series of Adult Art Classes:
$25/workshop members, $30
non-members. Pre-registration
required.
• Rosen Method easy move-
ment program, Thurs., 2-3 p.m.,
Folk art gallery, $5/class, free to
members. Must pre-register.
• Early Explorers: Mon.,
1-1:45 p.m. Free, suitable for ages
3-5. Pre-registration required,
groups welcome. For info, to
register, call or e-mail educa-
tion@everhart-museum.org.
• Museum Adventure Week:
Dec. 26-28, 9 a.m.-noon for ages
5-11, 1-4 p.m. for ages 12-16. $25,
museum members; $30, non-
members. Registration deadline
Dec. 17.
GreenBeing (334 Adams
Ave., Scranton, info@shop-
greenbeing.com)
• Not Your Granny’s Sewing:
one-on-one lessons: $40/lesson,
$140/4 sessions, 2-3 hour ses-
sions. Tailored to individual
needs.
Guitar & Bass Lessons avail-
able from Fox Studios (11 Rhine
Creek Rd., Drums) Mon.-Thurs.
1-10 p.m. $16 per hour. All ages,
all styles of music, all levels. Call
570.788.4797 for info.
Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Instrumental Music In-
struction
• Private Ballroom Lessons
• Private Vocal Instruction:
Tues. evenings.
• Private Guitar Instruction:
Classical, acoustic, electric for all
ages.
Horse Back Riding Lessons
Elk Stables, Uniondale, by ap-
pointment only. All levels wel-
come. Call 570.575.8649 to
schedule.
Math Tutoring and Coaching
Highly qualified and experienced
teacher. All levels tutoring,
coaching, homework help. Indi-
viduals/groups. Fun-filled Math
Anxiety Buster Workshops. Open
all week. Ongoing enrollment.
Call 570.899.5576, e-mail sib-
ut4710@aol.com.
Moscow Clayworks (moscow-
clayworks.com)
• Focus on hand-building
techniques: Adults, Tues., 6-8
p.m.; kids, Thurs., 6-8 p.m.
$125/5 sessions. Reservations
required.
• Potters Wheel for Beginners:
Mon., Wed., 6-8 p.m. $125/5
sessions. Reservations required.
NEPA Bonsai Society (Mid-
way Garden Center, 1865 Hwy.
315, Pittston, 570.654.6194,
www.myspace.com/nepabonsai).
• Monthly meeting last Wed.,
7 p.m. Features business ses-
sions, demonstrations/programs/
workshops.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine Street, Scranton,
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, newvisionsstu-
dio.com)
• Kid’s Art Class: Ages 11-16,
Sat., 3-5 p.m.; Ages 5-10, Sun.,
3-5 p.m. $100 for four weeks or
$30 per class. All supplies in-
cluded.
Northeast Photography Club
(www.northeastphotography-
club.org) meets first Wed. of
month 7 p.m. in boardroom of
Prime Med (old Wes Freedman
Building) off Morgan Hwy. Va-
riety of topics, monthly contest,
guest speakers. Membership
open.
Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St., Du-
ryea, 570.457.3589, phoenix-
pac.vpweb.com, phoenix-
pac08@aol.com)
• Ballet and jazz classes:
Tues., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages 10
and up. $10, first class; $5, sec-
ond class.
• Dimensions in Dance w/
Lee LaChette: Jazz, tap, ballet
for adults & kids. $10/hour, $5/
second class. E-mail or call
991.1817.
• Tap classes: Tues., 6:30-7:30
p.m. Ages 10 and up. $10, first
class; $5, second class.
• Tap / jazz / ballet: Tues.,
7:30-8:30 p.m. $10, first class;
$5, second class.
• Vocal lessons w/ Joelle
Colombo Witner: Wed., Sun.
E-mail or call 991.1817.
• Vocal Coaching w/ Nicole
Rasmus: $15/half hour
Not only can you see sweet wrestling moves at the WWE Supershow at Mohegan Sun
Arena Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m., you can lend a hand by dropping off a new and unwrapped
toy for Toys for Tots on your way in.
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 42
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 34
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AGE: 24 HOMETOWN: HONESDALE OCCUPATION: MANAGER
I FEEL SEXY WHEN... I‘M WITH MY BROS. NOTHING SEXIER THAN BEING WITH YOUR BROS.
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SEXY IS NOT... ALL ABOUT LOOKS AND HAS A LOT TO DO WITH ATTITUDE.
Kristin Wido
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• Stage Combat Lessons w/
Paul J. Gallo: 12 weeks, date/time
TBA. 1.5 hours, prepare for in-
tense physical activity, dress
appropriately. $20/week or $200
up front.
Piano and Flute Lessons
(Anne, 570.881.2433)
• Private studio in Kingston,
enthusiastic approach, learn at
own pace and in natural learning
style. Professional teacher/per-
former (Bachelors in Music
Performance, SUNY Purchase
Conservatory of Music; Masters
in Music Performance, Uni-
versity of Texas at Austin Butler
School of Music). Accepting new
students of all ages, time slots
available early mornings into
evenings weekdays for 30, 45, 60
minutes.
Pocono Arts Council (18 N.
Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poco-
noarts.org)
❏ Adult Classes
Register by Dec. 15 and save
$10 on each class.
• Drawing: Dec. 12, 19, 6-9
p.m. $54, member; $62, non-
member; $50, senior member;
$55, senior non-member.
• Oil Painting: Dec., Thurs-
days, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $72, mem-
ber; $80, non-member; $60,
senior member; $65, senior non-
member• Acrylic Painting: Dec.,
Mondays, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
$110, member; $120, non-mem-
ber; $90, senior member; $95,
senior non-member.• Drawing:
Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, 6-8 p.m. $72,
member; $80 non-member; $60,
senior member; $65, senior non-
member.• Watercolor Painting:
Jan. 7, 14, 21,28, 6-8 p.m. $85,
member; $95, non-member; $65,
senior member; $70, senior non-
member.• Intermediate Water-
color: Jan. 13, 20, 27, 1-4 p.m.
$85, member; $95, non-member;
$75, senior member; $80, senior
non-member.
Private Voice Lessons Mon.-
Thurs. by appointment. Learn
proper singing technique in
downtown Wilkes-Barre studio.
Specializing in opera/classical/
musical theater. Hour, half-hour
lessons. Student discounts avail-
able. Please call 824.5428 or visit
www.katrinalykes.com for info.
Something Special: (23 West
Walnut Street Kingston,
570.540.6376, angiethear-
tist@aol.com, www.angelademu-
roart.com)
• MANGA Art Class: (Japa-
nese Cartooning) Wed., 4-5 p.m.
Learn the art of Japanese car-
tooning. 4-week session, supplies
included: $60 per child. Call or
e-mail to register.
Southside Senior Center (425
Alder St., Scranton,
570.346.2487)
• Language Partnership En-
glish & Spanish Classes: Fri., 10
a.m. Free, open to all. For info,
call 346.0759.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverly-
comm.org)
• Ballroom Dancing Lessons:
Wed., 7:15 p.m., Comm audi-
torium. Basic & advanced ball-
room, swing. $15/person. For
info, call Vince Brust at
489.3111.
Wyoming Valley Art League
• Painting with Irina Krawitz:
$15/hour, $120/4-weeks. Call
570.793.3992 for info.
SOCIAL GROUPS
AA Intergroup NEPA If you
want to drink, that’s your busi-
ness. If you want to quit, we have
an answer. Info: aaintergroup-
nepa.org, 570.654.0488
Alcohol Anonymous: Mon./
Fri 7 p.m. (373 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre), Tue. 7 p.m. (25
Church St., Wilkes-Barre), Wed.
10:15 a.m. (301 Shoemaker St.,
Swoyersville), 7 p.m. (1000 E.
Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre),
8 p.m. (562 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston), Thurs. 10 a.m. (75 S.
Prospect St., Nanticoke), 7:30
p.m. (301 Lake St., Dallas), Fri.
7:30 p.m. (Triangle 24 Hour
Club, Dallas), Sat. 7:30 p.m.
(1003 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort), Sun. 7 p.m. (128 W. Wash-
ington St., Nanticoke). Call
570.288.9892 for info.
Beehive Area Narcotics
Anonymous (Wilkes-Barre-
Kingston-Nanticoke-Mountain-
top) 24 hour phone line:
570.654.7755 or 1.866.935.4762.
Better Breathers Club: Sec-
ond Tuesday of every month,
6:30 p.m., Geisinger-Community
Medical Center, Professional
Building Auditorium (316 Colfax
Ave., Scranton). Info:
570.969.8986.
Building Industry Associ-
ation of NEPA (570.287.3331)
• Sponsorship: Become host
of a monthly General Member-
ship Meeting. Call or e-mail
danielle@bianepa.com for de-
tails.
• Accepting entries for Out-
door Theme Project from build-
ers, trade schools, Vo-Techs, Job
Corps. For info, call
570.287.3331.
Living with Grief: free six-
week bereavement support
group (2-3:30 p.m., 6-7:30 p.m.,
Spiritual Center, Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
1000 E. Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.808.5539)
Nar-Anon Family Group
Meetings Sun. 7 p.m. Clear
Brook Bldg. (rear), Forty Fort;
Wed., 7 p.m. United Methodist
Church, Mountaintop.
570.288.9892.
Narcotic Anonymous Meet-
ings every Tues. at 7 p.m., down-
stairs in the Methodist Education
Building, located off Courthouse
Square, on the corner of Marion
and Warren Street in Tunkhan-
nock. There are no fees or dues.
Newcomers always welcome.
Oakwood Terrace (400 Glea-
son Dr., Moosic, 570.451.3171
ext. 116 or 101)
• Support Group Meetings:
third Wed. of each month, 6:30
p.m.
Overeaters Anon. meetings
Mon., Tues., Thurs., 7 p.m.;
Wed., 7:30 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. No
fee, newcomers welcome. Call
570.829.1341 for details/meeting
locations of visit www.oa.org.
Pride of NEPA meetings the
second Tues. of each month.
Visit prideofnepa.org for details.
Suicide Bereavement Sup-
port Group First/Third Thurs.
every month, 7 p.m., at Catholic
Social Services (33 E. North-
ampton St., Wilkes-Barre). Call
570.822.7118 ext. 307 for info.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Re-
solve Infertility Peer Support
Group: Last Sun. of month,
6:30-8 p.m., Kistler Learning
Center at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley. Contact Jennifer for info,
610.393.8098.
Wyoming Valley Home
School Network A support
group for home school or cyber
school parents throughout NEPA
providing monthly meetings,
field trips, park days, more. Visit
wvhsnetwork.webs.com or con-
tact Julie Lemardy at jmlemar-
dy@gmail.com for info.
- compiled by Sara Pokorny,
Weekender Staff Writer. Send
your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded
listings at theweekender.com.
Last chance to donate new unwrapped toys to needy children through the Sons of the American Legion Mountain
Post 781 “Toys For Tots” drop off points, which will run until Dec. 15. The drop-offs are at Mountain Post 781,
Church Road, Mountain Top; Jannuzi’s, 69 North Mtn. Blvd., Mountain Top; The Good 2 Go, 36 North Mtn. Blvd.,
Mountain Top; Tony’s Pizza, 26 S. Main St., Mountain Top; and Wychock’s Beverag, Route 309, Wilkes-Barre.
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 39 W
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AGE: 34 HOMETOWN: BIRMINGHAM, UNITED KINGDOM OCCUPATION: ACTOR/MODEL
SEXY IS NOT... CLICHE OR OBVIOUS.
Mark Allen
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AGE: 27 HOMETOWN: HARVEYS LAKE OCCUPATION: RETAIL MANAGEMENT
WHO I FIND SEXY... BESIDES MY BABY DADDY, CHANNING TATUM.
Emma Michaud
SEE P. 46 W
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It seems like just about every-
one is marketing their products
and businesses as eco-friendly
these days, so it’s tough to find
the ones that really are green.
When I first heard about Eco-
Tech spray foam, I had no idea
what it was all about. After doing
a little research and talking to a
few people, I realized right away
that these guys might just be the
best thing for keeping it green on
the market when it comes to
energy.
Based out of Sullivan County,
EcoTech is an eco-friendly way
for homeowners, architects, and
builders to insulate their homes
in order to preserve energy and
save money. Owner Charles
Petersheim started EcoTech in
March 2009 during the peak of
the recession. Because spray
foam is becoming a standard
when it comes to new construc-
tion, the company has been
growing ever since.
"EcoTech uses spray foam
insulation that is the greenest and
the cleanest on the market," said
Petersheim. "We are a green
company for two reasons – our
functionality and composition.
Our spray foam is the greenest
available because it is composed
of more than 27 percent soy and
over 45 percent renewable prod-
ucts."
According to the American
Society of Interior Designers
Foundation and the U.S. Green
Building Council, a product is
green if it is "energy or water
efficient; uses healthy, non-toxic
materials and is made from recy-
cled or renewable resources," all
of which EcoTech’s spray foam
is.
As far as the functionality of
the product goes, it easily reduc-
es energy costs when it comes to
heating and cooling a home.
Energy costs are always on the
rise, so this product is perfect for
saving money and keeping your
home well-insulated. Out of all
of the green energy forms out
there, from geo-thermal to solar,
spray foam insulation is hands
down one of the most effective.
The best part is everyone can
afford to go green with spray
foam because it’s quick, easy, and
very affordable.
"Spray foam insulation is the
wave of the future, and using
EcoTech spray foam is one of the
easiest ways to go green," said
Petersheim.
When I think about re-in-
sulating my home, I picture my
house getting torn apart. What’s
great about EcoTech is they are
non-invasive, meaning they sim-
ply access your attic and base-
ment and line the roof and walls
with spray foam. Nothing gets
torn up, and there is no mess at
all. Families that have used Eco-
Tech immediately notice a signif-
icant difference in the feel of
their homes, especially during
the bitter cold days. According to
the United States Department of
Energy, adding spray foam in-
sulation is the quickest way to
make a house more energy effi-
cient and reduce each home’s
carbon footprint.
Visit ecotechsprayfoam.com
for more information on Eco-
Tech.
W
Green piece
ECO-FRIENDLY ADVICE
Jen Stevens | Special to the Weekender
Local spray foam maker
keeps homes green
EcoTech is an eco-friendly company in Sullivan County
that provides a way to insulate homes in order to
preserve energy and save money.
LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Invisible Swordsmen, Blinded Passenger,
Paul Keen @ The Keys • 12.07.12
Photos by Rich Howells
For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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AGE: 19 HOMETOWN: SWEET VALLEYOCCUPATION: PART-TIME AT HOLLISTER
WHO I FIND SEXY... ANYONE WHO TRIES TO LOOK THEIR BEST.
Brent
Oliver II W
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Beer: 2XMAS
Brewery: Southern Tier Brew-
ing Co.
Style: Herbed/Spiced Beer
ABV: 8.0%
Description: Southern Tier
2XMAS pours a clear ruby red
color, showing a slight golden
hue with a mild beige head that
quickly dissipates. The aroma of
figs, cinnamon, raisins, gin-
gerbread, and slight hints of clove
and orange will be evident upon
your first smell of the beer. Im-
mediately upon your first sip, the
cinnamon and ginger spices will
make an immediate appearance
on your taste buds, and the taste
will linger long on your palate
after swallowing. The aftertaste
has slight hints of caramel, along
with the aforementioned spices,
with a mild amount of heat from
the alcohol, but not enough to
detract from the experience.
2XMAS is a very malt forward
beer with very little evidence of
hops, mainly due to the spicing
involved. The carbonation in
2XMAS is very mild, but enough
to rinse the palate after each sip.
This is a true holiday treat, and
no holiday celebration would be
complete this year without this
beer on the table.
Food pairing: Southern Tier
2XMAS is a perfect desert beer
that is a dream for any chocohol-
ic. A true treat is to have some
dark chocolate slowly melt in
your mouth and just before it is
all gone, take a nice sip of
2XMAS and let the beer linger in
your mouth briefly. Once you
swallow, you will be grinning
from ear to ear. Did Santa Claus
leave some gingerbread cookies
behind? Well grab some 2XMAS
and finish them off for him. The
spices in the beer and the gin-
gerbread are a beautiful match,
and if Santa has some 2XMAS
with his cookies, he may not
leave any behind!
Is it worth trying? The an-
swer is short and sweet – yes!
This is a perfect beer for that
friend who loves wine and claims
to hate beer. Southern Tier ac-
tually based the recipe for
2XMAS on a traditional Swedish
Glögg recipe. Swedish Glögg is a
spiced red wine served tradition-
ally during winter, especially
around the holidays, so 2XMAS
is very much a great meeting
point for wine and beer lovers
alike. So grab yourself a bottle
and enjoy the holiday season!
Where can I get it? Currently
available in bottles at: J & H
Beer, Wilkes-Barre; Wegmans,
both Dickson City and Wilkes-
Barre; Krugel’s Georgetown Deli
& Beer, Wilkes-Barre; Backyard
Alehouse, Scranton.
Rating: W W W W
Remember, enjoy responsibly!
Cheers!
W
-Derek Warren is a beer
expert, avid homebrewer, and
beer historian. Derek can be
reached at
NEPABeerGeek@gmail.com.
I’d Tap That
BEER REVIEWS
Derek Warren | Weekender Correspondent
Southern Tier 2XMAS is filled with holiday cheer.
www.theweekender.com
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Musician Showcase Night feat. Apache Chief and Gino Lispi
@ Bart & Urby’s • 12.05.12
Photos by Amanda Dittmar • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com W
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*
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*As Traded vehicles sold As Is with no warranty. Tax and tags extra. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is
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Vesuvio’s is now in Wilkes-Barre
Home of the cheese steak stuffed pizza
570.824.8747
MON & TUES 9-10
1/2 PRICE EVERYTHING
.50¢ BUD LT DRAFTS (TUES ONLY)
THURS 9-11
$1.75 DOM BTLS • $2.75 IMPORTS
FRI 6-8
1/2 PRICE EVERYTHING 10-12
$2 BOMBS & $3 PINNACLE
PINT MIXERS
SAT 10-12
$2 BOMBS & $3 PINNACLE
PINT MIXERS
SUN 8-10
1/2 PRICE EVERYTHING
GET IT WHILE IT’S HOT
EXPIRES 01.12.13
LRG PLAIN PIZZA 16’ 8 CUT $7.99
SICILIAN SQUARETRAY 8 CUT $8
ANY LRG STROMBOLI $10
ITALIAN HOAGIE $5
CHEESE BURGER $5
BUCKET OF WINGS(50) $19.99
ANY PARMIGIANA DINNER $7.99
TAX NOT INCLUDED.
TOPPINGS EXTRA
111 North Main St.
Wilkes-Barre PA
7
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Melissa

s Mind
“Hugh Hefner
says he’s getting
married again this
summer. The bride
will wear just her
bikini. The groom
will wear just his
diaper.”
Lissa of KRZ has a lot on
her mind, and she needs
to speak it. Check out the
Weekender every week
to read her deep thoughts
and philosophical
approach to life.
For more of Melissa’s wisdom, follow her on Facebook and read her blog.
facebook.com/melissakrahnkerocks • 985krz.com/Lissa/11276840
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570-714-9924
www.wyomingvalleykia.com
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SUNDAY, MARCH 10
THE WILTSIE CENTER, HAZLETON
“Bad To The Bone”
“One Bourbon,
One Scotch, One Beer”
“Get A Haircut”
Rockin’ the blues for more than 30 years,
legendary blues rockers George Thorogood &
the Destroyers are well known for their classic hit
“Bad to the Bone,” as well as iconic rock covers
of Hank Williams’ “Move It On Over,” Bo Diddley’s
“Who Do You Love?” and John Lee Hooker’s “One
Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer.”
Join them for a rockin’ blues evening!
or call Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000 or visit
Ticketmaster outlets at Walmart or Boscov’s.
Follow us on Facebook!
facebook.com/wiltsiecenter
LIVE IN HAZLETON AT THE WILTSIE CENTER
WWW.WILTSIECENTER.ORG
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HAIR LIP
Plastic surgeons in Turkey and
France told CNN in November
that mustache implants have
suddenly surged in popularity as
Middle Eastern men use their
increased lip bushiness to convey
power and prestige. Surgeons
extract follicles from hairier parts
of the body in procedures that
cost the equivalent of around
$7,000 and show full results in
about six months. An anthropol-
ogy professor told CNN that, by
tradition in Arab countries, a
man of honor would "swear on
my mustache," use mustaches as
collateral for loans, shave off a
vanquished foe’s mustache as a
reward, and gravely insult ene-
mies with "Curse be upon your
mustache!"
LATEST MESSAGES FROM
GOD
-- At the religious festival of
Pon, thousands of Muslims travel
to Gunung Kemukus, on In-
donesia’s main island of Java, to
have the required sexual inter-
course with a stranger. The expe-
rience, which supposedly brings
good fortune, has become heavi-
ly commercialized, but never-
theless, about half the participa-
nts are "pure," in that no money
changes hands. More than a
quick tryst is involved, according
to an October Global Mail dis-
patch. The pilgrims must first
pray, then bathe themselves, then
select their proper stranger, then
bathe themselves afterward (care-
fully saving the water for later
re-use), and finally return seven
times at 35-day intervals to re-
fresh their ritual.
-- According to testimony in
Perth, Australia, in November,
one retired priest, Thomas Byrne,
80, bit off the ear of another,
Thomas Smith, 81, in a brawl
over a parking space. Father
Byrne and Father Smith are
residents of the same retirement
home in the Perth suburb of
Dianella.
-- For centuries, some residents
of India’s Madhya Pradesh state
have allowed themselves to be
trampled by garishly dressed
animals in periodic attempts to
have their prayers answered. The
November "Ekadashi" (the 11th
day of certain months of the
Hindu calendar) this year began
with prayers, followed by the
liquoring up of the animals (cows
in Ujjain and buffaloes in Bho-
pal, for example) to "remove
their inhibitions," according to a
WebIndia123 report. Even so,
according to local press reports,
hardly anyone ever gets hurt.
CULTURAL DIVERSITY
-- Things People Believe: (1)
Personalities are heavily influen-
ced by blood types, according to
the Japanese. People with Type A
blood are thought to be "sensitive
perfectionists and good team
players, but over-anxious," ac-
cording to a November BBC
News dispatch, while O’s are
"curious and generous but stub-
born." Some industries market
blood-type-specific products
ranging from soft drinks to con-
doms. (2) Names given by their
parents heavily influence a per-
son’s fortunes in life, according
to many Thais, but that means
relief from misery is just an
official name-change away, ac-
cording to a November Wall
Street Journal dispatch from
Bangkok. Services-for-fee are
available to help find prosperous
names, with one smartphone
application suggesting five for
the equivalent of about $10.
-- Saudis Remain Freedom-
Challenged: (1) In September,
officials in Jeddah detained 908
female Nigerian visitors who
were not accompanied by appro-
priate male guardians as required
for all females in the kingdom
under age 45. (Women older than
that are allowed merely to carry
notarized permission slips from
husbands, sons or brothers.) That
the Nigerians were in the country
only to make the required Mus-
lim Hajj pilgrimage did not deter
Saudi authorities. (2) Saudi im-
migration officials in November
began a text-messaging service to
notify husbands if a woman
attempts to leave the country (at
an airport or across a border)
without the official "yellow
sheet" authorizing her departure.
-- Update: Japanese and Chi-
nese traditions absolutely reject
the idea of reusing wooden chop-
sticks, and for many years Ja-
pan’s (and then, China’s) forests
easily met chopstick demand.
But Japan requires 23 billion
pairs a year, and China 63 bil-
lion, which the wood industry
(even China’s) eventually could
not provide. In 2011, Korean-
born Jae Lee built a factory in
Americus, Ga., near forests of
poplar and sweet gum trees that
proved the ideal combination of
softness and hardness for the
sticks. In 2011 and early 2012, he
supplied Japanese, Chinese and
Koreans with 20 million pairs of
"Made in U.S.A." chopsticks
every week. (In June, Georgia
Chopsticks LLC was inexplic-
ably closed by court order, even
though its sales had remained
brisk.)
QUESTIONABLE
JUDGMENTS
-- Police were seeking a 6-
foot-3 man concerning an at-
tempted child-abduction in No-
vember after a father intervened
as the man led the father’s 2-
year-old daughter toward an exit
of the Fashion Square mall in
Charlottesville, Va. The father
alerted Fashion Square’s security,
and the cops took the man into
"custody," which turned out to
mean escorting him off the prop-
erty and warning him not to
return (catch and release?).
-- Questionable Product
Launches: (1) The Demeter Fra-
grance Library (maker of such
"classic" scents as "Dirt,"
"Crayon" and "Laundromat") has
added to its line with "Sushi"
cologne, reported the website
FoodBeast.com in November.
Fortunately, the scent is not that
of raw fish, but "cooked sticky
rice," seaweed, ginger and lemon
essences. (2) A company called
Beverly Hills Caviar recently
installed three vending machines
in the Los Angeles area that sell
nothing but varieties of caviar
(ranging from pink mother of
pearl ($4) to Imperial River Belu-
ga ($500 an ounce).
PERSPECTIVE
"In beautiful La Jolla Cove,"
wrote The New York Times in
November, describing the cliff-
side-vista community near San
Diego, "art galleries and coffee
shops meet a stretch of unspoiled
cliffs and Pacific Ocean" -- un-
spoiled, that is, until recently,
when seagulls took over. Now,
because of California’s showcase
environmental regulations, use of
the cove has been restricted, and
cleaning the bird droppings from
the land is subject to a permit-
application process that might
take two years. Some residents
profess not to mind ("Smells just
like the ocean," said one, "but
maybe a little ’heightened’")
while others are appalled ("As
soon as we pulled up, it was like,
this is awful"). Even though the
smell grows "more acrid by the
day," according to the Times,
residents’ and visitors’ only
short-term hope is for cleansing
by the traditional winter rains
(which, fortunately, do not re-
quire California permits)
W
news of the weird
STRANGE CRIME STORIES & MORE
Chuck Shepherd | Weekender Wire Services
7
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EDDIE APPNEL
SUNSET
VILLAINS
KATIE KELLY
TIM HUSTY
TYRANTS
TEMPLE
CHARLES
HAVIRA
102.3-FM The Mountain
Every Sunday
from 8-9 p.m.
LI STEN
TOTHESE
ARTISTS
THIS WEEK
AND PLENTY
MORE
MUSIC
ON THE
MENU
LIVE
WITH ALAN K. STOUT
FACEBOOK.COM/
MUSICONTHEMENU
weekender
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NEW CAR 694 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 287-2117 USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
All Lease Payments have all Incentives applied. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
Tax & Reg. Additional offers end 1/3/13.
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
4WD EXT CAB
ALL STAR EDITION
MSRP $36,175
39 month lease, tax & registration additional. All incentives applied $2749 due at signing.
12,000 allowable miles per year. Must be approved thru Ally S and A Tier.
LEASE
FOR ONLY:
$
299
PER MONTH
for 39 months
Tax included.
2013 CHEVY CRUZE LS
MSRP + DFC
$19,020
24 month lease, tax & registration additional. All incentives
applied Total due at signing $2100. 12,000 allowable miles per
year. Must be approved thru Ally S & A Tier 800 + CB Score.
Automatic
LEASE
FOR ONLY:
$
149
PER MONTH
for 24 months
Plus Tax
2013 CHEVY MALIBU
LS
MSRP + DFC
$23,150
24 month lease, tax & registration additional. All incentives
applied Total due at signing $1999. 12,000 allowable miles per
year. Must be approved thru Ally S & A Tier 800 + CB Score.
LEASE
FOR ONLY:
$
189
PER MONTH
for 24 months
Plus Tax
24 month lease, tax & registration additional. All incentives
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I went to an end-of-summer
party with my friend Becky. The
party was hopping, and there
were people everywhere. Becky’s
boyfriend, Mark, was supposed to
meet us there, and he was bring-
ing a few single friends.
The Jell-O shots were flying,
the Solo cups were ponged and
flipped. There were spoons,
quarters, and card games going
on at every table. There was a
giant trampoline, and I was
showing off my awesome gym-
nastic abilities with the other
girls when Mark’s friends ar-
rived. There were four of them,
and one caught my eye right
away. It was time to get off the
trampoline and onto my game.
I chatted with him over by the
keg and found out his name was
Brian. He was a junior at King’s
College and a fellow Red Sox
fan. We bonded instantly over
baseball and the horrible season
we were having. We talked all
night and laughed and played
chicken with the other couples in
the pool; everyone thought we
were cute together.
He had received a phone call
from a friend who needed a ride,
so he had to leave. He took my
phone and added himself as a
contact, then added my number
to his. I walked him to his car
and we had a blissfully perfect
goodbye kiss. He made me
promise to call him in the morn-
ing.
I awoke the next day over at
Becky’s house and Mark was
there. He said he couldn’t find
his phone and thinks he left it at
the party. He needed to get in
touch with Brian because they
had plans that afternoon. I told
him he could use my phone since
he had saved himself as a con-
tact. I went back to sleep.
When I went home, I decided
to make that phone call to Brian
that I had promised. It rang once
and went to voicemail. Hmm…
My call was ignored. I went
about my day and then tried to
call him one last time before I
went to sleep that night, ignored.
The next day, Becky and I
went to lunch and we ran into
Mark and Brian at the mall. I
walked over to say “Hi” and he
said, “Stay away from me. You’re
crazy.” …What?
I spoke with Becky later that
night and found out that Mark
tried waking him up that day by
calling him over and over. Since
the calls came from my phone,
he saw 25 missed calls from my
number and assumed I was a
crazy stalker. Mark never men-
tioned to him that he was the
caller, and if he were to do so
now, it would look like a cover-
up, so I decided to cut my losses
and vow to never loan out my
phone again. W
Girl talk
TALES OF DATING DISASTERS
Melissa Hughes | Weekender Correspondent
Sometimes it’s a classic case of miscommunication.
Call me
maybe?
A series that I have watched
with interest for a while but
never really got into is “Hitman,”
so with the release of “Hitman:
Absolution”, I thought it would
be a good time to jump onboard.
The first “Hitman” game was
released in 2000 on the PC; I
don’t play many PC games, so
that could be why I missed it. My
only experience with it is watch-
ing friends play it, so without
having played any of the previous
games myself, I can’t compare it
to the older entries.
“Hitman: Absolution” is the
fifth game in the series, follow-
ing the story of Agent 47, a hu-
man clone who shows little emo-
tion and uses his highly devel-
oped senses in his job as a con-
tract killer. Agent 47 works for
an organization called the “In-
ternational Contract Agency”
where a group of professional
hitmen are used to extend the
influential of wealthy customers
around the world.
The agency deals with their
assassins using the aid of a “han-
dler,” providing correspondence,
gadgets, and briefings. Agent
47’s handler went rouge and
turned on the agency. In “Absolu-
tion,” Agent 47 is contracted to
kill his longtime friend and han-
dler Diana Burnwood. He is
usually emotionless, but he did
have a soft spot for Diana. As
Diana is dying, she tells him why
she betrayed the agency. She
discovered a young girl named
Victoria who was genetically
engineered to be an assassin. She
didn’t want Victoria to suffer the
same fate as Agent 47, so she ran
away to protect her. As Diana’s
final request, 47 agrees to protect
Victoria, for which the agency
brands him a traitor. Now Agent
47 is on the run.
“Hitman” is a third-person
action game that incorporates
shooting, stealth, costumes, and
brutal melee. The first things I
noticed were the gorgeous graph-
ics and sound – the facial anima-
tions really bring tension to the
story, and the musical score
really brings life to the action
sequences. The gameplay feels
really slick; I particularly like the
shooting mechanics. Aiming is
really good, and the thing that
makes you feel really badass is
you can slow down time and pick
all of your targets, taking out a
room full of guys in an instant.
The sneaking and hiding me-
chanics are adequate for a stealth
game, but the best stealth ele-
ment is being able to steal and
wear the clothes of the enemy.
You can wear all manors of out-
fits to blend in and sneak around;
the only problem is if you there
are other guys wearing the same
thing, they can spot you pretty
easily. One way this can be
avoided is you can cover your
face as you are walking by, which
works sometimes. The thing I
like the most about this game is
the amount of options you have
to complete each mission. You
can sneak in, shoot up the place,
or even kill from afar, and the
ways you can murder are im-
mense. You can strangle, stab,
burn, electrocute, blow up, you
name it. This adds a ton of varie-
ty and things to do, especially if
you play the Contracts mode.
In this mode, you can set con-
ditions for the level, such as how
many guys you have to kill, and
your friends online can try out
your custom Contract and you
can compare scores. Your scores
even go up against a worldwide
leader board so you can see how
good you are. It is like the game
“Horse,” but a bit more violent,
depending on how you play
“Horse.” This is one of the only
online features the game has, but
the single player game is pretty
amazing.
If you like stealth games or
action games, it is definitely a
game you should try out, even if
you are new to the series like I
am. If you are a longtime fan,
then you have been anticipating
this game for six years. With its
gorgeous graphics and great
gameplay, this could be one of
the best action games of the year.
W
-Robbie Vanderveken is the
digital operations specialist at
The Times Leader. E-mail him
at
rvanderveken@
timesleader.com.
get your game on
VIDEO GAME REVIEWS
Robbie Vanderveken | Special to the Weekender
The fifth game in the popular ‘Hitman’ game series is a real killer.
Hitman hits his mark
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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
I know you hate metaphysical mumbo-
jumbo and mystical bulls--t. For that rea-
son, I attempt to simply tell it like it is.
When you need a sincere pat on the back,
I do my best to compliment you in a way
you can hear. On the same token, I have
no qualms about kicking your ass when
necessary. But my favorite task (combin-
ing the two aforementioned duties) is my
responsibility this week: delivering a play-
ful spank. When you examine the rosy
glow of your ass cheeks later, I want you
to think about what you’ve done. If you
haven’t a clue, here’s one: your crime
relates not to being naughty, but to not
being naughty enough.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Stage an intervention for your choco-
late-addicted friend. Driven to the brink by
a slavish devotion to the dark stuff, hound-
ed by horrible acne and an expanding
waistline, she’ll eventually be grateful to
you for stepping in. Be firmly compas-
sionate, without resorting to lame, reduc-
tionist strategies like: “Try carob. It’s
almost the same.” Might as well give a
heroin junkie Tylenol. Simply own that
she’s giving something up that’s irreplace-
ably great, but ultimately not as great as
the things it’s keeping her from. Then use
the same hard-nosed, tough-love attitude
on yourself to conquer your own less-than-
healthy habit.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
First imagine the lamest little girl fanta-
sies you can: princesses, rainbows, uni-
corns. Now think of the sad, twisted cor-
porate executives whose job it is to take
those sickly-sweet visions and shape them
into products those poor, naïve little wom-
en find irresistibly delicious—and their
parents find palatable enough to purchase
for them. This marketing strategy has
resulted in some nauseatingly lame mer-
chandise, and one of the illusions you’ve
been swallowing. Carefully constructed to
appear to your particular sensibilities as a
scrumptious and nutritious meal, it’s really
as vacuous and simple as cotton candy.
Throw it away, now that you know—
before you take another delectably empty
bite.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Things you don’t need: a box to fit
inside, a square peg for your round hole,
and a category to fall neatly into. Why do
you insist on associating with people who
offer only these options? There are others
who recognize that cramming you in a
toybox would only cramp your style. They
possess a variety of multi-use pegs for
every shape hole. And, since they’re com-
pletely uncategorizable, they’ll be thrilled
to know someone else who transcends
definition. Why settle for two dimensions,
where only one facet of you is allowed to
shine at a time?
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
While you may not have the protruding
brow and powerful jaw of humanity’s
“missing link” between our primate ances-
tors and the modern Homo sapiens, your
Neanderthal attitude pretty much qualifies
you anyway. Chill out on your bash-first,
ask questions later approach. Lower your
club, and back slowly away. If you don’t,
you’re likely to get clobbered yourself.
You can protest “Me have big stick!” all
you want, but it’s useless; These days,
people use smarter weapons, like email
viruses, media smear campaigns, and
lawsuits. Better develop a more sophisti-
cated offense, or else get used to not hav-
ing it your way all of the time.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Don’t waste time with useless stunts
like stuffing your face with habanero
peppers or lighting your farts. Take the
brave, foolish streak you’ve been wearing
this week and harness it to serve some
constructive end. Don’t risk your life
jumping between rooftops to impress
someone, not when there are more daring
and impressive leaps to be made in your
attitude. A tricky and dangerous emotional
turnaround would go further towards
getting you laid or loved than its physical
equivalent. Save the bungee-jumping.
Bounce back with a new idea and you’ll
never have to jump off the bridge in the
first place.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Reincarnation gurus don’t ridicule the
many people who claim to be Cleopatra or
King Arthur. They accommodate them
instead, by inventing the possibility that
those souls split and were reborn into
many new incarnations. I know you share
my cynicism. Why didn’t Homeless Joe’s
soul fracture and find itself born again in
80 different people? You wouldn’t give
money to a pasty-faced medium with an
infomercial so he could tell you about
your life as Queen Elizabeth I. So why are
you giving something much more impor-
tant (part of your soul) to someone as
conniving and pathetic? Next time he asks
for a piece of you, laugh in his face. It’s
less than he deserves—in another life
you’d have him beheaded.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Cancers brag. Not as often as an Aries,
perhaps, but when you do, it’s more osten-
tatious and obnoxious; it’s tales of being
hand-fed peeled grapes by scantily-clad
attendants in a bathtub filled with real
pearls and rose petals. It’s epic descrip-
tions of the grand adventure where you
risked life and limb crossing shaky, frag-
ile, crumbling rope bridges over hot spit-
ting lava to return a dying culture’s most
precious talisman. That your gloating isn’t
quite this extreme is irrelevant; it sounds
exactly that lush and extravagant to your
exhausted listeners. Stop telling us how
amazing you are. If you are that cool,
those who need to know will figure it out
all on their own.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Hachiko was a faithful dog. His friend,
Eisenburo Uyeno, was a professor in a
different part of Tokyo from where they
lived. Still, Hachiko would accompany
him daily to Shibaya Train Station, and
invariably be waiting for him when he
returned. Unfortunately, he died. Hachiko
kept his vigil at the station for a decade.
Regardless of obstacles, he always return-
ed daily to the station to hopefully await
his master. When the dog finally died,
touched commuters had a statue erected in
his honor, a testament to his devotion. It’s
a dog story for you, since you’ve been in
the dog house lately. To get out, ironically,
follow Hachiko’s example — for nothing
more than a bowl of kibble, show off just
how patient and loyal you can be.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You are what you do, like it or not.
Anyone can resist, for a time, the influen-
ce of a job or activity; you don’t become a
corporate pawn overnight. But it’s insidi-
ous, the way daily tasks creep in and take
over your personality. You become what
you despise despite all your resistance.
The only solution, ultimately, is to do what
you love more than you do what you hate.
How’s your balance of duty to passion?
This week, do what it takes to tip it at least
slightly towards the love of life—then set
yourself up so it’ll stay that way.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Prescription for reviving a slight “slow-
down” in your sexual economy: 1.Take
exciting risks, like racing around on a
powerful motorcycle, clinging to a sexy
stranger you barely know. Almost a guar-
anteed turn-on. 2.Lower the bar slightly.
Your interest rates are too high. Don’t
sleep with anyone below your standards,
but do consider everyone who approaches
you. They may know something about you
that you don’t, yet. 3.Jack (or Jill) off. Get
the juices flowing. Put it this way: If noth-
ing’s coming out of your libidinal bank
account nothing’s going to come in.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
The best prank caller I know got his
dream: His new cellphone uses the old
number for an obscure local museum.
People calling are subjected to the mu-
seum’s complicated hours (“We open at 4
A.M., close at 5:45 AM for 5 minutes,
reopen at 5:50, then close again at 11:15
for a 15-minute cigarette break…”), de-
tailed, realistic descriptions of the whale
carcasses the museum is forced to sell to
support itself (“Do you know how hard it
is to keep a museum afloat?”), and bizarre
exhibits (“The History of Lesbian Self-
Absorption in California”). You, too, may
get a chance to show off one of your more
obscure talents this week. Milk it; it’s only
a matter of time before they change the
number and the calls cease rolling in. W
-To contact Caeriel, send mail to
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS
Bob Barker
Dec. 12, 1923
TAYLOR SWIFT
(pictured)
Dec. 13, 1989
Ted Raimi
Dec. 14, 1963
Don Johnson
Dec. 15, 1949
Krysten Ritter
Dec. 16, 1981
Milla Jovovich
Dec. 17, 1975
“Stone Cold” Steve Austin
Dec. 18, 1964
sign language
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It isn’t every day that you have
an opportunity to speak to some-
one who single-handedly
changed an industry.
I recently spoke with Chris
Roberts, the developer of the
groundbreaking “Wing Com-
mander” series of games. Ro-
berts is now kicking off another
extremely ambitious project,
“Star Citizen.”
“Star Citizen,” with its im-
mense scale, first-person per-
spective, and eye-popping graph-
ics, promises to be everything
that the “Wing Commander”
series was, and much more. Back
in the early 1990s, Roberts was
one of the pioneers of the Space
Combat Simulator genre, and his
concept of an “interactive movie”
– where every action a player
took somehow influenced the
overarching story – would
change gaming forever.
He combined state-of-the art
visuals with a compelling story
and musical score to create an
enduring story that has worked
its way into the annals of classic
science fiction.
Roberts turned out to be ex-
tremely gracious and generous
with his time. I asked him what
he had been up to for the past 10
years. He replied that he had
become interested in film pro-
duction and had worked on
“Lord of War” and several other
titles over the course of several
years.
“And after so many years of
making games,” he said, “I final-
ly got a chance to play some of
them.”
But he never took his eyes off
of the gaming industry. In early
2011, he began to prototype what
is now “Star Citizen.”
“I started to feel like I wanted
to make another game,” he said,
“and when I feel that way, that’s
what I have to do.” Roberts said
that it was great to be able to
work without a strict develop-
ment schedule and added that he
was happy to be personally in-
volved in the “nuts and bolts”
aspect of the game. “It was really
great to be able to roll up my
sleeves and get my hands dirty
with programming again.”
Roberts decided to break with
the traditional publishing and
distribution models and their
corporate controls, instead chos-
ing to “crowdfund” the game. He
asked fans if they would contrib-
ute money to develop a game,
hoping to raise $2 million, at
which point investors would be
willing to fund the rest. The
response he received was over-
whelming. He raised nearly $7
million from almost 100,000
people.
“I’m incredibly thankful to the
fans,” he said. “They care about
the game, and the genre, and
having their feedback on the
project has been rewarding in a
way I never expected.” Fans had
the opportunity to contribute
anywhere from $5 to $10,000 or
more, and many gave more than
$1,000.
Referring to the gaming expe-
rience he was trying to create,
Roberts said, “At the end of the
day, I want people to say that it
was worth it.”
W
-Nick DeLorenzo is director of
interactive and new media for
The Times Leader. E-mail him
at
ndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
Chris Roberts is the developer of the groundbreaking
‘Wing Commander’ game series.
'Commander' developer a real 'Star Citizen' W
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There’s nothing better during
the holidays than hot cocoa.
Some people like theirs with
whipped cream swirled on top.
Others add peppermint schnapps
for a buzz. I like mine half-naked
on a Vegas stage! Sorry, Mom
and Dad.
Fortunately, with Ice-T’s wom-
an, Coco, now headlining “Peep
Show” inside Planet Hollywood
on the Vegas strip, it’s now pos-
sible. I recently spoke with the
busy “Ice Loves Coco” star fol-
lowing her Dec. 3 debut, playing
Bo Peep in the striptease show
that takes audiences on a sexy
adventure with some of the most
beloved fairytale characters of all
time.
The Weekender: What was it
like being the new girl in a
show where the cast had al-
ready been performing togeth-
er for a while?
Coco: They have rolled out the
red carpet for me. They’ve all
been telling me I’m a breath of
fresh air, like it’s a change in the
scene. They were very accepting.
W: You’re no stranger to
flaunting your body. How has it
been adjusting from posing for
revealing pictures to being
topless every night in front of
an audience?
Coco: When I post things on
the Internet, I know there’re a
million people looking at it, but I
don’t see them looking at it. It’s a
little different, but I have to over-
come that because it’s a show.
W: Ice-T is in New York
filming “Law & Order: SVU”
while you’re in Vegas. Anyone
who has seen “Ice Loves Coco”
knows you two are rarely
apart. How did he take the
news of you going to Vegas?
Coco: He was a big supporter.
I was a little concerned because I
didn’t want to leave, but he was
like, “If I got a Las Vegas show, I
would leave in a heartbeat. So the
fact that you got one, you need to
go and just live out your dream.”
W: When I saw “Peep Show,”
not only were the men into it,
but the women loved it, too.
From a female perspective, are
you surprised women are big
fans of the show?
Coco: You think of it as kind
of dirty, and you might not be
able to bring your woman to it,
but it’s the whole opposite. It’s a
burlesque, classy, striptease show.
W: What can Coco go on the
record saying “Sorry, Mom
and Dad” for?
Coco: I was a little eccentric
with my body growing up, just
wanting to show all my body
parts, just really free with myself.
It’s made me who I am today. W
sorry mom&dad
A 20-SOMETHING’S WILD ADVENTURES
Justin Brown | Weekender Correspondent
Ice-T's lady
bares all
It’s the perfect time of year to warm up with some hot
Coco.
motorhead
RIDE OF THE WEEK
Michael Golubiewski | Special to the Weekender
To submit your vehicle,
email: mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
1986
FORD MUSTANG GT
CONVERTIBLE
Owner:
Ed Murphy
Scranton
“This car is my baby,” Murphy said.
“My parents bought it for me new back
when I was in high school, and I’ve kept
it up since.” The Mustang features a
302 cubic inch engine. “It still runs as
great as it did back when it was new,”
Murphy added. “I know a lot of Mustang
fans aren’t fans of the 1980s versions,
but this one is a great car.” W
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Attorney,
Denise Bierly,
814-237-7900
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570)
342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
IF YOU’RE NOT SELLING
YOUR JUNK VEHICLES AND
HEAVY EQUIPMENT TO
HAPPY HAPPY
TRAILS TRAILS
YOU’RE LOSING MONEY
WEEKL WEEKLY Y
SPECIAL SPECIAL
Extra $100 for
school busses
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
6am to 9pm
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
Line up a place to live
in classified!
Line up a place to live
in classified!
Line up a place to live
in classified!
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC ‘94
Coupe 2 door
90,200 miles.
Color Red.
$2,300 or best
offer. Call
570-825-1990
Plains
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ’95
F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
NOW $4,295
LINCOLN ‘00
NAVIGATOR
4x4, Dark
green, loaded
with new equip-
ment. 5.4
engine. Runs
great, looks
great! 155K
$4495
570-675-5046
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK ‘05
CENTURY
Silver, 83K,
4 new tires.
Warranty.
Price Reduced
$6,195
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CADILLAC ‘06 DTS
Grey, low miles,
local trade.
Performance
package with
navigation, sunroof.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CHEVY ‘04
MONTE CARLO SS
Sharp. Warranty.
$5,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `04
BLAZER
4 wheel drive, auto,
4.3, super clean,
$6,995
CHEVY ‘01
CAVALIER
Low mileage, auto,
4 cylinder. $4,595
SUZUKI ‘02
VITARA
4 x 4, auto, clean
$4,595
DODGE ‘02
NEON SXT
4 cylinder auto.
$4,395.
All Cars Have
3 Month Warranty
BACKROAD
WASH & LUBE &
AUTO SALES
1351 Shoemaker
W. Wyoming
570-693-5823
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
HONDA ‘09
CIVIC EX
Grey. 42K miles.
Moon roof, alloys.
Reduced Price
$13,900
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
MANY VEHICLES AT
AUCTION PRICE
‘04 Mitsibishi
Outlander
4x4 112k
$4,499
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive
74K $5,399
‘06 Dodge
Caravan 57k
$6,899
‘06 Chrysler
Sebring Conv.
Touring 60K
$7,199
‘05 Chrysler
T & C 63k
$7,199
‘06 FORD FREESTAR
62k, Rear air A/C
$7,599
‘05 Dodge
Durango SLT
106k warranty
$7,799
‘05 CHEVY
MALIBU Only 36k,
Private Owner
$7,899
‘07 Ford Escape
4X4 XLT 83K
$9,599
‘10 Chrysler
Sebring Conv.
Touring 6 cyl.,
30k factory
warranty $13,899
‘12 Ford Fusion
25k factory
warranty $14,999
‘11 Mitsubishi
Endeavor
4x4 26k
Factory warranty
$16,999
‘11 Ford E250
Cruse. P.W.
PDL Cargo
Only 8k miles!
$17,499
‘11 Ford E250
Cruse. P.W.
PDL Cargo
Only 3k miles!
Factory Warranty,
$18,299
‘11 Ford Escape
XLT, 4x4, 26k,
Factory Warranty,
6 Cylinder
$18,799
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
WE WILL ENTERTAIN
OFFERS!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
96 Ford Taurus,
30 V6, 4 door,
power window &
door locks, A/C
$1,800
79 Chevy Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
90 GMC Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
96 Buick Skylark
Auto, 4 door, 81K
$2,300
00 Chevy S10
Blazer. 4 door.
4wd. Red.
$2,500
96 Pontiac Grand
Prix. White, Air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good.
106K.
$2,995
02 Ford Windstar
44K, auto, 6
cylinder, air, all
power options,
runs good.
$4,600
95 Buick Park Ave
54k. $3,995
03 Ford Windstar
LX, 6 cylinder,
A/C, 94K, all
power options,
$4,300
94Cadillac Fleet-
wood Limo, ex -
cellent condition,
40K $6,000
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $10,000
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $11,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$47,000
Junk
Cars,
Used Cars
& Trucks
wanted.
Cash paid.
574 -1275
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA ‘10
ACCORD LX
22k. Silver. 22k.
Factory Warranty.
Like New. $15,495
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
INFINITI ‘02 I 35
Silver with black
leather.
TOTAL LUXURY
EXCEPTIONAL
CONDITION
Only 84K
$9,190
825-3368
LOUSGARAGE.COM
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
ONE YEAR
BUMPER
TO
BUMPER
WARRANTY
On Most Models
825-3368
LOUSGARAGE.COM W
E
E
K
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,
W
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412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
DIRECTOR
OF NURSING/
ADMINISTRATOR
An established ASC located in Kingston,
has an immediate opening for a
Director of Nursing/Administrator.
Excellent opportunity for a seasoned
RN or experienced healthcare/clinical
manager with ASC experience.
Responsible for day-to-day operations,
future planning, staffing,
budget/financial, inventory, physician
relationships, marketing and compliance
with all rules and regulations.
Please send resume to:
pjresume1@hotmail.com
FA LL FE STIVA L O F SA VINGS!!!
W E SE RVICE A LL
M A KE S A ND M O DE LS!
W INTE RIZE Y O UR VE H ICLE NO W !
E XPE RT SE RVICE
FO R O VE R 65 Y E A RS
$AVE $AVE $AVE
TAKE $10.00 OFF YOUR
M E CH ANICAL RE PAIRS
OF $100.00 OR M ORE
W ITH TH IS COUPON
O NE CO UPO N PE R RE PA IR O RDE R,
CA NNO T BE CO M BINE D W ITH O TH E R
CO UPO N O FFE RS,NO CA SH VA LUE
E XPIRE S 12-31-2012
BRAKE SE RVICE
$AVE 10% OFF
W ITH COUPON
-INCLUDE S NE W SE M IM E TA LLIC PA DS
O N FRO NT O R RE A R
-INCLUDE S INSPE CTIO N O F CA LIPE RS,
M A STE R CY LINDE R A ND LINE S
O NE CO UPO N PE R RE PA IR O RDE R,
CA NNO T BE CO M BINE D W ITH O TH E R
CO UPO N O FFE RS,NO CA SH VA LUE
E XPIRE S 12-31-2012
TIRE S! TIRE S!
TIRE S
GRE A T PRICE S
A NY SIZE
RE GULA R O R SNO W S
FRE E COL L ISION
RE PAIR E STIM ATE S
570-825-4581
1280 SANS SOUCIPKW Y
H ANOVE R TW P,PA 18706
H OURS
M ON-FRI8AM -5PM
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
TOYOTA ‘07
COROLLA LE
Silver/Grey Cloth
Moonroof. 82K
SUPER CLEAN!
$11,200
825-3368
LOUSGARAGE.COM
VOLVO ‘06 S40
Automatic, original
owner. Paid over
$30,000. Fully
equipped too much
to mention. Clean
car fax. Like new
with only 14,000
miles. Just serviced
& inspected by
Volvo. Brand new
tires. $13,900 nego-
tiable. call for details
570-510-8613
VW ‘03 JETTA
Silver with grey
cloth.
SPORTY 5
SPEED.
Only 80K.
$7,100
825-3368
LOUSGARAGE.COM
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$1,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
439 Motorcycles
SCOOTER ‘12
BRAND NEW
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
YAMAHA ‘08 STAR
RAIDER RAVEN EDITION
Mint condition.
Very low miles.
Asking $7400.
Call for details.
570-472-2327
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HONDA ‘06
PILOT
One owner.
AWD. 104K miles,
moonroof, leather
heated seats.
Warranty.
$12,500
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP `12
LIBERTY SPORT
4 x 4. Silver.
14K miles.
Factory Warranty.
$20,495.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP ‘04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Columbia Edition.
Silver. 94k. Moon-
roof. 4.0L 6 cyl.
new tires. Warranty
$9,400.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP ‘10 GRAND
CHEROKEE
V6. 4x4. Silver.
41 k miles.
One owner.
SHARP! Factory
Warranty.
$20,200
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
LEXUS ‘05
RX 300
AWD. 102k miles.
Navigation. Heated
seats. Like New.
Warranty. $13,900
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
SUBARU ‘10
FORESTER X
PREMIUM
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
Silver/Black Cloth
Panoramic
Moonroof.
61K $17,500
825-3368
LOUSGARAGE.COM
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
472 Auto Services
IS YOUR CAR
READY FOR
WINTER?
LOU’S GARAGE
WILL SERVICE
YOUR HONDA, VW
OR OTHER IMPORT
TO MAKE SURE IT
IS SAFE FOR
WINTER!
825-3368
LOUSGARAGE.COM
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
490 Truck/SUV/
Van Accessories
TRUCK CAP
Ford F-150 2008-
2009 A.R.E Truck
Cap. Black, Fiber-
glass, 5 1/2 ft bed
Has break light,
interior cargo light,
clamps. All carpet
on the inside
Sliding side win-
dows with screen
locking back win-
dow/door. Front
window folds down
for cleaning $400.
Call 855-0550,
leave message
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
ASSISTANT
FOOD SERVICE
DIRECTOR/ TRAINEE
Food Service
Management Co.
seeking Assistant
Food Service
Director/Trainee for
local school district.
Management or
supervisory experi-
ence required.
Must possess
strong communica-
tion and computer
skills. Need PA
clearances and
background
checks. Competi-
tive wages/benefits.
Send resume with
salary requirements
to: Corporate:
HR-WB121112
580 Wendel Road
Suite 100 Irwin,
PA 15642
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
548 Medical/Health
RN CHARGE NURSE
Full Time
3pm-11:30pm.
Skilled Nursing
Facility Experience
Preferred
Lakeside Health &
Rehabilitation
245 Old Lake Road
Dallas, PA 18612
570-639-1885
E.O.E.
548 Medical/Health
LPN
Need night shift
caregiver for Mon-
day, Tuesday and
Thursday, 11pm-
8am. Pittston area.
Alert, reliable, trust-
worthy. Experience
and references.
570-239-4589
Leave a Message.
OPTICIAN
Experienced full
time-part time
Optician needed for
upscale optical.
Experience
required. Emphasis
on exceptional
patient care/cus-
tomer service.
Frame selection,
lens design, lab and
dispensary experi-
ence preferred.
Outstanding com-
munication skills,
organizational
ability, a profession-
al manner, and
superior attention
to detail are
necessary for this
position. Salary
commensurate with
experience. For-
ward resume’ to:
Thomas Engle, 1100
Highway 315, WB,
PA 18702.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
To place your
ad call...829-7130
RESIDENTIAL STAFF
PT shift positions
available for serving
female youth in
24 hour/7 day a
week residential
treatment program.
Experience with
youth MH/MR popu-
lation is a plus
BS in social work or
related field is pre-
ferred. Excellent
compensation,
benefits, salary.
Fax resume to:
570-825-4746
or e-mail
skrochta@voapa.org
EOE
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554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
$900.00
Laflin – Miners Mills-Bear Creek -Potential Profit $680
Baltimore Dr. • Briar Creek Rd. • Wildflower Dr.
• 2nd Street • Jumper Rd. • E. Main St.
144 Daily Papers • 160 Sunday Paper
Shickshinny – Mocanaqua – Potential Profit $380
E. Butler St. • N. Canal St. • Grant St. • Italy St.
• Jeannette St. • Main St.
78 Daily Papers • 98 Sunday Papers
Swoyersville - Potential Profit $600
• Maltby Ave. • Hughes St. • Owen St. • Stock St.
• Noyes Ave. • Lackawanna Ave.
138 Daily Papers • 158 Sunday Papers
Wyoming - Potential Profit $800
• W. 8th Street • Hill Top Dr. • Holden St. • Butler St.
• W. Brady St. • Shoemaker Ave.
177 Daily Papers • 187 Sunday Papers
89 Sunday Dispatch
Routes Currently Available:
PRODUCTION/
MACHINE OPERATORS
$10.50/hr Plus
AEP Industries, Inc., manufacturer of flex-
ible packaging films in Mountaintop hiring
Starting at $10.50/hr. – PLUS .50¢ /hr. for
night shift; 60-90 day evaluation provides
increase $$ based on YOUR perform-
ance, attendance etc. Full-time 12 hours
shifts alternating / 3 & 4 day work weeks
(overtime pay every other) Every Other
Weekend A Must.
As a Machine Operator you will remove,
inspect, and pack finish product to specifi-
cations with strong opportunity for promo-
tion. You must be able to do some heavy
lifting, MUST know how to use a tape
measure and scale, and be a TEAM
PLAYER. Previous mfg. experience pre-
ferred. Benefit Pkg. includes: Medical,
Dental, Vision, Life Ins., Vacation, Holiday
pay.
Applications accepted daily @
AEP INDUSTRIES, INC. 8 am - 4 pm
20 Elmwood Ave
Crestwood Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA 18707
Email: grullony@aepinc.com
EOE * A drug free workplace
554 Production/
Operations
Looking for some-
one with experi-
ence in CORIN
WORK. Please
contact Drew at
(609) 712-2591
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES
Experienced Outside
Sales professional
(Commissioned) to
offer our no-cost
financial services.
We are a growing
company with huge
upside potential.
Must have strong
people skills and be
comfortable building
relationships with
senior executives.
Fax Resume to:
(866) 969-0690,
Email to: CMCNorth
east@verizon.net
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
ATTENTION,
SERIOUS RETIRE-
MENT IMPACT!
Learn to operate
a mini-office
outlet from home.
FREE online train-
ing, flex hours,
great income
potential!
www.123IAmFree
.com
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
COOKIE ROUTE
AVAILABLE:
1-2 days a week
with good income.
For more informa-
tion call Karen at
570-925-5991
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
COINS nickels 1916
P Buffalo; 1938 S
Jefferson, 1939 D
Jefferson $40.
570-287-4135
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (25)
1928-1980, GAR,
(22) 1928-2006,
MEYERS, (22) 1957-
1981, WYOMING
VALLEY WEST, (11)
1970-1992. NANTI-
COKE, (2) 1971-
1979, PITTSTON, (11)
1967-1981HANOVER
(6) 1951-1981 MINT.
Prices vary depend-
ing on condition.
$20-$40 each. Call
for further details
and additional
school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
OIL TANKS (2)
275 gallon indoor oil
tanks. Very good
condition. Convert-
ed to gas. $125.
each. Call
570-760-2793
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BEDROOM SUITE. 7
piece. Light maple
wood. Triple dresser
with mirror, chest, 2
nightstands, head-
board, footboard
and rails. $750.
570-762-6322
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
744 Furniture &
Accessories
DEN
FURNITURE
Wood/cloth. Reg-
ular size sofa,
chair and
ottoman. Coffee
table, 2 end
tables. Excellent
condition. $325
for all.
570-675-5046
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
SIMPLICITY LAWN
TRACTOR,
Model 738, with
mower deck, snow
thrower, and snow
blade. Excellent
Condition.
Negotiable.
570-474-6158
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW
BLOWER.
Craftsman. 12
HP, 32” dual
stage. Electric
start. Track
Drive. $525.
570-675-5046
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
758 Miscellaneous
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
DVDs “The Office”
Seasons 1, 2, 3, &
4. New $35.
570-606-9776
758 Miscellaneous
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
CA$H P CA$H PAID AID
1930-1970’s
Guitars,
Microphones
Radio/Amplifier
Tubes and
Theater Sound
Equipment.
Call Don
Sugar Loaf NY.
715-377-2558
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
BORDER COLLIES
1 male, 1 female,
3 months, 1st
shots, parents on
site. $250.
570-864-3257
YORKIE PUPS
READY FOR
CHRISTMAS!
AKC. Tiny, Teddy
Bear Faced. Males
& Females
Hypo-allergenic
$800-$975
Vet checked, 1st
shots & dewormed
570-436-5083
To place your
ad call...829-7130
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
Selling
your
ride?
We’ll run your ad in the
classified section until your
vehicle is sold.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNLLLLLLLLYONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNE LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEADER.
timesleader.com
To place your
ad call...829-7130
P
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503 Accounting/
Finance
551 Other
503 Accounting/
Finance
551 Other
503 Accounting/
Finance
551 Other
557 Project/
Program
Management
557 Project/
Program
Management
557 Project/
Program
Management
Back Mountain Company
looking for help
in Accounting Department.
•Experience with accounts payable, payroll
and employee/customer service issues preferred.
•Applicant must exercise practical judgement,
self discipline and be able to prioritize workload.
•Cross train in various office duties.
•Proficient in microsoft office.
Full time position with benefits
Please send resume to:
hr@pdmco.net
EOE
Are you looking for rewarding job
opportunities working with individuals with
intellectual disabilities?
We invite you to join our team in our Luzerne County locations.
St Joseph’s Center has the following employment opportunities:
All positions require a high school diploma and a valid driver’s
license. Please apply online at www.stjosephscenter.org or
2010 Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA 18509; Phone (570) 342-8379
EOE
Program Assistant
These positions are based at our Adult Day Program and assist
with meeting the personal, developmental and therapeutic needs
of our clients. Positions are full time.
Direct Care Staff
These positions are based in our group homes and are a part of
our nursing team assisting our residents with their daily needs
such as personal hygiene, meals, and activities. On the job
training is provided with shift differential. Positions are part time
and per diem.
LPN
Must have a PA Practical Nursing License and prior experience
preferred. Positions are part time.
Project Management
Specialist
Integrated Business Consulting (IBC) is a leading provider
of consulting and education services specializing in the
Public Sector-Federal sector. IBC was formed in 2003 to
meet the ever demanding needs of the Federal Government
for experienced ERP consultants with expert knowledge of
financial and supply chain management. IBC expanded their
business in 2007 into education and currently is the primary
provider of instructors to SAP Education as well as an
Authorized Education Partner of SAP and Business Objects.
IBC has additionally expanded into other industries
including transportation, retail and consumer products.
Due to our ever growing demand, IBC is looking to fill the
following position:IBC is looking for an experienced Project
Management Specialist. Project Management support indi-
vidual shall have a Bachelor's degree with a minimum of (7)
years of Project Management experience. Candidate must
demonstrate experience in planning/scheduling using MS
Project or an ERP System. Degree in Engineering, Computer
Science, Business Management, Project Management.
A minimum of (10) year experience of project management
experience may be substituted for a degree. A PMP or Pro-
ject Management Certificate is a highly desirable. In addi-
tion, previous experience supporting military asset repair,
overhaul, or logistics is a plus. Must demonstrate a profi-
ciency in the use of MS Suite of products; Project, Excel,
Word, Power, Point. To qualify for this position you must be
a U.S. Citizen. Resumes must be submitted to
creeves@ibcllc.com along with a cover letter
For further information about this position and other
openings, visit our website at www.ibcllc.com
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
820 Equestrian
QUARTER HORSE MARE
Registered, 24 year
old 4H horse, great
for children or
beginners. English
or Western. No
bad habits. $975.
570-443-7170
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
SHAVERTOWN
9 room house, 4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, heated sun-
room, 2 car
attached garage.
570-947-1200
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
modern country
kitchen with Corian
counters, family
room with fireplace,
wet bar and walkout
to patio, multi-level
decks. All appli-
ances included.
$217,000.
570-675-0446
evenings.
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
EXETER
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-899-8877
570-654-1490
MOCANAQUA
180 MAIN STREET
Great two story, 2
bedroom & 2 baths
with hardwood & tile
floors, granite coun-
tertops, finished
basement, walk in
closet, 9’ ceilings,
gas fireplace, above
ground swimming
pool & hot tub spa.
for more information
call 570-542-7525
or 570-902-9183.
WEST PITTSTON
4 bedrooms, 1 bath,
single car detached
garage, eat-in
kitchen, living, din-
ing & family rooms
gas baseboard
heat, 2 zones.
Unfinished base-
ment, window
treatments includ-
ed, great bones.
$74,900.
570-262-7949
or 570-332-7686
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3
season porch. Pro-
fessionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
PITTSTON
35 STARK ST
Completely
Remodeled 3 bed-
room. Home in a
great neighbor-
hood. Includes
refinished hard-
wood and new tile
floors, new bath-
room and kitchen
with stainless steel
appliances and
granite counter-
tops. Gas heat, nice
yard and porches.
$74,900
Call (570)654-1490
912 Lots & Acreage
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
New Section in
Highland Hills,
Only 3 lots left
in Charles
Place. Call
570-498-9244
915 Manufactured
Homes
EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE
& SAN SOUCI PARKS
PRICES REDUCED!
Financing Available
MobileOneSales.net
Call 570-250-2890
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
Beautiful, meticu-
lous two story. 2
bedrooms, 2.5 bath
condo at Newberry
Estates. Security
system, central air,
washer/dryer, fire-
place, skylights, pri-
vate master deck.
All maintenance in-
cluded. Amenities
include golf, tennis
private pool. No
Pets. $1,300/month.
Call Susan
570-510-8395
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
39 Tripp Street
Modern & spacious
first floor 2 bedroom
apartment with sun-
room & rear porch
Includes stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er, dryer, storage,
garage & off street
parking. $575/
month plus utilities.
References, securi-
ty. No pets, No
smoking. Ready to
move in and
December is FREE!
570-417-2775 or
570-954-1746
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references.
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
KINGSTON
Third Floor, two
bedrooms, kitchen,
living room.
Refrigerator and
stove provided.
Heat, water, and
sewer included.
Nice neighbor-
hood. $625 per
month. Lease, first
& security deposit,
and references
required. No pets.
570-288-5569
LARKSVILLE
1 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/
dryer hookup, deck,
off street parking.
Includes sewer &
garbage. No pets,
non smoking. Secu-
rity & lease,
$445/month.
(570) 693-2586
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LARKSVILLE
Large 3
bedroom 1/2
double. Stove &
fridge included.
Newly remod-
eled. $695 plus
security,
utilities extra.
No Pets.
570-814-9299
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedrooms.
Fresh Paint. Lots of
kitchen cabinets.
$485 includes water,
sewer & garbage.
718-744-4748.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LUZERNE
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
RENT RENTAL AL
Private entrance
to door covered
carport makes
perfect quality 2
bedroom deluxe!
Glass enclosed
porch, maple
kitchen, all appli-
ances, fireplace.
$750 + utilities.
2 YEARS, NO
PETS /SMOKING
/EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION.
570-288-1422
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
152 Elizabeth Street
Spacious 2 bed-
room apartment with
ample closet space.
Off street parking.
All utilities and appli-
ances included. No
pets. $795 + lease &
security. Call
570-510-7325
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apt.
2nd floor, stove &
refrigerator, off
street parking.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Non smokers & no
pets. $550/month.
570-655-2567 W
E
E
K
E
N
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R
,
W
E
D
N
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Y
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D
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2
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1
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P
A
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E
6
5
242 N. M em orial H wy., Sh avertown,PA
675-1245
HE AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
— K E E P T HIS C O UPO N —
E N D O F T HE W O RL D S PE C IAL
$40 O F F
O UR JAC UZ Z I M AS S AGE
W IT H C O UPO N
E X PIRE S 12- 21- 12
N O T GO IN G T O DIE ?
N O W HIRIN G?
2
0
6
5
3
9
SENSATIO NS
New A m ericanStaff
A cceptingallm ajor credit cards
5 70 -779 -4 5 5 5
14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
SUND AY NOW OP E N
12 -8 P M
INTR OD UCING
SUM M E R & STAR
D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H OUR $40
M OND AY 4-8P M
2 0 M INS. F OR $30
TH UR S. 2 -6 P M
2 F OR 1
F R ID AY
1/2 OF F AL L SE SSIONS
SUN. 12 -6 P M
2 0 M INS. F OR $30
7
3
1
7
8
8
7
4
7
0
1
8
ELITE SPA
N E W S TA F F !
Orien ta l S ta ff
Body S ha m poo
M a ssa ge-Ta n n in g
318 W ilkes-Ba rre Tow n ship Blv d., R ou te 309
L a rge P a rkin g A rea • Open D a ily 9a m -M idn ight
570.824.9017
7
4
9
8
8
5
2
5
7
6
7
3
539 R e a r Scott Str e e t, W ilk e s-B a r r e
570.82 9.3914 • H our s: 10 a m – 1 a m • Op e n 7 D a ys A W e e k
Or ie n ta l Sta ff
M a ssa g e
B od y Sh a m p oo
Ta n n in g
Sa un a
539 SPA
B E A U T IF U L Y O U N G
A S IA N G IR L S
Profes s iona l
M a s s a ge
Open 7 days
9:30 am -11 pm
Fash ion M all
Rt. 6
7
5
7
9
7
8
570-341-5852
South Rt. 309 • Hazleton
(entrance in
back, 2nd
floor)
FREE
PARKING PARKING
570-861-9027
Spa 21
7
7
2
5
3
9
Magical Asian
Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
9:30 A.M.-12:30 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
7
7
2
5
4
1
7
9
0
8
7
1
Holistic Healing Spa
Holistic Healing Spa
Tanning & Wellness Center Tanning & Wellness Center
THE STAFF FROM HOLISTIC DAY SPA & TANNING THE STAFF FROM HOLISTIC DAY SPA & TANNING
WANT TO WISH YOU A HAPPY HOLIDAY! WANT TO WISH YOU A HAPPY HOLIDAY!
EVERY SUNDAY & MONDAY ALL DAY - DOUBLE TROUBLE WITH EVERY SUNDAY & MONDAY ALL DAY - DOUBLE TROUBLE WITH
CHRISTIANA & SAMANTHA! COME TO OUR SAY SPA TO SEE CHRISTIANA & SAMANTHA! COME TO OUR SAY SPA TO SEE
NIKKI! GET A HEAVENLY TOUCH MASSAGE WITH SELENA, NIKKI! GET A HEAVENLY TOUCH MASSAGE WITH SELENA,
SAMANTHA OR CHRISTIANA! ADONDA IS A SWEET SENSATION! SAMANTHA OR CHRISTIANA! ADONDA IS A SWEET SENSATION!
TASHA WILL GIVE YOU AN ULTIMATE MASSAGE. TASHA WILL GIVE YOU AN ULTIMATE MASSAGE.
WE APPRECIATE OUR CLIENTELE! WE APPRECIATE OUR CLIENTELE!
PLEASE CALL AHEAD FOR MISTY! 570-406-3127 PLEASE CALL AHEAD FOR MISTY! 570-406-3127
570-406-3127 • HELP WANTED! 570-406-3127 • HELP WANTED!
697 Market St. Kingston 697 Market St. Kingston
HOURS: 9:30AM-11:30PM HOURS: 9:30AM-11:30PM
7 DAYS A WEEK 7 DAYS A WEEK
The Aroma A Spa
405 N. River Street • Wilkes-Barre
ORIENTAL SHIATSU
BODY MASSAGE
570-991-8566
10 AM
to 10 PM
DAILY
7
9
0
9
4
9
S w e d is h & R e la xa tion M a s s a ge
750 Ju m p e r R oa d , W ilk e s - B a rre
M in u te s from
the M ohe ga n S u n Ca s in o
$10 off 60 m in . m a s s a ge
H EAVEN LY TOU CH
M AS S AGE
Tra c to rTra ilerPa rk ingAva ila b le
Sho w erAva ila b le
8 29- 30 10
Im m e d ia te H irin g
N ew Cu s to m ers Only
7
9
1
8
1
4
7
9
2
8
2
6
Secret Moments Massage
SENSUAL MASSAGE
PRIVATE BY APPOINTMENT
DAILY 10AM-10PM
81N EXIT 182 / 81S EXIT 191B
SCRANTON 570-702-2241
M&R Agency
Rt. 11, West Nanticoke
735-4150
$20 OFF
ANY SESSION, ANY DAY,
ANY TIME W/AD
EXPIRES 12-19-12 • NOWHIRING, INCENTIVES OFFERED
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
STOP IN, RELAX & ENJOY!
C
A
L
L
P
A
U
L
to
advertise
829.
7204
HEAD 2 TOE
Ask about our
daily specials
570-793- 570-793-
5767 5767
NOW HIRING! NOW HIRING!
OPEN
24/7
NEW GIRLS
AVAILABLE
INCALL/
OUT CALL
CREDIT CREDIT
CARDS CARDS
ACCEPTED ACCEPTED
P
A
G
E
6
6
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
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S
D
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D
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C
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M
B
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1
2
,
2
0
1
2
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MOVE IN FOR
XMAS!
1-2-3
Bedroom
Rentals in
Kingston,
Wyoming,
Wilkes-Barre,
Plains.
Call
Property Mgr.
for info &
appt.....
570-899-3407
HAPPY
HOLIDAYS!
PITTSTON
2nd floor, large and
modern. 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
computer room,
laundry room with
washer & dryer. Full
bath, kitchen with
stove, fridge and
dish washer. Fresh
paint and carpet.
Water and trash
incl. No smokers,
no pets. $550/mo
plus security.
570-881-9789 after
6PM
Line up a place to live
in classified!
SUGAR NOTCH
1st floor 2/3 bed-
rooms, beautiful and
bright, all new, Eco-
nomic gas heat/AC,
plenty of closets,
quiet location, wall
to wall, tile, rear
porch. No pets, ref-
erence + security +
lease $495/$595
570-822-2032
or 570-239-2752
SWOYERSVILLE
Spacious first floor.
2 bedrooms, new
heat, central air,
kitchen, bath, and
appliances. Incl.
coin-op laundry.
$650 plus security
and utilities. No
pets or smoking.
570-885-7434
Ask for Lauren
WEST WYOMING
Eighth Street
Beautiful, 2nd floor,
2 bedroom, 1 bath.
All appliances,
includes washer/
dryer & air condi-
tioning. Non smok-
er, security & refer-
ences, off street
parking, no pets.
$595 + utilities.
954-2972
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-
BARRE
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
RENT RENTAL AL
General Hospital
area. Deluxe
remodeled 1st
floor, kitchen,
appliances, Vic-
torian accents.
$625 + utilities. 2
YEARS, NO PETS
/SMOKING
/EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION.
570-288-1422
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC
WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Fabulous 1 bed-
room, hardwood
floors. A/C, marble
bath. Security sys-
tem. Laundry, off
street parking.
$650 570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
Newly renovated 2
bedroom apt. with
off street parking
for one car. Locat-
ed close to down-
town & Wilkes Col-
lege, at 412 S.
Franklin St. Mini-
mum one year
lease. $575/mo
with $575 security.
contact Bill
570-371-7762
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
815 N. Washington
1st floor, very large
1 bedroom, with
open floor plans.
W/w carpet, cus-
tom kitchen with
breakfast bar and
appliances. large
closets and stor-
age, coin-op laun-
dry, all utilities
included plus cable.
$625 + security
No pets.
570-814-1356
WYOMING
Large 1 bedroom,
second floor. Extra
room for den/study.
Includes heat,
water, garbage, off-
street parking. No
pets or smoking.
Proof of income,
background check.
No lease. $575
month plus 1
month security.
570-693-2415
Leave Message
To place your
ad call...829-7130
944 Commercial
Properties
LOCATION
MATTERS
PRIME OFFICE
SPACE
The Mack
Building
281 PIERCE ST.
Kingston, PA.
Refined office
suites, or
individual flexible
office spaces on
2nd floor
comprised of
approximately
1,300sq. ft.
Central A/C,
glass door
entrance, 6
rooms consisting
of waiting room,
French doors
leading to
conference
room(s), offices,
bathroom,
kitchenette, with
ample storage/
archive space
available, parking
lot area
professionally
maintained.
Multiple signage
opportunities:
Exterior Bronze
wall
plaque,Entrance
glass-doors,
Street frontage
sign, and
billboard
*Available
February 1st.
showing by
appointment only
570-472-1110
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
STOREFRONT
Glen Lyon. Unique
opportunity at
61-63 East Main St.
High Traffic Area.
570-881-0320
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
950 Half Doubles
AVOCA
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, washer
/dryer hookup,
Garage. Pets nego-
tiable. $600/month,
+ utilities, 1 month
security &
references.
570-852-9204
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
CHARMING & SPACIOUS
6 room, 2 bed-
room duplex,
includes 2nd &
3rd floor. Ample
closets. Washer /
dryer hook-up.
$575 / month +
utilities, security
& lease. No Pets.
570-793-6294
PITTSTON
109 LaGrange St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
New wood floors,
porches, big kitchen
with dishwasher, full
attic, basement, lots
of space! New gas
furnace & new win-
dows, small yard.
Easy on street park-
ing. Section 8 wel-
come. $625/month,
plus utilities. Pets
okay with additional
rent. 570-798-7051
PLAINS
SPACIOUS
Victorian charm, 3
bedroom, 1 bath
hardwood floors,
neutral decor,
stained glass win-
dow, large kitchen
Washer/ dryer
hook-up, off street
parking. No pets.
Reduced $675.
month + utilities,
security & lease.
570-793-6294
WILKES-BARRE
SPACIOUS 3 BEDROOM
1.5 bath half dou-
ble, full basement,
washer/dryer hook
up on first floor.
Large back yard,
off street parking
for two vehicles.
Credit check
required. $725/mo
+ utilities. call
570-328-2676
953Houses for Rent
CLARKS SUMMIT
4 bedrooms,
2 baths, all appli-
ances, washer/
dryer hookup, no
pets. $1,400/month
+ utilities & security.
Month to month
lease.
(610) 256-5352
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
2 bedroom home,
large yard, off
street parking.
$800/month.
570-675-3904
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DUPONT
7 room house with
3 bedrooms, 1 full
tile bath. Large
kitchen with beau-
tiful oak cabinets,
new stove,
fridge, carpeting,
flooring, draperies
& windows.
Washer/dryer
hook up on 1st
floor. Single car
detached garage.
Large yard. Gas
heat. Pets OK, no
smoking. $900/
month + utilities &
security. Close to
airport, I-81
& casino.
570-762-8265
EXETER
Beautiful magnifi-
cent Cape Cod style
home. 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, finished
lower level, 2 car
garage with a rear
deck area. Master
bedroom and bath
on first floor, new
carpets, recently
painted, hardwood
& tile floors, granite
counters & stainless
steel appliances in
kitchen. Gas heat.
$1500 per/ month.
570-479-6722
HARVEY’S LAKE
Month to month
lease. Furnished, 3
bedroom, living
room, kitchen bath,
washer/dryer, cable
and internet heat
included. Electricity
not included $1200
per month. No pets.
570-639-5041
KINGSTON HOUSE
Great location &
neighborhood. 3
bedrooms 1.5 bath,
dishwasher &
garbage disposal.
2 car garage. No
pets. $1000. per
month plus utilities
& 1 month security.
call 574-7904
leave message.
Available Dec. 1st.
PITTSTON
Remodeled single
home. 3 bedrooms.
Gas heat. No Pets.
$695/month & 1st
month, & security
deposit. Credit
Check Required.
570-479-0302
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
15 Filbert Lane
(off of Hazle St.)
3 bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, eat in
kitchen with stove.
Washer/dryer
hookup, fenced in
yard, off street
parking for 1 car.
$595 plus utilities
and security.
No pets.
570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 2
bath Town-
house with built
in garage.
$650/month plus
utilities. 1 month
and 1/2 security.
No Pets
570-647-5053
WYOMING
1 bedroom. Freshly
painted. New win-
dows. $500 month
+ utilities & a month
security. No pets.
570-693-3466
959 Mobile Homes
LAUREL RUN ESTATES
Mobile for rent.
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
shed, corner lot. Oil
heat. $600/month.
Call 570-823-8499
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Wash-
ers, Dryers, Refrig-
erators, Dishwash-
ers, Compactors.
Most brands. Free
phone advice & all
work guaranteed.
No service charge
for visit. 706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
C&C MASONRY &
CONCRETE
Absolutely Free
Estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-766-1114
570-346-4103
PA084504
1132 Handyman
Services
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
Selling a Business?
Reach more poten-
tial buyers with an
ad in the classified
section!
570-829-7130
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
AMERICA
PAINTING
HOLIDAY SPECIALS
Insured.
Senior Discount
570-855-0387
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
Line up a place to live
in classified! W
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GERARD BENNETT
AGE: 20
HOMETOWN: ASHLEY
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
MOVIE REVIEW, DEFINITELY.
IF YOU HAD TO PICK, WOULD YOU WANT SOMEONE WITH BEAUTY OR BRAINS? BEAUTY JUST
BECAUSE ANYONE CAN STUDY AND GET SMARTER, BUT YOU CAN’T CHANGE YOUR LOOKS.
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PHOTOS BY
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DITTMAR
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AGE: 22
HOMETOWN: THROOP
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
MODEL OF THE WEEK
FOR A GOOD TIME I … LINE DANCE HORRIBLY
WITH ALL MY GIRLFRIENDS AT THE HONKY TONK.
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APA - is a uniquely American beer with a crisp, medium body and light amber color. generous additions of Warrior and Cascade hops
provide a refreshing bitterness and vibrant citrus aroma. This style has been our number one selling beer for ten years and running.
A very drinkable yet hoppy year round favorite. very nice with grilled beef and other marinated meats. An ideal balance to any spicy dish.
5.1% ABV 40 IBU’s
L.T. VERRASTRO, INC. * IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR * 1-800-341-1200
FEATUREDATTHESE NEPA BEER DISTRIBUTORS FFEEATUREDA A T A TTHHEESSE NEPA BEER DDIISSTTRRIIBUT PP ORS
LACKAWANNA
A & A BEVERAGE WAREHOUSE .................. SCRANTON
A CLAUSE INC ................................. CARBONDALE
ABBEY BEVERAGE ............................... DICKSONCITY
BEER CITY U.S.A. ....................... S WASHINGTON AVE
BIRNEY BEVERAGE .................................. MOOSIC
BORO BEVERAGE ................................... MOSCOW
BREWERS OUTLET ............................. DUNMORE
CADDEN BROTHERS ........................ LUZERNE ST
CROWN BEVERAGE ........................ CLARKS SUMMIT
CLARKS SUMMIT BEVERAGE ............ CLARKS SUMMIT
FLANNERY BEER DISTRIBUTORS .............. MOOSIC ST
GREEN STREET BEVERAGE ..................... DUNMORE
HARRINGTON’S DISTRIBUTING ................. MINOOKA
JOE’S BEERMAN ..................................... PECKVILLE
NORTHPOCONOBEVERAGE .................... BILL’S PLAZA
OK BEERMAN LLC ...................... KEYSER & OAK ST
OLD FORGE BEVERAGE ..................... OLD FORGE
OLYPHANT BOTTLING COMPANY .............. OLYPHANT
PIONEER DISTRIBUTING ................. GREENRIDGE ST
TAYLOR BEVERAGE ................................ TAYLOR
MONROE
BREWSKIES BEVERAGE ............ E. STROUDSBURG
EAGLE VALLEY BEVERAGE ................ E. STROUDSBURG
LAUREL BEVERAGE ....................... STROUDSBURG
WALCOTT BEVERAGE ............. EAST STROUDSBURG
WEST END DISTRIBUTORS, INC. ................... GILBERT
PAUPACK AREA
BIG LAKE BEVERAGE ................................. TAFTON
HAMLIN DISTRIBUTORS .......................... HAMLIN
HONESDALE BEVERAGE .................... HONESDALE
NEWFOUNDLAND BEVERAGE ....... NEWFOUNDLAND
SHOOKYS DISTRIBUTING ........................ HAWLEY
WAYMART BEVERAGE ............................ WAYMART
LUZERNE
BEER SUPER ................................ WILKES BARRE
J & M UNION BEVERAGE ........................ LUZERNE
NANTICOKE BEER DISTRIBUTOR .......... NANTICOKE
PLAZA BEVERAGE ............................. PITTSTON
QUALITY BEVERAGE OF NEPA ....................... LAFLIN
LUZERNE
WYCHOCK’S BY-PASS BEVERAGES ....... WILKES-BARRE
WYCHOCKS MOUNTAIN TOP BEVERAGE ..... MOUNTAINTOP
HAZLETON AREA
ALL STAR BEER .................................... SUMMIT HILL
DUNBAR BOTTLING ............................. LEHIGHTON
HARMONY BEVERAGE ........................... BLAKESLEE
HIGHLAND BEVERAGE ....................... JIM THORPE
PARTY BEVERAGE ................................ CONYNGHAM
QUALITY BEVERAGE ............................... HAZELTON
T VERRASTRO ......................................... HAZLETON
WYOMING /SUSQUEHANNA COUNTIES
B & R DISTRIBUTING ...................... TUNKHANNOCK
LAKE WINOLA BEVERAGE ................ LAKE WINOLA
PLAZA BEVERAGE ....................... TUNKHANNOCK
WYOMING COUNTY BEVERAGE ........ TUNKHANNOCK
MONTROSE BEVERAGE ...................... MONTROSE
SUSQUEHANNA BEVERAGE ................. GREAT BEND
CLIFFORD BEVERAGE .............................. CLIFFORD

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