THE LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES

A CATALOGUE
OF

ENGLISH COINS
IN

THE

BRITISH MUSEUM.

ANGLO-SAXON SERIES.
Volume
II.

(WES SEX AND ENGLAND TO TEE NOB MAN CONQUEST.)

BY

HERBERT

A.

GEUEBER,
AND

F.S.A.,

ASSrSTANT KEU'ER OF COINS

AND MEDALS;

CHARLES FRANCIS KEARY,

M.A.,

F.SA.

WITH ONE MAP AND THIRTY-TWO PLATES.

LONDON: PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES.
C.

B. QUARITCH, 15, Piccadilly, W. Henry Frowde, Oxford University Press Warehouse, Amen Court, E.C. RoLLiN & Feuardent, 19, Bloomsbury Street, W.C, and 4 Rue Louvois, Paris; A, AsiiER & Co. Kegan Paul, TRiJBNER & Co. Longmans, Green & Co.
; ;

1893.

r^)si)OM
•Ul.\li;t>
liV

:

WIM.IAM CUiWhlS AND SONS, LIMlTliD,

bTAUFuKI) ^Tla:KT AND CIIABING CKUSS.

PRii::

-.^-Aii.

CJ
PREFACE
BY THE KEEPER OF
COINS.

This volume of the Catalogue of Englisli Coins in the British

Museum
Eadgar
the

contains descriptions of the Coins of
to

Wessex from
England from

Ecgheorht

Eadwig, and

of

those

of

All

to the

Norman

Conquest.

Taken

in conjunction with

first

volume, which dealt

with the coinages of Mercia,
it

Kent, East Anglia, and Northumbria,

completes the descrip-

tion of all the Anglo-Saxon Coins in the National Collection. 'C3'

In the
of those
inserted.

lists of

moneyers given in the
in

first

volume the names
were

not

represented

the

National Collection

In the present volume this scheme has been further
all

extended by including
not

known types

of Coins,

whether or

represented

in

the

Museum

series.

The

names of

moneyers and the descriptions of the types of Coins not in
the

Museum

are printed in italics.

As the Coins
and not the

in the

volume are

all Silver

Pennies (unless
is

otherwise described), the weight only of each piece
size or metal.

given,

This volume has been compiled by Mr. H. A. Grueber, F.S.A.,
Assistant Keeper of Coins, and by Mr. Charles F. Keary, F.S.A.,

the author of the

first

volume.

Mr. Keary

is

responsible for

the Introduction, and Mr. Grueber for the description of the
Coins, the Indexes, the Illustrations, and for seeing the

work

through the

press.

BAKCLAY

y.

HEAD.

2 1 .'55135

CONTENTS.
PAGB

PREFACE INTRODUCTION
Arrangement

iii

Contents of Present

......... ......
Volume
in

xi
xi

xi
xii

Typos and Moneyors not

Relation of coinage to history

History
Ec^'beorht

Rise of the power of Wessex

...... .......... .....
National Collection included
.

xii
xiii xiii

xiii

Battles of Camel ford and Ellandune

Extent of power of Ecgbeorht
Institution of a

.....
.

.

.

.

xiv

xv
xvii

West Saxon coinage Distinction between Kentish and West Saxon types Type derived from Prankish coinage
.

.

.

.

First

coming of the Vikings

.... .....
.
. . . . .

.

xix

xx
xxi
xxii
xxiii
xxiii

Coins carried by Vikings from England to Ireland

^thelwulf
Viking attacks on England continued
jEthclbald's rebellion and the j^artitiun of the

Kingdom.

xxv
xxvii

iEthelbald

Extreme
^thelbearht
.ffithelred I

rarity of ^Ethelbald's coins

.........
England
from
. '

cannot be explained

xxvii
xxviii
xxviii xxviii

Vilving invasion of

The
'

three great invasions of

covered by the present volume

Vikinga

'

distinguished

and eleventh centuries
Republican character of
Invasion of Wessex

tiie

Alfred
First

..........
payment
of

...... .... .... .......
Danes
.
'

England during the period
xxix
the
.

of

tenth
. .

.

xxix

Vikings

xxx
xxxii
xxxii
xxxiii

ransom
of

to the
.

Vikings

London coinage

Hal fdan

.....
. . .

.

xxxiv

VI

rONTKNTS.
Unnuuy—JVAtntl—roHtintiril.
rriici<«

<linK« "f ({ullKjnn'H

army
.
.

I'lw't-

of

Wwlnioro
tin-

.

Im'n«i«' in

|M>wor of

Kiij,'liHh kinfjH

UikIiUi of coliiHgt!

r<-«C!rvr<l

for over-king
.

lABt m-riouH nttiy-k of the Vikings

Clironologiral orrangonifiit of ^Tiifrcds coinage

Viking. coinages, bnrbaroua Imitotions of Wcbbcx coinage,
A<-

FninkiMil

and Scandinavian moneyers
'

.

Snniiiinry of

Viking' coinages

Jjidwwird

tiic

Elder

Rebellion of iEthclbald
F'xteiminn of

West Saxon
//Hr(;»i

Iluilding of the

.....
rule

Sulimiiwion nf Vikinj:;3

))y

'armies'

Improvement of coinage under Eadweard the Elder
ifltlielHtnn

.......
in

Scandinavian States

Northern Europe
.

South-Humbrian and Northumbrian Danes
CJreatnesB of ^Ethelstan

Nmiiismatic records of extension of English rule
Uiittle of

Brunauburg

Eadniund

..... ..... .......
the Northumbrian

Kndmund and
Eadn'd

Danes

.

Submission of the Five Burgs and of Northumbria

Kovolt of Northumbria

........ ....
peace begins with Eadwig

Nortliumbriau coinage an evidence of power of Danish

Kings of Northumbria
Ett'lwi;:

Em of txternal
Ea«lg5ir

Religious struggles

.... ........ ..... •••.....
to

English and Danes in Wales

Homage
Kavlwtaril
II.

Eadgar on Dee

Coinnge of Eadgar

.... ..... .....
....

^

.Klholretl II

Cntues of the decoy of the English nation
Bncial and religious divisions

<

Renewal of Nortliern invasions >lnf Tryggvasmi

CONTENTS.
HiSTOEY

vu

—jEthelied

11.

continued.

Battle of Maldou

Olaf and Svend

JSthelred's revenge on

Massacre of

St. Brice

.... ....
Danes
in

Ixxiii

Ixxiv

England

Ixxv
Ixxvi Ixxvi
Ixxvii Ixxvii
Ixxviii

Fall of Olaf Tryggvason at Svold

Marriage of ^thelred and
Invasion of Svend
.

Emma

Dancgeld

.....
.... ....
.

Conquest of England by Svend

Ixxix Ixxix

Death of Svend
Invasion of Cnut

Ixxix

Eadmund

Ironside

Lxxx Ixxx
Ixxx

Treaty of Olney

Death of Eadmund Ironside
Coinage of Ethelred
navia

......
II.
;

its

great influence

ScandiIxxxi
Ixxxii

Cnut
Scandinavian Empire ruled by Cnut
Establishment of standing army of huscarls
.

Ixxxii
Ixxxiii

Peace established by Cnut
Cnut's viceroys

....
^theling
. .

Ixxxiv
Ixxxvi
Ixxx^^ii

Harold

I

Murder
Harthacnut

of iElfred the

Ixxxvii
Ixxxviii Ixxxviii

Fall of Cnut's Empire

.....
.

Coinage of Danish kings

Ixxxix
xcii xcii
xciii

Edward the Confessor The house of Godwine Norman influence
Harold II

xciv
xciv

Invasion of Harthacnut and Tostig
Battle of Stamford Bridge

Norman Conquest Coinage of Edward
MONEYERS

.....
. .
.

xcv
xcv
xcvi

the Confessor and of Harold II

XCVlll
xcviii

Large number of moneyers' names
Difficulties in the

way of determining exact form intended Earlier moneyers' names all Anglo-Saxon forms Appearance of Frankish and Scandinavian names
Status of moneyer
Signification of
'

xcix
cii
ciii
ciii

Mouct.,'

...... "...
'

.

Moneta

cv

Vtll

CONTENTS.
TAOK

Tviw
llmir
n-lifcioiw
(Icaifni*.

cvi

rimniotcr
ImiMingii,

Kloml

Ac, on coinB

Origin or myal buat, crown, helmet, &c.
roitraituro on coinH
Inilc|M>nJfnt

.... .....
• .

cvii
cvii
cvii

cvii
cviii

chamctcr of typos of English coins

MrjfTfl

Anglo-Saxon laws relating

Qrowtb of mints
Diflloiilticfl in

identifying mints

Chanj^ps of dies

........ ...... ........
to

mints

.

...
. .

cviii

cviii

ciz

ex

ex
cxi-cxxi

Historical notes on doubtful and new mints BuMMAUT of History and Anglo-Saxon coinage Map or Enoi^nd illustrating the Anglo-Saxon Mints.
. .

....

cxxi

CATALOGUE—
Kingdom of Wessex
ECGUEoRIlT
1
1 1

Moneyers

Ty|KS
Coins
.aitbelwulf
.

1

6

9 9
9
.

Mont'jers

Types
Coins
iEtholhald

13
21
21

Monoyere
Coins
.£tl)clbearlit

21

22 22

Moneyers

Typos
Coins
iBthclred
I.

.

22 23

27
.

Moneyers

27 27 28

Types
Coins
.£1frpd

.

32
.

Bloneyers

32
33 38

Types
Coins

.

CONTENTS.
Kingdom of Wessex continued. Eadweard the Elder
Moneyers

IX
PACE

Types
Coins
.ffithelstan

Moneyers.

Types
Coins

Eadmund
Moneyers

........ ......... ........ .........

83

83
84 87
101

101

103

105

122
122 123 124 142

Types
Coins

Eadred
Moneyers

Types
Coins

.......... .........

142

143
144

Eadwig
Moneyers

156 156
156
158

Types
Coina

Kingdom of England
Eadgar
Moneyers
Types
Coins

........ .......... .........
II.

163 163 163

165 168

Eadweard
Types
Coins

(The Martyr)

Moneyers

.........
.

191
191

192
.

192 197
197

^thelra3d II

Moneyers
Types
Coins

.........
.........

202 208

Cnut
Moneyers

243
243 248
255 302

Types
Coins

Harold

1

Moneyers
Types
Coins

302
304 307

CONTENTS.
KiNitiN)M or V.s^^l.^Sl^-continu«(l.

MoiM'jTrn

...-•••

320

Typwi
CoinH

^^^

325
Confessor

Kdwnnl

tlio

329

Mom-yoni

329 334 339
460

Typ<*
Coins
Iliiroia II

Monoycre

......•••• .........
......... ........

460
461

Typos
Coins

461

Ikpkxrs
(Jcniml Index

475

477

Index of Moneyora

495
532 537
541

IndcxofTyjKB
Index of MiuU)

Tables

INTRODUCTION.

The

present volume of the

Catalogue of English Coins Arrange*^^^^"

continues and completes the description of the coins which

were struck in this country between the Coming of the English and the Norman Conquest. As it was impossible to describe in one volume the whole number of pieces, issued during this period, which are contained in the National Collection, the arrangement adopted has been to distribute the coinage into certain classes corresponding to the different heptarchic kingdoms in which the coins were struck. The heptarchic kingdoms of which we possess coins are five Mercia, Kent, East Anglia, Northumbria, and Wessex. The
coinages of the
first

four of these districts are
of

described in
for

Volume
These
its

I.

The coinage
it

Wessex has been reserved

the present volume, as
last

merges into that of All England.
say, rather, this single series in

two

series

more extensive than those kingdoms put together and if the first object kept in view had been the preservation of a uniformity in the size of the volumes, it would have been better to describe in Volume I. the coinage of Wessex down, say, to the reign of Eadgar, and to reserve the coinage of All England and Eadgar's coins may fairly be so described— But this arrangement would have for the second Volume. into a series which is really continuous involved breaking and the compilers of the Catalogue felt that that would be
completeness
is

— or

of course

of the other

;

too

great a

sacrifice

to

superlicial uniformity.

make for the sake As it is, we see that

of a merely

the body of

the present volume contains, with indexes, &c., 54.4 pages
as

description of

compared with the 282 pages of Volume I., and the 4106 coins as compared with 2558 previously

825.y the EntjliHli njoment i'liU'A. 802 to a.lo collection of Anplo-Saxon coins preferred.Mng the In the last contents of tho Catalogue somewhat beyond the limits suggested by its title and its immediate purpose. with strict two centuries and a half. volume the plan was adopted of enlarf. the Introduction to in a and the body of the preceding volume. aoHoribod. for it would be impossible to repeat at length either the history of the coinage or the description of certain series of coins there given. period of history covered by the coinage described in volume extends from the accession of Ecgbeorht of the lirst king of Wessex who struck coins to the AVcssex Norman Conquest. a. again. for. The only details to which we need descend are those which immediately afi'ect the issue of the These will not be many. It is. of in the HritiHli MuHoum. a period of To speak. or from a.xii INTRODUCTION. in the lists of monejers. not the part of the compilers of the Catalogue to enter into any- thing like a detailed history of England for the period under consideration. The comparative poverty of the National Collection in certain branches— as. or. Tlina tho wlu. in the coins of iEthelred II. It is necessary to assume that is the reader of the present Introduction has read.d. if the exproHHion bo previons to tho Norman Conquest. for example. As a rule. accuracy we should date the beginning of the period from the Tho this — — battle of Ellandune. coins struck l. which the history of the currency touches political history is in the wider social aspects of the latter. It illustrates . the point at coinage.d. To some extent first the present period overlaps that covered by tho volume.. by inserting. 106d.d. however. it is not probable that Ecgbeorht struck any money before that event. names which are not represented in the Of the present volume the scheme National Collection. numbers at the present has been further extended to include all types of coins whether or not represented among the Museum coins. as will presently be seen. of which the Stockholm Museum possesses a much larger number than does the British Museum rendered this extension of the jdan of the Catalogue highly desirable if not — absolutely necessary. or position to read.

These struggles.d. Egbert. the king of Wessex. struggles between the heptarchic kingdoms of England. with whom begins the continuous (penny) coinage of England and it retained this pre-eminence under Coenwulf. Beorhtric. the peaceful or disturbed state of the country by or its barbarism . 789-802). Ofia's son. For there was in reality nothing essentially new in the policy of See Die.INTRODUCTION. that of the long Ecgbeorht. Nat.* We need not here stay to discuss the theories which have been enunciated of the imperial ambition which might have been fostered in Ecgbeorht's mind by his friendship with the first emperor of the New Western Empire. Mercia rose for a second time to pre-eminence under Ofia. Bhg. and was continued till Beorhtric's death. first to the rivalries of Northumbria and Mercia. which had taken England and the Scandinavian countries of Europe. Some of the coinages with which we have to deal are records of the recovery of England by the English kings for we find . In their reigns the kings of Kent and East Anglia were little better than viceroys to the kings of Mercia.v. taken in connection with those of some neighbour time by . Ofta's son-in-law.^Ethelstan and his successors striking at mint places which a short while before had been in the hands of the Danes. as was pointed out in the last volume. is a record of the rapprochement place between details of history. Ecgbeorht. The reign period in the history of Ecgbeorht brings to a close the first great Histoky. secondly to the rivalries of Mercia and Wessex. of the English. that is for : a period of thirteen years (a. Xlll its excellence the wealth of the country at any jmrticular its quantity. s. At another time the coinage of England. was driven from Wessex and took refuge at the Court of Charles the Great. were due chiefly. It is probable that his exile dates from the marriage of Beorhtric to the daughter of Offa. But even in such cases as these we must not look to the coins to give us exact dates or any of the minute countries. the legitimate prince. . was in much the same position.

victories over the Celts (First harrying of the West Welsh. the 815.licy now kin^. victory of Camelford a. Mr.sh king to concern himsolf much with hiH conquest. a. There is jxrhaps a difficulty * * nferring the him' {him tocirdon. was favoured by the failure of the great line of Ofifa. itH howovor. The Clironicle continues. uiulor hor W0H8OX jM. I. and Essex. Sussex. turned to him ') to EogUorht. supremacy of Wessex. . not a descemlant.d.'* EUandune ' : . . the policy of Wessex required that Ecgbeorht should.' and refers the him to Rnldre-l. EcgboorlifH policy wrh the who Mt thomselves Hutlii-irntly Mroup. . of whom WHS a rehiticin. speaking He then sent . if possible.d."Ethelwulf his son of Ecgbeorht with Ealhstan his bishop. such as Inc. as is probable. After his not in any sense a national English warfare. Celtic neighl)()urH. A.l)oorlit ^fa^lJ luay nitftii only a neighbour. on the ground that they had Ux>n originally unjustly subdued by his family. by the rise of kings of inferior worth. and accession disputed succession. being national wars. and the South Saxons and the East Saxons turned to him because they had been unjustly forced from his kinsmen. ftn.I). 822 or 4. to cntcrtftin The poHition of WoHsex. 'They drove Baldred the king over the Thames and the Kentish men threw off their allegiance to him. Earle translates toei'rdon as 'turned away from. 825). that Mercia had taken advantage of them to invade Wessex. . to Kent with a large force and they drove Baldred the king north And the Kentish people and those of over the Thames. ' ' p. assert his supremacy over ]\Iercia. not of Ofta's line. or he would once more sink into Ecgbeorht's Welsh wars were so far from iusigniticance.xiy INTROniTCTION. as jin outpoHt of iMigli. This warfare in which and the West Ecgbeorht was first engaged was the concern of Wessex. But Mercia was no longer as great Ecgbeorht as it had been when Ecgbeorht fled to Fraucia. Surrey.' for this translation in . of nil the lioi)tftrchic kiiiKH it. by a (Deposition of Ceolwulf. rondiring the whole pajssage. Iviii.. See Vol. and. and Wulfheard his ealdorman.> hcrr muiDt K<-j. of Beornwulf. as did the men of Surrey. • From hi$ nutgum. But the kinsmen prolwbly tho former kings of Wessex. obliged the subjugation of North Welsh of Wales proper Welsh of Cornwall.) Beornwulf was defeated by Ecgbeorht at the battle of This victory established the before spoken of.

we may be sure. more especially among barbarous or half barbarous peoples and in reading history we are apt to give too definite a meaning to such words as suhmission.' . much discussion among According to the Chronicle it is the same as the imperial title which Beda bestows upon some of the early heptarchic kings. protection of Ecgbeorht.* and made submission. all that Ecgbeorht required. which had no real political significance. A title of pre-eminence which is not bestowed upon the famous and magnificent Offa could not have had any strict relation to the possession of real power.S. and The year following the East Anglians too prayed the when Beornwulf the king of Mercia sought to punish them. Still. This event coinage. CEgir's door. The same fate befell Beornwulf s successor Ludican. It is now that we first hear of the title of Bretwalda about which there has been so historians. 942. XV the West Saxon kingdom of "Wessex heralds the foundation of The addition of Essex to the does not seem to have been maintained. used here fur mountain a difference) the name OSgisdyr (the River tlie is sinii)ly ' northern boundary of Mercia door. 829 the Northumbrians even consented to acknowledge his over-lordship. an empty title is quite as often an object 'of ambition as real power. or what was the bretwalda-dom which the But concerning the latter Chronicle says is the same thing. The formal act.' Eyder). but in a fashion ascribes this imperium to which appears so arbitrary that it is difficult to formulate any tenable theory as to what it could have signified. a. certain kings. they defeated and slew him. we are told met him at Dore (near Sheffield). I think we may assume that it was rather a bookish distinction than a real one. The Northumbrian kings con- Beda . or by the stream Dore. Chron.INTRODUCTION. (Earlo) pass. Concerning the real power of Ecgbeorht in England the one thing of which we may be sure is that The Northumbrians it did not extend beyond the Humber. supremacy. Ecgbeorht obtained a sort of supremacy over the East Engle and in a. was. The word (witli \Vc ' may compaie See A.d. tribute. * This Dore continuctl to be s.

Morrift rcinftincd for Wessox kingH. for some tinio aftor the victory of Ellandune. p. In one case the King of Kent was especially debarred from accession to the throne of Wessex and in another instance we have the relations of the kingdoms reversed. It is also the Inst event of importance previous to the Viking invasion of southern England. But this inversion of the usual arrangement was the result of a . including therewith Surrey and the decayed kingdom of Sussex. had not the Viking invasions given a wholly new complexion to English history. xsv. the eldest son or the heir designate was usually King of Kent. . allied some generations the allies of the for the most part both in policy and in however. When the head of the house was on the throne of Wessex. each retaining no doubt its distinctive laws and customs and generally they were governed by different members of the West Saxon House. of the two kingdoms would have revived. that the ancient rivalries It is probable. blood. as diHtinguiahed from its direct rule.* The establishment then of the kings of Wessex in the supremacy in Heptarchic England is the first great event in English history covered by the period over which extend the coinages described in this volume. all the territory south of the Thames. £"gSbL '^^*^ beginning of the West Saxon coinage must not be • See below. the father reigning as King of Kent and the son as King of Wessex. however (the latter name henceforward includes Surrey and Sussex) continued to be separate kingdoms. the kings of wuM very great. ft coinage of tlicir own. Ovrr Mrrriii. Over Kent.xvi liiiuc. . the power which the king of Wessex acquired after the battle of Ellandune was much greater we have seen that as a result of the battle all this country. was definitely added to the possessions of the House of Cerdic. uninflnonced by tliat of Houthorn Knglutid. Wessex and Kent. After their long rivalry. rebellion. the influence of Wessex. that is to say.l to iHHUP INTHODITTION.

as we shall presently have occasion to see. the last kings of Kent. than there is from the coinage of Ecgbeorht to that of his son so that on this ground alone it would be fair to assume that Ecgbeorht began to strike coins only as a king of Kent. find that eight at least of Ecg- beorht's three-and-twenty moneyers. who reigned not long before the and on the coins of Ecgbeorht. the coins of his predecessors. We must remember. Applying this test. or of and by the types of Ecgbeorht's coins as compared with those of the same rulers. . his contemporaries coins of a king of Mercia battle of Ellaudune. that these men were probably coining in Kent before the battle of Ellaudune. struck either for the kings of Mercia or Kent in other words. and that when we find. Thus of iEthclwulf s thirty-eight moneyers a much smaller proportion. and then for the other. the probability is that these moneyers were Keutishmen who struck first for one master of their country. The reader must be referred to the Introduction to the preceding volume for the history of the introduction of a coinage into this country. further.INTRODUCTION. looked upon as bronglit about XVU by the wide conquests of Ecgbcorht. This is the coins of Ecgbeorht as shown almost conclusively by the names of moneyers on compared with the names on . The same conclusion is enforced by a comparison of Ecgbeorht's types with those of his predecessors in Kent. There is therefore a greater air of continuity from the coinage of Ecgbeorht's predecessors in Kent to that of Ecgbcorht himself. we . This is as many as the average of moneyers who continue in a new reign from the preceding one. are survivals from the preceding reign. and of the intimate relations which long subsisted between the currencies issued on the two . the Archbishops of Canterbury. so much as by the incidental fact that his conquests included Kent. The coinage of this king is in fact really a Kentish rather than a West Saxon coinage. as we do. only about six. the same moneyers' names occurring on the again. that many of the coins of the kings of Mercia were probably likewise struck in Kent.

it is quite possible that it continued to do till death. we shall. as will one incident in the numismatic history of the West Saxon kings best explainable on the without one presently this king's appear. Nay. — ception perhaps of Northumbria. v. &c. The close the purpoHcH of internal trade in this country.). is that the coinage was then as much used for purposes of commerco between England and France as for from the close rcliitionHliii) relationship between the English censes witli Ecgbeorht's reign . iEtholbald. It till after the death of Ecgbeorht's grandson. long before the introduction of an Anglo-Saxon coinage into this country (Vol. for example. be safe to rely upon this isolated piece . find supposition that. Wessex. on her side.xviii INTRODUCTION. moreover. A. it need hardly be said. We have. had not experienced the yet we t)f a currency before the time of Ecgbeorht cannot suppose that in other elements of civilization Wessex was behind her rival hcptarchic kingdoms with the ex\Yant . TIio conclusion to be buIgb of the EnRlisli Chnnnfl. and the Frankish coinages and. would not. the usual money of The reckoning by the solidus of account is found.s. we know. a previous to the accession of Ecgbeorht and in the Wessex did not feel the need of currency. account. usual one. however. I. an admirable code of laws in those of Ine. in the West Saxon laws the value of parts of cattle the same reckoned in and this makes it probable that the custom of cattle payments was still largely in use though no doubt payment by weight of metal was the — parts of the ox. we see that while in the latter the fines imposed arc evidently reckoned in a current coinage. p. If wo compare the laws of Ine with the earlier or contemporary Kentish laws (those of iEthelbearht or of "NVihtred). in the Wessex laws they are reckoned in the solidus. its place is before long taken by a relationship between the coinage of England and those of the Peoples of the North. — money of account . the eye. the horn. as we shall have occasion to see in the latter part of this sketch. It possessed. drawn between the Prankish and English iiioiicy. Kent still provided all the currency of the south'. earlier years of his reign.

and 6.). PL ix. 796-822]. of course. has prototype in the coins of Coenwulf. has also a prototype in the coins of Ceolwulf king of Mercia. money for Wessex.d. in his life 'Rex iSaxonum wna ' unknown before the time of Alfred. the king lb. Tliose coins. Agreeably with the been generally adopted in this catalogue. I. principle. as 806-825]. vi. PL xi. 70. 5.d. Types 69. This attribution is perhaps upon the whole the most reasonable. 4 (reverses). king Ih. is incorrect. the reverses of xv. viii.d. and was not common afterwards. we find that (as has been already said) the large majority of the former are only copies. I. 11 we know. and the Archbishops of Canterbury. king of Kent. p.* which we have j^laced last in the list of Ecgbeorht's types. is from coins of Baldred.. pp. PL cf. p. title Nat. (obverse) are copied [a. it seems most reasonable to ascribe to it those with the legends SAX and SAXON lORVM (for Saxonum). If we attribute any of Ecgbeorht's Thus ii. p. nor even to assert that Ecgbeorht did not strike coins to Wessex. Type may be derived from the coins of Ceolwulf Vol. says that the Freeman.. of Mercia [a. 9 (reverse). whom Ecgbeorht drove out of Kent. 822-823 or 824]. Type iv. lb. For at any rate these types are original and owe nothing to the influence of coins struck in Kent before it was acquired by the West Saxons. king I. probably only developments of the type of the lb. 3. of placing the coins with the indications of a mint-name before those which have none. XIX of evidence. PL viii. probably clue only to the ignorance of the moneyer or of the clerk of . 796-806]. its p. are all coins of Baldred. (reverse) xv.Alfred who gave him liis pattern. 7 (obverse).). Type Types (obv. 4. If we compare the types of Ecgbeorht's coins with those of the coins of the kings of Mercia and Kent. Biog. ix. and (reverse) are from coins of CiiSred. PL xi. vii. ' is a ridiculous form. 7 (reverses). and xii. xvi. ix. which has * ' Saxoniorum (Die. PL xi. Type calls for special notice. 40. 68. p. of Mercia [a. those pieces i. 35.d. the predecessor of Baldred [a.. show that the former statement .INTRODUCTION. 40. lb. 8. 70. The obverses of Types xi.. king of Kent This.

iu of Charles the Bald.XX which flpcm typo irt INTUODUCTION. But this nrgument has. whatever may ho thouglit of the otlier types. or whether all should not rather bo ascribed to ' ' C'hnrloB the Duld.rtz. who came to the throne after The reverse of this Type i. f. 7. and to the possibility that this imitation of Prankish coins may have inaugurated • Tliia derivation of Ecgbeorht's (AC coins from the i^% (or |fc&^) coins of ("hnrlcnmgiio has an important bearing npon French nTiniismatics.jri. S64 I'JO) {EdMum it Pistense. Archbishop see Vol. o. xxii. of the death of Ecgbeorht. r. who p. bishop's coin was copied from that of the West Saxon king. so far as I know. i.r Li. PI.d.d. that first coins struck in Ecgbeorht's reign . . a. to have upon thorn tlio monogram tlio of the city reign. never Ijcen employed by French numisnintittt^. II. 814. xiii. for is this the monogram on the reverse (C^C) k<^s without doubt copied from the Karolus-monogram on Now Charlemagne died the coinage of Charles the Great. it extends long subsequent to it so that there is nothing to negative the supposition that the arch. and therefore. and the monogram was not again brought into in A. And though it is an original type it is far from improbable that ovitlently one struck in it was one of the reason.. I. use on the Frankisli coinage until the days of Charlemagne's grandson. .. and thirty years tvpe The fact that tlie or more lH-fort> the date of the edict of Pitres. and made is the sole Uy>\\ on. of Ciiiit<«rhury are made tlie first typo of The Kont. But of Canterbury (a. we may feel pretty sure that it was in use before the accession of CeolnoS. 833-870) though the archiepiscopate of CeolnoS begins before the doath of Ecgbeorht.^ his future issues. re-established this type. p.. is decisive of the controversy. at the edict of Pitrcs. For it was lit one time keenly ilisputed among French numismatists whether any of llu> coins wliirh bear tiiis Carol us or 'Karolus' monogram were to be ultrihutrd to Charlemagne. Ecgbeorht's intimate relations with Charlemagne give a certain interest to this example of one of the types of his coins derived from one of those of the western emperor.). Knplisli coinage I>efore found copied on the the accessi.* Ecgbeorht occurs also on the coins of CeolnoS. In truth. from the occurrence of this type in the Delgany hoard (see below. Charles the Bald. tliis one must have hoou issued suhsequcnt to the battle of Ellandune.D.

the chronicler tells us for the next year the pirate fleet was shipwrecked near Monkwearmouth and the crews were drowned or slain. a. And this interest is the greater from the fact above alluded to. In the year 787. Viliiujg in Western Cliristcn- . S. p. (Ciinib. followed upon the supremacy of Wessex in the battle of Ellandune. three ships of the pirates landed Beaduheard. 794 cf. S. driven thence. &c. 795). 8-9 Kcary. The attacks next fell upon South Wales. or 78!). according to the Saxon Chronicle. ' ' * Gwent.d. under the leadership of a certain Turgesius or Thorgisl. It went so far that in a. (Toa<l) R. 790. (Tudd) R. after some years of fighting. which. This Thorgisl. now agreed. . Chron.* From about this time onwards the pirates began to make settlements on the Irish coast. 832 a great royal fleet f of Vikings came to Ireland. on the Northumbrian coast.d.INTRODUCTION. founded a short-lived coast. that close relationship between English and Frankish coins ceases with this or the following reign. pp. came for the first time to Ireland (a. s. In 793 the pirates appeared in quite a different quarter. Ult. . pp. 8. . Assoc). . 4-5 t 795 Ann. After the introduction of a coinage by Ecgbeorht. and the Vikings. Arcliax)!. a. there was no other event of great importance for the history of southern England or the history of its coinage until the invasion of the country by the Vikings. 174 and uyto. and slaughtered the greater part of the monks of Cuthbert's foundation on that island. where they fell upon the holy island of Lindisfarne. WaroftheGaec1hll. which for the next halfcentury was to bear the principal brunt of their ravages. a. killed the port-reeve. according to the true date. s. upon the southern trifle took some of booty and sailed away again. The saint revenged himself. XXI thougli the accidents of commercial relationhave on the whole much more to do with determining the types of coins than royal alliances or enmities.&c. War. The preparations for this event had already begun. his coinage sliip . Four Mast. it may be assumed we are final assertion of the . The first appearance of the Vikings was in the previous and so far as we can ascertain the first attack century made by these northern pirates was upon the English coast. dmn.

kingdom in tho northern lialf of Irolanrl— in Loth-Cuind or Conn'n lialf. 830 and it seems probable that all of them. of these coins could have been struck was a. and the place it has been carried. but from Ireland. The latest date at which any .xxii INTRODUCTION. The combined army was met and defeated by Ecgbeorht at * Hengestdune (Hengstone). with a few of Ecgbeorht's coins was discovered in Delgany. that the coming of this great fleet of ThorViking attacks upon England iiogin again and there seems good reason to believe that these renewed attacks came. than to suppose that it was carried oflF to Ireland by the Vikings who attacked Sheppey in a. (now Sir John) Evans.t and that event put an end to the Viking See the pnper by t Jlr. HI'. sqq.. a.d. in Ireland. if not actually struck in the county of Kent (which may very well have been the case with all). 842 to a. Chron.d. in or about the year — — 1874. near Wicklow. " Num.d. that the pirates who carried their hoard over to the sister island. 836 the crew of a Viking fleet of thirty-five dfft-atod the English at Charmouth. There seems no better explanation of all the circumstances attending this deposit. not directly from the Baltic or the North Sea. 835. Chrvn.D. were Ix'sidcs many other settlements of Vikings on the Scnndiimviftn tlio division cnllod iHlnnd. [ 1882. and in 838 the Vikings allied themselves with the Celts of Cornwall for an attack upon the king of the West Saxons.d. kings of Kent and Archbishops of Mercian kings. p. . it is highly probable. " A lioard of coins found at IX-lgany in Ireland. the date to latest coin of the which the (the east coast of Ireland) to which hoard belongs. AS. For who else but these Vikings were at that period likely to have traversed the sea between the two countries ? And though it is not certain. were at any rate current there. TliorgiBl's iJut there kingdom lasted from a. The first attack was upon A hoard of English coins some of the island of Shcppey. It is just before the gisl to Ireland . s. 835 = 838?]. 61. some of Canterbury. had come thence to sail England.* In A.

sides of England the Northmen were more active than they were in this country. 850. a. S. the Ehine. and at the head of his fleet of 350 sail he steered to tlie English coast. who died either in a. Chron. One attack on England. The leader of the expedition was a Dane. Eorik by name. nqq.d. No. It occurred in a. (841). sailed inside the island of Thanet and up the Stour to Canterbury. and the Elbe. Kcary. has to be noticed. On both (842) §. .. attacks in XXUl England during the reign of Ecgbeorht. Fuhl. and is confirmed in 889. 303. 839. And it is about the time of the first cessation of the Viking raids on the English coasts that much more serious and determined ones began on the towns and abbeys which lay along the chief rivers of France and Germany. even after the breaking up of this in 845. In Ireland they had. were renewed. . || * We have a charter of Ecgbeorht and uEthclwulf which seems It is first written in to give us the exact date of Ecgbeorht's death. 3-car is the Still this and we cannot be absolutely certain between the J 1I>. the Seine. II s. last expression is not exact. more serious than the preceding ones. be seen that the chronology is confused for this period. the Garonne. got so far as to establish a temporary Scandinavian kingdom and. Bert. 850. and was due to the successes of the Vikings upon the continent. who for a time had held a fief of the empire. 837. East Anglia. Ann. § lb. He had now adopted the life of a Viking. and from Canterbury he and his fleet came up the Thames to attack — . 838. the Loire. Codex J)ipl. Xant.d. We find the Vikings in the south of England defeated at Southampton and victorious at Portsraouth(840)t and in the eastern shires. 838 or a. Lincolnshire.d. and at the latter date ^Ethclwulf says that this first of his reign (Kemble. The attacks on Ireland probably came from the Norsemen of the west coast of Norway the attacks on France came from the Baltic countries (Denmark and South Norway). Ann. as we have seen. &c. England lay between the two streams. I. 839. pp.INTRODUCTION. 852.* At the beginning of ^thelwulf's reign the Viking attacks -3]:thelwulf. 850 or 851. their attacks continued to be almost incessant. t A. 318-321. It will p. dates 838 and 839. Ann. Vikinfis. 240). I and finally plundering both London and Eochester Then for some years the attacks cease. Kent. 838..

855. or perhaps. 854 [B. E. Chruii. 853 [A. Presently they apiin crossed the river and came once more into the territory of yT:th(d\vulf. 2G4 .'H in a pitched and wan ntlr>rly dofcatod. a. S(jd). s. 850 (^IVrlz.d. J and it is probable that all the different fleets or armies began just ' mere an invading nation. 853. S. it is probable that there to storm its camp. we have no important Viking change in the situation to record until the great invasion of England in the year 866. p. o. to speak more The father accurately. and though a succession of raids and alternate defeats and victories of the English are reported in succeed- ing years (a. We do not hear of the little army of Vikings ever being expelled from its settlement upon the edge of Kent. 851 [A.' of Merrill. X Stcenstrup. 30G. vol..d. which is represented as a signal one. S. ul sup. though we hear once at least of a desperate effort being now insensibly to extend their policy.XXiv Ix)n«lon. AiiHahit Ilcrtiani. but in those of the Franks. § A. Noritmnticrnc. 856. tli<' INTUOUUCTION. cliirl city of tlio Mercian kingdom. king of Kent. i.. 853 [B. t A.f Ilowbcit in the same year we find the strangers wintering for the first time on English ground. of his son iEthelbald.]. and much more portentous for the future than any which had been recorded up to that It seems that the Vikings began about the same time.§ were periods in which the Vikings quite disappeared from English soil . s. kill'. not in the English chronicles only. the rebellion of iEthelbald in a. than their defeat at Ockley.j. 445). Keaiy. D. C. (he biittlt. namely.n. in the And this event is much more important island of Thauet. Thames.* Bcorht- wulf. 6'. c. • A. 8G0. and the latter suflered a defeat at Ockley.-F. D. and from being pirates gradually became in some sense made Still. king of Wessex. Chron. and son collected an army to attack the Danes. Chum a. The victors idiindercd London and spread north of the. C] . oiicountorod the Vikinf. I. p. period to take up winter quarters in many ' of the districts which had been the scenes of their attacks. for is it in this interval which needs recording In this year may have had some influence on the coinage. The only event here.].a.

II. and on his return through Francia espoused Judith. Ilarald's chiof wife.^thelbald.INTRODUCTION.. pp. Wessex. At any rate it gave ofi'ence to a section of the chief men. llaguliikl. U. gei<t. s. 118 {E. wife Dc G. eon. rch. Ligcs. JElfridi (AVise). § § As of higlietjt rank. cf. i. pp. S. — wives. The succession to the throne rested among the Teutonic people upon no fixed principle of primogeniture and there are certainly to be found among them instances in which the superior rank of the mother gave a superior title to the throne though this was rather among the heathen Teutons. at the head of which stood his eldest son iEthelbald. 21. 1.t an honour which the English law or custom forbade to the wife of the king.} . Capit. iEtlielwiilf maclo a pilgrimage to XXV Rome. 450). bishops and ealdormen. Civil war was avoided by the moderation of the king who consented to a partition of the kingdom in a sense the reverse of that which usually obtained between the father and his eldest son. the daughter of Charles the Bald. c.. Erik Bludox.* Charles made it a condition of the marriage that his daughter should be crowned queen and sit beside her consort. A. The marriage of ^thelwulf and Judith was solemnized at Verberie by the famous Hincmar. the first occasion being that of the marriage of ^thelberht of Kent with Berchta. in virtue of father's heir. archbishop of Eheims. confronted by a rebellion. and * Amialcs Bert. daughter of the king of Jutland. lGS-9). waa. regarded aa hia Uaralda Swja him Edrfagra. Coronatio ludithae (Pertz. This was the second time that an English king had married a Frankish princess.ZEthelwulf had several children by his former wife. and tluir hia mother's rank. waa . in the case of Ilarald lldrfugr in Norway. To JEthelbald was given the chief kingdom. 857 (Pertz. in the case where the king had several contemporaneous . king of West Francia. AVilltlmi Malm. § It is possible.. t Cf. therefore.450). vol. X Asscr. R. which brought in its train the evangelization of the English.. that this elevation of Judith to the rank of a queen consort was (should she have children) a real menace to the rights of . the daughter of Charihert king of Paris. of the kingdom and on his return to his own country iEthelwulf found himself .lEthelwulf s eldest son . Caroli II. 10-11. a.

and from that period it has been attempted. From the time of ^Filfred an historical arrangement of the types seems possible. 1 rather militates against the in- suggested. a mint-place precede the coins devoid of attempt to distribute the types into an historical sequence must have proceeded largely on guess-work. Chronich' makes no mention of the rebellion of iEihclbald. 1-4 first appear among the of -^thelwulf s types. father retained only tlie (uHiiftlly) dependent kingdom of Kent. though the principle of heading the coinage of each reign with the mint-coins has not been this system of abandoned. He struck no coins. This reading would be forced upon us if we had only the types PI. this reading be the right one. or iElthelstan. 85G.D. 4. we might suppose that these coins were struck by yEthelwulf subsequent to the repartition of the kingdom in A. obvious that these under-kings had not the right of coinage.XXVi liifl INTItOKI (TIOV. while Jithclbald had the western. uoU. f of that we may But when iEthelwulf became once more : • Assor. in the earlier reigns. Should. hml previously fact. when they display a head or bust are always placed before and the coins with the indication of any such indication. the coins with the name of Canterbury head the classes to which they belong. il is to his deuth been king of Kent.* Tor convenience of deHcrij)tion and reference the plan adopted for the arrangement of the types of the coins of the The types earlier West Saxon kings has heen as f(dlows. however. The the division of the kingdom. It is in virtue of arrangement that the coins PI.'. II. But it . 2. 9. Asaer says only tbal the eastern part of the kingdom was rttnincd by iEthelwulf. the elder brother of /Ethelbald. does not follow that they were among his earliest issues and we might be tempted to explain tbe juxtaposition of the two names DORlBl and cant by reading y€THELWULF REX CANT[I/E] and taking DORIBI (for DOROBERNIA) to bo the name of the mint. But tbe existence of type terpretation PL II. Thus. where any those which liave none . II. p. the more important division. This is the arrangement adopted in the first volume. The rule over Kent as an under-kiue: did not include the right of striking coins bo pretty sure. In t fHv last .

dated a.. They X Wc have a charter of . 174). and that Wessex had not at this date a regular currency of its own. is t The genuineness of the existing specimens are all from the same die. and after some adventures rarity of ^Ethelbald's coins. Codvx. Cf.d. which only four specimens. no. § Asdcr. § 117 (7s.d. Will. and only three are now known to An explanation (which has already been hinted at) exist. p. At iEthelbald's death (a.<Ethclboarht as king of Kent. III. he may very well have continued to issue money for his separate kingdom.INTRODUCTION. (IVudentius) 858. I. Malm. c. 860). 856 and the death of his father in 858 and after that date the kingdom of Kent appears to have passed to his brother ^thelbearht. For it does not seem certain that -iEthelbald ever reigned as supreme or indejjendent king in Kent. much questioned. p. (last type with the retained upon the coinages of iEthelbald last It and iEthelbearht. II. that Judith whom we saw married to -^thelwulf two years previously. S. as much as Kent had. . is of iEthelwulfs types we may be was type xvii. XXVll towards the end of his reign king of Kent only. And the acceptance of the contrary theory is made a little more difi&cult by the fact that iEthelbald's solitary type reproduces a type of his father's coinage and is continued in the coinage of his brother and successor. of — — . but on his father's death he married his stepmother. 858. lo. He not only rebelled against his father. Kemble. IMalm. * PI. have ever been described. Anii(ih» Bert. she returned to her father's court. 281. and perhaps can hardly be accounted responsible for the incestuous marriage. He was king of Wessex between a. 6. § Judith was still only sixteen. also "SVill. No satisfactory explanation can be offered of the extreme iKthelbald.f would indeed be given by the supposition that the so-called West Saxon coinage was still even at this late date almost exclusively a Kentish coinage. iEthelbald's reign was a scandal to his contemporaries and to the chroniclers of a later time. Which was bust *) which the reasonably sure. .t It seems difficult to believe that this explanation is the true one.d.

arriving on the East Anglian coast and establishing itself there from which time the Viking invasion of England begins. i>.ir as giwu in the uarrativf. . ('(Hint of Fluiiilcrs. No other event of inijtortanee distinj^Miinhes for tlie history of tho (a. given.?. 08 a X A. In 8G0 cease altogether. p. e. 350. Wehmd.'li liini tlio nucts- troHH of Miitilda. we find tho the English on the and about the same timo we find a huge fleet. t AnnaU» Bi-rt. aa they corresi>oud nearly always to the correct ye.. In the spring of 806. AiouiUs Deri. the whole of Kent. and which before it had come to an end had totally changed the history of this island. the capital of Wesscx ho was subsequently defeated by the united fyrds of Hampshire and Berkshire. and Kcary. a leader who had established himself at the Somme. .d. less HciindiiluuM H«»rt.^thelred.)> 861 (Hincmar). in tlie second tliey are renewed. 8(!0-8f50). . : ^Kiialml I.* ^Uu'llKTuhi. Thoy form tho three great epochs in her history during at the men from Thanet ravaging moment they were treating with . p. the year of the accession of . There are three great invasions by which England was afllicted during the period covered by the present volume. basis of a bribe to leave tho country . which had been collected in Francia and Flanders. Chron. • Chnm. Ix-cnnu' tlu.t took the opportunity of sailing with two hundred ships to the Wesscx coast and fell upon and plundered Winchester. Charles did not give his eonseut to the marriage till the year 8G3. t In the winter of 865 we read that the Vikings came to Thanet and wintered there § and this appearance of the Danes on the Kentish coast was more ominous than any of the preceding ones. and nono of great moment that of his next During the first tho Viking raids BnccesHor (a. Ilereafttr the references to the Chronicle are not § -1. find throu. 862-3. SCO (Pnidont. o. for it was the precursor of a great expedition which took the form of a definite invasion of England. c. tho wif(! of Williiim the Conqueror. s. finding his hands tied in Francia. a. She followed Baldwin about dressed man (mutnto liabilu).XXViu of u INTItOIdCTION.wife of more or I'mMwiii lintH-di-fir. (Hincmar). coinage of Wesscx /I'^thelbuld'H reign 858-8C0). and who was in tho act of concluding a treaty with Charles the Bold. a.

As the ambition size. In the interval between the attack which wo have now to chronicle. all the Scandinavian nations had undergone a great trans- — . or new elements which they introduced. and the customs by . until of the Vikings grew these bodies increased in from still being small armies. . All these three invasions were invasions by Scandinavians. we have evidence that there must have been following their banners a very mixed nationality. for they had adopted most of the laws and customs of their neighbours. but by Scandinavians in such different conditions of civilization and government that they must be reckoned almost as three different nations. For this reason.d. the second is that of the Danes under Svend (Swegn) and Cnut. which w^as the chief agent in the second invasion of England and in still more marked contrast to the Normans who were hardly any longer a Scandinavian folk.INTRODUCTION. constitute the most important part of the history of the intervening periods. and the tliird is the Norman Conqiiest which brings our era to a close. that and the same likewise was their Constitution in is. the same But the constitution of the larger and of the smaller bodies was . the new-comers were Scandinavians. they became almost nations. We have some traces of the laws which governed the bodies of Vikings associated at this early period for the sake of plunder or settlement in England. the laws. 866. 1003-1016). however. the Franks. which began in a.d. the technical sense. and the attacks which began a hundred years later (a. of a type comparitively speaking jirimitive and in this respect the Vikings stand contrasted with the Danish nationality. it would be wiser to speak of the first invasion of England. The first of these invasions it will be convenient to speak of as the Viking invasion. nay Scandinavians of a very pure type at any rate. these centuries. In laws and customs. not as the invasion of the Danes but as that of the Vikings. and her recovery the assimilation of the XXIX first from the two. by no means one of pure Scandinavians.d. formation. ruled by a single monarch. 980) and ended in tlie invasion of Svend and Cnut (a. Wlien we examine the lists of moneyers' names for the districts which became subject to these Vikings.

we sometimes given to these kings a Latin versifier '^Ye is king says • Solo rex vcrbo sociis tamen imperitabut. Sweden.scqnont years. • t Ablm. (chiefly by custom and as. •Armies. i. whctlior wurfaro or at rest.XXX INTItomCTION. occasionally as the Great Army (se imjcla the Sometimes the army divides up into two or more here).'* Yet the their leaders. no superiority. if not in name. by this time split up into that what was The Army. .I). In thf formor mnaning of tli(< WMid \vr hnvn to noto that tho Hiniiller and lar^ftr activoly bo<lin« wrro boforo everything else. tbe cbanges which just at this time are taking place in tbe constitution Everybody knows tbe of Denmark.. Steenstrup. i. Hilt 31 f the more 1« ngthcncd trcntmont of the buhjuct in Steenstrup. we find that they constantly proclaim are all themselves Pvcpublics. are Army («? lure). Due.! \\c must bear in mind while we are speaking of tbe republican character of tbe Western Vikings (as tbe Norse Sagas call the settlers in the Britisb Isles). and the Huh. was tbat tbeir leader had no rights over the soil. Far. 277 sqq. X Dndo. I. such as the title of king. or at any rate no dominant authority except for strictly military purposes. when the intention is simply to designate the Vikings settled in The only difference is or about Northampton or Bedford.' has This latter use of tbe word continues several armies.' f The mere use or ' disuse of a title. The invading Vikings of onK'nRf^'l i" always spoken of as A. that wbicb made it republican in fact. c. Vrbh. : Of one of have no king. What we may take to be tbe essence of tbe Constitution of tbese Vikings. armies. which their units wen' hfhl inf^cthrr. and Norway.' is of small importance. .e. 38 cf. title equal. TV Norm. Bel. ^•iO. o.' and long after the first great area of conquest was the over wo find mention of a number of lesser armies — Northampton. &c.sociation) down to tbe time of the Army of ' second era of invasion. with regard to the Constitution by wbich tbese earlier bodies were governed. story of tbe taunt of the maiden Gyda to Harald of Norway. or the Army of Bedford. Again.

But there are reasons for postponing the date of the battle till about thirty years later. (Heimskringla.d. and as has been already described in the Introduction to the * Districts." said she. X The battle of Hafir»fjord. also Skene. 3. is usually dated about a. S70 and if that date bo accepted. iu which this con fedi ration was defeated. c. and the beginning of the eleventh centuries. I. in the countries of their origin. 50. In a. and the supremacy of Haiald assured. we cannot suppose that any members of the Army of .d. 'She answered that she would never sacrifice her maidenhood and take for a husband a king who governed no more of a kingdom than a few fyllcir* " And it seems to me wonderful. During the greater part of the reign of iEthelred I. the epoch of the Viking invasion of England in a. SGG took a part iu it. 866-878 must be distinguished from the Danish invasion of the end of the tenth. of a bygone or passing order of things. Bureale. and — which more specially concerns us— had obtained the assistance of many of the Vikings of the West. Celtic Scotland. all of the petty kings of Norway who thought themselves strong enough to resist his encroachment.) t Haralds Saga kins Hdrfacjra.e. had the feature in the case entered into a confederacy. thereScotland. and Norway. ' ' A. These considerations are enough to show that in many points beside the mere difference of date. who were of the same class. Cf. the doings of the Great Army did not intimately concern the history of Wessex. II. and perhaps some of them the same individuals who took j)art in the great expedition of 866. fore. Unger. and become its supreme king. ed. as have done king Gorm in Denmark. i.D.d. p. . as the opponents of the extended sort of kingship which was the new order of the day in Denmark. See Corpus I'oct. a taunt which was supposed to have been the awakening of the ambition of Harald Fairhair. 487. tS:c. and Ireland. 3. 867 the Army marched north. of England. The settlers in these islands. and king Eirik at Upsala. t appear in the history of the Scandinavian nations as the representatives. " that there is no king here who has the will to unite Norway.INTRODUCTION. Sweden. XXXI •when he sought to make her his wife." 'f Before Harald had realized the policy thus sketched out for him.

. .). li.k York. a ransom ' ' • . strong enough to march westward. and they were brought to an engagement with the English forces under the command of iEthelred and iElfred. and then in A. iiti«l it f<H.<scr (Wise). p 10. .D. the king of Wesscx and a Wosscx army commanded hy tho two surviving sons of TEtliehvulf. I. where they were protected by two streams. All these events in the invasion of Wessex passed during the earlier months of the year 871. pp.'^h forces consisted in reality of two armies. yEthelrod tho kinf^. hhImIiumI tlin <.d. brother-in- law.'('(l into Mcrcia. was paid to induce the Army to return again into Northumbria. one commanded by two kings. and the other by five earls. and the war was for a time confined to attacks by tho English upon foraging parties. and tho noxt in command. Halfdan and Bfegsaeg.\. proviouM voluino. The only survivor of all these leaders was Ilalfdan. Ixi.xxxii T\Tit<n»t'rTiov. iickiio\vlo(lf. marched to r>nrgred'H assistance. Tlui noxt ycnr tho an\«('t«Hl tli«> army mnrchcJ West Siixoii oithcr an Btato. who effected his retreat. and the elder and the younger Sihtric. to Northumbria. and East Anglia (Vol. For the next two years the doings of the Vikings were confined to the northern and midland countries.1.'re(itor pjirt of tliiit country. Mercia. Harald. This was in a. The united English army found the invaders shut up in tho stronghold of Nottingham. and once more shut himself up in Reading. Fraene. After a fruitless siege a compromise was efifectod. at the famous battle of Ashdown. and this act kinpjdom in so far as Mercia was dopcndcncy. which brought no honour to any of the leaders of the English forces rifr.* The Dani. 871 half of tho Army crossed the Thames and began The invaders took camp at Reading. or a close ally of that Consequently I'nrgred tho king (whose coins wo ohscrvo aro of types siniilar to tlioso of tho majority of yKtlu'lrod's coins) sent to seek tho aid of his . the Kennet and the Thames. 868. the invasion of Wessex. killc<l two riviil kiiiKf of Norlliumbrin. iEthelred now died. tho secundarius iElfred. Introduction. and to sorties of the But at length the invaders thought themselves garrison. Asbjorn.

j Halfdan. d . t Steenstrup. p. Alfred was obliged to abandon all the eastern side of his kingdom. XXXUl and Alfred the Great.* and was no doubt disbanded during this interval.Alfred was again able to collect a force. and the next important engagement between the English and the Vikings took place at Wilton.INTRODUCTION. After this Alfred purchased the departure of the invaders from his country. Some delay was caused by the ascended the throne. For as seems almost certain the danegeld. Next year (a. he was confronted by an utterly changed condition of things in the country. but a hard-won victory. and by the The English army was never funerals of the dead king. A. and raised up in his unwise king's stead a puppet of their own. and they returned into Northumbria. a. ' ' instead of being. A. Mercia got rid of the Vikings by paying a ransom. The Danes had received reinforcements and marched westwards. Chron. 21 sqq. Normannerne. but are barbarous imitations of Alfred's coins. that many of the coins with the name iElfred were probably not really made under the auspices of that king. This time victory fell to the Danes. or in districts which their invasions had disorganized. p. 874 MS. manufactured either by the Danes themselves. withdrew his forces from Wessex and retired to Mercia. 148 gqq. as the earlier historians supposed. then only twenty-two yeara old. in view of the fact which we shall presently see. summoned but for a short period at a time. iv. It is of importance to take note of these money payments to the Danes. the leader of the Vikings.d. We cannot call these payments a danegeld. s. + Asser. S. p.'J ' Asser. an 'And he swore oath and gave hostages that it thegn. a sum gathered together as ransom and paid to the Danes. onnta the : name of the tlicgn. 874) the army came back and deposed the Mercian king Burgred. Ceolwulf. which had no doubt to be affirmed by the Witan (--Ethelred had left an infant son). When . 2G. ceremonial of accession. was in reality a tax (a sort of ship-money ') imposed to raise money ' for the arming of a force — essentially a naval force — to protect the country against the Vikings.

vii.ilfdan and hi. 870. the kingdom of York as it is now often called. roftdy for tliom HhouM follow I'. but Natinniil Odlcction. so far as they had any king. two sections. . and Ilalfdan was the king of it. it Vikings took possession is very likely that Il. p. p:u. and would have who would bim at the army's need.i I. which is without doubt a coin of The piece is given here. t .f • ' p. and probably their power was small. marched into Northumbria..4. and one Then remained in Mercian territory..' the oath of military service. Clinm.struck* at this doscrilM-d in Mr. 35. S.. Ohr VLF (in ox.\iTvpc iv.ut 1.XXXIV INTIlODIiCTIOM. and began definitely to The northern half of Northumbria settle in the country. the Vikings made their own kingdtun. period in London.c * nudy. not in the For wo have an of London. was left under the rule of princes of the old English line. Description. while Ceolwulf Kcnyon's edition of Ilawkin's Silver Cains Ilalfdan of Kii>/laud.s iniitalinn Londnn monogram as on TElfrcd Typca vi. niul tlmt 1k> liimsrdi' would l. of Mercia. . (recersi). The southern half of Northumbria. 3. 79. p. One of these.s interesting coin. Thus the ancient kingdoms of Beruicia and For two years it ' the Army ' divided into Deira reappeared. nor puhlishcd in this catalogue. We see that this eccentric coin is in a certain way a link l)(>tween a very rare piece of Ceolwulf II.-vs hcrcs poarfo. (nrtr><»).' II. rcmuincd tituhir kinR of Mercia.irliftron. Vulcniiiiian nui. lJ.0 on wlmtovor day tlioy all it.) DEME XRX»^ of coin of lirv. under Hiilfdan. a. or of ns on x'Elfreil Mapnns Ma. But they struck no coins.

so much picturesque legend has gathered. whicli appears unadvisable. This concession. (He had already gained one victory with it in a. about which and his hunted days of wandering. and all the rest submitted to them save iElfred the king. The Army went no further than Exeter. at the junction of the Tone and the Parrot. may have been necessary.*) The Viking Army that was allowed to depart from Wareham on condition would quit the territory of the West Saxons. XXXV Gnthorra. Guthorm's army came first to Wareham. 877 it marched it to Chippenham. S. but gave over the rest of England north of the Thames. who were quite unprepared for its appearance. roughly speaking. after settling for a short while at Camhridge.INTRODUCTION. sailed out to sea and round to attack once more the kingdom of Wessex. The armies of iElfrcd and ' Guthorm encountered downs close above at -^thandune.d. Chron. and in a. or But the other half of the Army. s. The spring of 878 saw tlie revival of his hopes and of the courage of the English. An army secretly assembled under the shade of Selwood forest. There it was besieged hy iElfred. and by a partition of England. and marched upon the Danes encamped in or about Chippenham. 27. to * Asscr. Mercia west of Watling Street and the Piivcr Lea. p. \ A. the only one of the four English kingdoms wliich remained unsuhmerged. The resistance of the English seemed to break down on every hand. Many they drove over seas. a. This time the victory of the English was decisive. There it received reinforcement. Still the result was that it brought to ruin the English defence. 875. and a fleet which came to relieve it was defeated by the fleet which iElfred had taken advantage of the lull in the Viking attacks to build.'f The winter of 877-8 is the winter of iElfred's entrenchment with a little band of devoted followers on the island of iEthelney (The Princes' Island). whose leader now was GuSrnm. which added to the kingdom of iElfred. It was followed by the baptism of Guthorm and his followers at Wedmore. For two years Wessex had to sustain the hardest struggle which it had yet known. probably upon the Westbury.d. d 2 .

and the taxes which had to be contributed to these ends. One result of the war was that Wessex now finally and completely absorbed the countries south of the Thames.. a. s.n#. There was never again question of an under-king in Kent. or perhaps any that followed him has done. It was till HSO that the army of Guthorm fairly it. For Alfred's •hii>-Uiilding.t. Compare the letter of Alcuin in Jaffe.* That the new England which rose up out of the anarchy of the war. 894.ifred did in the direction of creating a standing army was to divide the Militia into two 8ccti. was devoted chiefly to the Till' rt'st of the reign of ^l^Ifred fruitful vic'torioH of peace. be the ravages which a century of Viking attacks had in the civilization of made England. Vol. the creation of a standing army. ])uring the years of peace that followed it is probable that that J'jlfred extended the shire system into Mercia lie redacted and amended the laws both of the West Saxons . and of the Mercians above all. a.itfd not liow. We may take it that the payments made to the Danes. She • The earlier Viking attacks on Nortliumbria bail done not a little to destroy the comparatively high civilization of that country at the end of the eighth century. the kingly of things. Bill Rer. are the main causes of the increase in the coinage which is characteristic of iElfred's reign. S. Chron. A. that he found the leisure to do more than any king before him. of a fleet. i^. power was becoming more defined. 22. See ^1. . and keep one half or tlie other always * with the colours. 8t>7. Ger. and to repair as far as might . And in all these lands it rested more or less upon a standing army.s now domiuions. si^* A. t What .XXXVi ho inlml. to spread and encourage knowledge and learning among his people.'ViT Bottlt'd ill INTItuDrCTION. a. Western Mercia took the place of Kent in this respect. not in England alone. p. Chron. nii-l ^'nvcniod by tho Viking invarlors.' It is prolMible that in addition to this there was a pertuancnt army for garrison duty. was difierent from the England which preceded it we may feel sure. such as it had been the effect of these wars to create. vi. Many of the characteristics of the early Teutonic civilization were unfitted to the changed condition On every hand.I).

* In the year 884 the Chronicle tells us that the army in East Anglia broke the peace. t Asser gives tlie impression that Alfred's attack on East Anglia preceded the breaking of tlie peace. leading ealdorman of Mercia.Alfred. 1-J4)^ and others concerning the evidence afforded by these ORSNAFORDA coins. IJiit this cannot have been the case otherwise the expression opprohn'osf J'i<>iiit would be too unreasonable. the of the domains of the House of Cerdic. and a man of the old blood royal.! Two years later we find iElfred rebuilding or refortifying London and giving — — it over to his son-in-law ^thelred. XXXVU became the dependent kingdom. we observe. the English sustained the last serious attack from foreign Vikings which she was to know for many years. the king) of the Mercians. ' course strike this under-lordship .d. is founded on a misconception. This seems in fact the most reasonable conclusion. . R. Finally. that the coins with the London monogram were In that case we must consider Halfdan the originator of this important type in the coinage of .INTRODUCTION. and at the same time a new Viking army probably with the connivance of the East Anglians made a landing in Kent. he made with his ships an attack on the East Anglian coast. not yet the integral portion ^thelred. away with any external difficulty in the way of accepting the coins which read ORSNAFORDA as an Oxford coinage. Kven supposing (as Asser also implies) tliat ^Elfrcd's naval attack was directed more against : the English than against the Danes. that coinage would bear the name of Alfred. was made the lord or the ealdorman (but not. and when he had driven away the new comers. Green ('Conquest of England. did not include the right to coins so that if iEthelred issued money at any mint in his dominions. if the internal difficulties in the way of changing an R into a K are not considered too great.' p.' the daughter But of of Alfred and sister of Eadweard the Elder. the famous Lady of the Mercians. which was only partially successful. in a. 892-3. One Army * All that has been said by J. -Alfred had kept his fleet in good order. just as Eadgar's Mercian coinage (struck in the This does lifetime of Eadwig) would bear Ead wig's name. and he was married to uEthelflaed. It may be at this time struck.

. whither ^Elfred was obliged to carry tho English floet to besiege him while iEthclred the ealdorman led an army against the invading force.iim>oof . With intervals this new war lasted till the year 897. PI.d. 874). coin of Ceolwulf II. 78.d. i. and this circumstance is to first evidence of a turn of the tide.XXXviii INTKODLtTIOS. We described in the last volume the coins probably struck by the Siefred. came from Fraiurc. and famous reign ended in that the T • a. 870-889. xlix. and on a iv. is Type Type iii. came with a fleet of 110 ships to Ilasting's aid. a Northumljrian leader.stiiif^. :{. uf Mercia (a. * from the solidi Such a case of atavism ' on the part of a coin-type seems almost inexplic* Shc ttLio lulrwluclioH to Vol.d. is that of ^l^thered.l>lfn. 901. But though this applies to the coins appear to hold true of the tijpca. Wo see that ^'Elfrcd took occasion of his latest victories to somewhat be noted as the extend his empire. iElfred's long r. coins were struck during the years of comparative tranquillity which followed the expulsion of the Danes from . or of Magnus iMaximus. may assume i 1 greater number /. It resembles certain Bceatta types and types of early English gold coins (Vol. and eventually sailed round to Exeter. pp. nnotluT. in which ^"Elfred's son Eadweard. who held his see between a.'s coins. pp. the future king. took part. li. Vikings from Northumbria and East Anglia joined their Tho former brothers-in-armH. is a variety of Type ii. cfimo— prolmbly from tlio Illiine and fiiniouH ILi. and was no doubt the type of the ii. I. Vol. or the year following. it does not Typo Typo i. 9. who at this time.tl. p. is the type of iEthclred first issue I. These last were encountered and defeated at the battle of Buttington. of iEIfred's "We . Archbishop of Canterbury.1 Wesses. I. . I.-liii. the curious and inexplicable type which occurs on the coin of llalfdan (VLFDENE) described above. PI. of ^Elfred. In tho succeeding reigns we see the tide running strongly towards a complete recovery of England by the English kings. xiii. which had marched right across England from the Thames to the Severn. '2) and is apparently derived of Valentinian I.* of coutiiuiital VikiiiRs heinlctl — by llui .

^inggostcd the London and Lincoln monogram-types is Louis le Bcgue (a. as we have seen.d. this coin is the inauguration of the monogram type. 16). if the reading of the last monogram be correct. 8(j 1-879).. In a.d.INTRODUCTION. XXXIX abnormal one.d. We come next monogram types. For during a part of this time London lay in a deplorable condition. xxix.d. 886. able. 874. was introduced in a. 874. probably precedes some of them. were like London before a. mentioned places. were disposed to imitate the coinage of the Franks. like the previous type. lord of the Mercians. . probable that the Vikings would be more familiar than facie the English with the Prankish currency of this date (so much of which had been but we have evidence in 95. then. 38. I. This typo is by the VLFDENE coin closely connected with the London monogram type which almost immediately follows.* This first London monogram. ?) These types for convenience sake are placed next though chronologically type x. Wo have already described a coin with the London monogram. vi. they struck for their own use.-xii. issued in 874. seems hardly likely that the monogram type should have remained totally in abeyance after its introduction by Halfdan until the year ^Plfred was fully and legally lord of Loudon. The of coins had been hitherto monogram upon the reverse And not only is it jjrimd essentially a Prankish device. Nos. pi. its governor. pp. Probably that of Halfdan. But Halfdan only remained a short time in London. to the {See Vol. Monnaies livtjuhs dv Francv sous la liace Curlovingienne. The case is clearly an stress must not be laid Type v. x. struck as it seems in a. paid as ransom into their pockets) 204 sqq. that the Vikings. though it might have done so. in the earliest coins which the Cuerdale coins (Vol.d. Lincoln and Koiseng (Castle Rising . iElfred rebuilt the town and made ^Ethelred. Compare Gariel. 886. PI. Both the last * The Frankisli king whose coins may be taken to have .) I. It is highly probable that after his departure the Londoners continued to strike coins with this monogram but placed upon It it the head and name of ^l^lfred. is similar to the coinage of Ceolwulf II. From the London monogram ? are derived the others. and too mncli on it.

xvi. 894 to circ.D. and xxiii. : Types xxi. xxiv.d. I. is the Orsnaforda type. Types xiv. I. 07-137. is derived from the EftHt Eadmimd Anglia described in Vol. "Winchester. 223.' Type xxii. rex saxonvm.xix. Though therefore they boar tho immo of tho king of Wessex St. Type XX. the pieds-forts or so-called ' which read on the reverse ELl MO-. I.X\ IN'IK()I)i. which likewise resembles the earlier types of Eadweard the Elder and Type xix. made by introducing a design which is Frankish in origin and is to be found on the coinage of Siefred. of Eadweard the Elder. aelfred the coins of Type xxi. Type xvii. pp. of the mint Ba^an. 5-7). as ou the coins of NorthI. and xv. 890 and 914. which reads eadweard rex saxonvm and these coins of Eadweard too have on the reverse the three first . xxvi. which closely resemble some of those of Alfred's at the types successor Eadwcard I. who reigned from A. 877-894. Pis. ' ' . 12). and Bath.Elfred with Type i.VO. Gu^red-Cnut of North- umbria reigned from a. 898. the Gloucester coin stands rather apart from the other mints.' connects the last types of . who held the In fact. is only a variety of Type xviii. U.-v. we have now arrived see between a. xvii.d. Type xviii. with tho reverse CNVT. lettt-rs. struck at Exeter. Pis. Typo xiii. I'l. outHido tho kiiiK<l<>ni of /Klfrofl. in its obverse similar to Type pp. viz. aeon /Elfred's coins of Type . (see pp. a.d. tlicy are almost more coinage of Viking coins than English ones. king of Northumbria (Vol.. is xiv.d. Arclibishop of Canterbury. are the types which were copied by Ciutliorni-yllthflstan when he began to strike coins (Vol. unibria described in Vol. nos. pp. 905.(TI()N. 204-221. This legend. Type xvi. (' Dorobernia ') is the same as that of the coins of Plogmund... and it may perhaps belong to an earlier part of yElfred's reign than the other mint-types which follow.) tho issue of which must have taken place before a. ' Alfred rex Saxouum. and offering pennies. but have on the as have obverse the same legend. 1029-1032. BAO. PI.

xxix. can be that And we have now to examine again Alfred's coins with the : object of distinguishing two classes (1) The true Wessex coinage. Most of this coinage must have been struck somewhere between that year. the first Christian Danish king in England {Ih. has the three letters of the mints. I. fare. be taken that all the types from Type were issued subsequently to what is known as the Peace of Wedmore. there is that curious series the penny coinage of Northumbria. arranged in a difierent manner. may. of . however. pp. The first are the coins which commemorate the martyred king Eadmund of East Anglia slain by the Danes in a. more or less barbarous imitations of the We must look back for a moment to the previous to ascertain the difierent coinages which we know to volume have been struck outside the limits of Alfred's kingdom durin"his reign. and the year 905. Finally. Exeter and Winchester. It is obvious. according to the best lights which issues. that all these types belong to the latter years of iElfred's reign.. two Christian and one heathen. all which the coins are certain as it It seems almost as the coins bearing Alfred's name were not struck under his authority or within his dominions.-xxiii. we think. p. And albeit these only include a minority of . 870. determined the order of /PJfred's we have by no means finished with the classes into to be distributed. the moneyer Eli on the ineds-forts connects these coins with . 870. therefore.ZElfred's types.INTRODUOTION. the coins which belong to these types constituted without question a large majority of It xiii. very well reflected on the coinages of iElfred's reign and it results from this that when we have.Alfred's piece struck at Bath. we possess. are .d. xxiii.) Then there are the coins of Guthorm-^fchelstan (a. (See Vol. 878-890).d. Again. 97-137. The confusions of this time of invasion and internal warand of a new departure in the history of England. In the Museum Collection the later coins stand to the earlier in the proportion of 384 to 68. 95). xli This reverse again is similar to that of first Type xxi. and (2) The coins of Alfred. the issue of this reign. Of these there are three classes. which.

nil tlio ^vlli(•ll known oxaniplcs 'SM)). 424-427. p. though not struck either iu probably Wessex or under the authority 1>. Archbishop of Canter- bury (Vol. of iElfred. fornifd piirt of the ('uonLilc in llio llounl(//'. and finally we have imitations of just the same character of Alfred's coins . 49. or those struck by GubrcdCnut of Northumbria and therefore imitative coins which . which arc what they profess to bo. no.. 11 . 103. 4(j. coins struck outside yElfred's dominions. 454. No. and therefore. (p. of /Elfred's coins maybe designated as probably professedly imitations. 7C). we have imitations of the coins of Plegmund. 82. . 80.s barbarous imitations of iElfred's of the made in places under the rule Vikings and where society was a good deal disWo have even a series of imitations of the St. 148-154 (Oxford).xlii INTItoliICTloN. p. It is in each case most probable that the coin was made in the district of the least In other words. p... 2 (St. PI. 41-15. no. p. pp. 79. Eadmund coinage or in the country of Cnut. cf. p. No. no. 59. ^n. iu England deserves the name of a than Viking Beside coins of these series.. 54. 79. p. combine yElfrcd's types with one or other of these two are likely to have been made in the country of the St. No. Eadmund. coinage. Endmund). p. PI. PI. xviii. which were probably Eadnumd no. xxix. organized. 41). as well as between Alfred's coins and those of Northumbria (-154). 453. Nos. any other isHUod coinage. xix. 81-83 (Lincoln). we have other scries of more or les. commemorating St. 10 then. pp. \Vo sec that we have a link between the coins of yElfred and those of St. Nos. 113 (London). xvii. 28-74. Nos. I. 'JOl This scricH wliicli more. 48. pp. I. Eadmund). the coins of the famous king of Wessex are likely to have spread farther than those celebrated type. Nos. 11. p. Eadmund (2). No. 13) . Nos. 6G p. Introduction. nos. It is just at this point that the confusions and varieties . 189 (St.. coins (Vol. The following numbers "Wessex coins. 38..

for example. in the xliii moneyers which appear upon the coins A large number of the names upon the St. Directly we pass outside the region of iElfred's kingdom these un-English names meet us face to face. seem to defy analysis.. Abboe* number as are We find such names . Puzzling. Eadmuud series. But still belong to this St. ones. there is one thing that comes out clearly with regard to them. however. The majority series. which we marked as uncertain in the Index to Vol.INTRODUCTION. But what is strange is that they do not appear to be so much Scandinavian names as Fraukish names of the reach their maximum. as these names are. Eadmund among those names about which we need entertain no reasonable doubt by far the greater certainly not Old English. that a large number cannot be English names. of the moneyers' names. I.

i. § Ulaj't S. settled in East Anglia and Mercia or the army brought over with it a certain : . likely before that event. liowovcr. see 40 *</«/. For if we take the partition of JElfreds and GulSorms Fri^ to be the great portion the of this we find about fifty years later that a kingdom once Guthorm's. ' IVrtz. : . Tryggvag. and another and of Guthorin's moncyers. Hut of. § "We can explain the occurrence of Frankish names upon the coins of East Anglia on one of three suppositions either there were a great many Frankish soldiers in that portion of the Great Army. despite under the rule of ' five X known its as Five Burgs. Derby. Her.d. at any rate in this sense. we must believe to have been its state after the death of Guthorm. It is pretty certain that the St. and very partition of a. has been separate small republics quite possible. though he was in the first instance a forced convert. Better. Leicester. • Eng. vol. Five Burgs.xliv lNTH()l)i:(TIO.s bo a con•). Eadmund coinage began in For these Scandinavians were quick the reign of Guthorm. SornMuiurnr. i^tvcnstrup. nut. Eadmund coinage was It probably belongs to a period struck before a. was in a quasi-anarchical condition. when East Anglia. under Guthorm. 27 fq. and often strangely zealous in their character. Tlie lirst was probably never within the kingdom of Guthorm but the other four were. new witness the case of Harold Blaatand of Denmark faith who. the character of tiicsc miniature republics.. On iv.t which possibly Scandinavian. p. to change their creed. Nottingham. given we find Among Al^bonel the Frankish inoiicyors Knodas striking also for above Guthorm-iEthelHtan.V. that the St. that Such there was no single recognised ruler in the country. arc Lincoln. 134. p. . 93. which. Eadmund was martyred by the Danes. The ami Stamford. tlm traction of Stcfiiii nnmoH Grim.d. 88G. which aro prolmhly. 905.. (Heimskriiigia) c. nominally a Danish kingdom. had no sooner become so than he set to work at once to imperil and to lose his supremacy over Norway by trying to compel his vassal Earl Hakon to accept baptism. Ston (niilf.' It is pious and the fact that St.' bo calKd. and Gislcca and are Odulf.sB tlii. who has a Frankish name. t X v.

. for 134-5. that the coins were issued by traders. Eadmund's and Eadred's. Bonsom Dudclet * This is t Hadcbald (?) the theory adopted by Mr. and . ' t This may be a corruptiou of bonus homo. In the following reign. v. we have Bern gar (Beringar?) Lanfer ]\Iarbert Kinnard (Rinard) Sigot. and these having some skill in metal-work were employed to engrave dies and were at the same time authorized to place their names u^Don them or finally.* men find As the English power extends to the north and east we Frankish and Scandinavian names beginning to appear beside the English moneyers of the West Saxon kings. the majority of these in East Anglia at this time were of Frankish descent. Eberhard) Ercimbald. which are probably Scandinavian Framwis Frio<5ulf Flits Irfiira Sigebrand SigeferS Odo Raegenulf (a. Thus in the coinage of Eadweard the Elder. ^thelstan 925-940). In addition to eleven Frankish names from the preceding reign we find on Eadmund's coins Abenel Agtard Efrard (Everard. pp. we have Mtcrten Paul Stefanus among new names Abba Baldric Domcnces. and Raegenald Rsegengrim purstan which may very well be Scandinavian. Domiuic Duriaiit Biildwine Barbe Bardel or Burdel Giongbald Gislemer of possible or probable Frankish origin. Rev. xlv number of Fraukish captives (thralls). But sqq. ciii.INTRODUCTION.* a pedantry Godmau. we still find a large number both of Frankish and Scandinavian names.d. Grimwald Gundbert lofermuud Pastor "Waltere Pi lit Warimer We also have the following names. York Powell. see below. p. English Mist. And if we continue our inquiry into the succeeding reigns.

to the era of the second Scandinavian invasion of England. Norse or Swedish. . the coins of Guthorm-TEthclstan. of the coinages of iElfrcd and Plcgmund may be grouped together as the Viking coinage of England.xWi INTIMUMTTIOV. and as such they It must be remembered are of considerable interest. that as yet scarcely any English coins had found their way to Scandinavia. that is to say. The various scries of coins initiated during iElfrcd's reign which wo have been recently describing. Eadmund coinage. S4. as was noticed in the Introduction to Vol. to the end of the tenth century.. but that is by no means of a certain. I. And though. that the Swedes possessed a certain currency copied from the coins of Dorstat. for Dnnisli naiiirs And wo Imvc Un-pcniilf Uun. is Dclgany Find. What certain is that for the initiation lasting Scandinavian currency. but the Scandinavian names naturally continue in large numbers. It is possible. we must go to a much later date.liilf /Kriiiiir. countries. Northumbrian coins from the Cuerdalc Hoard. • A York inonoycr. which found their way is to the north . it they had produced no imitative coinage there either. that in which the Danes..r Armilf Ulf pi(«liilf Furiuim* Oilii Uuingrim ponilf or Doomlf Uudor Eadrod only Engilbred Norlwrt OSolrio Walter Imvc a Frankish look CiKilin Orim Unbein may Under Eadwig the bo Scandinavian. and so forth. the imitations of the St. and hy the time wc reach the reign of i'Ethelred II. now become the Scandinavian. Frankish names grow fewer. + St c Xiim 1SS2 (pninr already citc«l on the Dclgany Hoard) p.t and certainly they had as yet produced no imitative coinage in the Scandinavian as we see in the case of the probable that English coins had been carried over into Ireland by the Vikings of that country. Irish. they have almost disappeared. Chrnii.

We cannot : English. that is. This earlier currency. llalfdau in Northund)ria probably attempted the same thing. . Though they bear the names of kings Cnut and Siefred.INTRODUCTION. These are the only coins which can be said to imply a state of kingship among the Vikings at all corresponding to the kingship which obtained among the make that mistake. much King of England. In England it was of course originally the same: but though as ^l<]lfrod is still nominally 'king the part of of the Angcl-cyn. themselves. were coined in a country subject to the Vikings the and must have passed current among the latter barbarous imitations of the St. took a leading part. t Wliat is meant by this is that 'king' among these wandering Norsemen is like 'earl. did so j)artly with a view to obtaining a more territorial kingdom than had been customary witli the Vikings. stands ajiart from any other Scandinavian coinage. this mixed collection of original and imitative tyj^es. with their rude workmanship and their imitations of Frankish types. And therecan be little doubt that the settlement of Normandy and tiu! vassalage of the Norman dukes is to be explained on the same principle. and is the only one which represents what we have ventured to speak of as the nationality of the Vikings. governments of that nation which issued reasonably he drawn from it. If the coinage itself chaotic. mixed and represents sufficiently well the nation and the it. lie is always spoken of as a tyrant. though they were issued under the auspices of Christians. Eadmund coins copies of JEUred's coins were made. Eadmund coins seem to prove that they did so. The Cuerdale-Northumbrian coins again. xlvii Danish nation. It would not he wise to press the coinage for more information than can Numismatists are too apt to tell by what authority these The St. as we see that it is. * Tlic genuine coinage of JEUrcd. we can hardly suppose that they were issued under royal authority in the sense in which the contemporary coinage of iElfred was so.' always a personal and not a territorial title. or of successors Eadwcard or Eadgar.' he is in effect England which he rules. wlien he adopted Christianity. as his It does not seem a too bold conjecture to suppose that Guthorm-^Ethelstnn.* The only pieces out of all these extra-Wessex series which at all correspond to our ideas of an ordered and regular currency are the coins of Guthorm-ZEthelstan. it is. stand quite apart from any other series that we know.

* the son of ^thelred I. moro than hint these various points which the coinage of yElfred's time may illustrate the in the first place. H. part of our purpose to write that history at length. against him. Ixvii). pp. a. whereas Eadweard had already showed his metal in more than one encounter with the Vikings. 117-8.). 901. Chnm.Xlviii INTKODUCTION. But the history of Northumbria is buried in too much obscurity for us to say wliat manner of king Gu^red-Ciiut was. support he received at his first rising. S. the accession of Eadweard the Elder. because it is no history of the period It is impossible to do in . . who not unnaturally was aggrieved at being passed over by the Witan. The course which ^thelwald pursued in his rebellion was an outrage on the patriotism and the religious feelings of his countrymen and it leaves When he found how little a taint upon his courage. we enter upon According a simpler period of history and a simpler primogeniture. (E. shows the part the Christians played in changing the succession. lie bad the Christians and the priests (the depositories of the ' law) I.. and in the second place.' . less to dwell still upon all its constitutional aspects . t A. The history of this period for all the parts outside the kingdom of Alfred is buried in obscurity. he retreated to Wimborne and shut himself up in the city with a nun whom he had ravished from the cloister. 001 . He swore that he would die there but instead secretly left the place and fled north to Northumbria. where he was welcomed by the Northumbrians as a king. because it is not advisable to overstrain the evidence which can be derived from coins. and who It is probable that this attempted to raise a rebellion. s. S. . Fl. The story of the ' invention of GutSred-Cuut (see Vol. as numismatists are somewhat apt to do.^thelweard. With coinage. . Wig. and the confusion of the coinage only reflects the state of confusion of the country. iEthelwald. in A. but then p.d.f Gubred had probably been dead The people of the north were perhaps six or seven years. to the strictest laws of That was Eadweard was not the heir to the throne. * ' JEthelbaldus. iEthelwald was a man of no worth or likelihood.

t Abbo. . at this period the building of forts was being actively carried on. 905 he and his Northumbrians were defeated by the English at Holme. Par. 885-7. 590-6). Urhis (Pertz. The rival of Eadweard maintained himself for a time but in a. &c. 77G-805).r sea and liad returned. <>. glad to welcome a claimant xlix from a family whose ideas of were more determined than their own. 1 18. the settle- ment of Normandy in a. as we see. the next great kiu^sliip . — — event in the history of the continental Vikings. In Germany. Let us note that two new elements of warfare became at this time conspicuous by the aid which they gave towards the Vikings' defeats the increase in the cavalry arm the development of the heavy-armed man-at-arms of the mediaeval type and the development of military engineering. far.d. i. in Norfolk.d. 912. must be looked upon (like the settlement of East Anglia in this country) rather as a register of defeat than a token of victory. A like turn of the tide had occurred it may be as well on the Continent also. Flomieo he had tlic lieen driven ovt. beyond the borders of This was the first of a series of Eadweard's kingdom. 8!JI. X AnndlfK Fuldevses. vol. i. In the defence of Paris. c. III. pp. above spoken of.) This victory of Arnulf s was a final one as regards the relief of Germany from serious Viking invasions. a. 8914 was this defeat abroad which brought about the second Viking invasion of England during Alfred's reign. Annnles Vedtiofiin 88. f And though subsequent and temporary successes followed that defeat. Stoenstrui) lias set right clirouulogy of this rebellion. ii.d. Reginouis Clironicon (lb. 32 sq. In Germany the Vikings sustained a decisive defeat at the hands of Arnulf the Emperor (It the successor of Charles the Fat in a. too. The prelude to note in passing of it is the defeat of the great Viking fleet and army which besieged Paris in a. the building of forts and fortified bridges to hinder the advance of invading armies and invading fleets. a. Bel.d. 522-4). And it is this clement in warfare which is the most important one in England for the * ' — — — — * According to p.* engagements which all mark the turn of the tide of victory against the English Vikings.INTRODUCTION. it is the fortification that plays the principal part.5-7 (lb.

s. priests (the depositories of the ' law) GuSn'd-Cunt (see Vol.). story The of the ' invention of ' . who not unnaturally being passed over by the Witan. But the history of Northumbria is buried in too much obscurity for us to say what manner of king Gu*red-Caut was. we enter upon coinage. H. . * ^thelbaldus.' ^thelweard. S. S. because it is no history of the period It is imposaiblc to do in . . That was iEthelwald. . pp. a simpler period of history and a simpler primogeniture. He swore that he would die there but instead secretly left the place and fled north to Northumbria. 901.Xlviii INTIIODT'CTION. AVith the accession of Eadweard the Elder. as numismatists are somewhat apt to do. I. he retreated to "Wimborne and shut himself up in the city with a nun whom he had ravished from the cloister. whereas Eadweard had already showed his metal in more than one encounter with the Vikings. shows the part the Christians played in changing the succession. 117-8. part of our purpose to write that history at length. and in the second place. t A.* the son of . p. a.f Gubred had probably been dead The people of the north were perhaps six or seven years. of Eadweard was not the heir to throne. (E. 001 Fl. The course which ^thelwald pursued in his rebellion was an outrage on the patriotism and the religious feelings of his countrymen and it leaves When he found how little a taint upon his courage. and the confusion of the coinage only reflects the state parts outside the of confusion of the country. because it is not advisable to overstrain the evidence which can be derived from coins. in a.d. less to dwell still upon all its constitutional aspects .. According to the strictest laws the I. The history of this period for all the kingdom of Alfred is buried in obscurity.^thelred was aggrieved at It is probable that this attempted to raise a rebellion. and who support he received at his first rising. moro than hint these various points which the coinage of Alfred's time may illustrate the in the first place. iEthelwald was a man of no worth or likelihood. where he was welcomed by the Northumbrians as a king. Chnm. but then he had the Christians and the against liim. Ixvii). Wig.

d.INTRODUCTION. in Norfolk. Prir. t Abbo.•v/. (lb. it is the fortification that plays the principal part. Keginouis Chronicon X Annaldi Fuldenses.d. f And though subsequent and temporary successes followed that defeat. Ihhis (Pertz. c. i. The rival of Eadweard maintained himself for a time hut in a. a.* engagements which all mark the turn of the tide of victory . III.Alfred's reign. the Emperor (It the successor of Charles the Fat in a. had heen driven ii. 32 . pp. vol. 8914 was this defeat abroad which brought about the second Viking invasion of England during . the building of forts and fortified bridges to hinder the advance of invading armies and invading fleets. xlix glad to welcome a claimant from a family whose ideas of kiugsLip were more determined than their own. 118. 522-4). at this period the building of forts was being actively carried on. Stoenstruj) has set right the chronology of this rebellion. against the English Vikings. ov(. Let us note that two new elements of warfare became at this time conspicuous by the aid which they gave towards the Vikings' defeats the increase in the cavalry arm the development of the heavy-armed man-at-arms of the mediaeval type and the development of military engineering. a. 885-7. 595-6). o. 776-805). And it is this element in warfare which is the most important one in England for the * ' — — — — * Acconlinf^ tn Florriicc he p. the next great event in the history of the continental Vikings.r sea and liad rotnrnod.d. A of like turn of the tide had occurred to note in passing it —on — it may be as well is the defeat of The prelude the great Viking fleet and army the Continent also. as we see.d. ]'pdii>tfi)ii 885-7 (lb. above spoken of. In Germany. heyond the borders of This was the first of a series of Eadweard's kingdom. too. e . 912. which besieged Paris in a. Annnlpn i. &c. far. 905 he and his Northumhrians were defeated hy the English at Holme.) This victory of Arnulfs was a final one as regards the relief of Germany from serious Viking invasions. In the defence of Paris. must be looked upon (like the settlement of East Anglia in this country) rather as a In Germany tho Vikings sustained a decisive defeat at the hands of Arnulf register of defeat than a token of victory. 8U1. Bel. the settlement of Normandy in a.

Eadweard takes any title in Eex Saxonum. ealdorman of Mercia. We may assume.' These arc the only srenuine charters given. For Eadweard had very early in his reign the opportunity of extending his immediate rule over some of the Angles north of the Thames. and even in the lifetime of -^Ethelred. a. of Mercia. until we enter upon the succeeding phase. This king is not Guthorm-iEthelstan who died in a. This practice of fort- building was the main instrument in the extension of the power of the West Saxon kings over the Scandinavians settled south of the Ilumbcr.1 INTRODUCTION. Angul-Saxonum Eex. ' Saxonum Rex .D.' his charters Eadweard calls himself Before his death Eadweard had the opportunity of wholly Whenever. the title Angnl.d. which Eadweard begins building these frontier fortresses of his kingdom we find that his power has already extended some way into the old Viking country. (C. and the types of the coins which bear it favour this ^Ethelflaed. assumption. upon his ' coins.\. and of Eadweard's Eadweard was the king of this part of England. 337 (. ai)d his wife iEthellL'cd.(or Angul-) 904) Eadweard called himself 'Hex Ansl'Tum. that the rather restricted title ' Eex Saxonum was only used by Eadweard at the beginning of his reign. &c.5 (a. ^Ethelrcd. the Lady of the Mercians. S. 330. s. 33.* but another Guthorm called Eohricson Eadweard renewing his father's (Eiriksson). Slonarehiiim Jlorciorum teuentes. 338. it is addition to that of rex ' simply ' ' incorporating Mercia with his dominions.d.' occurs.' as his But in father and great-grandfather had done before him. 890. which had previously belonged to Guthorm-iEthelstan.d. Chron. The buildins. of fortresses in En^cland was not inaugurated — — * A. over part of the country of East Mercia. call themselves in their only genuine charter (K. 901 and 903). the sister. the greatest in the recovery of England from the At the date at Vikings the Building of the Burgs. Each step whereby Eadweard gained his extension of territory we cannot trace not. period on which wc arc now embarked. After his victory over the Vikings at Holme we find compact with the king of the East Englc. in no. 891). nos. that is. 901). t In Kcmble. A.

a.d. Thorpe identifies the place with Bramsbury or Bramsby.S. burg which Eadweard built was upon the old ^Ifred-Guthorm peace. (Hdlls Ser.) williuut * A. From this time forward the work of fortress-building went on apace.\ix.) Vol. ^thelflciecl the Lady of the We first read that in a. had lucn betrothed lo liagnald of York Cthe Kagnald. sec A. p. and they loft only a daughter.' in Lincolnshire. Citron. ll by Efidweard but by Mercians. 907 (cf. Her husband had predeceased her in a. Seo A. p. Ixix. Then in a. v. y'. and Welsh neighbours as against the Vikings.d. X Waidhorongli? in Oxfordslnre § . Wig. The next burg was built further east.D. for it is impossible that at this date If power could have extended into that country. that is to say at Hertford on the Lea. which Steenstrup places in Hertfordshire. Brcmcsburli. near therefore as much against her the Welsh border. half-way towards Colchester and in the country formerly assigned to Gutliorm. r. 911 is the probable date of the beginning of the work of building burg is said. sou of Ivar. I.^ in Staffordshire. to Bremesburg. 907 iEthelflaed restored the town of Chester which had lain waste for some time. rule. Chron.§ It was unfitting that Mercia should any first The line of division in the s. iEthelflaed's first have been at ' quite inadmissible iEthelflfed's . Indox s. S. Fl. But we are not told that ^thelflged fortified it. in the Chronicle. Stafford. Cherbury in Shropshire. Her second burg. In a. we accept Steenstrup's allocation we find her beginning near the boundary of her own and her brother's identified. 912. The town (it is probable) became a mint under ^iEthelstan. so that it is clear that Eadweard's dominions had extended in this direction. I. 914-15 iEthelflsed further built Tamwprth. Eddesbury and liuncorn in Cheshire.* A.Elfwyn. at Witham. 89-i). But the country north of the Thames had formerly belonged to the Mercian half (-^thelflped's half) of the West Saxon kingdom. and Wedensborougli. his sister.S. and Warwick. * Scergeat. s.d.INTRODUCTION. DLO and l>clow p. 120. . a. Chron.d. t . whose biography is given in Vol. e 2 .^lOlhclllred's danghtcr.' cannot be After that we find her building upon quite the opposite side of her dominions at Bridgnorth. 918 (?) ^thelflaid died. f This identification is forts.

|(B.) 920 (c. Hertfordsliire (A. taken from Steenstrup's Normannerne. 913 c. A-D. there was a party West Saxon king.) 921 Essex Cok'h ester Stamford (Soutliern Burg) Lincolnshire (N()rtlu'rn\ Nottingham(Nottingham I (A.) 915 (B. (a.) 921 jNorthamptonshire .) Poakland 924 Eadwcard"s knowledge or consent. .lii INTRODUCTION. longer be separated from Wcssox opposition. kingdom. Warwickshire ("Buckingham.) 922 922 918 919 919 Burg) shire Tbelwall Manchester (Nottingham Burg) \ Bakewell (Southern Cheshire Lancashire Nottingliamshire (A. D. Burg.) 915 (B.c. c.) (a.) 921 921 918 918 (Huutingdon\ shire . 914 914 914 915 Tamworth Staffonl Eddesbury "Warwick Cheshire (b. vol. 923 024 920 921 921 (A. Cledemutha (Gladraouth Towcester \ Essex South "Wales . Witham Hertford (Southern Burg) ^thelflsed Essex .) Chorbury Wedensborough Shropshire Cheshire Bedfordshire . 913 913 B. but without any active the Anglian state in his own .} (A. D. CD. The following is table It of is all the burgs built by ^thelflaed and Eadweard. Hertfordshire (a.b.b. [MSB.) 915 (A.) (b. . Staffordshire Hun corn Eadweard Bedford (Southern Burg) ]\Ialdon .) (A. A Hertfordshire j Staflbrdshire. YEAP^. D.) 921 (A. in I^Iorcia opposed to the claims of tlie Apparently. c. incorporated a and Eadwcard tlie Elder.) (B.) 919 (A. Hertfordshire /(b. therefore.)913 (b.c. \ 9141 (D. expect tliere to be.) 914 . 915 . not -without some remonstrance. c. 42.) 913 913 912 912 . c.) 913 c. c. d. Waymere Huntingdon .. c.] ^tliclflaod Bremesburg Scergeat .) 910\ (D.) (A. iii./ c./ t (b. D. 915 (B.) 915 915 916 916 916 916 917 918 Eadweard ^thelflc'cd Buckingham \ shire > (a. Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. as indeed we should .) 909 . p. c.) .) 911 Eadweard Bridgnorth Hertford (Northern Burg' Shropshire .

and slew many men. xxx).* This at least appears to have been the case. When Eadweard had built his burg at Witham. must be left doubtful. ^thelflaed's first burg was built subsequent to a victory which she had gained over the Danes at Tettenhall or Wednesfield. This army and broke the peace. Wctlncsfield in ^thelwcanl and Florence. of Huntingdonshire and Bedfordshire. where the Danes were settled in large — . Chron. or was the cause before subject to the Danes.' In a.. or at any rate of Scandinavian blood was comparatively small.t therefore it Whether work. East Anglia. 913.INTRODUCTION. a.xVorma)int /•. parts of Cambridgeshire. sliows tlie identity of the hattUs of The site of the battle is in Staliordahire Tettenhall and of "\Vt dne. And we may conclude that a very large part of Danish England or Viking England was at this time Tinder a republican form of government (see what is said Possibly we may divide Viking-England above. Leicestershire.slield. we only now and then hear of kings being concerned in these ' ' risings. * Tetteuliall in the Chronicle . A. Northamptonshire.(('. S. iii. . which were 911. where the prointo three distinct divisions portion of Viking. p. 13 tf^/'/. Except in the early account of the peace between Eadweard and Guthorm Eiriksson. a great part of Derbyshire. liii Whenever a burg is completed we find that submission is made by the dwellers in the immediate neighbourhood. though is the connection between the two events not clear. was brought about by ^thelflsed's thereof. where the people were anxious still a kingdom to have a king as a counterpoise to the English kingdom and the middle region. but which had been and probably was Northumbria. t Stecnstrup. and that the battle took place in a. but Danes from Hertfordshire may have taken part t in it. It is probable that the "West Saxons and Mercians fought together against the Vikings.' was eventually defeated. s.d. we read that a good deal of the folk submitted to him. Eutland. Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire.J But it was not to be expected that these works would go on without opposition on the part of the Danes.d. 914 * the Army rode out from Northampton and from Leicester.

only now grown into the Seven Burgs. . 921. themselves the Danish communities conThese armies ' ' ^thelred So do the Five Burgs. and were eventually defeated by the men of Hereford and Gloucester. bys and but settled under a very Iooho form of government. the peasantry (landleoda) such as were left. both in East Engle and in Essex. It was directed first against the Welsh. submitted to King Eadweard. A great army was gathered together from the land of the Mercian Danes. No doubt among tinued to be small republics within the state. These men sought on of small republics was that ' AVe have in a. in what form Eadweard extended his power over England. ' : but in their constitutional bodies commended themselves to him not thereby w'hoUy abandoning their earlier form of . submitted to him and all the Army in East Engle swore oneness with him.' And the army which belonged to Cambridge chose him to be lord and protector as he arede.liv INTHODUCTION. The English folk in many places threw off the lordship of the Danes and became Eadweard's subjects once more the Danish folk not singly.s.d. and the Army. Eadweard's severest struggle with Vikings at home took place in a. and from Tempsford they marched ' on Bedford. II. divided into difl'creut armies under different chiefs. and of the East Anglian Danes. ThurferS and the holds. The invaders took prisoner the Bishop of Llandaff. One group * ' known as the Five Burgs. north as far as Welland.' * AVe gather from these quotations. . 921. Ckron. who had before been under the power of the Danes.' 915 an account of a new Viking raid. (this in tlic great region of * ' ' numbers tliorpcs '). and the king [of that body of Vikings] slain. But this rising only led to further defeats of ' Tempsford was taken. which notwithstanding seem to have been incorporated rise again to the surface in the troubled years of A. the Vikings. constitution. their side to raise fortifications : they built a fort at Temps- ford in Bedfordshire. S. which belonged to Northampton.d. ' . and sought his peace and protection a great number of the folk.a. that it would will what he willed.

presently Eadweard's coins undergo a further his son. i^j^'l^^'iaril the Alfred's later Exeter and Winchester coins for example) are a great improvement upon his earlier ones and these later types are continued in the earlier coins of Eadweard But.sh king beginning to strike at Nottingham and Derby.^thelstan struck coins at two (or And. one thinks.). improvement. They arc of great weight. The busts upon them are sometimes beautifully modelled and engraved. Previously the coins were assigned to Leicester. . xi. For . or the Eadmimd.INTRODUCTION. 3rd Ser. as we have said. have only been subsequent to a second revolt. In every respect the reign of Eadweard the Elder istic is sufficiently reflected in his is one Coinape of of reviving prosperity for the English.. assign to this king the especial credit of having subdued the Five Burgs. may be. of the period. the cointhan heretofore engravers launch out. Vol. and this charactercoinage. It is precisely the time when \\v sliouM look fur a lioicester coinage also. We know too that all Viking England all Danish England if that expression be preferred eontinned to be governed by its own laws till it once more obtained a Scandinavian sovereign in Cnut.. and the manning of a fleet we may believe that England south of the Humber was now one. IMontagu sustains the attribution which has been followed in the catalogue. as it were.* Burgs are still a sort of political unity long after the days of — Eadmund. and. into a series of elaborate . * The nttribution of the coins of iEthclstan assigned to Chester was adopted subsequent to the publication of a paper on the mints of Chester and Leicester by Mr. 12 sqq. and remind us of the best drawings on Anglo-Saxon MSS. the Five three) of these five towns. 1)6 referrc^d to the paper for the arguments by which ]Mr. Certain verses quoted in the Chronicle. Eadweard's son and second successor. But that must. speaking of Eadmund. in their reverse types. in \y at the English kingdom in Eaclweard's reign. Ilynian IMontagu (Ntim. The reader must p. for example. But latest in that of his son — — for larger purposes of administration — for the furnishing of an army. The letters in the inscriptions are better made and more clearly cut coinage (the . Citron. therefore that the supposed Chester coins are Leicester coins after all. But at the same time it must be acknowledged that the time when we first find ai> Engli.

'haud of Providence' occurs on some imperial coins of pi. the Danes. as after an interval of forty years we do once more. and that the coin of ^Ethelred I. 13 and 14. It might even be fancied that the types of a building or a wall.' appear again in these acage. But navian people to remain stationary during these two hundred years and. connected with this parent type. the like of wliicli are not unless indeed we go far to be found either before or after back to the peaceful and prosperous reign of OfTa. When we read in the English Chronicle.). Deutsche Milnzen. 24. ' ' . Vol. or even in the Scandinavian world generally. . I. * This type of the tho period (Danncnbcrg. This fact is interesting in view of the relations of Eadweard's son (and daughter) to the Gerniaa Emperor.Ivi INTUODUCTION.' it would have been impossible for the Scandicounts.. we know that they did not do so. p. the accounts of attacks upon England by various bodies of Scandinavians which begin almost directly after the accession of ^thelred II. 27). tlie reign which saw the first faint warnings of that great Viking invasion of which Eadweard in a certain sense — saw the end. 503). II. t Originally they were no doubt derived from the temple type of Lewis the Pious. The names and expressions which we have been used to in the earlier the Army. Great changes had taken place among all the Scandinavian peoples since the moment at which ' ' . as a matter of fact. &c. In any case the buiklings ou EadwciU'd's coins are only remotely p. were commemorative of the building of the burgs. we might fancy we had gone back two hundred years and were reading the history of the outbreak of the Viking era at the end of the eighth century. king of Mercia. which bears this type was struck by Viking invaders in East Auglia (cf. ornaments and dcsif:^ns (tlio hand of Providence. 94 Vol.* tho rci)rcs('ntation of buildings. It is possible that this type (like tlie monogram type) was introduced by tlie Vikings.! The Scandinavian populations in the British Islands. viii. such as those of the reverse of PI. which had done so much to free England from the yoke of the foreigners. were at this moment entering upon a transition era which separates what may be called the First Viking Age from the Second Viking Age.

for a portion of their territory. gradually been up a vast a Greater Scandinavia. Waterford. most of the Western Scottish Islands. xlv. but the constitutions under which they were governed had been changing likewise. Iloworth (Archicologia. and Limerick. and Caithness) were nominally vassals. But the earls of Orkney who appear upon the stage of history at this period were men of very older countries. it. the Orkneys and Shetlands. and Denmark no doubt had an influence on other Scandinavian settlements. 244 »v/. "We may place the ending of the First Viking Era about the year 912. There were. out of the three built parent Scandinavian During the era which preceded countries had congeries of states. and in customs.INTEODUCTION. included . in speech. with the (counting from the East to the West) a huge district in the North and West of Eussia extending from Kiev to Lake Ladoga. Sweden. Shetland. In the three older kingdoms at any rate monarchies had been established on a tolerably secure basis and the establishment of these strong powers in Norway. for another part. Man. Norway.* At that date the extent of the conquests of the Scandinavians was practically complete. of the kings of Norway. of the kings of Scotland. Northern England. Then there were the Scandinavian Colonies. Ivii they first emerge into the light of history. . large settlements in Ireland grouping themselves into what were known as the three kingdoms of Dublin. strong character who made themselves into practically * This date has been disputed But not ill by Mr. For not only had the northern states expanded in the way we have described. and a strip of land in North Germany (Mecklenburg). It included Sweden. our judgineiit ou sufficicut gruuuda. The earls of Orkney (Orkney. which is the date of the treaty of St.). This Greater Scandinavia. the Faroes and Iceland. Clair-en-Epte. further. Here were ready to hand all the materials for forming a great northern empire and at one time it was quite within the bounds of possibility that an empire might have been formed out of these elements. and Denmark. to complete this great stretch of territories which were all inhabited by peoples closely allied in blood.

And in the earlier naval battles between the English under -^thelwulf. tlio Wo know less about the rulers of Western isLuulH iind of Man. but so far as England is concerned at a transition era between the two. or else the man of the Vik (the Bay par excellence) i. But this is not the etymological meaning of the sea-rover. ' ' . indcpondcnt Rovcrcigns.' the modern French suisse. These changes in meaning may be compared. Among the English.Iviii INTRODUCTION. the land on the northern side of the Skager-rak. with such words as myrmidons. sea-advcnturor. ' ' Cleasby's Icelandic Dictionary (Vigfusson). and naval were their chief delight. in East Anglia and Mercia. But we may feel sure that in these countries also the very nebulous groups of Vikings. and their invaders. but were only ships of transport. ' Viking. the Viking ships were not originally designed to take part in naval engagements. they came as an army rather than as a navy. There is another way in which the second era of Scandinavian conquest in England stands contrasted with the When the Vikings first came to England. word riJi-ing. &c. or under -Alfred. which resembled the different Armies which our English Chronicle speaks of as settled..e. Etymologically it is either the man of the vik (bay) in the general sense. at the beginning of the tentb century. for the simple reason that the Christian powers had no fleets to oppose to them. During the period battles of the Second Viking Age all the Scandinavian powers had learned to fight at sea. as in other which the word ' Viking is found in commonest nse. ' ' . In other words. The earlier ' ' Vikings could not fight at sea. or to any first. or again about the kings iu Ireland.* We have not yet arrived at the outbreak of the Second Viking Age. s. of the other countries of Christian Europe. Scc * The era in is ' Sagas. were beginning to group themselves into stronger and better-governed states.auiug must be the earliest oue so that the change in meaning to the general sense which * Viking has in the Sagas. implies a change in the chiuacter of the Vikings themselves. in the during the latter part of the tenth century and the begiuuing A'ikuig signifies in this use neither more nor less than of the cleventli. This etymological mt.' and so forth. v.' . Among the Christian powers the English were the first who set about the building of fleets. with the change iu the meaning of the word Hellene ' iu the second place (as a change from a proper to a general name). the former were generally victorious. in the first place (aa a mere expansion).

countries. has been identified with Ivar. The Vikings of Northumberland came very near to submitting to iEthelflsed. pp. to note is that during the reigns of the War pp. I. however. So that a good deal among the Northumbrians. English kings though governed according to Danish law and custom. and Ivar. of the Gaedhil ivith (he is GaiU (R. a son of the half mythical or wholly mythical Kagnar Lodbrog. l. Nottingham. an instinctive tendency towards centralization lix and stronger government made itself felt. and we may surmise became more homogeneous and stronger by the same process which was simplifying and strengthening both the English and the Scandinavian of the sense of nationality states. liii. of brother Eadweard. collectively this house is known in the Chronicles as the Sons of Ivar (' Hy-Imhair in Irish*). t Tlio iilciilificafiuii X probahly mistaken. even among the English of Northumbria. a Norse king This Kagnald was a ruler whom the of Northumbria.. lose their distinct indivi- duality and became levelled a district subject to the away into a larger Dane-Law. as we saw.J8. and we actually find an Archbishop of York. during the two generations which follow Alfred. expended all their energy in absorbing into their kingdom the Danes south of the Humber. rallied round the Danish kings of that district. an Englishman.INTRODUCTION. such as those five burgs. p. I.f The biographies and the coinages of these kings of the house of Ivar were given in the last volume. Stamford. 2«. All the lesser armies or the smaller republics.! and ' it is But what we have * Todd. 231-2. Sec Vol.S sqq. remained.. Northumbrians had imported from Ireland. lutroductioii. the founder of the house. not therefore necessary to repeat their history here. But they would not submit to her There had been talk. and Derby. Ixxii. And he was only the first of a series of Northumbrian kings who all belonged to the same house. This tendency was strengthened by the vigour of the "West Saxon kings who. Ixviii. Vol. Lincoln. S.).. . The country north of the Humber. marrying ^Ethelflaed's daughter to Kagnald. Leicester. taking the part of these foreign kings against the kings of Southern England.\ix.

however. — — . li.e. Guthfri^ — who was a relative of according William of Malmesbury he was the son of Sihtric Gale. Eadmund. the portion of Northumbria which had still been left to the Anglian kings though as under-kings only were the members of this coalition. Bernicia. rather than allow themselves to be incorporated in the West Saxon kingdom. II. about whose title to succession there was some doubt. friS went first to the king of the Scots but he did not deem himself safe there from the power of ^Ethelstan. He may : have done this as King Sihtric. was not at the beginning of his reign in a position to attempt the conquest of Northumbria from her new kings the less so that (as we have said) the English Northumbrians showed that they had enough of the spirit of nationality or separatism left in them to make them ready sometimes to side with their heathen conquerors. 0. Welsh. or as protector of his sister. Muliu. subjugated by iEthelstan. and compelled to swear oaths and give hostages to him. ^thelstan. * ' West Welsh ' t Wil. . Sihtric Gale. (E. A little later another unsuccessful attempt on the Northumbrian kingdom was made by one TurferS. directed against Howel. king of the North the power of the English king. p.. king king of Bamborough i.Ix INTRODUCTION. A. king of Dublin. the and add heir to it to his own kingdom. S. But they were. It was probably subsequent to these events that the Chroiiicic says. and Eadred. drove him from the kingdom.). returned to Ireland.* Constantino (III. as did no doubt the petty rulers in Mercia and East Anglia. by a slip of the peu. 212. GuthiEthelstan. and so [Godfred]. and to give him Sihtric Gale died the next year. of the Scots. One of iEthelstan's first acts was to make peace with the present king of Northumbria. and Eadred. iEthelstan was then able to take over the kingdom of York. TEthclHtan. the Chronicle says. these kings do not at once disappear before the power of West Saxon kings. The act was not in first all respects a prudent one for it produced the great alliance of lesser British princes. three sons of Eaflwcard. and his sister in marriage.).t to tried to make good his claim to the kingdom of Northumbria.

^jlthelstan had thus intimate relations with Kichildis. sent an embassy to England. Charles the Simple of France married Eadgifu (Eadgiva). the one told in Harolds Saga Harfagra. but that his position was recognised by foreign princes we know. who was called Hakon ^thelstans-fostri. sought asylum in England that this Lewis was brought back to be crowned king of the West Franks. amidst the troubles which surrounded the late it was from England Carlings. The most famous of these marriages was that of the Princess Eadgith (Eaditha)] with the Emperor Otto I. ^thelstan's greatness was recognised by the northern Harald of Norway. reign. the most glorious That the years which any king of Wessex had yet known. married Hugh the Great. This queen and her son Lewis. . or the sons of the men. We know that many foreign princes sought tho hands of his sisters. There are many accounts of the relations of JEthelstan and Harald.) Then followed seven years of peace. for they were the men. represents the intercourse of the kings as . or Louis d'Outremer. the father of Hugh Capet and Ealgifu (Ealgiva) married Louis. Whence he is known in history as LudoEadhild (Ethilda) vicus transmarinus. nearly all the Christian princes of Western Europe. the daughters of Eadweard the Elder. hardly friendly. This relationship between England and Scandinavia is of interest. yEthelstan assumed the ' ' Ixi which title Eex totiiis Britannise we see on his charters and his coins. more especially in view of the practical jokes (for such they really wore) . The best known story.INTRODUCTION. Ixii. now nearing the end of his powers. son of Boso. We must only accept the outcome of the legend that -^tlielstan did really become godfather to ITarald's son Hakon. who had fought under the banner of Kjutvi and his allies at Hafirsfjord. So that friendship between Harald and iEthelstan was as natural as were the friendly relations of Harun-el-Kashid and Charlemagne. Harald Fairhair had no cause to love the Norsemen who were the foes of iEthelstan. (See below p. king of Provence. But we may believe the stories of tho which ^thelstan and Harald played upon each other are apocryphal. . and nephew of Charles the Bald's second wife. titles which ^Ethelstan assumed were not empty boasts.

D.Ixii INTRODUCTION. „ 937 . . . BRIT. .t . A. 353.. totius Britannia) hujus rex . „ 934 . We find that this title appears on nearly all the coins with mint names though in one instance. . 345 (date uncertain). . Nottingham. .. . viz. per omnipatrautis dcxteram totius Britannise regni solio sub- limatus „ 347. In the reign of Tli^tlielstan we Lave the carlicKt numismatic record of the conquests of his father in the coins struck by the son at certain mint-places in Mercia.TB basileus „ „ apice totius Albionis sublimatus. . . Another feature of the coinage of iEthelstan is the appearance on it of the title REX TOTIUS BRITANNI/E [REX TOT. and a record of his own conquests in the coins which he struck at York. „ limatus rex Anglorum et asqne totius Albiouis. rex Anglorum trantis per omnipatotius dexleram Britanuife regni solio sub- limatus :{(i9. . Anglorum dcxteram totius . rex Anglorum. . * t Which never On occurs on the charters of ^thelstan. rex totius Britannia' . 929 . tlio part wliicli English coinage played in inaugurating a Scandinavian currency. 3G4. . per omnipatrantis Britannise regni solio sub- „ 356 (date uncertain). . . rex monarchus totius Britanni.. ^^clstanus rex Anglorum. . we have a reversion to the antique form Eex Saxonum. . the probably genuine charters of iEthelstan in or described as follows : Kemble we find the king signing Charter no.* We have already said that the title 7'ex totius Britanniie was probably first assumed after the submission at Eamot (Emmet) of the Scottish and Welsh kings and of the Northumbrian GuthfriS. totius Britmniaj rex rex et rector totius .o insula' . Derby. a coin of Derby. .] of which we have just spoken.. rex totius Brytannias 357. at Chester (?). „ regnum rex totius Albionis deo auctore dispensana „ „ 348. Britannia! insulw. . „ „ „ 931 . . totius Britanni..

The Northumbrians chose Olaf Quaran. On must remember that the driven forth. and gained that memorable victory the fame of which lives against -^thelstan . .).. iEthelstan must have been taken more or less by surprise. Tlie Ciironiek! is extremely coiifiisiiif. at this point.Eudmimd. It was natural that when the firm hand of ^thelstan was withdrawn Danish England should think once more of revolt. Ixxi. dlafs S. according to one tradition. ' c.>lory of Simoon of Durliam. Ixiii 934 Constantino III. p. and likewise. The fleet of the allies sailed up the Humber and took York. Ixx . A new coalition was formed against . From this time to his death (a. likely that since ' when Halfdan first gedseldo (divided) the Northumbrian laud among his followers. Ixx. 940) the reign of ^thel. He craftily opened negotiations with the two Olafs.d. 33. 870) last king of Bernicia had been ruler to represent the It is ' now no nationality of the Northumbrians. king of Scotland. (D. In A. But in the interval he and his brother Eadmund hastened the muster of an army. E. and there was the time (a. Tryggvas. not wholly dispersing the English. L.^thelstan. the son-in-law of Constantino the Third. in song. Olaf Quaran came back to Scotland bringing with him another Olaf. the brother-in-law of Olaf Tryggvason. t ' Anlaf of Ireland tho Clironiclo (D. We his death stan was undisturbed. who was then only eighteen years of age.. he was succeeded by his brother Eadmund. I. Olaf Godfredsson from Dublin.* Three years after this harrying of iEthelstan's in Scotland. F. Owen of Cumberland joined it. At length the English troops encountered those of the allies at the battle of Brunanburg. subsequently King of Norway. a modus vivendi had been established * Vol. It was either just before or just after this event that Constantino married his daughter to Olaf Quaran. and one of the two Olafs who had fought at Brunanburg t (Vol. as almost all tiie Olafs (Aiilafs) who appear in history at this juncture came from Ireland.D.INTHODUCTION. pp. and the different ]\ISS.) must he compared with eaeli otlier and with the corresponding' portions uf tlie hi. a Norse King of Dublin. rebelled and the English king sent a fleet and an army to invade Lis country.d. But this title is far from distinctive.) calls him.

. Carmina 1. 697. The Danes of the east too of East Anglia and of East Mercia acknowledged him as king. Oswaldi. Ermoldus Nigellus. allied himself with Olaf. himself by descent a Dane. Northumbria.^ a peace between the two armies was brought about. Vita Lud. S.). 84).-lxxi. Archbishops of York. Annates (Pertz. Boreale. another son of Godfred. Ebor.|| and fredsson apparently died in this same year 942 Eegnald. (Ibid. 501-516). Eadof a — ' ' . ii. See Vol. s. § This event took place in a. Olaf Tryggvason. It was for these republican armies now a choice between Norse kingship or English. a. t Vitd S. 942. Ohif Quaran is supposed to have been tlie brother-in-law of a (see preceding third Olaf. Olaf Quaran and his cousin Olaf Godfredsson. vol. Chron. became the second king in . had collected an army he marched therewith to Leicester and nearly succeeded in capturing both Wulfstan and Olaf. The At Tamworth failed to take.404. lately raised to the Archbishopric of Canterbury. but this place he Olaf marched first on Northampton he was more successful. this baptism of Olaf Quaran was an event of capital imiiortaucc in the history of Scandinavia. The contest had lasted for at least a year. sq. (Eaine. Corp. I. town was stormed with great slaughter on both sides. the king of Norway page and cf. T. but they escaped during the Eventually. S. R. mund upon . Eadmund stood sponsor for him. through the mediation of the celenight. Rog. 11 § Einhaid. pp. iK'twoon the t^YO races. ii.t who had been his part . iv.Ixiv INTRODTTCTION. ii. Wulfstan.sh even were not nnwillinp. If so. Ixx.* brated Odo. in history. as Alfred had done for Guthorm or as the Emperor Lewis the Pious had done 116 years earlier for one of the first converted Danes mentioned . to welcome a Norse king from Ireland in default For we find that the kiufjj of the old Bornician stock. 14.d. and the conversion of the Irish king may have been the determining cause of the conversion of his more distinguished brotlior-in-Iaw. Sac. p. P("/ (Pertz. probably divided But Olaf Godthe Northumbrian kingdom between them. i. The effect of the peace was to make of Northumbria a legally dependent but practiOlaf accepted baptism and cally separate Norse kingdom. pp. Arch. Angh. Archbishop of York.). X Stut)hs. . * A. and that the Engli. Thegan. 212). 043. Poet.

more completely than his predecessor had done. Chron. he gained an equivalent by adding to the latter the whole of eastern England. only two years. of the terms of the -^Elfred-Giithorm peace. however. a. The kingdom years after this Eadmund was murdered by Leofa at Pucklechurch. p. ii. 94 (RoUa Series). 943. it does not seem that we have any authority to reject the general sense of the statement that Eadmund made.f What the exact meaning of this statement is it is not possible to determine. 944 Eadmund drove out both He gave part of their dominions to Malcolm. Eadmund was compelled to behold a Norse Northumbrian kingdom established upon a more or less legal footing at one end of his dominions. and Eegnald in the north lasted In a. / . continued to be governed by Danish law and ruled with a certain independence. a reminiscence. these Danish republics of East Mercia and East Anglia an integral part of the territory of the West Saxon kings. For on the one hand we find ^thelstan striking at at least two of these five towns. S. J t A. 1015. we find earls ruling in East Anglia and in Northumbria. Simeon of Durham. says that Watling Street was the boundary between the English and Northumbrian kingdoms. A. a. and possibly at three.INTRODUCTION. H. on the other hand.t Still. indeed. these kings. no doubt with the object of forestallking of the Scots ing any such hostile combination against the English as that which had threatened iEthelstan at J^runanburg. though we cannot define with precision. a. all the ancient is no doubt that all Danish Danelaga. On the other hand there England. i>. Chron. The Chronicle specially mentions that the Five Burgs were added by Eadmund to his kingdom. Two . a.. Before Cnut came and divided all England up of Olaf into earldoms. perhaps.* But this is certainly a mistake.d. * li. we read of the burning of the seven ' burgs ' (and these seven certainly included the earlier five) as much as seventy years later in the reign of ^thelred Il. IxV If. Simeon Dunelru.

xxix.\i. PL xi. with Yol. 4 [Eagnald] xxix. Yol. and See Vol. Eventually the Northumbrians made peace with Eadred. wag Succeeded by Eadrod tlic tliird of tlie sons of Eadtlio Elder.d. 5. who had carried with him into exile a large fleet and army. 4 [Olaf Quaran] with Yol. But before long the Northumbrians once more took Olaf Quaran for their king. i. PL xxix. and as an act of vengeance. This time they did not look for support to tlie Irish Norsemen. The coins struck by the kings of the House of Ivar are very different from those struck by the mysterious Cnut (GuSred-Cuut) and Siefred of the Northumbrian kingdom during Alfred's reign. came to York. how much power Eadmund and Eadred possessed in Northumbria during the periods in which they were nominxii. and was there received as king. i. ii.^thelstan] Yol. 8-11 . 5 [Olaf]. 14 [. lx. [Olaf and Eric].d. the son of Harald Harfagr. ii. with Yol. And in many ways the coins struck by the princes who reigned alongside of Eadmund and Eadred are evidences of this. 6 [yEthelstan] xi. 955. 9 [Eadmund] and Yol. PL xxviii. 1. i.d. from which in many IIc wcard . 948 the Northumbrians again revolted. i. Erik. PI. or Eadred. PL x. Eadmund. Erik had been expelled from the throne of Norway by his halfbrother Hakon. 7-12. In a. But in a. . ix. pp. Eailrcd. Eipon Cathedral was among the buildings burnt by the English army. PI. They are not barbarous fabrications such as those earlier Danish-Northumbrian coins but are modelled upon the contemporary coins of the "Wessex kings. 2-8 2-6 [Eadred]). fearfully ravaged the country. * [Eadmund]. iEthelstan. ii. Eadred marched an army into Northumbria. and then Erik for a second time. instances they are clearly copied (cf. but elected as their king Erik Blooox. 3. and Erik was driven out. known as iEthelstan's foster-son. Undoubtedly during the last two reigns we find a certain recrudescence of the power of the Norse kings in Northumbria.Ixvi INTRODUCTION. . 047 Eadred received at Tadcaster (in YorksLiro) an oatli of allegiance from the Nortlmmbrian Witan with Archbishop Wulfstan at its head.-ii. Again.* Eadred died in a.

d. Against the representations of the historians is to be weighed the fact that Eadmund struck but one coin with the name of Bat then neither of these the York mint and Eadred none. as said in Vol. Arnulf and Eaegenald. Eaegenald or Eegnald. Farman and Eadulf).. and again from A. Farman. 948-949. Ecbcrht (?) Hcldalt. We have to add Eadmund's known York moneyer Ingelgar. 949-952. Arnulf. We may assume therefore that the coins struck by these moneyers. other Land we have good reason at for believing is But on the from a comi. princes affected very their coins. are. on coins of the Norse and English kings of York alike seems to dispose conclusively of the theory tliat the moneyers were conflicting at this point. by the way. and from a. Farman. Eaegeuald or Efegcnold. sufficiently so to be fairly characteristic. though not rare. Eadmund has two of these moneyers. much the placing of mint names upon York moneyers are Adclbert. while Erik BloSox probably reigned from A. ally kings of that country Ixvii it wonlJ not be easy to determine. Ecberht (spelled Ecgbriht). a.. Let us further note that Olaf's and Erik's lists of moneyers have several names in common (Ascolu-Aculf. . These dates are arrived at after a careful comparison of different authorities. were struck at York. 952-954. four. It may be noted.D. that the occurrence of these names.d. who struck This might in itself be taken as evidence for Eadred also. York from for the evidence in regard to dates and periods It is very would be difficult to believe that Olaf with an array of eight moneyers and eighteen types.D. ^thelstan's . Eotberht and Siuard (Siward) and of these eight names. and Hunred. of a continuous currency at the city of York.INTRODUCTION. or Erik with his five moneyers and eight types. and IJotbert (Eodberht). Ingelgar. even when the pieces bear no mint-name. Of Erik's moneyers Hunrcd strikes also for Eadred. could have held the kingdom of York for a short period only. occur on the coins of Eadmund without mint names two of the names. JE^ehed. Arnulf and Eotbert occur again on the coins of Eadred. Ingelgar (the latter his known York moneyer). and Eotbert is somewhat rarer. Olaf Quaran reigned 941-944. Ingclgiir. Arnulf. . viz. parison of different writers that.

of the rest of Eastern Mercia. and it lasted for twenty-five or consider that England's practical We may Viking troubles dates twenty-six years. mm who travelled in the service of By the expulsion of Erik shortly before the death of Eadrcd. and of East Anglia. among the Danes of the Five Burgs. With the ecclesiastical disputes of this period we have It was of evil this period of . immunity from from the accession of Eadwig. for they represent the conquest of the Five Burgs as the principal achievement Eadred's great achievement was the of Eadmund's reign. ilEthelstan there is a considerable coinage at that Under Eadmund and Eadred It reappears it almost disappears. subjection of the Northumbrian kingdom. If then we are to assume a continued extension of the power of the English kings during the reigns of the sons of Eadweard the Elder. but in those of his nephews. augury for the future that England made calm the occasion for bitter intestine quarrels. but the king. Eadwig. a Then again Under Eadmund and Eadred we have considerable Norse coinage at York. and under Eudwig a considerable York coinage is once more found. This is of course more or less in accord with what the chroniclers tell us. Put more concisely. not local people. England gained definite and final possession of the Northumbrian kingdom. under Eadwig. which at one time practically went the length of civil war. the facts with regard at York are : to the coinage Under town. though the efi'ects of the achievement were felt not in his reign. we must suppose that during the reigns of his two younger sons the English rule was extended especially towards eastern England. not from that of Kadgar the Peaceful. Under ^Ethelstan and under Eadwig we have practically none. This was a sort of anticyclone between two storms.Ixviii INTRODUCTION.

the Norsemen made no attempt. 959. and then followed the reign of Eadgar. even partially successful. or as . Their only interest for us is the degree in which they weakened England and prepared the way for the disasters which overtook the next generation. The first effect of the unpopularity of Eadwig was the separation of Mercia from Wessex.d. to wrest Northumbria from the English kings. Eadgar espoused the side of Howel against his The latter was assisted by troops sent by Maccus. assume that Eadgar who now obtained the rule of Mercia. it seems that Maccus was himself compelled to do the same. ruled as under-kings to the king of Wessex . kings of the house of Cerdic. Grim). Howel was successful he paid allegiance to Eadgar as his over-king nay. the king of Man. — — * I.3^thelbald.* We may moneyers who struck for Bedford under Eadwig did not all strike between a. just as the former kings of Kent. Cumberland again a larger country than the modern county which had been over-run by Norsemen from Ireland and had long before been freed by Eadmund and granted as a fief to uncle Jago. A disputed succession in the kingdom of North Wales invited the interference of English and of Norse troops..d. the fifteen most glorious years in the history of the assume. two years after Eadwig's succession. . that the five . . No doubt the effective rule belonged to the younger brother and to him belongs the credit if.d.e. Eadwig died in a. . even though king of Wessex. Ixix nothing directly to do as it is impossible to see any way in which they could have affected the coinage. For though three of them were moneyers of Eadred (Baldwine. 955 and 957. We may. during Eadwig's reign.INTRODUCTION. for instance. During fields for this reign the struggle outside the boundaries English and the Norsemen found of the English kingdom. ruled as under-king to his father the king of Kent. Eadgar. which took place in a. I think. tliat if he struck coins for Wessex Lc placed liis father's name upon them. . 957. the same three also struck under Eadgar. Boiga. when they were brothers or sons of the king of Wessex. ruled as under-king to his brother.

d. Huntington.f These three princes. as 'basileus totius BritannisB. Lincoln. 975-979) we come to the reign of England's of -^thelred II. Tempsford (?). IIowcl. two years before Eadgar's sible who are also spoken that this death. . Gloucester. number of the and in the number of the moneyers employed it fairly well carries out the impression of magnificence and prosperity which the chroniclers attributeto this reign. Winchester. in the to strike them.IXX INTHODUCTION. 973. Chichester. king of Scotland. Celtic Scotland. As generally happens in history. Hertford (?). Ilchester. Eochester. i.. was slain in 954. and the coins.d. Juchill. king of Strathclydo.' took place in a. Hereford. Thetford. Eadwcuid II. 3G2. king of Westmoreland (it is difficult to understand a king of Westmoreland by the side of a king of Cumberland and also a king of Strathclyde). to note that in the excellence of design and execution. iEthelred's character has borne the chief part of the blame for the misfortunes which fell upon England during his long reign. Winchelsea. of Scotland (or Alban *). Oxford. Derby. Lewes. . and that the uncle and nephew had found some sort of modus vivendi in North Wales ? This celebrated row upon the river Dee or say universal homage to Eadgar. Wilton. were three of the eight nnder-kings Malcolm who gave token the river Dec. and then great disasters. Stafford. of their subjection by rowing Eadgar nj)on ' The remaining ' princes were Kenneth. t Malcolm J. Dufnall. was confirmed to another IMalcolm hy Eadgar. Totness. Exeter. Of the coinage of Eadgar we have only pieces struck. York. p.^thelred's sohriqud of Unready does * SkouL'. Is it posJacob is the same as Jago. I. Southampton. that Eadweard the Martyr (a. Leicester. London. Wallingford. Dover. Cambridge. Lymne. and Malcolm. Stamford. We have also to note that there is now a con- siderable increase in the number of mint-places recorded on There exist coins of Eadgar struck at Bath. Maccus. Canterbury. Ipswich. Bedford. Chester (?). Shaftesbury. sou of Donald. Norwich. The short reign of intervenes. and Siefer-S or Siefred and Jacob of as kings of Wales.

its Ixxi motlorn significagives it but means the Counselless. It tured that the English really had very may be conjecmuch deteriorated during the foregoing generations. bear tion.udomes. the descendants of the Vikings in the East and North. In trying to understand the history of this new era wo must never of cleavage lose sight of the fact that there were two lines at this among the inhabitants of England moment one a distinction of blood. not of course.oa iieafod Aiigelkyunid and Cri«t(. and the other of religion.INTRODUCTION. This is only to be expected much for when we remember how very rapid and The superficial had been the conversion of the Dunstan and Odo to reform the clergy were rendered necessary by the scandalous condition into which church discipline had fallen and no doubt the corrupefforts of . . would be far more favourable to Svend than the English in the South and West. The technical truth for is. The country was like a human body which has been overfed on too nourishing or too stimulating food. The party which represented the secular party of the previous reigns. a. the party opposed to Dunstan w'ould be : the people among those of English birth who were. tion of the clergy only reflected the corruption of the people. we it see. the least bitterly opposed to the half-heathen Svend course in his claim to the throne of England the two nationalities . Clironicle {s. It is probable that the religion of the people had altered very the worse.^Ifheali tlio marfjT Wiub id nuiiling. It had not yet absorbed the large foreign element which had settled in the country. Vikings. as everybody knows. S.speaking of . while of among who lived side by side in England moment. we see treachery on among quently cowardice among the all the nobility. during the whole of this reign. and very frepeople. 1011) in . so iSo lur w. Freeman rather a meaning of one who acted without advice of the Witan. which is . evidences impossible adequately to account sides of a most extraordinary degeneracy in the English people.* at this * Note in this connection nn expression used in a verso in the A. when the time came. But it is by no means just to lay the chief blame for all the misfortunes of England upon its ruler.

In A. But these and other points of resemblance in the first and the second era of Scandinavian invasion are chiefly superficial. . 980 we read that a naval force ravaged Southampton another ravaged Chester. Probably it was only an aurora borealis. and the very next year ravages on the coast began. but still it was accepted by the people of the times as a warning of some coming terror. is memorable for the death of diff'erence there . the points of like- ness between the beginning of this second Viking age and the beginning of the first one. too. which was partially burnt. took.D. It is curious. a bloody cloud was remarked in the sky. We . . that is to say on the accession of iEthelred. of Man. moreover. 982 three ships came to Dorchester and afterwards they sailed round to London. exactly two hundred years after the the first We read how age was preceded by a supernatural warning— a rain blood which Alcuin saw descending upon the minster at of York. and we know that that holds true of the Ecgbeorht's time. and Thanet also was attacked. and the relations between the English and the Norse Maccus. that the second age begins almost first. first invaders in Down to Eadgar's time there had been considerable fighting in the outlying parts of Great Britain between the English troops and the Vikings of the islands. There were other attacks in 983 and 986 and in 989 Watehet was ravaged. that this second army of Vikings came in well-armed fleets ready to fight both by sea and land. and Eadgar took another. Suporficially. as we saw. The next year there was another fleet on the south coast Padstow was harried and the fleet likewise attacked Wales.Ixxii INTRODUCTION. have already pointed out how many points of were between the two classes of invaders this one among the rest.D. are almost absurdly striking. In A. Just before the beginning of the second age. as we have already said. just like those that (to read the accounts in the Chronicle) began in England towards the end of the eighth century. It is probable again that the first invaders in ^^thelred's reign came either from Ireland or from the Western Islands. This year. the Norse king islanders were becoming strained. one side in the quarrel over the succession in North Wales.

The Olaf was the famous Olaf Tryggvason. There is a long and fabulous history relating to this Olaf's birth. was stormed the army then sailed up the Humbor and plundered Lindsay in Lincolnshire. — .INTRODUCTION. 993. it seems. in which the English ealdorman Brihtnoth strenuously but vainly endeavoured to resist the invaders. for now a new Scandinavian foe had appeared in the field the most powerful of all Svend. . 991 a fleet came to the east coast and attacked Ipswich . and to his early bringing up in Eussia. the Bernician capital.D. and it is quite certain that both Denmark and Norway had their eyes upon England.D. but we really know nothing definite about him before his appearance at this moment upon the stage of history. was under the command of three leaders. After this defeat. All these attacks were like the attacks which opened out the first Viking period. this fleet. This was probably a Danish army. and which was much the richest country of any which lay at all near the great belt of Scandinavian States which we described upon an earlier page.000 pounds of of Dublin. and the enemy had time In A. Justin. and Guthmund. In A. But he was betrayed by one of his ealdorman. the memory whereof has been preserved in a fine Anglo-Saxon poem. is memorable not only for the appearance of Olaf. merely plundering expeditions. Olaf. 902 ^thelred gathered a great fleet at London intending to revenge the Maldon defeat and to drive the invaders from the Eastern Counties. . which was already half Danish. but for the battle of Maldon. In A. who four years later was to make himself king of Norway. king of Denmark. is said to have been a sister of Olaf.D. king This year. silver) to the Northmen. 991. Bamborough. either from Ireland or from the Isles his first . to escape.^Ifric. wife. Ixxiii Dunstan. It is very likely that he came from the Western Vikings. we saw. in a far hetter organized condition for making great conquests than they had been two hundred years before. as we have already said. and without any great significance. the English paid their Hrst bribe (10. hut the Northern powers in general were.

d.Ixxiv INTRODUCTION. In A. had made himself odious by his crimes. but according to the story in Olafs Saga after he had plundered in England this year. From this time England had two or three years' peace. Olaf when he came with Svend to the English coast was still a heathen. It was due to his change of faith that in the year 995 Olaf showed himself willing to come to terms with ^thelred and to receive confirmation at the hands of the English archbishop. Olaf was fully occupied in spreading Christianity . where he met a very reverent hermit who converted him by a display of his prophetic powers. had been converted by force by the Emperor Otto I. liavo said that the trouhlcs of Wc this age are a fjood deal complicated hy beiug a series of struggles. or again between the high party. but between heathens or half-heathens and Christians. He had now again become against his father. From that time to his death presentative of Harald's line. apostatized. the old earl and champion of the crown of Norway. friendship with the earls of the nominally Christian. Harald's sou. and all these different interests acted and the secular party Svend may be reckoned the nearest apcounteracted. the party of Dunstan. follow him Hakon resisted. was that Norway substantially threw off its vassalage to Denmark and that Hakon became practically an indepenSvend. and now when Olaf arrived in Norway he found that Hakon had already been hunted into hiding by his bonders. not merely between the English and Danes. (a. His father. 1000). his vassal. when he became the reformer of Norway. he sailed to the Scilly Isles. but he had apparently taken to his new for he did his faith and become a rather zealous Christian best to make Hakon. heathenism in that country. earl of Norway. Harald Blaatand. show that his interests were rather with the heathen party than with the Christian. proach to a representative of heathenism. who was often in rebellion dent king. and the result in his change of faith. 995 an opening arose to Olaf Tryggvason to secure Hakon. but his family of Hakon and his subsequent opposition to Olaf Tryggvason. and that everybody was ready to receive him as the rechurch or monastic : .D.

and it is quite possible that the men of Cumberland had furnished some contingents to the invaders of England. His idea seems to have been to revenge himself for the incursions of foreign fleets by the massacre of the Norsemen or the Danes settled in his own country. Whenever a force was gathered against the invaders force in to encounter the .INTRODUCTION. ms. Cumberland was We at that time very largely inhabited by Norsemen who had come over either from Ireland or from the Western Islands. purh sum ying.'* AVhen the king did take active measures it is difficult see what purpose they had. S. could be seriously injured by * A. . there was ever through some tiling flight determined on. Thouf^h he had set to failed to meet the fleets that assailed him. Ixxv Iceland. Though ^thelred has received the most part of the blame for the feebleness of the English resistance. .d. and in preparing himself growing hostility of his two Scandinavian neighbour states. Sweden and Denmark. They were bribed to withdraw. Chron.^lithelred to took this occasion for a strange display of energy. 995-7) to have been much occupied in Wales and Svend was probably engaged during these years in an invasion of Saxon and Sclavonic Germany. he now by work to attack the Norsemen settled in or hard his territories. ' by Norway and ponue wearS pser refrc. fleam astiht. unless they were merely dictated by desire for revenge on those who were most open to attack. least of all those that liad come from Norway and Denmark. One fleet came in 998 to the Isle of Wight.d. A sentence of the Saxon chronicler must suffice us to explain the state of affairs. it was hard for him to find any among his thanes or ealdormen who were to be trusted. s. 995 and 1000. But that the foreign fleets. a. England was left almost at peace. The Western Vikings seem during part of the same period (a. or rather to show that no satisfactory explanation is possible. another in 999 to Kent. Between a. read that in the year 1000 ho ravaged Cumberland and attacked the Isle of Man.

and the massacre of Saint Brice was a very important one in the history of the Scandinavian The year 1000 was the year of the great coalition nations.* It is of course impossible to suppose that ^thelred cont(>m|)lated a massacre of all the people of Danish blood settled in England. a massacre. Sigvald. as it is always called. the leader of the Jomsburg Yikings. were among the most capable defenders of England against the invaders. The order given was that on Saint Bricc's day all the Danish men in England were to be slain. was drawn into the alliance and was induced to betray Olaf Tryggvason into the hands of his enemies. Svend. champions. not of Christianity only. C. B. jc ou A. and as he sailing in and Sigvald were company past the island of is battle which ensued uku —the battle of Svold — Augclcynno wa-ron. fleet to One authority states that yKtlielrcd likewise sent a of attack the dominions of the duke Normandy. and perpetrated upon men who were settled peaceably in this country and had no reason to They may have been comparatively recent expect attack. and Erik. * The three allied potentates lay in wait for Olaf as the former was returning from a friendly voyage to the who The ruled in the country of the Oder. But there can be no doubt that this slaughter of Saint Brice was. king of Sweden. the earl of East Anglia. 1002. . the son of Hakon. The epoch of these two attacks the attack upon the Danes in Cumberland. Others such as Ulfketil. the celebrated massacre of Saint Brico. Chron. Olaf. former earl of Nor way. king of Denmark. a very celebrated little republic of fighting men situated at the mouth of the Oder. made between the three Northern leaders. Acts such as these quite serve to explain the still more foolish and criminal act of two years later. ihe harrying of the Norsemen in Cumberland was an ahsurd notion. S. Slav king Eiigen. as Odo the Archbishop had been. comers. The coalition was directed against Olaf — Tryggvason.Ixxvi INTRODUCTION. D. but of the high ecclesiastical party. many of whom were. but they had been allowed to settle themselves and become subjects of the English king. Het s. ofslean calliv ya Doiii»can a.

But when the news it of the massacre of Saint Brice came from England found the king of Denmark more powerful than he had ever been. It was natural that the king of Denmark should have been a good deal occupied with these events and with the settlement of his rule in Norway. ealdorman of Danish descent. the southern part of which went to Svend.d. the counterpoise to the spread in this country of Danish influence. 1003 that Svend returned to England to avenge the slaughter of his countrymen. In it Olaf Tryggvason fell. the sister of Eichard the duke of Normandy by this act a new influence was imported into English politics. the western part to Earl Erik. after ^thelred's first wife). and his death was followed by the partition of Norway. while a strip was taken from the east and incorporated in the kingdom of Sweden. a Norseman. who had been.d. burning Norwich and ThetThis was the country under the rule of an earl or ford. In a. He is said to have taken an oath to do this at his succession over the Bragi cup but now for the first time he saw himself in a position to put his purpose in execution. iEthelred had married Emma (iElfgifu. the English called her. Ixxvii one of the most celebrated in Scandinavian history. It is curious that in the find these first year of definite Scandinavian invasion we two influences brought into connection in the betrayal of Exeter to Svend's a certain Count Hugo. through the influence of Emma. it should be noticed. He began with the siege of Exeter. made the governor of that city. 1004 Svend turned his fleet against the eastern counties. In the year of the massacre. . We shall have hereafter to notice the gradual spread in England of the Norman influence. It was in a. and fully prepared to undertake in a more thorough fashion than he had yet done the invasion of England. while the Massacre of Saint Brice .INTRODUCTION. as we shall see. which was. According to the Northern Sagas he had always intended not merely to ravage the country. had given him a sufficient pretext for so doing. or of Scandinavian Fearless. which was betrayed to him by the abovementioned Count Hugo. army by . influence generally. and to drive iEthelred from the throne. but to make himself master of it. Ulfketil or Ulfkcl Snilling.

the heaviest ransom that had yet been exacted. They then settled themselves in Wight and harried everywhere in Hampshire and Eventually 36. his intention of conquering England for himself could not have been very fixed. a tax which takes an important place in the compilation of Domesday. bribes.* who was son-in- law of iEthelrcd. lOOG a very severe attack was made. is as lie called in the Northern Sagas.Ixxviii INTRODUCTION. See p.000 pounds of silver had to be Berkshire. is 13 & 23 (linger. law promulgated in a. along with the heavy pay- ments made to the invaders — the danegelds of our history more than once that taxes We books. The law is the forerunner of by Cnut and Harthacnut for the support of a standing fleet and army which constitute the real danegeld known to English law.'s ship-money these laws were We must take these laws into quoted as a precedent. Fresh Danish and in the attacks followed in the years 1009 and 1010 latter year iEthelred paid a fine of 18. 1008 levied a universal land-tax: for the support of a fleet.d. have already said efi'orts of the English king were rendered abortive mutual jealousies and the acts of treachery of the by the thanes and ealdormen who surrounded him.' At the time of the levy of Charles I. cc. The fleet came first to Sandwich.d. In chapter 23 we are told that Ulfkel was killed by Erik. than internal commerce are the origin and tributes more of large issues of coins at the period about which we write. carl of Norway. . certain taxes instituted ' account as among the concurrent causes of the large coinage of ^thelred's and Cnut's reigns. neim^liriugla). Ulfkctil was one of the most capable and devoted defenders of the English against the Danes and this year he succeeded in heating back the enemy from East Anglia. In the earlier passage Ohif the Saint said to liave taken the English side in a battle niiirnheiiSi) in I'lfkel fought by the Danes and English on Ilringinara-hoath (HringSniUing's hmd. iEthelred once more and for the last time made deter- A mined efforts to collect forces to repel the invaders. The year 1012 saw the martyrdom by the Danes of All the . In a.000 pounds of silver. * 6lafs Saga kins Hdga. If Svend was willing to retire with these paid to them. Ixxx.

d.INTRODUCTION. But as a new king there were necessarily difiiculties in his way. There was a pretender in Norway as well as in England. Svend's son Cnut the Great (Canute) was proclaimed king by the Danish fleet and army. January of the year following (1014) . king of in history as Olaf Skotkonuug. The two ' passions ' was the typical Eadmund was were much the same in wliich origin and circumstance. Alfred and Eadweard. It was said that he desecrated the shrine of St. He was brought back from Normandy by a Norse fleet belonging to Olaf Haraldsson. He came in an immense fleet. ArcliLisliop Ixxix ^Iflicah (Elpliegns). Svend sailed for largest fleet — . part his brother-in-law. in a. for it is the beginning ^f the long enmity between Olaf and Cnut. But Svend himself died the next month. Emma. From London king iEthclrcd sent his wife. by the Witan and by the Londoners. of England in a. each victim sacrificed himself to save his people or his flock from further sufferings at the hands of the conquerors. in whose honour so many coins were struck and that the dead saint from his tomb struck kins: Svend with a mortal illness to which he almost immediately succumbed. 1013. Duke Eichard the Fearless. On the other side. or Olaf the Saint. Tliis Olaf . martyrdom of the of this second invasion as that of first. which was furnished by Sweden. and her two children. Olaf. For a time therefore iEthclrcd seemed to carry all before him. . He was supported by a stronger personality than his own that Finally. all England north of "Watling Street. and a little later on of all England except London. Eadmund. England with the which had yet been seen upon our coasts and now the definite and decisive conquest of England was The Danish king received the submission of undertaken. — of his heroic son. known Eadmund Ironside. who had already borne arms against Svend and this fact is interesting. Then ^Ethelred was recalled by the English party.d. to Normandy to place them under the protection In of Emma's brother. Cnut returned to 1015. the martyr of the first Viking invasion. abandoning his crown to the Dane.^thelred himself followed.

Cnut. it must be owned that in appearance it does not by any means tally ' — ' Heinrekr Strjona. and he relieved London But at last he which the Danish fleet was investing. was universally chosen as . n. hins Helga. (A) s. 1016. — * ' — iEthelred. Erik. had boon one of tlic three powers allir'd against Olaf Tryggvason at tlic battle of Rvold another of the allies. Chron. S. Eadmund. He fought against the Dane with doubtful results at Pen Sel- wood by Gillingham.ffithelred II. says the Chronicle. Eadric Striona. according to the Norse writers by the aforeAnd Cnut mentioned Eadric Striona [' Henry Striona j. England was divided in much the same way that it had been divided Still the by iElfred after the peace of Wedmore in a.^thelred's He did all that it was successor by the English party. callon Angeleynncs rycc. Eadmund Ironside. dered Coinage of . at Shoiston. there people (_pser ahte Cnut sige & gefeht won him aU the English him ealle Engla )?eoda).Ixxx INTRODUCTION.f struck no coins and can hardly be reckoned to have really reigned in England. well called Ironside. 878.* Eadmund Ironside the king took all the English empire. London was not in fact taken during the lifetime of . the Norwegian earl — celebrated already as a victor in two of the most famous engagements of the Scandinavian world joined Cnut with his contingent. c. 1017. 'He. iEthelred's most doughty champion. who had acted in a similarly treacherous manner on several occasions. was present at the taking of the Ulfketil castle of London.d. t A. His son. and at the treaty of Olney. In reviewing the coinage of ^Ethelred II. but he himself scarcely ventured outside of fications. possible for a man to do to vindicate his rights. a defeat brought about by the desertion of one of his thanes. Cnut took the whole of the country north of Watling Street and Later on in the same year Eadmund was murthe Lea. Her on pissimi gcarc feng Cnut cjuing to . its forti- and there he died in a. 24. Danish king thought it wiser to come to a compromise with Eadmund..' says the Olafs Saga hins ITdga.' Olafs S. where he slew Ulfkel Snilling the East Anglian earl.d. suffered a severe defeat at Assandune (Essiugton).

c. 139 (HcimsJixipijla}- 9 . and still more rapidly during The the years subsequent to the accession of Eadgar. taxes. Introduction to Vol. before. It is for this reason that in the history of the Numismatics i * Compare the catalogue by B. things lead us to believe that in spite of the disorders in which England was plunged during all this reign. or tributes than for the ordinary purpose of currency. II. the wealth of the country was increasing. Professor Thorold Rogers has noted that the same thing took place during the Wars of the Roses. It the larger — number evident that a large — nay of coins coined by ^thelred the invaders. the National Museum at this series than our it is were For at have been found in the own and.f It is not only that ^thelred's coins far that might be an accident of discovery in this exceed in number those of any previous reign but that there were . iv. Ixxxi with the picture of terror and suffering which the chroniclers for us during this reign.| And the effect of the English wealth and the English currencies was more felt during zEthelrcd's reign than any other. E. X 6l(i}'« S.INTRODUCTION. own National Collection. Svenslm t History of I'rief)'. more minting places than there ever were and a much greater number of people employed in reign striking coins. Mijntlitth.* But at the hardly possible that such an immense number of coins could have been made unless there was a good deal of wealth in the country and a good many same time . A)iglo-Sach8i8ha Mynt k. used for the payment of ransom to this day larger hoards of his coins Scandinavian countries than in our said above. At any rate there can hardly be a doubt that the wealth England had grown enormously during the century which followed the death of il^]lfrcd. For coins were used much is more for the payment of dues. Hihkbrand. as we have Stockholm is richer in . wealth of England made a great impression upon the of Scandinavian states of the north. It has already been said that a large currency is not at this historical period an evidence of commercial prosperity to the degree that it is draw with us at the present moment. kins lleh/a.

Europe. ^thelred II. and by Earl Hakon Eriksson. * Cf. Cnut the Great.Ixxxii INTRODUCTION. after a certain fashion. The accession of Cnut forms a supreme moment in our history. to a greater extent again as in the early years Denmark. p. modelled their first issues These types are our upon one of two types of iEthelred. 3rd Series. all modelled them upon the types of speak with greater Or. the fact of the throne. vii. to a somewhat less extent among the Norsemen among the Norsemen in of the Scottish islands and of in Man the . it was before all things desirable that England should be drawn into it. and Norway. should be a warning to us as to what conclusions we draw from the study of coins. Ckron. anything of the nature of a Scandinavian empire were to be created. contrast presented by the wide spread of iEthelred's coins among the Northern people. And if. We have more than once spoken of the Greater Scandinavia in Europe.* It is curious that in this way we find the coinage of in almost every instance they Cnut. iii. and Norway respectively were issued by Svend. and iv. Vol. Sweden. Sweden. symbolizing. stood almost within that huge arc. The only new types of importance introduced in this reign are those with the Agnus Dei and the Dove. Norse and Danish invaders. '233. Num. and evidently constituted a regular currency Ireland. by Olaf Skdtkonung. the wide empire which was enjoyed by his successor on the English And this fact. . they one and ^Ethelred's coins. iEtlielred's coinage became known over the whole Scandinavian world. with the strict limitation of his power of which these very peoj^le were the instruments. out of blood. yl^^thelrcd's of Nortlieni reign is the most im- portant of all during the period over which our inquiry Owing to the fact of his heavy payments to the extends. that vast chain of Scandinavian states which stretched across the north from Eussia to England. The earliest Scandinavian coins struck in nos. this congeries of separate states. And the of eleventh century. Denmark. kings of these three last countries began to bethink them of issuing coinages of their own. to accuracy. which was now half Scandinavian in Iceland.

Denmark and king of Norway. Among those who were executed was Eadric Striona who. of whicli there are many other proofs in the history of this time. and to which again the large London coinages of ^thtdred and Cnut bear witness. doubtful. The kings in Scotland. suffered deservedly enough. incidental proof of the high position in the country which the chief city of England had attained. Coins with the .INTRODUCTION. and 15. possessed Iceland and the lesser colony of the Faroes which were dependencies of Norway. no reason to assume that Cnut's coins with Dublin mintmarks prove that he had any actual rule in Ireland. iml Die nuirdcr of Eailiniinil. likewise acknowledged That he had any power in Ireland seems name of Cnut were indeed struck in Dublin but so also were coins with the name of ^thelred. the predecessors In the same way we have of a regular Dano-Irish coinage. England became in reality the central state and the seat of government of Cnut's empire. Still his power was so great that but for one fatal flaw in the Scandinavian system of government. but two highland kings. 1017.000 pounds of silver for England at large. or Greater Sweden as it was called.e. Sweden proper and Scandinavian Eussia. not the lowland Scots only. Chron. as ruler of Norway. Cnut began his reign in this country harshly by putting to death several of the chief men in England who had previously opposed him or whose power he feared.000 pounds for London alone.* Cnut likewise levied an enormous tax of 72. s. Taxes of this kind were no doubt licavily felt by the * A. S. For Cnut. an his supremacy./ 2 . But as soon as he had completed the conquest of EngLand he became an English king much more than a Danish. as the Chronicle says. The latter certainly could not have been struck by ^thelred himself: they were only imitative coins. i. The chronicler however only attributes base troaclicry to Ejidric. Ixxxiii The creation of such an empire Cnut effected. which included this country. a. with the exception possibly of the Swedish states. there seems no reason why his empire should not have been extended over the whole Scandinavian world. .

D. days of Tacitus's Germani t These men who were huscarls. and they would serve the secondary purpose of guarding the king against plots or violence on We read of one of the most famous the English side. Tlie i. English.e. but they were necessary to the imperial aspirationw which Cuut cherished. however. as Tacitus says. which foreshadowed the principles upon which Cnut intended to govern his newly: acquired kingdom. He introduced the traditions of the Vikings and of the Scandinavian nations into English politics by constituting for the first time a standing army and a standing fleet. kc which are less epithets than synonyms for prince. that he had been commander of Cnut'a huscarls.v.' remembered that in days before a regular currency existed. which may be taken to mark the cessation At this of the severities consequent upon the conquest. Biog. . AVilliam Hunt says (Die. Canute) 'the hu. Earls of Orkney. 524 (Miiller) says that Cnut's standing army was 6000 strong men on each). 13. 4000 would be the number of troops. Nat. mean. The Standing J'leet consisted actually of forty vessels the standing army was the crew which manned it. words hringhrjdtr. the far-off descendants of the Comitatus of the Prince in the — went by the name of The designation was well of the understood in the north. c. 100 armed * Saxo. ImUjgifa.Ixxxiv INTRODUCTION. . Both Danes and English united in this decree. The reign of Cnut was as regards (GO ships. t Mr. tainer of a large standing force . s. 1017-18 there was a meeting of the Witenagemofc held at Oxford. seems to make the comparison invalid. of this small standing No army doubt most were Scandinavians. formed a body-guard round the king. the enterctti plnrimi comites. If tlie fleet was of 40 vessels. thegns. p. essentially the giver of rings (money) to the household soldiers (coinites. Neither was very large. the comitatus could hardly have a strictly stipendiary character and so far as concerns the Scandinavian and English people we may believe that the companions of the king did in very early days receive payment in the precious metals.* At other times they . Their strictly stipendiary But it must be character. assembly it was decreed that the laws of Eadgar should be observed we may understand by this expression the laws which were in force during Eadgar's reign. in the armlets or necklets which constituted a sort of currency. G. it would seem.<irarh have been frequently compared with the comitatus. or what not) in other words. members In A.

he could find no better way of bringing himself to their notice than by allying himself as he did by marriage with the German Imperial family. and wealth should be recognized by the continental princes. but even on find . Cnut richly endowing the shrine which his And on every side the Danish king was a liberal endower of churches and monasteries. His conduct showed that he did not hold the throne as a conqueror. from whom were sprung Henry the Fowler and the emperors of his line. We remember that the peace Cnut was is of Ead gar's time was by his descendants first broken through ecclesiastical disputes. . a complete contrast to his It is quite possible that the story of St. Eadmund's At any father had desecrated. The majority of Cnut's troops were sent back to Denmark and he only reserved forty ships. we No course could have been wiser from a mere worldly point of view though we have no reason to suppose that Cnut was actuated chiefly by worldly motives. and that he should take his due place among the European powers. and to the theory that the peace of Eadgar had been re-established. The the Continent. It is a marked contrast to the policy adopted by William of Normandy half a century later. his famous army of huscarls. We may assume that the coins with the legend 'Pax' (PACX) have some reference to the agreement at Oxford. the crews of which constituted. tion of Anglo-Saxon laws. miraculous vengeance rate a contemporary legend. first founders of the second German Imperial house or say the truly German Imperial house the Brunos and Liudolfs. not in this country and in his native Denmark only. had been famous for their If Cnut desired that his power liberality to the Church. as has been said. In Church matters father. by endowing abbeys in France. or to the promulgation of Cnut's laws. — — dukes of Saxony. but as the lawfully elected king of the whole people.INTRODUCTION. and by making a pilgrimage to Rome. IXXXV Britain almost a repetition of the reign of Eadgar. The terms of this agreement of Oxford were to a certain extent embodied in a series of statutes identical with or similar to those which bear the name of Cnut in the collec.

whose house had given so many rulers to the country but afterwards it was made into a kingdom. and Cnut's son Svend was made king of it. when Cnut succeeded to that country. which proved fatal to Danish power in this country. being put East Anglia under to death at Christmas. was entrusted at first to Hakon the son of Erik. the brother-in-law of Cnut. the king's . . one earldom it was governed by the celebrated Godwine. through his sister Gyda. Later on Ulf entered into a sort of conspiracy to make Harthacnut. a. Mercia was another its first earl was Eadric Striona. its position in the centre of the great arc — say rather great cvsjJ — of which we have often all spoken. the greater antiquity of its habitation. But what more than anything ruined these hopes. who. He Wessex waa divided all his domains into great earldoms. a Norseman who had at one time been a comrade formed a third . it its proximity to the Continent. were the customs of inheriThat tance which obtained among the northern nations. Northumbria of Olaf (the Saint) of Norway under Erik Hakonsson of the House of Hlade. 1017. when Olaf had been driven from the throne. king of Denmark. and the density of its population. Though England had been conquered by the Dane she was really . and if that empire could have been extended to include all the Scandinavian countries. the custom . The superior wealth of the country. — — — brother-in-law formed a fourth Norway. . was the same cause which weakened the edifice of power which Harald Harfagr erected in Norway.IxXXVi INTUODTICTION. his share in this conspiracy cost Earl Ulf his life. and likewise. she would still have remained so. the brother-in-law of our Earl Godwine. we saw. Cnut's son. as they almost always ruined the hopes of extended Scandinavian rule. Thurkill.d. and though Cnut seems to have consented to leave his son in possession of regal powers. — the centre of his Danish empire . With regard to bis own government Cnut adopted a system not unlike that adopted hy the emperors in Germany. was ruled by Earl Ulf. soon met the reward of all his treachery. Never therefore. were the prospects of England brighter than they were during this reign. Denmark. tended to secure else a foremost position. during her history.

one of the Emma and iEthelred II. another in Denmark. assigned to Harold. If Harthacnut had at once come from Denmark to assert his but as he still stayed claim. Cnut had two sons by his first wife or mistress -^Ifgifu. . Cnut. Besides had been agreed between Emma and Cnut on their marriage. in Harthacnut was the fact. ever great they were in other things. so as to keep intact the greater portion It does not seem that any place was of Cnut's empire. all the to From what we know advantage was on his side. that if she had any son he was to follow his father in England and Harthacnut was the son of Cnut and Emma. a civil war might have arisen his party became reconciled to Harold. the iEtheling. son of his wife of highest this. . ^Elfred. Harold appears have had the stronger character. of inheritance which divided the estate equally IxXXVii among the sons of the deceased. these people seem to * Called Alfifa in the loclaudic Sagaa. The result was not in strict accordance with the intentions of Harold I. and. of the two brothers.* Svend (Sveinn) and Harold Svend he always designed to succeed to the kingdom of Norway. Olafg saga hins Uelga. He was however opposed by Earl Godwine and the more English part of the population. and a third in Norway. . . rank. Harold's principal and most disgraceful act was the measure he took children of to get rid of one of his rivals. they were equally unscrupulous. 252 (Hcimskringla). away . and Harthacnut during his lifetime became. was enticed over to England and murdered. c. cf. events which followed Cnut's death. as Harthacnut was absent from the country.INTRODUCTION. as we saw. we sec the fatal process of decay which seems among the Scandinavians always to follow Howa prosperous reign and a period of extended empire. king of Denmark probably he was intended to reign both as king of Denmark and king of England. Thus one of Cnut's children succeeded in England. many people In the scries of said by the connivance of Godwine. it his only legitimate son. Harold found a party of Danes ready to support his claim to the throne on the death of his father.

While Harold was reigning in England. as Norway a few years previously. but more especially at Worcester. 1040-1042) as king of England presents but few events which bear directly on his coinage. takinf:^ tlieir proper place in history. and Harold was mnch lesi? popniar in England than Cnut. Norse lendermen and the people generally reverted to their loyalty to the old line. The most important was the levy of an extortionate danegeld to provide pay for the crews who manned the ships which accompanied the king from Denmark. and Magnus succeeded in recovering a great part of the territory which had been taken from Norway and attached to Denmark. or . and England. The levying of this tax led to serious riots throughout the country. tlie have lacked some ventodtlicmfrora want of whict proHarold and liis brother were inferior to tlicir father in character. Norway. appeared in the person of Svend Estrid's son. was anxious to revert to her old line After Harthacnut's death a new claimant to the of kin^s. where the third brother Svend was imable to retain Soon after Cnut's death the chief his hold on the kingdom. of much greater abilities than the last king. but an agreement was come to between Magnus and Harthacnut. of rebellion. sister Estrid. so that the eyes of the English turned towards Eadweard (Edward It was just the same in the Confessor) the son of iT^thclred. where a general massacre of the huscarls took place.IxXXviii INTRODUCTION. He might have carried his conquests farther. Harthacnut's power had very much decreased in his own kingdom. throne of Denmark. Harthacnut's two years' reign (a. and ravaged the neighbouring country. Magnus the Good. political instinct. In the course of a few years we find the tables turned between Norway and Denmark. in person with his army of Danes. burnt their city. Svend made but feeble resistance. By such acts the Danish princes became more and more hateful to this country.d. put the inhabitants to the sword. and sent to Eussia to recall the son of Olaf. a son of The The king came city paid heavily for this act Earl Ulf and a nephew of Cnut by his AstriS. whereby it was decided that the survivor of the two kings should be the inheritor of both.

It may have been a purely original But it may with equal likelihood have been copied device. they were likewise great founders of trade and commerce. In especial the likeness of the two series in the formation of the inscriptions and in the reverse types is to be noticed.INTRODUCTION. PL xvii. and head wearing a crown. XV. But historically this type has no special significance. The whole appearance of the coinage of ^Ethelred II. It was not afterwards abandoned and. 2. from a similar type to be found on the coinage of the . This type has a certain fiscal significance for the double cross was made to facilitate the cutting up of the coin into halfpence and farthings. Unquestionably the whole history of our Anglo-Saxon coinage points to the fact that if our Northern conquerors were great despoilers. 1. even during the severest days of Danish invasion. But in minuter points there are some changes. we must note the introduction by Cnut of two obverse type (2) the : Especially varieties of (1) the head wearing a pointed helmet. in the use of a circulating medium. we should see if we continued our inquiries into the later English coinage. 11 . Ixxxix to Coinage of The coinage of the period of Danish rnle from Cnut a Harthacnut shows in its general appearance continuity ^^j^^^"^ with that of the previous reign. (Cf. that is to say. PI. as . For in these respects the coinage of iEthelred is distinguished somewhat not perhaps from that of his brother Eadweard but certainly — — from the coinage of Eadgar his father. xvi. 11. 12). passim). The double cross on the reverse first becomes common under ^thelred II. It is the same helmet which we frequently see upon the Bay eux Tapestry. In all these features the coinage of the kings of the Danish line is but a continuation of that of /Ethelred II. 7. as compared with that of the previous reign signifies an increase in fiscality. . With the crowned head it is difi'erent. The representation of the pointed helmet is interesting.xxi. This type of reverse becomes still more usual under Cnut and his immediate successors (cf. 7. 10. it long survived the Norman Conquest. consistent with what was said above of the possibly increased wealth and trade of the country.. PI. 3-5.

of Germany. sdclis. . the types of different varieties of this coinage were becoming appropriated to the two divisions of northern Europe. Deutsche Miinzen der III. of Lotharingia. suggested a rare type of ^thelwulf.. both series were descended from the earlier Carlovingian Emperors denarii. who had his earls of Norway.* noted that on the Continent a wider and wider divergence in typo and general character between the coinage of France Though and Germany was at this time declaring itself. of Swabia. of East Anglia. of Franconia. its indirect influence through currency. and perhaps was afterwards copied by some king in East Anglia. Kaiserzeit. of Mercia. Danncnhcrg. [Otto 983-1002]. the temple. 3il. as the German emperors had their dukes of Saxony. and of Wesses. who framed his Scandinavian empire so much upon the pattern of the empire of the German emperors. frank. But before the period at — — which we have now arrived the direct influence of the coinage is quite lost sight of in the English Not so. This is in such complete accord with the political history of England at this moment that there does not seem to be any valid reason for doubting that Cnut.XC INTRODUCTION. Under Cnut the number of mints does not diminish and most of those cities and burgs which exercised the right of mintage under ^Ethelred continue to do so in this reign. * Cf. coinage the monogram type suggesting a type to Ecgbeorht. however. PI. Of the new mints which appear we shall speak under a Carling . and so forth. this would be the strongest example of the influence of the German coinage on that of England. of Denmark. the German-speaking and French-speaking terriWe have seen (long before) one type of Carling tories. Another Carling type. 15. It is to bo in Gormany about the Rame period. If we accept the theory that the crowned that bust of Cnut was copied from the crowned bust on some coins of the German emperors. u. deliberately adopted the crowned bust upon his coins in imitation of the crowned bust of the German emperors. of Northumbria.

This manuscript records the dedication of the abbey of Hyde. Stowi-. Oxford. or vice versa. are found in very small numbers. While the idea of the crowned bust was. correspond closely with those which occur on the coins of iEthelred. The National Collection only possesses one specimen of type i.* XCl We have referred above to the coins of Cnut which bear the mint name of Dublin. were evidently coined in large numbers.-x. and York. Types i.-xvi.-xx. and there Cnut is represented presenting a golden cross to the abbey.. t I^- M. probably suggested by the coinage of the emperors. . The exact chronological arrangement of the types of Cniit is rendered not difficult by paying a due regard (1) to the types of the preceding and succeeding reigns. were probably issued during the second half of the reign. and (2) to what may be called transition types. We have referred above to the inscription PACX . f Types xi. those which combine a new obverse with an old reverse. which occur also on coins of Harold I. wearing a similar crown with three fleurs-de-lis in a contemporary MS. near Winchester. and they are nearly as common as those which immediately precede them whilst types xvi. v. London.-x. the mint place illegible. in the British Museum. as has been said. They could not however have been struck before the death of Eadmund Ironside and Cnut's For the accession to the western portion of the kingdom. and contain the two forms of the royal bust spoken of above. Of these types nos. and may reasonably be assigned to quite the end of the reign. and Harthacnut. It may therefore be concluded that these comprise the first issues of Cnut. mints at which coins of these types were struck are Bath.-vii. Sec below p. Coins of these types must have been issued in very small numbers. 'JGO. S'/'/. Shrewsbury. Norwich. as they are all rare.INTRODUCTION. it possesses no Types viii.-iii. special heading. Of types ii. and that so indistinct as to make . fviii. the crown itself is no doubt We find him the exact form of one worn by the king. specimens. the king wearing a pointed helmet or a crown. as numerous specimens of all are known. are all closely allied.

or rather of the Danish population of England.XCll INTRODUCTION. and York. . shows that the English treasury was drained to support the army and fleet which Harthacnut had to maintain in Denmark against the ambitious designs of Magnus the Good. and the dearth They have never of his coins of other types is general. headed by Earl Godwiue. Meanwhile the more English party. Nos.. 1. A similar representation is that which occurs on Northumbrian coins of Sihtric and Anlaf [Olaf]. decided to offer the crown to Edward. guaranteed by his treaty with Harthacnut. . a portion of the English. the Norman duke. That they are English we need not question. 3 and 5. When Harthacnut died.) The types of Harold I. are but repetitions of the later types of Cnut nos. the king is shown hokling the Danebrog or Danish national standard.. and PI. V. and for some time he continued to assert his claims. only nos. we find again occurring during the reign of Harthacnut. follow in the like order. is perhaps the most interesting of all the types of Cnut. and vi. desired to keep the Dano-English empire still united by ofiering the crown to Svend Estrid's son. (See Vol. Earl Godwine acts in these negotiations the part of General Monk at the Restoration of Charles II. and ii. It is a curious fact that of all the types of this last king published by Hildebrand. then an exile at the court of . as they bear on them the mint names of London.-iv. After Edward's restoration the carl of Wessex retained a position of much greater power than Monk was ever able to attain. been found in this country. on which which occurs on the coins of Cnut. Edward the Confessor. But it may be doubted if Svend was at Magnus of Norway that time strong enough to accept it. iEthelred's son. PI. had laid claim to the succession in Denmark. I. Norwich. and i. i. Type xvi. The general scarceness of the coins of Harthacnut is of course primarily due to the shortbut the fact that his coins are more ness of his reign common in the Scandinavian countries than here. xxix. is The history of England from this time forward almost more the history of the house of Godwine than of the house of Cerdie. are represented in the National Collection. xxviii.

The reign of Edward the Confessor is of great importance in the But it is a history of England on this account alone.d. continued not only till the death of Godwine in a.d. in the next year by a counter-revolution and English This state of things influence was once more supreme. and that the new comers gradually absorbed more and more the offices tinuous influx of of State. 1053. It is probable that for a while William himself continued to strike two disfor his English subjects and for tinct classes of coins — — . namely the introduction of influence.d. his of It is not necessary therefore to trace at great length the growth of the Norman influence Conquest. in England before the the earlier We know the that during there years a of Edwaid Confessor's reign took place con- Normans into this country. Norman as Freeman says. The coinage of Normandy. at their head. history decline the . After that the coinage Normandy ceases for a century and more. XCUl to But at the same time a new element was beginning enter into Englisli history.INTRODUCTION. 1051 took Archbishop of Canterbury. howplace the banishment of Godwine. 1050 became In a. on the other hand. who in a. . This was followed. and where is continuous with that of the previous reign it does show originality in types these changes are certainly not due to the influence of any French coinage. curious fact that no trace of the Norman influence is to be detected in the coinage of this reign. under the contemporaries of Edward Robert or William is undistinguishable in its general character The from the other French coinages. coinage of Edward the Confessor. What is stranger still though this matter lies outside the Norman coinage the subject of the present volume in this country has no sharp line of demarcation from the Anglo-Saxon coinage. ever. is Up the to the year of the 1051 the history of of this country power of Godwine and of his house and the rise of the power of the Normans with Eobert of Jumieges. the Norman Conquest really began in the reign of Edward the Confessor. royal or feudal. — — — Normans in Normandy. and it owes nothing whatever to the coinage of the dukes of Normandy.

The different earls whom Cnut bad appointed to govern under him in England.* There were two external forces threatening Enirland. we know.) . S. HaroM. a. Chron. under his licir inthodhction. 1054-5. and Northumbria. St. Harold Sigurdsson or Harald Hardrada (HarSra^r). Magnus had once extended his claim as heir of Harthacnut. Olaf s half brother. which was indeed as Harold much the reign of II. and the triumph of the Dano-English party meant the revival of the power of these earls. "When Harald returned from his long residence in the Greek empire. Harold. who had once all but succeeded in extending his empire over Denmark. Mercia. and the earls of Northumbria and Mercia. Magnus divided his kingdom with Harald.A. not only to Denmark but to England. 1048. Let us note how the same sort of thing had been going on in other Scandinavian countries.Ii. Malm. our Harold's brother. s. Harold II. some of whom were members of his own family. rivalries which had arisen among Edward's earls was that between Tostig. (E. is marked by the same tokens of weakness which sooner or later manifest themselves in the government of other Scandinavian countries. Wherefore as soon as Harold bad overcome the rivalry of the xsormans he had still to encounter the rivalry of the other earls in England. the earls of Wessex. Harold as the reign of Edward the Confessor. he claimed half the kingdom of Norway. 's reign. had during the weaker reigns of Cnut's sons once more split England into a series of smaller States. when Harald Hardrada became sole king of Norway. The English Harold did not settle matters so amicably with The most serious of all the disputes and his kinsmen. Morkere and Eadwine.xciv but. G. which sees the end of this reaction towards the Scandinavian side of English politics. and Tostig was banished. Wil. during all tlio rcmuindor of tlio reign of Edward. H. So far as • — — A. of East Anglia. how that Magnus. S.d. and they reigned together on comparatively good terms till Magnus' death in a. eventually sided with these earls against his brother. § 200. had since found a rival in his uncle.

Goia CHeimskr. cc. ed Unger). England was in reality the greatest of to all Scandinavian states. by which the power of Harold Godwineson was threatened. a. with far was eventually driven off. claiming to be the heir designate of Edward the Confessor. When Tostig was driven from this he had thus a choice between these two powers. from her moorings. the thought of asserting in a more active manner his This was one danger claims to the throne of England. Magnus S. she lay a prey for two rival claimants. duke of Normandy. and the favoured of the Pope. Harald extraordinary to see how this brief space the position of England in northern Europe had been entirely changed. from the moment of his accession. the king The results of the prosecution of of Norway in the north. c. t Ilarulds S. but Then he turned. a. Under Cnut. entertained. 1046 (D). * A. these two claims is well known. Ilarirdda. and had stronger claims than his. He turned first to William of Normandy and obtained a fleet from him. XCV England was concerned he had gone no farther than to make some naval preparations and to send an embassy Harald to Edward the Confessor to assert his rights. the duke of Normandy in the south. On the other side of this country lay the territory of William.INTRODUCTION. 37-39. more memorable Hardrada. 82. country. . The fact that England was ruled at this time by one of her most capable sovereigns only brings the inherent weakness of her . who was more adventurous than Magnus. both of which were threatening England. and the other Scandinavian countries had drifted into separate policies of their own. was a more serious rival than Hardrada. and had probably a larger army of mercenary troops at his command.* Hardrada. with which he harried the south coast of England. as it were. and stood in a position become the seat of empire over them all now that she had been shaken. as has been pointed out. though she was a conquered country. t It is results. Citron. S. to the other in claimant. who.

Then followed the battle of Stamford Bridge. and about sixteen years older than the half-brother who We preceded him on it. which were our guides through the coinages of the Danish kings. viz. Not probably because the king. p. like Harold Godwinc's son. the occurrence of transition types. At the same moment Tostig succeeded in persuading Ilarald Hardrada to undertake the invasion of the same country from the north. there appeared upon the field an army which the English Harold commanded. which a landing. for he knew that ho could not crown by peaceable moans only. types from the previous reign. 526. in Lives of Edirard the Confessor. Luard (Rolls Series). William had effected Then followed the battle of Hastings. ed. position Before the dcatli of of for the Confessor and bci^ain the his coronation Harold. The Norse army arrived in Yorkshire. who was in his fortieth year when recalled to ascend the throne of his ancestors. were Edward ever represented.XCVl INTRODUCTION. and both were slain. was ever without a beard. CoXbw Harold and of Edward the survival of II. beardless assume that the types with a Edward's types. of Normandy. ITarald Hardrada received liostages from all the He had only just done this. Hail. and sailed up the Humber. Coinage of We have the same criteria for determining the sequence the Confessor's coinages. with a moustache only. the . 396. discretae proceritatis. Barba might of course stand for moustache. brings our period of history to a close. insignis lactea. capillis et barba canitie . having completed his preparations. and the survival of one type into the succeeding reign. in which Tostig and Harald Hardrada were deciMeanwhile the Duke sively defeated. when northern provinces. into greater relief. facie plena et cute rosea ' * and on the * JISS. Vita Mdivardi Regis. Edward Duke of William had preparation an invasion acquire England. a contemhave in the anonymous Hominis persona erat porary description of Edward bust are the earliest of ' : We may decentissima. Publ. set sail and by the time that Harold had brought for England his fatigued army back to the south.' .

.). now it is for the first time on coins of the English kings survive all the others. fessor.INTRODUCTION. the laws of h . the short cross voided beneath quadrilateral ornament. and the short cross with limbs terminating in three crescents This last type is the connecting link V. type. The majority of the reverse types with the beardless bust occur also in previous reigns they are the small cross pattee. xvii.. they shave all but the seems on the whole reasonable to suppose that the beardless bust of Edward the Confessor is a mere survival of the type of the previous reign.. is probably adopted from late Koman coins. or whether it was adopted designedly.). The martlets in the angles of the cross. Whether this was mere chance. the PACK typo (types i. &c. if not the last typo of his predecessor. is to say. known as the sovereign types.). The most remarkable of the new types of this reign are (1) types ix. and his greatest desire therefore might well be for peace a desire which. that It moustache.-iv. The types with beardless bust which are (types new are the cross with expanding limbs. because it was one of the latest. who adopts this type only. on the reverse of type ix. the king full beard. Harold and Duke William alike wear their hair after the Norman fashion.. holding sceptre and orb. but a type destined to This type likewise possibly. and vi. are commonly called the arms of the Con. and x. was not realized. it may be derived from Byzantine coins . and . however. German coinage. XCVll Bayeux Tapestry. unfortunately for him. that the ancient laws of the country. and xiv. The facing bust appears . Type comes from the with the reverse type PAX between two lines connects the coinage of Edward with that of Harold II. which represents the king seated facing. Or we may suppose that ho meant by adherence to this type what Cnut meant when ho first — adopted it. between those with the beardless and with the bearded bust (type vii. is always represented -with a and is indeed the only figure who wears one. we need scarcely discuss.). Harold knew when he accepted the crown of England that he was beset by enemies on all sides. which show the king upon a throne (2) the types with a The obverse of the sovereign facing bust (xiii.

The duty of the witness was not to sign the lettered. the supplying of dies appears to have rested with the Exchequer. has that name spelt generally in the same way on each. we are not dealing with the writing of that is. downcoins. wonltl 1)0 Eadgiir. formation as to the manner in which the various mints throughout the country were provided with dies for striking In later times. Exactly how the signatures upon the coins We possess no inwere made it is impossible to say.XCVlll INTIJODI'CTION. but to attest cross in * it . Should this system have been in force before the Norman Conquest. moneyers contained in tlie present volume complete the list. men —men of their age — as instrument. an<l the peace between tofore. up to the standard we are in the case of the charters. In the lettered first place. of these officials up to the time of and the whole list furnishes us with a larger the Conquest contribution towards an Onomasticon Anglo-Saxonicum than is given by any other series of documents. But there are some special difficulties in the way of making use of these names on the AngloSaxon coins which it is necessary to point out here. of The names the . The result is that we do not any great crepancies in the spelling of the names on the charters ^Ifhere dux or an ^Selwold episcopus. we can then well account for a great similarity of workmanship and minute resemblances which sometimes characterize coins of the same type albeit struck at diflerent mints. iiiaintainod in their integrity.' whose name appears on some half-a-dozen different charters of about the same date. at all events from Henry 11. This stroncf similaritv micfht also . For it must be remembered that the names of the witnesses to the charters were always written by the clerk who drew up the document. an ' ' * wards. by placing just as of his finger on the front of his ' name we to-day is deliver as our act and deed a transfer land or see of shares by the dis- placing a finger on the wafer which attached to document. EngliHlinicn and Norsemen reign as here- MoNEYEns. even in the case of those which were used at the London mint. not even excepting the Charters.

One class we might liken to a blunt chisel on a even a screw-driver the other class The one implement makes the straight line in the letters. It would seem that they had by which We . and ignorant If. we must suppose them incapable of signing their own names. or two classes of implements. to sign their as most probable. the inscriptions were have not now to do with men wielding a pen and writing upon parchment but with engravers making use of one or two tools to punch in letters upon a coin-die. which is generally we notice rather wedge-shaped. showing how the cut has broadened out at the end of tlio stroke. it is not likely that an obscure coin-engraver in Norwich or Exeter would have been able to sign his name upon a coin. the great earls and thanes would have been unable names below a charter. It is so easy for a man who understands very little of the use of the signs bi' . even if they were doing so. Here. A further and subsidiary group of errors would arise in process the mechanical copied and preserved. two implements. In the formation of each letter the engraver uses one or other of his tools several times. we have another and a subsidiary cause of error. the other implement made the curves. then. who were capable of almost any kind of mistake in copying an inscription placed before them. It follows therefore that the first class of errors in the proper the mistakes which inscriptions. to work with. very small scale — or was of the nature of a gouge. there can be little doubt tliat the process ])y which the names of the moneycrs were finally transferred to the dies was in the hands of unlettered people. through the engravers names would arise from made in copying the of the phonetic value mere ignorance of the signs set before them. But even if the types were supplied in this manner. Thus in the commonest form of S for example he uses it four times (a) in B he uses it thrice (13).INTRODUCTION. of the is value of the letters which expressed them. . h 2 . It does not affect the question whether these engravers were placing their own names upon the pieces or not because. XCIX have boon brought about })y tlio sonding of workmen provided with patterns to the various towns.

398 . (Sec for examples of the changes of A into H and N. for — — . or to use the wrong implement. the straight one instead of the curved one or vice versa . The slightest stroke will change L into c. or in a succession of reigns signed by a moneyer 'Earduulf. no difficulty in deciding what name the moneyer there was had intended to write as would have been the case had we been dealing with a clerk writing upon parchment and that therefore the right reading of the name upon the coin was This far more a question of philology than of epigraphy. In this last instance another source of error. example. we find a number of coins in one reign.' it is more probable that the engraver has in one or two instances left out the R than ' .' and only one or two signed Eaduulf. . or even to alter a letter by the mere alteration Thus B may of the angle at which he holds his tool. If. The faintest shake of the hand may transfer C A and H constantly interchange so in fact do H and into F. The epigraphical considerations is by no means the case.) These errors of the engraver give us by far the largest number of mis-spclliugs with which we have to deal. must first be weighed the etymological come after. sqq. It has been necessary to dwell at some length on this point. . and of the evidence which these criticisms afforded of how far the considerations which we have detailed above were liable to be These critics supposed that overlooked by such writers.C is INTRODUCTION. a very large margin for errors of this kind. of the coins of Edward the Confessor. Familiarity with the inscriptions gives the numismatist a But he must always allow certain ^a«V for these mistakes. wliich might then be either P or W. hecome P R may become F D may become P. M still more frequently do H and : N. on account of some of the criticisms which were made upon the first volume by writers who are not themselves accustomed to the handling of coins. the confusion between the we have Runic H [ = N] and the Roman N it would appear that this confusion long survived the disuse of the body of the Runic The smallest stroke gives us D in place of C alphabet. pp. . engraving to leave out or to misplace one of the three or four strokes which make up his letter .

But if we had a numhcr of pieces in one reign struck by Lytelman and this form CYTELM only occurred once. Any number more of such changes might be instanced which. would convert one moneyer into another. mediate form a matter of fact there may the two horizontal strokes are attached stroke. seven or eight e's. The reader of this catalogue may is here be warned against inseparable from any In the present volume about a hundred difierent alphabetic forms are used. it would he more probable that the engraver of the coin had made the slight. All attempts to decide such questions upon prima facie considerations of philology are therefore to be deprecated. But it is impossible to give all the intermediate forms which actually occur. But as t which is neither one nor the other. Take. — single letters . throughout these coinages constantly used for M. This opigraphic question not affected hy the consideration Eardwulf and Eadwiilf are perfectly ' ' ' distinct names. it might be almost infinitesimal. for example. CYTELM would naturally stand for Cytel Monetarius and the name Cytel is very common in this coinage. when we include the compound letters the number of types used in the following pages is increased very largely. including as many as twelve a's. names as ' The same argument would apply to such Eadmund and Eadhun seeing that H is . not fewer G's. that a CI new moneyer that lias appcarctl who only is signs one or two coins.INTRODUCTION. error of changing L into c than that a new moneyer Cytel had appeared in this reign. It is be infinite variations in the way to the perpendicular extremely hard for the cataloguer to decide . seven R's. slight in themselves. we should yet have to consider (after the manner of Hume) where the fallibility of the human instrument was most likely to manifest itself. seven S's this is of course speaking only of the a possible source of error which printed catalogue of coins. the We have among our types one intertwo letters n and F. seven D's. and that the last letter of a moneyer's name is very frequently omitted. And though both the names might in themselves bo perfectly natural.

We have one intermediate form H tionH hctwccn H aud N. the same number of intermediate forms and B and D. -brord. -el. -laf. &c. and somep and D have times merges into H. -hysc. one or other of the characteristic old English terminain recognizable . charters of the same era. Oba. -sige. As a matter of fact it is only with regard to quite the minority of names that we are left in any serious doubt. -hun. -friS -heard (hard). Tata. but by comparison very few. are very difficult to distinguish. . -heah. they are either dissyllabic. Diga. -hsed. -mund. Ella. M varies indefinitely between that form and n. -wald (weald. And. wold). Ifa. To set against those difficulties w^e have the advantage derived from the repetition of the same name a number of times upon the coins. tions. -weard. -here.Cll INTUODUCTION. but the gradations of the middle stroke are really infinite. which of two normal forms ho in to rch. We may quite get a considerable variety in the spelling of a name. &c. -wig. such as Brid. -uc (Duduc. Tuma. -wine. (fer b). During range themselves into easily recognized forms. the earlier portion of our history.^ute any purThe same applies to the gradaintormcdiato one. That is to say. But on the whole the names Birnwald. V and Y. -bcrht (bryht). cisely the same is the case with the names attached to the No doubt there arc some peculiar names. -no^. Byrnwald. . . such as Bosa. -ing. -mod. the moneyers' names are of normal Anglo-Saxon character. both in this volume and in the previous one. at other times into N. B and to ticiihir . Lulluc). Brynwald. -lac. -red. R. such as Burnwald. familiarity with the kind of mistakes that engra- commit allows us to strike diflferent kinds of spelling and to approximate to the original form which the engraver has probably had before him.with Prea few rarer terminations. -wulf (ulf). as has been said an average between many before. Man(n) ending in A. or else ending Lulla. such as -beald (bald). Hussa. -ric. monosyllabic. Buda. -gar. Dun(n). Tocga. For each variety of coin in the catalogue implies that a different die has been used for the piece. -geard. -helm. -stan. Wina. and therefore that the engraver has had a fresh opportunity of correcting vers his error.

There is nothing in these names a Simon. the prototype (however really unlike him) of the far more famous Sir John Falstaff. to distinguish with certainty between English and Scandinavian names. -fugel. to suggest that the bearers of them were not Englishmen. vinr. Od-. Winterfugel. or forms slightly corrupted by English influence. -fara (Irfara). of the well-known Caistor family. such as Sumerleda. Concerning the exact status of the moneyers. which has. Sumerfugel. ' some of the ' are at and others which are certainly Scandinavian. But we see that certain very characteristic and quite unmistakable prefixes and suffixes are to be found on the such prefixes as Arn-. that is. It is especially interesting to find Fastolfs at this date striking at Thetford and at Lincoln. But as a matter of fact we hardly find any among the moneyers of the earlier period. . the family of the Sir John Fastolf of the Paston letters. Nor-. is Winer. When we come to iiElfred's reign we have among the moneyers a Samson. slightly Englished. and the moneyers were all laymen. again is Scandinavian. such terminals as -cy tel. so. but later on the latter become the commonest. Ulf as a suffix cannot be distinguished from uulf. and a Stefanus. It is not easy. : Ulf- — undoubtedly Scandinavian which is probably the 0.INTRODUCTION. -leda. we may believe. Fastolf is a good Scandinavian name. something . N. Winter' leda. Presumably these names were borne chiefly by ecclesiastics. some which appear to be Frankish. In these we find two varieties of un-English names. Some of the Scandinavian Oda names ' are particularly interesting. no small interest for us both historical and literary. the proper Anglo-Saxon form for the two forms are constant throughout the coinage (as on charters likewise). — quite in the country. amid all the varieties of spelling to which the moneyers' names are subject. further. The former first the most frequent. CHI Wo tain might expect to find here. a cer- number of Latin and biblical names. as in the charters. But as we have already seen it is different when we get to Viking coinages which are contemporary with the coinage of Alfred. Those forms with winter (instead of ' vetr ') appear to be hybrids. Dreng again is coins of the later period .

intend ' For if the coin was debased. Dutistani. This at least is implied in one or two passages in Domesday. he was its fabrication. in the reign of James I.' t It appears from all these entries that the moneyers received dies. 27. concerning the town of Worcester: 'In civitate "Wirecestrc habebat Rex Edwardus banc Quando moneta vcrtebatur quisque monetarius dabat sx sulidos ad Lundoniam pro cuneis moneta) acoipiendit?. the monetarius usually paid a sum he was without doubt a person whose position enabled him to put money in circulation.civ INTRODUCTION. 202. and it is likely that end of our period the right of coining was farmed out to the moneyers.'iiiue eorum xviii solidos pro cuneis reeipiendis et ex eo die quo redibant usque ad uiium mensem dabat quisque corum regi xx solidos ct similiter habebat epit^eopud de suo monetario xx sulidos. punished by having his hand cut off and stuck up to be over the mint-smithy. such as John. Stubbs (Rolls Ser. said in tlio Introduction to the first was volume . c. The inscriptions on the reverses of the coins throw no These inscriptions light upon the position of the moneyer. though not in much more can be said than that information on the suhjcct.' The entries for Dorchester.g. we are left As was noticed without precise the first volume. prevent at the ' get them. therefore. This would them from being men of some wealth not. Ed. . however. the extract from the laws of TEthclstan there given seems to point the moneyer out as the actual fabricator of the At any rate he must have been at the smithy to supercoin. and it is implied in most that they had to go somewhere (generally to London) to . . Vila S. and Wareham are similar to tliat for Worcester. He would be in something of the position of the tradesmen who issued copper tokens when a copper coinage was scarce or still more like at the beginning of the present century issuers of a token copper coinage in England. the loss of a hand. BridiHjrt. * Eadmer. If.' The story which Eadmcr relates of how Duustan insisted on the punishment of three false moneyers who were his villeins {qui in potestate viri erant*) shows that as a class they were men who were more or less in a servile condition. Lord Harrington. Quando moncbx rcuovatnr dalxit consuetudiueiu. .). the earliest down for the right of coining. : qui. p. linus ex liis crat monetarius episcopi." And of Hereford in like manner we read " Septem monetarii erant in civitate. The pimishmtnt inflicted was tliat decreed in the law of ^thelstau. t E.

Finally the mint place appears. and continued by his successors and on the contemporary coinage of Mercia. Chron.. t See pp. and an examination of the list 15.. 7G. The rest arc distributed as under four occur in 7 towns. represented in a Large hoard found in the City 'In the aecouut of the City Hoard. xvi. EENARD M~ON EXE. &c. type i. The question * therefore arises whether at this time ' moneta could really have in the eyes of the coin-engravers stood for monetarius. notably for example in the case of the type introduced by ^thelwulf (no. and then the name of the town.')) will show that number whole. It has been disputed whether the monetarius was or was not sometimes an itinerary moneyer travelling in the There may have been a few moneyers service of the king.). almost from the very beginning of the coinage the form MON ETA becomes the usual one after the name of the moneyer.. pp. Godric in 12. occur in one town onhj.' Nam. Com- ..INTRODUCTION. four in of widely distributed names down to 22. Elfwino i. Of tho remaining (J5. 23 S(in. BOIGA MONET DEORABi. and we have at first ELI BAD. Ernest Willott gives some Edward occur 220 different moneyers' names.t it is obvious that this word 'Moneta' is no belief that there We must note — — necessary contraction. pare also zElfred.. these one. 37. three in 5. in 13. Table V. and II in but three. These facts arc ccrtaiidy opposed to the notion of peripatetic I. 75.' If it did so. but the evidence of the coins is opposed to the were many. vol. MONET. the exact number of the letters in the inscription being carefully arranged beforehand. Lcofwine. In some cases. are. moneyers. 21. why should they have voluntarily * of statist ios with regard to the moneyers the Confessor. it CV known. is * ' of this kind. 32 occur in only two towns. LULLA. vol. and eleven in 4. These forms give place to the universal one with the name of the moneyer followed by ON (in).* that. though the earlier English coins contain a certain number of difi'erent contractions such as MON. DUDD. reducing the p. or just one-tcntli of the Of G. or nearly three-fourths.. &c. (<cc. 3rd Scries. p.. Godwine : in IG. at first the name of the moncycr only. Then a portion of the word such as Monetarins is added BlORNFREO MONETA. (Num.. of the present volume. Chron. Mr. and Vol. xvii. Later on it becomes till the appearance of the mint-names almost the stereotyped form. occurs in 19 towns.5. 33.

Crimes.' the word a legend such as coin. same page). Keg^eres. Obelrices under Eadred. It ' It is not necessary to 21) could suppose that the engravers or the users of for grammatical accuracy. comparable to the uugrammatical perfect and past participles (shooted.CVl INTRODUCTION. Inguces (Ingulfs ?). the present volume present no compare in interest with some of the We have no such types described in the previous volume. It is quite possible assisted at this unnatural abbreviation? that the form afterwards it moncta at first was a contraction. king of Mercia. TvvEs. series as the sceattas or as the coins of Ofia. Wihtes all under Eadmund Agtardes. coins described in varieties of type to * Boigaes. Boigaes. only sij:]. 215 This is a regular English is really ODAN tor ODA (see no. was the issuer thereof. . that Lord Harrington was the issuer ' of the copper token coinage in the reign of James I. position And ' the sup- moneta. and for them to understand that to see the name of some moneyer before it to interpret the legend in the sense we are supposing. Cnapees. Durandes. in the same sense. on which it would not be wise to insist as for very well have been intended forms as Amyndes (Amundes). The possessive case.nify Torlitulf's money. Fre^ices under Eadwig.* Dunnes. or so of possessive cases better than on the supposition that when they were engraved. Gotae. and Cnapees. that is. But such .' they did so interpret the word receives confirmation by an observable tendency in the later that coinage to put the name of the moneyer in the genitive. catclied.' ' money ' only. But were the case. It is possible that the OBAN on p. are in the possessive case. but that became a substantive word. Under ^thelstan we get the form Paules.' And TORHTVLF moneta * in that use of (p. are of course ungrammatical forms. Sigares.) -which uueducated people use to-day. In tlie latter use it * ' could only have signified ' money.' or person who signs the coin. if this at all events ' ' moneta ' had come to stand in popular repute for coin. it rather implies that the monetarius. etc. * tlie coin were sticklers would be enough for either moneta meant money. 77. It seems impossible to explain the occurrence of even of only these dozen it may Paulus.

The coins of ^thelred II. and iEthelred I. on The varieties of these the reverse some religious symboh We have first in reverse types are moreover not numerous. and sometimes seems to have a spiked crown outside it.. and of Eadgar. It is a round helmet. CVU The majority of the coins present on the obverse a bust. 3 and 10. The busts of Ecgbeorht. PI. xi. iEthelbearht. Peter at York. The sides. the variety of designs that they show. show us for the first time the king wearing a helmet. cross pattee. iEthelwulf. iElfred's coins show some attempt at portraiture which becomes much more apparent in the coins of Eadweard the Elder. and PI. the hand of Providence. 10. . of Eadmund. possibly the minster church of St. 9. and at first following its prototypes is always a filleted bust and is beardless. and for the first time a conspicuous crown similar But of to the crown on the coins of the German emperors. inscriptions in place of types on one or both which bear These are most frequent in the reign of iElfred. ix. and various forms of buildings one — device seems to be that of a church. as for example on the soUdi of Honorius or Arcadius. are purely conventional. and this appears once more in the coinage of Eadgar. Until the reign of Edward the Confessor the bust when It is a traceable descendant it appears is always in profile. The workmanship of many of these coins is highly artistic. Very often these symbols appear on both and the ^ ov P There are a certain proportion of coins sides of the coin. 8 and 9. PI. x. the types of the later kings we have already spoken at sufficient length. Under iEthelstan we get in one type a crown or the suggestion of one. from the bust on Eoman coins.INTRODUCTION. During this period the busts on the obverse begin to show often unmistakable signs of attempted portraiture. PI. PL vii. then we have A and Cx) combined. xiii. of iEthelstan. floral patterns. coins of Eadweard the Elder stand out conspicuously by crosslet. the cross frequency some variety of the cross. The beauty of the work is still more striking when we take into . Under Cuut appears the pointed helmet such as we see on the Bayeux Tapestry. 2. the and the cross moline. 13.

nos. arc a little more explicit. and their importance as showing the increasing domination of the kings of Wessex. The whole is of the coinage described in the present its volume distinguished in general character by its indepen- dence of the coinage of the Continent. 9G8. J Chron. imitated on a few rare ^thelred I. The dissimilarity is greatest between the coinages of the two nearest countries. iv. 5. whose beard is as conspicuous and as much of a personal distinction on the coins as it is in the Bayeux find a revival of the latter at Tapestry. have already been noticed. a. The rapid growth of mint-places. no information on these points. accession of Tl^^tlielred II. another type. 928. it is an instance of copying from England.Cviii INTRODUCTION. which Eadgar gives one moneyer of Stamford to the t The Charter in abbey of Medeshamsted (Peterborough) is of doubtful authenticity (sec J. the art of the engraver conspicuously declines. facing. tlie hust being again quite conventional. oTa). Edward But in almost every other case where we find an approach between the coinage of England and that of any continental people. We copied from the coins of * monogram type ' of the Carling denarius. low relief of consideration the extremely the engraving.6'. >S. pp. 13S-9. 6. In the first volume reference was made to the enactments of the Synod held at Greatleyt in Huntingdonshire. however. have seen one type of Ecgbeorht England and France. s. Gtsdze dir . but wo any rate on the coins of Edward the Confessor. and wo lose all traces of portraiture Witli tlic for a time. the temple ' type. we know little or The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle afi'ords us absolutely nothing. Scbmid.* We have seen that the crowned bust of Cnut may have been suggested by the crowned bust The crowned bust. of of the German emperors. and Kenibk-. and not of ' the reverse process.. when it was ordered that there should be one kind of money throughout * PI.d. in a. the Confessor may have come from a like source. f The laws of ^thelstan. .1. Of the laws which regulated the constitution and the working of the mints.

INTRODUCTION,
the whole rcahn, and that no one shouhl coin save
in
:

CIX

a

but certain places, on account of their importance, were to have two or more moneyers. Thus, Canterbury was to have seven four for the king, two for the bishop, and one for the abbot
town.

Each burg was

entitled to have one

moneyer

Colchester three

— two
;

for the king,

and one

for the bishop

;

London eight;

Winchester

six;

Warcham [Southampton] two Hastings and Chichester, though specially mentioned, were to have one moneyer each. Many of the burgs availed themyet we have selves of this privilege granted by iEthelstan
;
:

Lewes two; Hamtunc Shaftesbury two two

no coins struck during that reign of even some of the places such as specially mentioned in the edict of Greatley It does not Chichester, Colchester, Hastings, and Lewes.
;

follow, of course, that these places did not strike coins at

we can say is that none are at present Anglo-Saxon and Oriental coins in Skye * has brought to light tlie new mint of WardThis borough, one of the burgs founded by iEthelfiaid. is of importance, as future finds will very probably increase the number of mints during the reign of iEthelstan, and thus show that the privilege of coinage was of wider extent than at present it can be proved to be. During the successive reigns of Eadmuud, Eadred, and Eadwig, the number of mint places decreases, but with Eadgar they again increase, till in the reign of ^Ethelred 11. there was no place of any note which did not exercise the right of coinage. There is no doubt that the frequent and heavy payments caused by the Danish invasions was one great cause of the growth of the mints. The fines and taxes had to be paid in coin, and this could not have been done had the numljcr of mints remained restricted. It was the easiest and readiest
that time
:

all

that

known. in 1891

A

find of

way

of levying a tax.

Religious houses as well

as very

small towns and even villages must have had to share in
the burdens and this would in some way account for many mints only existing for a very short time. Among such places may be mentioned Bedwin, Brewton, Darcnth, Otford, Sidbury, Welmesford, Weybridge, Witham, Sec.
;

* Proc. Soc.

Aut. Scot. 1891-92, Vol. xxvi.

p. 225.

ex

INTKODUOTION.

The mint towns mentioned in Domesday form but a very small portion of such as wore actually coining money during the reign of Edward the Confessor, and at the
time of the making of the Great Survey.

The
diflicult

identification

of

the

various

mints

is

rendered

from the
is

fact
tlie

tliat as

a rule only

the three or

four initial letters of

names are given
in
full,

in the inscription.
;

sometimes LVNDONI, LVNDONIA. Lincoln is sometimes found written LINCOLNE, but we also have the form lincolla. We have DEORBY, GIPESFIC, CEOTFORD, and in two instances DEORBii, -DEOTFORDE. For Salisbury we have the forms SERBY and SERBl, which are enough to show that the whole inscription would have been SEREBYRIG or SEREBIRIG.
These forms arc no doubt, properly speaking, those of the
oblique case.

London

often

written

lvndene

But

it is

equally certain that (like the Celtic

which is also an oblique case) this is the form of the word which survived the longest, and that from this termination byrig in iEglesbyrig, Cadanbyrig, and the rest, the modern forms Aylesbury, Cadbury, &c., The Latin writers nearly always use this are derived. form, and we have in them frequently such phrases as 'quod quod Sceftesbyrig nuucuGlastingabyrig nuncupatur,'
Kil- in place names,
'
'

'

patur,'

*

qui Searesbirig nominatur.'

It is evident

from the passages in Domesday cited on a

previous page* that the establishment of a large number of local mints was a source of considerable revenue to the king, which was augmented by the frequent changes of the

types of the

coins.

The

entry under Worcester which

directly mentions the reception of the dies at London is important it probably shows that the practice of issuing
;

them from the Exchequer William I. To what extent
not know.
chan<'-ed.

existed
this
it

during the reign of custom prevailed we do

later reigns the position of the

which his

was general. But in these moueyer would be greatly He was no longer the actual maker of the die on name occurred, but he became only the officer in
In later reigns

* P. civ.

INTRODUCTION.

CXI

charge of the mint, and as such was responsible for the true standard of weight and fineness of the coins issued by him. The mints described below are either doubtful or else have been identified for the first time in the course of preparing the present volume of the Catalogue of English Coins.
berry, co. Berks,

Ashdown (^sbedune or ^scedun) in the parish of Blewnow usually called Aston-Upthorp, is first mentioned in A. S. Chron. s. a. 648, when Coenwealh, king of the West Saxons, gave 3000 hides of land there to his
kinsman Cuthred,
In
A.D.

It

was probably the scene of the famous

victory of iEthelred and Alfred over the

Danes in a.d. 870. 1006 it was occupied for a while by the Danes, "Why a mint should have been established at this place we have no evidence to show. The only known coins attributed to this mint were struck during the reign of ^thelred II.* Bedwin (Bedewind or Bedewine) in the union of Hungerford, Wilts, is better known as Great Bedwin, to distinguish There is an ancient it from the smaller place of that name. camp in the immediate neighbourhood In a.d. 675 it was the scene of a battle between Wulfhere, king of Mercia, and iEscwine, king of Wessex. iElfred gave land there to Edward the Confessor signed a his elder son, Eadweard.f and a grant of land at that place was made charter there J At the Great to the monks of the church at Abingdon. Survey the king held it, as also did Edward the Confessor The only coins of this it was never assessed or hided.' National Collection were issued during the mint in the
; *

reign of

Edward

the Confessor. §

Brewton or Brutun (Briutune) in the union of Wincanton, Somerset, was distinguished as the site of a monastery founded by Algar, earl of Cornwall, circ. a.d. 1005, for monks It was for a time annexed to the of the Benedictine order. abbey of St. Martin of Trouarn in Normandy. The manor was a royal one before the Conquest, and was hold by William L, who granted it to William de Moliun, in whose
||

* Hildtbrand, Angl. Mynt., p. 37.
t Birch, Cart. Sax.,
X " Istud fiiciuiu est
§
.'Jd:^

(Alfred's Will).

ad

villniu

nomino Bcdcwiudo
II

in

camera

regi:*," Koiiililc,
i.

9il.

Sec

p. R12.

Collint;un,

7A/.s7.

of Somu-i'if, vol

'ii:!

ex 11
poRseRfiion it

INTRODUCTION.

was

at tlio timo of

tlio

Great Survey.
to

Tlie
It

coiuH of
is

tills

plaeo were issued in the rei^n of Cnut.

probaMo that the mint belonged

the abbot of the

monastery.
a ])urg built

Bridgnorth (Brydiga, Bricge, or Brigge) in Shropshire, by TEthelflajd in a.d. 912.* There appears to be no further record, of this place till after the Conquest, when the castle and land there were held by Robert do

Bclcsme, son

and

successor

of

Roger

do

Montgomery,

Earl of Shrewsbury.

Cadbury (Cadanburh or Cadebcrie) in the union of Wincanwas the site of a Roman camp or city, as many Roman antiquities, coins, &c., have been found there. We have however no records of this place during the AngloSaxon period. At the time of the Survey it was held by Turstan Fitz Rolf, a Norman, who also resided there. Alwold held the manor during the reign of Edward the Confessor, and it was assessed to the geld of twelve hides.f South Cadbury (Sud-Cadeberie), close by, was also held by Alwold, and later on by Turstan. The coins of this place belong to the reigns of ^thelred II. and Cnut. (See p. 258, and Hildebrand, An(j. Mijiit., pp. 41 k 207.) Though there seems no reason why Cadbury should have a mint, there
ton, Somerset,

can be
*

little

iEthelred

II.

doubt of this attribution, as on the coins of the name of the place is given in full,

Cadanbyrig.'
Castle Rising (Roiseng or Risinges) in the

Lynn

division of

the Freebridge Hundred, Norfolk.

The evidence

of this place

having been a mint during the Anglo-Saxon period has been discussed by Mr. H. Montagu. t It is based on the doubtful reading of the monogram on the reverse of the coin of iElfred (no. 155, p. 54). Mr. Kenyon read the monogram CROINDEN for Croydon; BIr. Haigh read it ROISENG or ROISENGER for Castle Rising (?). With this latter reading

we

are

more inclined

to agree,

and the coin

is

ascribed to

Castle Rising in this catalogue.

Castle Rising was a place

* A. S. Chron.

s.

a.

912.

t Domesday.
I^rd Si-rics, ix. .3.S5.

X

Xuin. Chrou.,

INTRODUCTION.

CXlll

of considerable importance from a strategical point of view.
It stands

on the Wash and in a

district frequently attacked

by

tlie

Danes.
occur

No
till

other coins which

can be assigned to

this place

the reign of Stephen,

when

the mint

appears to have been revived for a short period. Corbridge (Corabridgej in the union of Hexham, Northumberland, was a lioman settlement, and during the Anglo-

Saxon period the site of a monastery. There exist however no records of this place earlier than a.d. 1138. The only coin which has been ascribed to this mint reads on the It was struck by ^thelred II. reverse OIERHD MO. COR.* The attribution is, therefore, very doubtful. Darenth (Darentune, Dserentan, Derent, or Tarent) in the union of Dartford in Kent, derives its name from the In a.d. 934 yEthelstan gave a grant of land river Darent. In Domesday it appears as beat Darenth to .^Ifwald.f longing to the Archbishop of Canterbury. There is only one It was coin known which can be attributed to Darenth. issued during the reign of .^thelstan, and is in the possesIt is of type v., and reads on the sion of Mr. H. Montagu. VRB. In the catalogue it is reverse beorhtvlf darent erroneously given to Dartmouth (see list of moneyers,
.

Beorhtulf, p. 101).

Dereham, East (Deorham or Dyrham),

in the union

of

Mitford and Launditch, Norfolk, was the site of a nunnery of Benedictines founded by Anna, king of the East Angles,

made

Withburga, his youngest daughter, whom he The nunnery was subsequently destroyed by the Danes but the remains of Withburga were disinterred and translated circ. a.d. 974 to Ely, to which see the manor The of Dereham was given by Edward the Confessor. J only coins which can be attributed to this mint belong to
in A.D.

650

for

prioress.
;

the reign of this king.§

two Dorchesters

or Dorecestre). There were Anglo-Saxon times, both places of great importance, and either likely to have possessed a

Dorchester

(Dorceastre
in

* Hildebrand, Anq. Mynt. p. 17.
X

t

Kcmblc,

3(54.

Komblc, 907.

§ P. 35G, nos. 200-202.

ex IV

INTRODUCTION.
It
is

mint.
coins

ronmins to determine whether Dorchester in Oxfordshire or
tlic

tlio

DOR on the
in

Dorchester

Dorsetshire.
Dorcliestcr in

union of Walliugford in Oxfordshire

In a.d. 654 was an ancient British and Roman settlement. an episcopal see was established there, and Birinus was its It ceased to be a see from a.d. 705-870, in first bishop. which year Leicester having fallen into the hands of the Dancr", Dorchester was made the seat of the united bishopric It continued to be a of Dorchester, Leicester, and Lindsey. In see until a.d. 1085, when it was transferred to Lincoln.* There ancient charters this place is styled villa ejnscojxdis. is no mention of Dorchester in Oxfordshire having received
the right of coinage or of a mint.

Dorchester in Dorsetshire was also a British and
settlement.

Eoman
at

The
a.d.

first

mention of
containing

it

is

in

a

charter of

Ecgbeorht,

833,t

a

grant of

lands

Weunland to three sisters, Beornwyn, Alfled, and UualenThe town is there styled villa regalis. In Domesday burch. As, moreover, we it is again spoken of as a royal demesne. are expressly informed in Domesday that in this Dorchester there were [in the reign of Edward the Confessor] two mint-masters, each of whom paid to the king one mark
in silver

and twenty shillings upon

a recoinage, it is evident

that Dorchester in Dorsetshire was the mint place during

the Anglo-Saxon period.

GeoSaburh or Jobaburh. This place is identified with Piaine and Dixon identify in Jedburgh by Hildebrand.J like manner JucJanburh with Jedburgh (Archbishops of York, vol. i., p. IIG cf. A. S. Chron., s. a. 952; also Toller and Bosworth, A. S. Did., s.v. Jutianburh). It would seem, however, that the usual names for Jedburgh were Gedword, Geddewerde, Oedewurth, ttc. It cannot, there;

fore,

be said that this identification
is

is

other than doubtful.

not a likely site for the event mentioned in A. S. Chron. s. a. 952.

Jedburgh

* Tarker, Uift. of Dorchester, pp. 19-22. X Aug. Mijnt. p. 497.

t

Komblc. 232.

INTRODUCTION.

CXV

Hamtune (Southampton or Northampton). Both places, Southampton and Northampton, are called in the AngloSaxon Chronicle and at this period simply Hamtune.' Southampton, as the chief port in the west, was a place of considerahle importance even in lioman times. It was occasionally the residence of the Anglo-Saxon kings and it suffered much from the incursions of the Danes. Frequent mention is made of this town in the charters of Edward the Confessor, and from Domesday we learn that it possessed two moneyers. The Hamtune mentioned in the Edict of
*
;

to* is also undouhtedly Southtowns mentioned in the edict are in the ancient dominions of the kings of Wessex. Northampton was captured by the Danes in a.d. 917 and

Greatley ahove

referred

ampton

;

for all the other

served as their head-quarters circ. a.d. 921. In this year, being defeated by Eadweard the Elder, the Danes evacuated Northampton and for nearly a century the town remained undisturbed. The year 1010 witnessed another invasion by the Danes, during which Northampton was burnt to the ground; and in a.d. 1064, during the rising against Tostig, it was plundered and the inhabitants outraged. During the reign of
this

Henry
in

II. it

received the right of coinage.
is

But

the balance of probability
right

that Southampton alone enjoyed
period.

the Anglo-Saxon

The

'

Hamtune

mint was
to the

in active operation

from the time of ^thelstan
all

Conquest,

though coins of

the reigns are not

represented in the National Collection.

Horndon (Horninduna, Horny ngdone, or Torninduna) in Essex is divided into three parishes, a division which appears to have existed since the time of Edward the Confessor. (1) East Horndon was held in the reign of Edward the Confessor by Aluuin, one of the king's thegns. Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, also had twenty acres there. (2) West Horndon, otherwise called Little Horndon, was held by two freemen during the same reign. At the time of the Survey the manor was held by Edward son of Algot. (3) Horndon on the Hill was in the reign of Edward the Confessor

CXvi

IMTIIOhfCTION.

by Uulric ii freeman, probably the Hame who held but Knstacc, Earl of Boulof,'no, and his East ITorndoii undrr-icnuut Garner held it at the time of the Survey.* The only coins of this mint were issued during the reign of
held
;

Edward
Lowik

the Confessor.

Jedbiirgli, sec

GcoSaburh.

(Luueic, Lufwyk, or Luhwic) in Of the early history of this place Northamptonshire. From Domesday it appears scarcely anything is known. there was divided between the Bishop of that the manor Constance and the crown; as Edwin and Algar held one virgatc of the former and Sibold one virgatc and a half of The attribution of the coin reading lvveic the latter.
or

Luffwick

(no. 20, p. 195) to this place is therefore very doubtful.

Lymne (Liman, Limna, or Limene) in Kent. This is the Portus Lemanus of the Eomans, one of their most important The harbour fell into decay at an early period harbours. of the Saxon occupation, and Hythe sprang up to take
its place.

lands at

Lymne were

In the early part of the eleventh century the The divided up into several manors.

most important of these was that of Aldington, which became
part of the estates of Christ Church, Canterbury, in a.d. 1032. In Domesday it is entered under the general title of terra

land held of the Archbishop by militum archiepiscopi, i.e. Coins of this mint range from Eadgar to knight's service.'
'

Edward

the Confessor.

similarity in the spelling of the

Essex and Malmesbury in "Wiltshire, The names of these two places makes it, when we have only the initial letters to guide us, almost impossible to distinguish between the coins of the
]\raldon in

two mints. Maldon is found as M9eldune,Mealduna,Mealdune,Meldune, and Meldunum and Malmesbury as Mailduifesburh, Malmesbiriensis, Mealmesburh (Mealmesbyrig), Mealdemesburh, and Both places were of considerable importance ]\[eldunum. during the Anglo-Saxon period. The first mention of Maldon
;

*
vol.

Morant, Uist. of Essex,
ii.

vol.

i.

pp.

207-21G; "Wright, Hist, of Essex,

p.

2.")0.

INTRODUCTION.

CXvii

is in the A. S. Cliron. s. a. 913, when Eadweard the Elder came with some of his forces into Essex at M?eldune, and encamped

there whilst a town was building and fortifying at WiSam Again in a.d. 920 the same king came to Mteldune and (q. v.).
rebuilt and fortified the town.

In the next year Maldon was

army of East Angles or of Vikings from over the sea, and was again besieged and
unsuccessfully besieged by a joint

captured in a.d. 993.

At the Great Survey Maldon formed

part of the royal domain, as the king had in it one house, and pasture for 100 sheep, and also 180 houses, which the

burgesses held of him.

The first mention of the town of Malmesbury during the Anglo-Saxon period is of the burning of the burg by the Danes, circ. a.d. 878. The town was afterwards consumed by another fire and rebuilt by Eadweard the Elder. In A.D. 1015 {A. 8. Giron.) after the murder of the thanes, Sigeferth and Morkere at Oxford, the king ordered that Sigeferth's widow should be taken to Malmesbury. The town owed its origin as well as its name to the celebrated abbey founded in the seventh century by Maildulf, an Irish monk, and is made illustrious by the writings of William of Malmesbury. Newark (Newarcha or Newerke) in Northamptonshire was an ancient chapelry in the parish of St. John the Baptist, Peterborough. There exists some doubt whether the coin attributed to this town (see no. 13, p. 160) may not have
been struck at Newark in Nottinghamshire, in which city a castle is said to have been built by Ecgbeorht. This manor was subsequently held by Leofric, Earl ofMcrcia, and
in

Domesday Godiva,
it.

his Countess, appears as paying
in the

the

danegeld for
Shropshire,

hundred of South 13radfield, There appear to be no records of its early history. Sir John Evans identifies this mint with Newport in Cornwall, the Celtic name of which was Laustephadon, or the town of St. Stephen's Church.* Northampton, see Hamtune.
is

Newport (Niweporte),

situated near Watling Street.

*

Nam.

C/iroM., 3icl Series, vol. v., p. 257.

CXVlll

INTRODUCTION.

Otford (OSnford, Ottaiifortla, &c.), in the hundred of Codshoatli,

Kent, wiis

tlie

scene of the victory (jljtained in a.u. 773*

by Oflii of i\Iercia over Eulhmund of Kent (cf. Vol. I., p. xlv.), and also of the battle in a.d. 10 10 in which Eadmund Ironside defeated the Danes. OflTa gave the manor of Otford to the Church of Canterbury, and at the Great Survey it was assigned to the Archbishop, and continued to form part of the possessions of the see till long subsequent to the Conquest.f There are no coins of this mint in the National Collection. A penny of iEthelred II., reading LEIFDOO MO OON, is described by Hildebrand, Auf^. Mynt., p. 130.
. .

It is of

type

iv.

var.

a.

Eichborough (Ricyeburh) in^ Kent is the Tortus Iiutupiae of the Romans. Traces of Roman work are discoverable in the ruins of the castle. There are in fact no evidences of Saxon occupation. Such occupation, however, might very well have taken place, and yet have left no durable
traces either in
buildiu<:i;s

or in walls.

It is therefore with
(see

considerable doubt that the coins with the legend RIC

There is pp. 289, 422) have been attributed to this place. no mention of Richborough either in the Anglo- Saxon
Chronicle or in Domesday.

Sidbury(Si'besteburhor Sideburh), a parish near Sidmouth,

This manor was granted to the see of Exeter by Edward the Confessor during the episcopacy of Leofric, and it was in the possession of that see at the time of
Devonshire.
the Great Survey.
at
p.

The
p.

attribution of the coins described

231

and

292

(^thelred

II.

and

Cnut)

is

doubtful.

Sidmouth (Sidmes, Sedemunde, or Sedemude), a seaport in The most ancient name appears to have been Sidemen. Numerous Roman antiquities and coins have been found there. At the time of the Conquest, Gyda, mother of Harold II., was in possession of the manor of Sidmouth but shortly after the Conquest and prior to the Great Survey it was bestowed by William on the monastery of St. Michael 'in periculo maris,' Mont St. Michel in Normandy. The
Devonshire.
;

* A. a. Chioii.,

c.

a.

773.

t Uastcd, Uist. cj Kent, vol.

i.,

p. 322.

INTRODUCTION.
only coin attributed
to

CXIX

this

place

has

the

mint

name

SIDMES.*
Southampton, see Hamtune.
Tcmpsforcl (Taemeseforda or Temesanford), in the union of Biggleswade, co. Bedford, was fortified by the Danes in
A.D. 921. Later on in the same year it was taken by Eadweard the Elder, who beset the burg and fought against it and slew the King, and Earl Toglos and Earl Manua, his
'

all those who were there within.' The city appears to have remained undisturbed till a.d. 1010, when the Danes took it and reduced it to ashes. The coins

son and his brother, and

attributed to this mint (pp. 173-174) were struck before the place was burnt by the Danes.

Tonbridge (Tonebricg, Tonebrug, &c.) in Kent. Of this records before the Conquest. There was an ancient castle there which is supposed to have been built before that time. In Domesday the only reference to Tonbridge is in speaking of Eichard de Tonbridge, alias Fitz Gilbert, who held the manor there and was also possessed of land in various other parts of Kent. The attribution of the coins of iEthelred II., ascribed to Tonbridge by Hildeplace there are no

brand,

is

doubtfuLf

Totleigh or Totley (Totleah or Totele) in the union of

Of this place there appear no early records. The coin of Cnut, which is ascribed to Totleigh, reads TOTEL.$ Wardborough (Weardburh) in the union of Wallingford, Oxfordshire. We have scarcely any records of this now In A. S. Cliron. s. a. 913, wo small and unimportant place. find that iEthelHaed, lady of the Mercians, built in the next year after midwinter that (burg) at Cyricbyrig (Cherbury) and that at Weardbyrig,§ and that same year before midwinter
Ecclesall-Bierlow, Derbyshire.
to be
'

that at

granted

Kumcofa (Euncorn).' Land by Eadmund to Wulfric
Aug. Mynt.
p. 137.
'

at
a.d.

Wardborough was Of this 944.|1

* Hildcbraiid,

t lb. p.

14!»,

3828-9.

% Ih. p. 301, .S5GG.
idoutifics
)

§ Steenstnip, Normannerne, vol. iii., p. i'i, Wi^densljorfnigli in ^tuffonlsliire (.-^ei.' above p. Hi
II

this

pliico

with

Kemble, Ills.

OXX

INTRODUCTION.
is

mint only one coin p. 1015, and Inmrs on

known.

It is of TEthelstan,

type

v.

tlie

reverse the inscription

BYRHTELM

MOT p>EARDBV. This coin formed part of the Skye hoard found in 1891, and the presence in the same hoard of coins struck at Oxford renders its attribution to Wardborough
beyond question. Warmington (Wcrmington), in the hundred of Polebrook, Northamptonshire, formed part of the possessions of the see of Peterborough, during the Anglo-Saxon period; though the documents which profess to record the grants of it are, as in the case of Welmesford (q.v.), not of the date which they profess to be.* At the time of the Survey the abbey of Peterborough still held seven hides and a half at "Warmington. Coins attributed to this mint read p>ORi or |>0RIME, &c. They were struck during the reigns of iEthelred II., Cnut, and Harold I.f Welmesford, Walmesford or Wansford (Welmesforda), in the union of Stamford, Northamptonshire, was also an ancient
possession of the see of Peterborough.
lated in A. S. Clirou. (E.)
s. a,

The passage
tlie

interpo-

supposed grant of the manor to the abbey of St. Peter, St. Paul, and St. Andrew, at Medeshamstede, i.e. Peterborough, by Wulfhere, son of Penda, king of Mercia; and a spurious charter in

657 records

supposed to confirm the grant. WelmesDomesday but appears to have been part of the knight's fees which Anketil de St. Medard held of the abbey. The attribution to Welmesford of the coin of Cnut with mint name p>ELMlAE (no. 556, p. 296) is open to doubt. Weybridge (Weybricca, Weybrugge, or Wibricg) is in the union of Chertsey, Surrey. Two hides of the manor of Weybridge were granted by ^thclstan to the abbey of Chertsey, a.d. 13 Dec. 933. | This grant was confirmed by
is

Kemble (575)
ford
is

not mentioned in

;

Edward

the

Confessor
still

in

a.d.

1062. §

Survey the abbey

possessed two hides of land at

At the Great Wey-

* Cf. A. S. Chron.,

s. a.

9G3; aud Kemble,

Coil.

Dipl. Sax., 575.

t Hildebruml, Aikj. Mynt., pp. 1G5. 314, 375. § lb. 812. I Kemble, 3G3.
"

INTRODUCTION.
bridge, and Alured held

CXXl

them

in the time of

Edward

the

Confessor, and after his death.

The

coins having the mint

name

[>ib or [>IBR, struck during the reign of Cnut,* can only be doubtfully ascribed to Weybridge.

Winchcombe (Wincelcumb)
place

in

Gloucestershire

was a

of residence of the Mercian kings.

Offa of Mercia

founded a nunnery there in a.d. 787. Two years later Coenulf of Mercia laid the foundation of a Benedictine abbey dedicated to St. Mary, which took the place of the nunnery. Coenulf was buried there in a.d, 822. The monastery suffered severely during the Danish ravages and was in a ruinous condition in the reign of Eadgar, when Oswald, bishop of Worcester, rebuilt it, and it was reconsecrated to the Virgin Mary and St, Kenelm.f The only coin

which can be attributed
no. 597, p. 299.

to

this

place

is

that

of Cnut,

Witham (Wi^am) in Essex. This burg was built by Eadweard the Elder in a.d. 913.$ There are no further records of it till the compilation of Domesday, from which we learn
belonged to Earl Harold (Godwine's son) during the Edward the Confessor. At the time of the Great Survey, Peter the Sheriff kept it in the king's hands, and
that
it

reign of

Bouillon,

was some time part of the estate of Eustace, Earl of who married Goda, sister of William I. It subsequently reverted to the crown, and Stephen gave it to the Knights Templars. § A coin reading Pi£)A, struck during the reign of Harthacnut is attributed to this mint.
it
|1

In completing, as we do in this volume, the description between the time when the English first began to strike money and the Norman Conquest, it may be well to review in a few words the contents of the two volumes together, and sum up very briefly
of the whole series of coins struck

Summauy.

* Hildebraiid, Aug. Mijnt., p. 307. t Rudder,
Ilii't.
s.

X A. S. Gliron.

of Glosttrsliire, pp. 825-2G. a. 913.
i.,

§ Wrif^lit, 7/^'^^ of Esxex, vol.
11

p. 21(3.

llildcbraud, Any. Mynt.,

p. -108.

cxxii

introductkjn.

the chief points of liistorical and artistic interest which the whole series of Early English coinage has to offer.

English coinage hegan, as we saw, with the series of

money current among the Franks of the Merovingian dynasty and of their neighbours the Frisians. AVo saw also reason to conjecture that, at the time at which this first English money was made, some Roman silver and gold coins and a very large number of small Eomau copper coins were still current in this country. The first series of English coins consisted of a few gold and a very considerable number of silver pieces (sceattas), which
imitations of the
earlier

were no doubt chiefly current in the districts nearest to the French coast. But they evidently spread through middle England as far as Northumbria, for we have coins of this series with the name of Mercian and Northumbrian kings.
In Northumbria it is probable that the sceattas did not displace the chief currency of the district, which still consisted in the small copper Eoman coinage of which we have before
spoken, and the result of the introduction of the sceattas was that these coins assimilated themselves in appearance to the
small

Eoman
series,

coins.

The Northumbrian coinage,

called the

Styca

Styca series

changes from a silver to a copper one, and this endures until the conquest of Northumbria by

the Danes in the year 868.
is affected

South of the Humber, the history of the English coinage by the changes which took place in the coinage of Francia. In the latter country the house of Heristal introduced, before the end of the eighth century, a new type of silver coin by the coinage of what was called the new denarius ; and this money was speedily imitated in England in the penny coinage of Off'a (probably struck in Kent) as also in the penny coinages of the kings of Kent, the Archbishops of Canterbury, and a few of the kings of East Anglia, Between the battle of Ellanduue in a.d. 825, and the death of Burgred in a.d. 874, we watch the other South Humbrian coinages disappear and that of ^Yessex alone survive. As we have pointed out, the early so-called Wessex coins were probably at first struck only in Kent. The two classes of coins, then, which mark the beginning

INTRODUCTION.
of

CXXIU
the

an English coinage

— the

sceattas of

seventh and

eighth centuries and the pennies which succeeded them

— were

both derived, so far as regards their general appearance and fabric, from similar (;\Ierovingian and Carolingian) coinages on the Continent. But from the very beginning of the

English coinage a great originality is shown in the details of the fabrication, such as in the choice of the types, in the forms of the letters in the inscription, &c. In truth the
originality
is

even more conspicuous on the earliest coins,

in the sceattas, for example,
Offa,

and on the

first

coins issued

by

on the whole we may say that in respect of type and general appearance the English currency throughout is markedly independent of influences coming from the Continent. The continental coinage develops into two distinct branches, the French and the German. The English coinage stands apart from both as a distinct series. All these facts argue a very considerable wealth and remarkable commercial activity in this
than
it

is

on the

later pieces.

Still

country.

The incursions
by

of the Vikings

and the

first

coins struck

a Scandinavian people during the latter half of the ninth

century form the next important feature in the history of
the English coinage.

One

of these difi'erent series of Scandinavian coinages

is

imitated

rather from the Frankish coinage than from the
(See Vol.
I.

English.

pp. 204-229,

and

PI. xxiv.-xxvii.)

All

the other coins which were struck by or under the influence
of Scandinavian conquerors in England, are no

more than debased imitations of the current coinage of the country. It is at this time that the names of the moneyers upon coins
begin to show a curious infusion of foreign elements, and not Scandinavian elements only, among the population

In iElfred's reign we have to note the of England. beginning of the practice of adding the names of mintplaces upon the coins, the only mint-places which had before his reign been mentioned on any coins being London Vol. I. pp. 10-11) and Canterbury (Vol. I. p. 41 and Vol. II. The chief interest to be found in tlic mintpp. 6, 13-14). names on the coins begins during the reign of iEthclstan.

who might have built up a lasting Scandinavian Empire if Cnut had had worthy successors.000 lbs. As we have already said. and Eadwig.000 lbs. That such payments in any form should have been possible despite all the misfortunes of England implies that her commercial prosperity had been continually on the increase. Eadred. and that the more purely commercial character of the coinage was exclusively kept in view. It is difficult to describe in words this same die. must have been enorThe payments which are recorded to have been mous. and for Norway. coined in the reign of -^thelred II. we have further that important event in the history of the English coinage. 45. Eadmund.— imply an enormous currency. and we may infer that a greater number of coins than previously were struck from After the reign of Eadgar the appearance of the coins.000 lbs. those of With the exception of three reigns. we notice a certain change in The dies appear to have been made more roughly than heretofore. the number of pieces issued was considerably greater than at any previous time. 87.. the initiative which it gave to the creation of a Scandinavian coinage currencies initiated by the Danes in Ireland and in Scotland and other currencies for Denmark. made at various times in this reign and the next 10.000 lbs. or at any rate after the accession of iEthelredlL. in some respects the most important event of all. for Sweden. or if the Scandinavian customs of the . In the reign of iEthelred II. from this reign down to For in the wliolo series of coins the reign of Eadgar wo have continuous evidence of the recovery by the kings of Wesscx of the country from the hands of the Danes.CXXIV INTRODUCTION. of silver.. while a striving after art in the manufacture of the Indeed the amount of money dies almost disappeared. 16. but the change in the appearance of the English coins general eflfect of it on the eye and mind is to suggest that after the death of Eadgar. even though we admit that these large sums could not all have been paid in specie. — . the coinage of -^iEthelred and its imitations symbolize the wide rule of Cnut. the number of recorded mint-places by the coins goes on continually increasing to the time of ^Ethclred II.

for the The designs on the sceattas are not themselves most part place. of course. . which is the first appearance of what we may call a coat-of-arms upon coins. and of imitations of it throughout all Scandinavian lands. suggest that our relations were (through Denmark and Frisia) rather more with the German Empire than with France. and how much the Icelandic Sagas have to tell us about English history. This history of the spread of English coinages in the North marks the end of the influence of English coinage before the Conquest. very much In the smaller . As we have said. and Norman influences began to be felt in this country. the sceatta series. but still it is not without artistic interest. artistically beautiful. Its artistic interest is. Perhaps in one we may see a reflection of it in the so-called Sovereign type of Edward the Confessor. must have led to an increase in trade between England and other northern countries and paved the way for intercourse of all kinds. or the converse. earliest series of all. Some further tokens of the power and the ambition of Cnut are given by the adoption upon the coinage of a crowned bust. we have a number and variety of designs which in proportion to the extent of the issue is perhaps without precedent in any other coinage of any history to the world.INTRODUCTION. The whole state of affairs changed when Edward the Confessor mounted the throne. but in of the development of ornament they ought take in a conspicuous first They present. is not reflected so far as we can gather upon the coinage. We know how much the English chronicles are concerned with Norwegian and Danish history at this time. probably copied from the bust on the Imperial German coins and one or two instances which occur at this time of the copying of German types upon the English money. some striking examples of the degradation of . Thus far as regards the historical interest of the English case ' ' coinage. the influence of the new power the Norman though it began to be felt — — during the reign of Edward the Confessor. this CXXV Undoubtedly enormous currency of ^thelred's coinage. as was shown the volume. inheritance could have been broken through.

E. who has placed at their disposal his manuscript notes on the early coinage of Wessex. time to have coins which are artistically beautiful. Montagu.ox XVI typcfl. McClure for his notes on that portion of the Introduction which deals with the mints. In the preparation of this Catalogue the compilers have been under special obligations to Sir John Evans. and throupjli degradation of the evolution of fresh In the first volume a good deal of space was allotted to tracing the origin. and to. as we have just stated. Mr.. of these types. E.A. could not he neglected in any hisBut after this time.B. again. and an artistic coinage does not again appear in England until the reign of Edward I. etc. . who has read the proofs of the Catalogue. or at any tory of Anglo-Saxon art..C. the development. and has supplied lists of unpublished moneyers. TNTllOnilCTION. designs. H. these. the coins of Offa arc in a way monuments of and in the history of Anglo-Saxon art.S. again. rate after the reign of Eadgar. and of its development out of Celtic art. of the Angevin or Plantagenet line.. Then. Some heads on the money of Eadweard the Elder afford the best examples perhaps of the kind of work of which we are speaking. the English coinage ceases to have any artistic merit.. F.S. K. these coin-types deserve a place alongside of the illuminated manuscripts of the period. After Offa's reign we continue from time to artistic excellence . Their thanks are also due to the Eev. Treas.

.

< .a z < M o z UJ a.

.

.

CATALOGUE. .

P. 21. Dartmouth read Darenth. P. 51.d. for 6. »i. add name of Eanwald to 1. 1. list of moneyers. „ . 101. first col. 1. dele in Kent a. 858. P. for Xristiano road Xristiana. 1. 409.CORRIGENDA. P. P. for read/ECELPIC.. 27 2. 0«bcrn read 0«grim. 394. for 5. P. 1.

See Iiitnxluction.] * Stiibbs. Diorniod [cf. 803-83U).D. Bosa. p. Osmund Sigestef. EStlmod. Ti^-beaiht] (Caiitor- Biornmod] (Canterbury). Sweflieard. fcCBOR.CATALOGUE OF ENGLISH COINS. u A . I. VOL. divideil by jionofrram "^ i bust. * Timbearht bury). Type Bu. seems scarcely J This monogram has bcpii likewise read It is pos^ibb' tliat lliis type is a Uegrudatidn from the type of Archbishop Wulfred ailmissiblc. Werlnard. I'l. <&c. in- between two eireh [Cf. Beornhart. Beornmod. ANGLO-SAXON SERIES. Around. 1 for ^f) (Dorol)iriiia Civitas). Beagmund. Obverse. tion between two r i. 7 . inserip. A. Wulgar. xii. Boornheard. iJehis.d.i>. See Vol. PI. 838* or 839t.s. anU the (a. JEfel-. 01»a (Canterbury). [cf. 73. Biosil. (Canterbury). Tiluuiue (Canterbury). died a. ECGBEORHT. Introiliiction to the ]>rescnt volume. Andred. 8crii)tion f& DOROB . 802 . Tideman. 1. but this rrailinf. see E?el-. Bosel [cf. Aenred. Srcc. f 'riicopivM. n. KINGDO^I OF WESSEX. | Reverse. Bosa] (Canterbury). Biorniuod. Ifa. Description of Types. 0^ * Around. Ti^lnaritf. Dynyn [Duniug V]. I. (Cautcrbury). Swefherd (Canterbury).t diadtuud. Moneyerg. Swene. &c. circles.

inscription between two circles.. surroundi d by crescmts. Around.] between two circles. Arou7id. . Coll. nioline. Head diademed. inscription he- tion between tico circles. vnr. Type Bust diademed. Around. Type t^imilnr hunt. 14. Around. two circles.. i ii. n. [Cf. Obverse. inscription between two circles. inscription 4. [Rud. Around. n.] I [Kvans Type Bust r. iiis('rij)tirin two limbs between bust. a. . | Around. Head diademed. 1. I. 1 iuncriptinn not divided hy Same. r. 27.] Type vi. (liadomcd. inscrip- I divided by I Cross. diademed.. two circles. tion between two r.. [Rud. 3. Monogram I. I inscription 2.. [Cf. Cross potent. ticeen Around.. r. •^- ( A and CO). I Lozenge-shaped four circles. <livi(led by bust. Around. n. inscrip)- i Cross crosslet. I.] Type iv. pellet. liorns outwards.WESSEX. Reverse. i.. inscription he- tween two circles. circles.] between two I [Cf. Around. PI. Head r. Around. two liml>s pattes. ]. inscription between two circles. iii. PI.] Type V.

in* pcripfion betwc ni two <irclc8. Olla Podrida.] Type viii. inscription between two I circles. Around. Around. 20. r. Around. between two circles. inscription l)('t\v(en two circles. I. J. 7. Around.] [Cf.] Type ix. [Cf. Head diademed. Around. Around. inscription 1 between two I. [E. G. scription —nine Tribrach. incircle enclosing pellet. PI. circles. PI. [Cf. crosslet. I. inscription I Cross pattee. I Tribrach moline. inscription becircles. inscription be- between two circles. HJ B 2 . Around. limbs fourche's. Type Ue(idr. I Cross I. inscription between two circles. Ar<nind. Around. I Cross pattee. with wedge in each angle (cross pattee over another cross patte'e). PI. Around. PI.] Type Cross pattee. r. PI. X. Sun? rays pattcs issuing from Around.. circles. 5. tween two circles.ECGBEORHT. Tyj>e xi Sun ? — piriht rays patt(fs issuing from Cross pattee.(li(t(himed.. vii. 6. iiiscrijition tween two | between two 7. PifiFard dll] Type xii. [Cf. Around. inscription be' rirrh enclosing pellet. Reverse. inscription between two circles. tween two circles. Head diademed. [Saiothill.

in- I Cross of five limbs pattes. 2. N. Obvcrnc. inscrijitiou becircles. ri. Since the figure was done the comi>ilers have had an opi>ortuuity of seeing tlie original. The figure lielow is taken from tlie only publislioil repre^-cntatioii ot the coin. S. [Num.] Type Cross of six limbs pattes. \ scription between two circles. I xiii. [Evans Coll. tween two | twcou two I. . 4G. inscription he- tween two circles.] [Cf. between two circles. !».] * The monogram horc given correctly rc})re!ients that on tbe coin. Cros* palt^e. Type xiv. Around.WESSEX. Around.. issuing from a tween two circles. xvi. Around. Arjiiiid. RevcrBe. inscription be- Six rays or limbs patt^s. Ciohh potent.] Type XV. inscription becircles. inscripfion Cross potent.. inscription between two circles. Type Cross potent. Around.. in- scription betwei^n two circles. common centre. Chron. n. Around. 27. [Riid. Around. Monogram ^fjL** Around. iii.

inscription be- RVM Around.dl. Around. iii. [Num. Around. Around. iuscriptiun between [Cf. Around.. Around. Obverse. tween two circles. 10. tween two circles. [Jlurdiison C. I. Inscription field. four crescents. Cross piitent. S/^oT fj^ (SAXON) placed. inscription becircles. tween two circles. inscription he- I Monogram PA (for SAX). between two circles.ECQBEORHT. irregularly Cross pattee.] Type xviii. Around. Chron. PI. inscription between two circles. horns inwards. inscription Cross pattee. [Boyne Cull. Type Small croxs jmtte'e icitldii xvii.S..] Type xix. 46. | inscrijition between two circles. SAX ONIO in three lines across Cross patttfe. N.] Type XX. inscription be- Across. tween two two circles.] . Reverse.

. Descuiition ok Coins.WESSICX.* No.

ECGBEORHT.
No.

WESSEX.

No.

AETHELWULF.

AETHELWULF.
Succ. A.D. 838 or 839; died a.d. 858.

(Resigned Wessex to bis son Ae'Selbald in 856 and reigned in Kent only.)
Moneyers.

Mtal-, see E?el-. Beagmutid. Biarnmod or Biarmod. Biarnno^ (Canterbury). Brid (Canterbury).
Degbeariit. Deineab (Canterbury). Diar (Canterbury).

ESelred? (Canterbury).

Hebeca? (Canterbury).
Hedeheald [for Herel>eabl?]. Herebeald (Canterbury). Herebearht.

Hunbearht [Hunbeant] (Canterbury).

Hun red.
l.ialm or Liuba.

Duduiue. Dun(n). Ealgmuiid [Ealbmuiid
bury).

Mauiuc [Manninc] (Canterbury). Manna, Mann, &c.
?]

(Canter-

Osmund

(Canterbury). Tiruald [Tiduald ?].

Eanmund
Eanwalil.

(Canterbury).

Torbtulf.

Torbtwald.

Eardwulf. EJelgeard
Eielheard. E^elbere.

Uermund.
l

= ESelheard ?]
ESelno^
?].

Uueallieard, Uuelheard, &c. [ = 'Uelmheard ?] (Canterbury). Uuelmbeard L=Uuealhi.'ard?]

E'Selniod [or
ESelno'6.

Uuilheah or Wilbeah
(Canterbury). Weineali [of. Deineab.]

[of.

Uuelbeard]

ESelmund (Canterbury).

Description of Types.
Obverse.

Trjpe

i.

DORIBI
ten.

or

DOR IB

Around,
circles.

irregularly writinscription between
[Cf. PI.

Monogram ^P!^
between two

.

Around, inscription

two

circles.

n.

].]

Type

i.

var. a.

Sumo

as reverse of preceding
I

Same
[Cf. PI. II. 2.]

as obverse of preceding.

Type

ii

DORIBI
ten.

or

DORIB

Around,
circles.

irregularly writinscription between

In centre

i^Ci.

An)uud, inscription

two

between two
[Cf. PI. II. 3.]

circles.

Type Ty

iii.

Monogram ^f^^
between two

Around, inscription

Cross

patte'o,

in

angles

CYMT

(CANT?)
tween two
II.

Aromul, inscription becircles.

circles.

[Cf.

PL

4.J

10

WESSEX.

Obveriic.

Keveree.

Type
Moii„-riin

iv.

Sj^ (SAXONV).
two

Anmiul,

CroBS puttee over anotlitr crobs

jiattee.

Around,
circlcB.

iiiecriptiou

bttwceu

two

iiiscriiitiiin ijutwcuii

ciirk'S.

[Cf. ri. II. 5.]

Type
Crtiss piitteo over aiiotlicr cross pattec.

V.

SAX
Inscription

ON 10
R/M
circles.

in

three

lines

Arounii,
circles.

inscriptiuu

between

two
across

field.

Around,

inscription

between two
[Cf. PI. II. 6.]

Type
yanie.

V.

var. a.

Similar,

SAX ONIO

and around, between

RVM
two
[Cf. PI. II. 7.]
circles,

OCLI DENTALIVM, in-

stead of

money er's name.

Type
Bust
tion
r.,

vi.

diademed.

Around,

inscrip-

between

t\¥0 circles,

divided by

Christian

monogram

^. An uud,
circles.

in-

bust.

scription
[Cf. PI. II. 8.]

between two

Type

vii.

Bust

diademed. tion between two
r.,

Around, inscripcircles, divided by

y
^"^

.

"^^^^^

JTB

a *^- Ground,

,

.

.

,

inscription be-

bust.

tween two
[Cf. PI. II. 9.]

circles.

Type
Bust
diademed. tion between two
r.,

viii.

Around, inscripcircles,

divided by

In centre «^.

Around, inscription be-

bust.

tween two
[Cf. PI. II. 10.]

circles.

Type
Bust
diademed. tion between two
r.,

ix.

Around,
circles,

inscrip-

Cross

patte'e,

divided by
[Cf. PI.

Around,
circles.

pellet in each angle. inscription between two

bust.

II

11.]

J

AETHELWULF.
Obverse.

11

Reverse.

Type

ix. vur. a.
I

Head

diademed. Around, iuscription between two circles.
r.,

Similar;

smaller

cross

pattc'e

;

no

pellets in angles.
|

[Cf. PI. II. 12.]

Tijpt X.

Ilead

diademed. Around, iuscription between two circles.
r.,

I

Cross potent.

Around, inscription

le-

tween two

circles.

[Rud., PI. 27,

2.]

Tyye
Bust
diademed. tion between two
r.,

xi.

Around,
circles,

inscrip-

Cross crosslet.

Around, inscription be-

divided by

tween two

circles.

bust.
[Cf. PI. III. 1.]

Type

xii.

Bust

diademed. tion between two
r.,

Around,
circles,

inscrip-

Star of six raya pattes.

Around,

in-

divided by
[Cf. PI.

scription between two circles.

bust.

HI.

2.

Type
Bust
diademed. tion between two
r.,

xiii.

Around,
circles,

inscrip-

Cross pattc'e over another cross

patte'o.

divided by

Around,
circles.

inscription

between

two

bust.

[Cf. PI. III. 3.]

Type

xiv.

Bust

diademed. Around, inscription between two circles, divided by
r.,

Cross

Around,
circles.

pattee over cross pomme'e. inscription between two

bust.

[Cf. PI. III. 4.]

Type XV. Bust
tion
bust.
r.,

diademed.

Around,

inscrip-

Cross,

between two

circles, divided

by

two limbs pattc's, two molino. Around, inscription between two
5.J

circles.

[Cf. PI.

HI.

12

WE8SEX.
Obverse.

Reverse.

Type

xvi.

BuH

r.,

diatlrinrd.

Around, inscription

Cross, tico limhs cross crosslet,
tes.

bcttrotn two circles, divided by bust.

two patAround, inscripliun between two

circles.

[INIontagu Coll.]

Type xvii
Bust
sometimes diademed. Around, inscription between two circles, divided by bust.
r.,

Moneyer's name, &c., upon limbs and between angles of cross formed of beaded lines.

[Cf. PI, III. 6.]

Type
Cross pattr'e over another cross pattee.

xviii.

Around,
circles.

inscription

between

two

In centre >^.

Around, inscription be-

tween two
[Cf. PI.

circles.

m.

7.]

Type xix.
Cross
patte'e

over another cross patte'e.

Around, inscription
circles.

between

two

Plain cross, the ends of which touch the inner circle, over cross pommee.

Around,
circles.

inscription

between

two

[Cf. PI. III. 8.]

Type XX.
Cross patte'e over another cross pattee.

Same

as obverse type.

Around, inscription
circles.

between

two

[Cf. PI. III. 9.]

Type xxi.
Cross pattc'e over another cross pattee.
Cross crosalet.

Around, inscription be-

Around,
circles.

inscription

between

two

tween two
III.

circles.

[Cf.

PL

10.]

Type
Cross patte'e over another cross
patte'e.

xxii.

Cross moline.

Around, inscription becircles.

Around,
circles.

inscription

between two
[Cf. PI. III.

tween two

11]

AETHELWULF.
Obversp.

13

Reverse.

Type
Cross pattce over another cross pattee.
I

xxiii.

Cross,

two limbs

Around,
circles.

inscription

between

two
|

Aroimcl,
circles.

pattes, two moline. inscription between iwo

[Cf. PI. III. 12.]

Description of Coins.

No.

14

WESSEX.
Moneycr.

No.

Obvorso.

Hcverae.

12

^EOELVVLF REX.
\'<ir.

»t.MANINL
[I'l. II. 1.]

TONETA
Wt.
17-8.

I'dlct

ill

centre

13

^E+)ELVVL-F REX
4<EOEL^VVLF4^ REX
V(ir.

4^0$MVND M0NET7\
Wt.

Osmund.

MO.
Uueallienrd,
Uiiellicard.
20-0.

14

^VVESLHESRD TOETR
Wi.

Pellet in centre.

15

i^ECELVVLF REX
Var. Pellet in centre.

^VVE7\LWE7\RD
Wt. 190.

IG

i<EDELYYLE REX
Var. Pellet in centre.

t.YYELWE7XRD
Wt.
18-G.

17

t-EOELVVLF REX

"I^VVILhEH

MONETS
Wt. 19
1.

Uuilheah.

Type
18

i.

var. a

i'E+)ELVVLF RE€e>^
Var.

N^D

J-NEREBEYLD MONETA
Var. Pellet in centre

Hereb'ald.

:

pellet

in centre.

Wt. 191.

19

^E4-)ELVVLF RRX
Var. Pellets in
field.

^NVNBEANT NONET
Wt.
22-6.

Hiinbearht.

20

»1«ERFLVVLE OE«^

I-NVNBETXNT MONET
Wt.
[PI. II. 2.]
20-0.

Type
21

ii.

«I«E4")ELVVLF

REX

1

+D17\R

MONETA
Wt. 17o.

Diar.

Far. Pellets in type.

|

[PI. II. 3.]

Type
22

iii.

>I*E+)ELVVLFE

RE^

Var. Pellet in type.

•^NEBEEA M0NET7\ DOR
Wt. 190.

Hebeca

?

23

Wt.
24

18-5.

Var. Order of letters in anjles of
cms.?
[PI. IT. 4.]

[CNTY]
Wt. 190.

AETHELWULF.
Reverse.

15

Moneyer.

Sertes B.

Without Name op Mint.
Type

iv.

25

J-AEOELVVCF REX

I

^EANp>ALD MONETA
Wt.
19-G.

Eanwald.

I

[PI. II. 5.]

Type
26

V.

^E+)ELVVLF RE: X

J-DIAR

I

lONETA
Wt.
19-4.

Diar.

27

REX
L-F

•J-I-EREBEALD

MOhET
Wt. 207.

Herebeald.

28

MVIANNA MONETA
Wt.
19-0.

Manna.

29

L-F

^OJMVMD

MOIN/ET
Wt.
21-2.

Osmund.

30

L-F

^0$MVND MONETA
Wt.
[PI. II. 6.]
20-5.

31

'fTORH->ALD MOhET
Wt.
18-7.

Torhtwald.

Type
32

V. var. a.
I

•^SEOELVVLF REX

•i^OEEIDENTALlVM
Wt. 200.

Xo

Mone3'cr.

I

[PI. II. 7.]

33
Var. Pcllot opposite each limb of

Wt

20-2.

smaller cross.

Type
34

vi.

^E+)ELVVLF REX

I

t.DEIHEVH MONETA
Wt.
23-3.

Deineali.

I

[PI. II. 8.]

Type
35

vii.

^E-DELVVLF REX

I

fO^MVND MCNETA
(Hlul<cli.)
!».]

Osmund.

I

[PI. IT.

10

WE8SEX.

No.

AETHELWULF.
No.

17

18

AETHELWULF.
Reverse.
Muncj'cr.

19

4<AEOELVVLF REX
Var.

^MAN-:

\A\L

MO

N

ETA
^O'O.

Manna.

Head

iliadt-mcd.

Wt.

^TIRVA LD MO N ETA
Wt.
22-7.

Tiruald.

I-TORHT VLF MO
Var.

Toilitulf.
21-0.

Head diademed.

N

ETA
Uerniund.

Wt.

»i«VERMV

ND MO
N

ETA
20-7.

Wt.

Type

xviii.

4-AEOELVVL REX

^BRID TONETS
Wt.
21-4.

Brid.

i^SEOELVVLF REX

^VVILHESH
Var. Tliree pellets around central
letter.

Uuilhoah or
VVilheah.

Wt.
[PI. III. 7.]

20-G.

^f^lLHESH

TOKETS

Var. Tliree pellets around central
letter.

Wt. 180.

Tijpe xix.
. .

EDELVVLF [REX]

I

J-TT^N [NIN] C
(Fragment.)

T

JIaniiiuo.

[PI. III. 8.]

Type XX.

^AEOELYYLF REX

I

-i^DVN

MONETA
Wt.
18-3.

Dun.

[PI. III. 9.]

Type

xxi.

^EOELVVLF REX

I

^BEffCTVND
Wt. 19
0.

Beaf'niund,

[PI. III. 10.]

)>

>)

•i'BEAQT'VND
Wt. 200.

)>

»

4<BEA[L]T'VVND
(IJrokon.)

20

WEflSEX.

Monpycr.

80

EOELVVLF REX

^VVELMhEARP

T

Uuulmhoard.

\Vt. 19-7.

Type
87

xxii.
I

4«SE€)ELYYLF REX

-J-OVN

TONETA
AVt. i:)0.

Dun.

[PI. III. 11.]

88

fSEDELYYLF REX

I

^DYYN TONETff
Wt.
19-2.

Type
89

xxiii.

•I<EOELYYLF REX

I

^EOELHERE
(Chiiii>od.)

ElSelherc.

I

rri. III. 12.]

90

^YYELHI-ESRD
Wt.
18-2.

ITuclhcard

i>r

Uueliiiliciird.

AETHELBALD.

•21

AETHELBALD.
Succ. IN Wessex, a.d. 85G; in Kent, a.d. 858; died a.d. 860 or 8C1.
3Io7ieyers.

Beahmund.

Tarhtulf.

Description of Coins.

No.

Rice. ]{iirim. NoTulf. in \Ve8hkx a. Eicl^'oard Et^elhcre. Uulfl. R^>H. AETIIELBEARHT.) Type ii.?. [Cf. ].l. 2. [Cf.d. . H< rcinund. ? OsluTC. Osbearlit. E?olr. Torhtulf.iI.ald. II(. Bust diademed. Ill Iluubearht. DtuciiHiud. Ebdulf. IN Kent. 801 Moneij<ri<. IManuiiiK. Eailulf. C( nrcd. IV. Degliearht. l)iarniod. Obverse. Cynfrc^].ear.. rinu?> [Uiliio5?]. | Moneyer's name.] • lu Kent. Sct'relS or Sclfrod. inscripcircles. lUiilinniml. PI. fee* a. UiiiltiioTi. Floriated cross with leaf in each anfjle. nf-e . betwceu two circles. Typp. yT]1*icl-.iinl [Cealheard?].. Wilno't) [ E?ered [= ESelred?].. Around. Iliiirniniid [or Uiarmio?>]. ri. dividetl by Around. KTiel-. H(JG. tion between two r. Himboarht]. liair scrijition unbound.fald.. Type xvii. Lialjincpf. Ucainmind or RKtard. Surrey aud Su:>6ex. &c. upon limbs and between angles of cross formed of beaded lines.] (Similar to Aethelwulf. IV. Hunred. Uerniunii? Uilitmund [Uiolitmund].il<l. inscription circles. Luecman or Lyccman ManiDC [Manninc]. between two bust. Ccuuoald. i. Es*ex. CuncfroTi [cf. SekTcd[ = Selfred?]. Turlitimind. ISaill'IDIIIIll Hen'l. Dialla. indi- 1 vided by bust. Sii^clirrc.d. Descriftion of Types. E?elu. Around. mkk a.d.uJKarlit [ = IIercbtarlit ?]. Ciiil. = lino^''']. Bust r. HcTofn. Ulaiiccard.i2 WKH8EX. Reverse. Uunhf-arlit or L'ynbcarht [cf. Oe-laf. E?clui)>. Kaldred.

Wt. i-BmRNV INE MO NETA Wt. It MO NETA Wt. Cfuucald. •I-BEACM VND MO NETA Wt. 12 •J-EVNEFR ED MO NETA Wl. 18-4. Binrnuino. 20-0. Wt. 2 10. BadLiiuiiiil.) y ^EEALE ARD MO I-EENR ED •t'EENVE N ETA 20-t). 18-2. Obverse. 18-8. . •I^BEAHT VND •I^BEAHM VND -I-BIARNVI TO N ETS 22-8. 15 •fOECBEA RR- MO N ETA Dogbcarlit. •i<B7^DEN OO MO N BadeiiolS. 4<BVRNV ALD Dot in cro!S8. Wt. Cealeard. VJG. Biiirmno<l. Type i. Ccnicd. 20-2. Dcalla. : OD MO: N E :-TA Wt. E-T--AWt. Wt. MO NETA Wt. MO euc'h N ETA of Btiiuuald. 18-0. Moneytr. 13 ^EVNEFR ED MO 4^DEAL: L?f NETA Wt. 208. l'J-7. 11 ALD TO N ETA 281t. Bcaj^niiiiKl or liciiiimuiul. 23 Description of Coins. 10 MO N ETA Wt.AETIIELBEARHT. 21G. CllIlc|lo^. anisic (Cliippud. Reverse. •I<AE£)ELBE7\RF REX I^BA DEM > Wt.

24 .

AETHELBEARHT. No. 25 .

26 W'KSHKX. . Nu.

Maiin. tion between two r. IV. &c. E?elrerl.] • Comp. n.d. between two inscription [Cf.. a. Cu^belm. i. Around.d. acroos field. as the preceding but of rude work. Diidda. Obverse. tions enclosed in lunettes. pelkt iu each angle. Heahiiiod. Deneuald. 6. divided l>y Moneyer's name. 871. Hussa. Description of Types. same Cross pattee.] var. IV. inscription between two [Cf. 27 AETHEIiRED Moneyers. see E?d-. divided by three straiglit bust. inscripcircles. uieu a. bust. Elbcre. Bust diademed. IV. Similar: lines icith inscription diiidtd by curved ends. T'eter's at Rouio. Dudd. 3. Dunn. The facade on Ihcsc . l. Type Fa9ade of Christian temple. Toilitmund. the upper and with curved ends. [Cf. tico Type ii. inscripcircles. ri. Slcc. piuliably that of St. IV. Type i. 863. in tliroc lines upper and lower poracross field . Burg^no^. in four lines «S:c. Louis the Ptous. Around. Biaromod. lines .] Type Same.. Buorneah or Biarncah [Boornhae]. Dealla. tion between two r. IMaimiuc. " Xristiano Rcligio " is coins coins of Charlemagne. a. SOU.AETHELUEI) I. circles. Diga. 5. pellet in each angle. Diarulf.. in Wessex. iii. ri. a.d.ulla. Oshere. Hereulf.* Around. Beuriieah]. &c. Uuiiie. Around.. Cross crosslet. I. PI. [Cf. divided by Moneyer's name. Bust diademed. 4 ] lower ones Type iii. Facade of Cliristiau temple.. Around. Ella. circles. Beornhae [cf. Liabiiic[g]. Herebeald. &c. Miel-. in Kent. inscription.

200. Biarneah. Wt. I'J 5.•J8 WEHHEX. ^^EOELRED R EX HhT^EDELRED REX ^TXEOELRED M REX 10 AOELERED REX 4«AE€)ELRED REX 11 . OD MO BIARNM NETA D MON BIARNVIO ETA-. I'y5. No. Type HMO •i<AE+)ELRED RE-i^ BIARNEA NETA Var. liiariunfxJ. 190. 20-8. Moncycr. 19-4. i. DMO Wt. REX HMO Wt.Wt. Var. •i«7^EOELRED REX DMO BIARNMO NETA Wt. ^EOELRED DMO R EX BIARNVIO NETA Wt. Dehobiitiom ok COINH. Seuiich a. With Bcst.

I. 29 .AETHELRED No.

180. ITS. MON Wt. 18-3. IV. . LVLLA: Wt. MON 37 MANNING ETA Maniiinc. 18-4. Wt. MON 29 HEREVLF ETA Herenlf. 33 . EDELRE NETA LD MO 28 l-EREBEA HercbcuM. No. WowytT. :• MON ETA :• Wt. 20-3. Mann. Obvrrae. VVt. 19-7. D 27 MO Wt 10-8. . 18-5. 180. ETA •M-^N.ir. NETA 180. ETA- 32 i<AEOELRED REX MON MANN ETA Wt. [PI. MON. 35 Var. 20 V. Rovcr»e. 10-7.] 3i Var. 17-7. Wt. 36 Tor. Wt.•M) WE88BX. : •: 18-7. MON 30 LIABINL Liabinc. AVt. 31 ^AEOELRED „ LuUa. Wt. 3. MSNN •ETSWt. MON ^n +AE+)ELRED REX EOELRED ETA \Vi. MON MON ETA .

42 ND M TORHTMV ONETA . | XHEAHmOD MT Wt. Cu?. MO Torlitimuid.] : A :• 45 t'AEDELRED REX TORHTM Toilitnnind VKDMON ET Wt.helm. 4. 21 -G.RE [PI. 18-5. 31 No. Obverse.-. Oshore. | +BE0RNHAE Wt. 40 MON 05HERE ETA ND Wt. 20-2. 180. Series B. a. 39 MANINC Wt.MON. 0. Beoruhae. [PI.- Fniiic. Type 44 ii. for. Withoit Bust.AETIIELUEL) I. IV. Miiiipvcr. Wt. 20-5. 17-2. Wt. i>.] See Vol. 21-5. 43 VVlNEi -. IV. Reverse. : A :• •^AEOELRE D REX MMONE TA CVDHEL Wt. . 19-8. iii. 5. Type 46 * Ilcalinind.-ETA-. lG-7. !)». I. MON Wt. 41 TORFTMV NET A Wt. /EDELRE-D REX [I'l. I IV.] Type 47 iii. ^E-€)EL:R-ED. 38 'i'T^EOELRED REX MANINC ETA Var. 200.

elulf. HiiirnUiild. Hunl>erlit. Birnuald. Boga. ste also yElf-. Cerman ? (Canterbury). kc. Eeiiulf or Ecwulf. Buga [= Boga?]. LiiijKuld.I). Drigniund.. AImdcI. Duiiie for Duiiinc. Kaduulf. E^elmund. Ludii or Lnde ILyde']. ])>i(ii'icine. E?el-. Jiiarnuulj. &c.32 WEH8EX. Bosa. yKlfwald or Klfuald. Elhi-n. lluutreS (Canterbury). HIED A.]. BerhtiTC. ESered. = Bereliald or Btrehold]. Cuneulf or Cyneulf. Birnri'd [ = Birnrcd for Biarnrod. Gni-uinc ? Bumhere Bumelm Cenred. (Canterbury. Circsriin or Hoirsirie? CudU'rlit and Cu berbt. (=<« Birnrod. AdiK'iird [Kailuciinl V]. Gu liere. Cui iiulf. E?. Heremund. iE^crrd or Kl'cred (('iintcrburv. Cialniod or Ciolmod [CiolnoT) Ciahilf or Cioluulf. Ikrnuald.aduald. Biarnrcd. \e. Ealduulf. Eiabinr. »*r nlno Ki"rl-. Ida ? ludclbard. Brnnod Biarnrcd?] (Canterbury. BurnualdorByrnuald. Eli (Batli). Hereniod.. Biornrcd (Canterbury). Bfornrcd or lifrnnd (Cauterlmnj). Bi'orniiuuT or Bourniiicr. Kad\ieard [i-f. l)iarald or Diaruald. . Bcrnald. Bri'fard. Hereferd or HereferT* (Canterbury). [< r Biarnrtd ?j (Canterbury f ). yKllHtim or Kirstiin (London). Goda.. Beriuald. E^dred. Diarniund. El'eluine (Canterbury). Eadslan. Elfstan (Canterbury). Fiih-ard. 'jOl. Mmieycrs. Eilelstan [ = E<5el8tuu]. Birnuald. Erieuuald. Jfwld. &c.n. ?]. Biare?. E' elhetih. Franhuld. Ditirhchtt. Dudig. BurijTui'fi. Ferlun ? [for see ^6ered. I'. E? el mod. Dunnine Ktullifhn. IJi'agntan. Gelda. Bercluild or Bcrntald [cf. i5'>cl-. Birued. or Byrnclni. Eebcrlit. Dunna or Dunn. or Dunine (Cantirbury). i'ET'cdntiiu or E?c'lstiin (( aiit( rlmry). A7(diilf [= yErdulf]. (CaiiUrbury). Eaetati [= Eadstan]. see also iE?el-. AdueardJ. ^Criliif [or il':«iliilf ?] (Roieeng). Hireuulf. Aluuiidii ? [AluiiiiM or Luda ?] Kadui aid. A. AELFRED. Edeulf [or Edwulf ?] (Canterbury). &r. Oxford). Hirelxrt or Heribert (Lincoln). Dealla. Elf-. Dela. S7l . Elda. or Byrnhcre. [ IlaMbert- Ileainilf (London)- Hi-beea ? >leliean? Hertliald. Dealine or Dealing. G«Wh-«Z/ [ = Ciolwulf]. Diaruald (Canterbury).]. Sicc.

Sigcstef. | I name. vr. PI. tions enclosed in lunettes. Uuiniger. Siestcf. 33 Simun. Uuynberht Uulfrcd or Uulfre^.] Type Same. inserip- I ]M(ineyer's tiun. Moncyer's name. \>\ Around. VI. VI. vr. Tiruald or Tirueald (Canterbury). Similar: inscription divided lines with curved cnd. PI. inner circle. &c. Same Similar: lunettes broken at I tlio angles. &c. Manninc. I [Cf. cross paltce with circle in centre and wedges in angles. itc. Tilouuine (London). diadonicd. 1-2. Luiihig. rar. inscription between two circles.. ).AELFEED. c. rar. or Liidig. Stcfanus. PI.s. PI. &c. Reginrjfed [Iifging. Tata. Type Bust i. 4. i. Torlitiiiund. h. Osgeard.] Type i. Uuinicr. Obverse. or Wynbcrht. VI. Resaud ? (Canterbury).vr'\. iliaileiiied. [Cf. Reverse. [Cf. across field upper and lower por. Around. ii. Uulfard. Description of Types. Osric. Ludeca Lulla. 0. Tikuoif [Tilouuine ?]. bust.. Similar I : lunettes broken in centre of curve. [Cf.] . Sefre«.] Type i. Wiard. in three lines. var. Sseris ? Samson. Oshcre. Uuinc. Uigbald or Uuigbald. a. Tilcfcin [Tileuinc?]. . divided by r . Same. Tidbald. Osuulf. divided bust.] l>y two Typr Bust r. [Cf. H. Sigeuuald. within and witliout leaves of quatri'roil over whicli. PI. Moclf? Nebeca [Hebeca].

Around. ri litre. Moiitaini's collection is uiiii|ue. crossbar at each angle of . r. Similar I I : no crossbar at angles of lozenge. VI. PI. VI. [Cf.') facimi . Tico rude figures (lifinan Emperrrrf. lie. H'liuire and oimpartmriit cm- moiicyrr's mime. h:nvin (xijiiih) in ruKpn vnnt ill It cimtdiiiinij ti trr/iril *]{ppcif. * Coins ri. a..iineii in first stnick hy Vnleniinian a. . v. inscrip(liadcmod. V. Ac. [Cf. rude hiigt with icings (angel). rar. PI. Climn Type riii4 tiiin r. Opin f/untrff(>il ornnmml trifh rpinlre. 364-375 (sec Vol. in i(irh iinijle of rrfi^n. V.] Type V Bust Around. circles. ahtire. The Mr. iiiscni ip- hitirccn two hy di tided ini l.] iv. I. divided by bust. a] I. 7. Cross pattec within lozenge. fiiil ill raiilrc.d. I j Similar limb of cross moline T* at each side of lozenge. .] Type Sanio. PI. Revene. 8] h.m WKHSKX. VI. p.. a rnitipnrt- iii. . la (soliili) of this typo were spr. vol. : [Cf. lozenge. Around. <1i(i(hmed.iiiii -•">. Type In»rn'])tvm nrruvynl to fnrm n rroRn. [Num. 2. 14. rar. .H^t. [Montftgu Coll. inscription. tion. from each angle of which issues a beaded straight line extending to edge of coin and dividing moneyer's name. in cumpartmetd* iif qu'itre/oil. tin iiuj circle. Type Same. |). gh})e hitween them.

with bust to left. inscrip- Name tion. : [Cf. moncyer's I Name I of mint in monogram iVvrv (Londonia) ornaments in r^\lil : I field. 14. V. [Cf.. in two lines across field ornaments in field. PI.. [Cf. 1. diademed.. PI. Around. Obverse. 7. xi. n. Ac. &c. moneyer's name. ix. Name of mint in monogram (LincoUa) ornaments in (Lin : M^sT field field. 2-6. [Cf. Around.] • A Penny of It is described in the Sale Catalogue. V. in.\y\j}) er's name. Around. iv. Very rudo bust name. r. tion in circles. inscripfour divisions between two Name of moneyer in monogram Par between name of mint (I. PI. diademed. [Num.] Type Bust r. Chron. IV. Around.* of mint in monngrnni fVvpv (Londonia) ornaments in r^slj/ : field. of mint in monogram |Vvr\ (Londonia) between money.] Type vii. IH66. V. this type.. Rude diademed.] Type viii. 8] Type Small cross pattee. 189. Around. Type Bust r. inscrip- Name tion. bust Around. X. of barbarous fabric. vi. r.] Type Small cross pntt^e. PI." B EcoUa) in two lines across Held. 35 Reverse. iti ttrn lines across field : small cross paU€e before arid after monogram. inscrip- Name tion in four divisions. [Cf. D 2 . No. 8..AELFRED. PI. 1870. V. of mint in monogram {Londonia) between moneyer's name. was in tlie Murchison Collectii'n.

Around. PI. 11-1. &c.] Tyjic XV. in two lines ornament-. Moneyer's name. inscripcircles. Ol»ver«e. : two lines in three or four divisions. ornaments. Eadmund between two [Cf. IV. 12] xiii. Reverse. name of circles.'u. Type Around. tion between two xiv. [Cf. IV. (lioisong ?) Ixdwcen nionfjtT'H &c. VI.] Type xvi. PI. V. rar. 9-10. a. VI. two circles. I [Cf. divided by three crosses patte'os : mints. Small cross patte'e. Small cross patte'e. I generally I IMoneycr's name. [Cf.] . of kina and mint (Dorolicrnia) boween two circles. 18] xvii. WE8HEX. [Cf. !»-ll. [Cf. across field : See. names of king and mint (Dorobemia) between two circles. V. Small cross patte'e.] TyiK xviii. tion between two Around... St. lG-17. PI. in-nriji Namn of mint in monosrrain ^t^ niiiiK-. inscripcircles. Same.] Type Similar: xiii.. 8.. PI. n. name of kin^ only. 10. 'J'ljlii' xii- \\un\ r Artniml. ri.^).] Type Small cross patte'e. Around. namoa Small cross pattc'o. PL Type VI. Arc. Around. ri. in two linos across fielil. divided by three crosses patte'cs. Names in of king and mint (Orsnaforda) oinathree lines across iiehl : IMoneyer's name.ingles [Cf. [Cf. V N T cross*: at extremities of even-limlx>d REX in . &c.. inscrip- tion in three divisions and between IMoneyer's name. 1 i In centre yj^. in two lines across field. VI. Aroimd. in two lines acroaa field. in across field ornaments.

Tyjie xix. IV. PI. V. "P limbs extended by beaded lines to edge of coin dividing name of mint. Name of king. inscrip tion. [Cf. in four lines across I field. It is figured in the -Yum. inscrip circles between two and fre Moneyer's name and mint (Ba'^an) in two lines across field ornaincnts. 7. li'2. Bust r. Around.AELFRED. lint-a orna- name. vol. PI. p. IV. ((. : [Cf. * In the Cuerdale find was a Halfpenny of this type. &c. divided by long cross on two steps.] Ty2)e xxiii Small tion cross patte'o. 11.. Names in of king ami mint (OrsnaforJa) across field : Monoyer's throe ments. It is a debased imitation. 12 and V. PI. sideways pellets in angles of cross oruameuts. : [a. 13. &c..] Tyjie xxi. in two linea aeross licld. PI. [Cf.. V. pellets. : [Cf. &c. PI. Reverse.. in two lines across field in field.Ucawaceaster). 13. I of moneyer.. v. diademed. Around.* . &c.] Type XX. 37 Obverse. IV. I First three letters of mint (Exanccaster and Winccaster) in pale ornaments. . &c.] no steps. 14-15. in four lines across I Name field. : quently in three divisions. Cliron. the cross having and the legends being blundered. Name of king.] Tyi^e xxii.

«8 WEHHKX. Dewchiition ov Coins. . Obvorito. No.

AELFRED. . 39 No.

40 No. . WESSKX.

AELFRED. 41 . No.

.42 No. WESaEX.

AfiLFREt). 43 Ne. .

. WE8HEX.44 No.

AELFRED. 45 . No.

.10 WESHEX. Nil.

[PI. in O . O Wt. 88 23-8. 89 25-5. -• . 87 23-4. O Wt. pyramid of dots on left. cross pat- below. 230. relkts above. cross .. . 2. Wt. O. 90 23-5. pellet only in alA)ve. alx)vc.] Type 84 vi. cross patte'e. AELPRED. V. 92 One O . 240. Wt.. • No Moneyer. 8G /elfre::: D rex Pellets in O ftbove and on left. [Londuu.] 85 Wt. /ELFR ED REX Pellets in above. b^Viy in • • . 250. pattoe below. •!• Wt. >CrhRD REX [V.(N (LONDONIA). below. 91 /E „ Pellets ttic . Wt. 250. V. . pyramid of dots below. 3. Kcversf Moneyer. /ELFR ED REX Pellets in above. cross pattec below. pyramid of dots.. cross patte'c below. • on left. LONDONIA.] . "^ I) >> )> Wt.. • • Wt. [ri. 243. ..

.48 No. W ESSEX.

.] (LONDONIA). 22-2. cross patte'e. D REX (LONDON seen. ELFR E Pellets in O.-. Reverse. Uncertain. •'. V... Type vii. on left. Pellets in above. V 7. pellets in below. I A) partly No Moneycr. •! . O below.-).• BOLT \y\^ I (LONDONIA). O ELFR. /ELFR I Pellets in alx)ve. ED RE-i* [PI. AELFRED. Fragments. FR Halfpennies. /ELFRED RE m [PI. 107.. V. cross patte'e.] No ornaments field. on left Wt. Above nn<l below. Moneycr. 49 Obverse. . Wt. below. No jMoneycr. (Parbarou. in ELFR + Crossline of N runs upwards .. . . . G. 8-0. LF IE No pellets in :• O . cross patte'e.. EX Below. cross patte'e .1 . O . Wt.^.) [PI. "EROT . /EL.

Aljove /ELFR-t- 4^ED REX IV)[^ J. Y. 22(). TILEVINE IIG 4-7\ELF RED REX Tilouino. 117 /ELF. Jl. 28-2. ^ 4^ 120 •o:RSNA BERII7X i" "^ "^ ( Bemald /EFRED>^ F^b. M0NETA Wt. 8. cross puttue. ORSNAFORDA..RBA = Bemuald). ll'. (Bcmuald ?). TtLDMO Wt.r' ix.50 WK8HEX. Wt. 22-5. lS-3 . .']' 22-0. Kcvcree. VVLF424 0. [yS^y monogram.t •9-RSHA BERIV J< ELFRED'I' F-4-RDA ALDM^. 1 [PI. lis •4-RSN7\ BERIV Boriuald /ELFRED F^o:RDA [PI.] Type xviii. [Oxford. TiJi. V. ! ^TAN \Vt. Ill /ELFR:- !- ED RE AELF-i- /Elfstftn. ALDIO Wt.... Heauulf. 9.) Uncertain. \Vt.] |-£AE^ 115 Vur.. Moneycr. EX (Fragment.

No. 51 .AELFRED.

131 l.li 133 134 135 136 137 138 13!) 140 .52 WESSEX. <i|)vor»e.

^ ORSNA ELFRED FOR DA BERIIV i* ALEDI ^ i* Wt. 22-5. 21-2. ^^ OHiilA BI3FIIV a3ydi3D hORDA ALDMO Wt. ^ ORSNA ELFRED FOR DA •6-RSl/IA BERIIV ALRDIIO Wt. ALDIIO OVSII7S BERHV ELFRID"^ F-6)RD7^ ALDUO Wt. i* t' ^ •o-ABIIA XEFFRED FiZcollV Ji vrano Wt.J. 20-0. ^^^ BERIIV •^ 4^ 4^ ELFRED^ F-»RDI ALRIIO Wt. 207. 20-4. 53 Obverse. Blvndeuki) Pennies. 22-0.AELFKED.I< F-9-RDI Hh ^ Wt. •*RCV)HA BERIV 4« . •9-RcoHA BERIIV •I* ELFRED. ^ 4^ . 20-7. amd33 FiaiA ALDNO Wt. :b::RSHA BERIIV J* !< ELFRED«i« F«:RDI ALDIIO Wt. ilouej-er. ELFRED^ F-9-RDI ALEDIO Wt. 20-9. 21-8. iwmi BERNV 4^ Bernuald. 22-1.

. WESSEX.54 No.

Without Name of Mint. Wt. Reverse. PINCEASTER. 55 Obverse. 13.AELFRED.] Type xxi.kel No Moneyer. Moneyer. FREDR EX SAX OMVM [PL V. 156 4*. 158 159 . [Wincliester. 24-6.) Series B.] 157 ^AEL [F]RED R [EX]SAX (Fragment.

.56 WKSflEX. Type i. IlcvcrHC.. N. • MJ^N• IGO I-aelbred:-: rex l-BO • SA : ETA- IGI :••• REX 1G2 •i^AELBRED RE 16:5 REX lOi ^AELFRED: REX 165 »i<AELBRED: REX 166 167 n ty 168 ^ELFRED REX 169 •i^AEBBRED REX .

AELFRED. 57 No. .

.) LVL LA-.] 5. ISO }<7\---ELFRED REX I I I 4<DI AR MV ND Var. Cross opposite each side of lozenge. (Fragment.-.] • D M • [O E«ered? NET|A (Fragment. ViSD lo- Torhtmund.) Uncertain. Var. Oj)posite one side of lozenge. (Fragment. . No. VI.^ Dunna. i7y [Hh?^ELFRJED REX [EO ERJ E [PI.S7\X EOLE M ETA small cross. ETA [I'l. 15 VI. of bead- Ends dl line [PI. 10-3.58 WESSEX. Wt. Diarmund.• Wt. 6. 22-2. Wt. 17-0.] floriated. T///)e ii. 185 . 7. 182 D REX-:. Revenc.) 186 D R LVV (Fragment.) LF MON ET Uncertain. Lulls. 181 ^/ELFRE D REX $ DVI/1 \A7\ -. Opiiosite each side of lozenge. VI.- MOH ETA (Broken. 184 ELFRE D REX ^OT RH TM Var. Var.- MON ETA Wt. Var. E^elmod.) Tyjye v. ED REX $AX (Legend undivided. o.) 183 +7XELFRED REX SAX (Legend undivided. Obverso. . Moncyer. Dot opposite each side of zenge. MON 178 AELBRED RE^* 4-DVINC Duinc (Duniuc?).

No.AELFRED. 59 .

No.60 we8sp:x. .

AELFRED. No. 61 .

240. Oriia24-4. 218 Var. ment. AEL FRE DREX BVRN ELM-tWt. BVRH ELM4< Wt. 225 TlfEL FRE DREX-: [PI.] 22(. 24 4.. 21'> Wt. 240.-'. 2H-5. 222 ^ „ „ „ „ BVRN EREA Wt. 223 20-5. 24 220 4^ 0. OinaWt. 221 I-EL FR ED RE BHNH ERE Wt. 11. EL FRED RE Wt. VI.62 W ESSEX. 224 7\EL . -hr-L FH ED RE BVGn MON Wt. •'. 260. No. '217 RcvcrM.- Wt. V(tr. Z(EL FRE DREX BVRN EL FR ED REX 228 +/EL FR ED RE . Obverse. '. mintn. 24-4.

No. 63 .AELFKED.

64 .

65 .AELFRED. No.

m No WEHSEX. .

. (J7 No.AELFRED.

08 NVKSSEX. . No.

AELFRED. . 60 No.

LFM* Wt. 21-2. . 22-5. 322 •i«REFDiiRHAED RE' EBRVE EBM* Wt. SIG 4<EL FR ED RE Var. 20-5. OriiainoutH. Ferlun ? 200. 'Mb HhAE LFR ED RE EOELV E«i-lalf.7U No. 220. E^ered. WRRHKX. 21-3. 21-5. Wt. 320 ^EL FR ED RE EOER EDM* Wt. Obrenw. Wt 817 22-7. 23-7. 23 4. 319 4«AE LFR EDR E EDERE DlM)<l/l \Vt. ReverM. 323 ^EL FR ED RE FER LVN AVt. 81» 4«EL ER ED REX Wt. 821 >> >> »> EOERE DM + N AVt. Moncyer 811 +EL FR ED RE EOELV HEM* Wt.

ii 3f\Q3 f\3 J3J{ . » „ 32G ^ .. » „ „ 327 ^[EL FR]„ „ 328 320 EL XH RE ED 330 4^EL FR ED RE 331 ^EL FR ED RE 332 fEL FR ED RE 333 3..AELFRED. 71 Obverse. No. 321 ^EL FR ED RE 325 ^ „ .

. N. ()l)vcriic. HS/i XEL FR ED RE !t3).WESSRX. 339 ><EL „ „ „ 310 341 4<ELF RED RE-:- 312 ><EL FR ED RE 343 «i«EL FR ED RE 314 ^E LF RE DRE 315 •l-AID ID D RE 31G •I-EL ED ED RE ... Hh .. 837 338 ^ELX.

No.AELFRED. 73 .

3G1 05VV Osuulf. J<EL ER ED RE AA0EL IHOINr Wt. S/ERIS IHIVI Saaris? Wt. Lulla.1 . » SI M VN Wt.) EL FR ED REX LVDIC Wt. ELFRED REX 5 LVLLA MOMET 30li Wt.jGi 180. EL FR ED RE 05VVL FMOM AVt. 3G7 •JhEL FR ED RE OiVVL FMOUE Wt. Obverse. 20 0. 23. R7\V Wt. LFMO Wt.. .71 WE88EX... 12 8. RcVCfHC. 20 7. 3G'J 20-2. •MO LVDIC MON \Vt. Monoyer. VI 13. EL FR ED REX ZILE Sigcuuald. X)'. 3G8 23-9. 24 0. MEFEt[I'l. 230.1. 30(3 . Simun. „ REX o$vv FMON Wt. . Moelf? •M:i ^'EL FR ED RE • Uncertain. Ni. 365 23-2. 370 » » )» 22-5. 20-8. VVSLD Wt.

TILE • VVNE Wt. 23 375 •->.AELFRED. ELFRE DR EX Wt. vvine.Wt. uoie ^EL FR ED RE tile:- (Tileuuine ?). 377 EL ER ED REX TILE-. TILE : Tileuuiiic. 380 381 AELFRED RE 382 "t-EL FR ED REX . 371 EL FR ED RE ztf:- Stefuuus.- 37S I-EL FR ED RE 379 Var. AMVS Wt. 372 19-4. Til. No. Four pellets aiouud cross. 370 25-0. 75 Reverse. Moncyer. 373 19-3. IOC. VOIE Wt. % „ „ „ „ TILE VVNE Wt. 21 374 0.

No. WESSKX. 3SG +EL ER E[D] RE 387 +EL FR ED RE 388 389 ^ „ 3U0 >> >i >> 301 EL FR ED RE 392 ^ „ 393 4-ELFRED RE .EL FR ED RE asi + . :{85 4* . 883 4.76 Olivcrsc..

AELFRED. . No.

. /EL FRE-. Rcvcnie. 230. 24 409 0.- DRE Var. I-AE LFR EDR E VVLF REDM Wt. 412 i«REIH^m EXI VVLF RIEDI ^ 413 •i«EL FR ED RE 414 ^EL FR EDRE 415 •i'EL FR ED RE 416 I-/EL F REDRE . ObvcMc. 23 7.78 No. 408 /EL FRE DRE VVLF RED Wt. WE88EX. Wt. Oinamcnts. 22-8. . . 23-2.-. 411 J^/EL FR ED RE ^JVV Wt.Wt. •J07 /EL .FRE DRE VVLF RED-. Moni-yer. 23 410 6. 400 Hh/EL FR ED RE VVLF RED^J* Wt.

So.AELFRED. .

FR ED . \AR\B Bimuald Wt. . Cudberht? ERHT 14] 430 . WERBKX. 438 ^/ELFRFDEE EADV VT^LD Eailuuald. RHT DVDIG -^ ! 431 4-.I-ri:NNIE8. 9 0. Wt. ELF FD REX laVD Tiaa Wt. Rcvcnto. . ED RE D RE Dudig. 43G 9-5. . VI. Wt 7-7. . 437 7-4. 100. 428 L FR ED. ? "IQM-f [PI. Moncycr. Uulfred ? T^EL . 434 4-EL • RF • DRE • . VI. REX 1 VVLF Halfpennies. . ^•ELFBDENAba (Inscription reatlinj: ritrlit to kit. . ERHT Wt.] 435 ^/ELFR ED HE EVDB Cudberht. ..80 Obrewe.) DRVI ADII-f Unrortaiu. VRNV Byrnuald ? MX 429 ^'EL [PI. No. .. . 432 433 COD j God a. Fhagmenth oil IlAI. 15. from luluw.

AELFRED. 81 . No.

.82 No. WESSEX.

FriMberhf. Gundherlit. Beornuuald. &c. . Berlitred.>i/or. Garulf. &c. Biornhelm [= Byrnelin]. Ear ward. liinard. Oslac. ? Boiga]. lua. Eofrmund.( «3 ) EADWEARD THE ELDER. see purhtc. Deoramod. ^iehed. Beornred or Biornred. A«ulf. JE^elstan. Badda. Moneyers. ? Osulf. Deornrtd [ = Beornred?]. Eadmuiul. ? Adualcl. Landc-B ? Cudberbt. SCCC. Eclaf or Ellaf? Edelgar. E^elwulf Faniien. 901 . Et'ile. BryMwald. [ = Bryhtwald?']. Lioflielm. ?]. Herebald. Eaduuald. Onlulf. Boga. &c. Eignmnd. . Clip. Eielstan. Heremfretia H( rcmod. Biorhald [Biornald? = Bt'orniaudd?'}. or Biuinuuald.^Sered [iE«elred ?]. Odn. 7Vj. JSScluuine. Durlac. Dryhtwald Dudig. &c. Cutfer^ ? Lanfcr. Igereii. liiunard. Fri^. Gaeald ? Gareard. AiehiJf. Ciolulf. Gtinter. &c. FrioUdf. Byrnelm. Crjnestan. Boiga. AD. Berngar. Biornard. Grimwald. Buga [cf. Abba. iE^elfred Eared [Eadred ?]. Eardwulf. Hadebald or Ha^ebahl. ? He^ul? IIIt nfred. see also ESel-. 925. Byrnard. Deoruuald. Beahstan. DIED A. Earnicidf. Agnes. Magiiard. &c. [= Beornrod ?]. Eadered or Eadfrcd Eadhelm. Alhstan or Ealbstan. Gunne. Brece or Brege. AdalberJit. Eicmimd. Beornuidf. ^^eluulf. lofermimd. ^8el-. Deora. or Burden Bumelm Cenhriht. Mann. Fri^eberbt. Bermiuald. Ealbstan.D. Sec. Hunlaf. Diora {^Deoramod ?] Dcorniod. Heardber. Beomfert. ritit. EaiL-idf. Irfara. Rrogenulf. Framuuis. Briht {London). Beamed [= Bcornred Beornere. [see iE«cluulf]. Marbert.

Twin. U'tween two field. crosses. Uuarmor. PI. field . tSrc. Turhthdm. iSim/«[rt/<Z ?]. purlac. in four lines across field. Around. lines &c. &c. . in two lines i'c.. Stear. see Etilc. PI. pellets. VII. Moneyer's across name.. symmetrically arranged in [Cf.] Type Small cross pattc'c.] field. Sip-t. r. lUf. Around. PI. \Valt<rc. VII. field. PI. symmetrically arranged in [Cf. VII. 1.] . Type iv.. &c. pellets. Obverse. Uulf-^'iir. Moneyer's across name. Unl/nlge. Wan'mcr [= Uuarmcr]. Reverse. 10. Uuealdhclm. 11. Uil/rf'd •> Hiplirnnd. [Cf. ornaments. 6-9. 2-5. iii.. [or Riomred f]. Type Name of king. pellets. First three letters of mint across field above and below. Uulfli. field . Tilii [or Tisa"]. crosses. Uuilhif\_UyUa']. ^\' ill' gear.] Type Bust.84 Itiornhed ? WE88EX. &c.jard [Uulfanl]. Utwfred [Uun/rcdy}. Moneyer's across name. Bymmetrically arranged in [Cf.. ( 11 Uiiak'inan alhnan). in two inficription between two circles. IJulfrcd. &c. Uvid)crht or Wynbcrbt. 1. Description of Types. field. inscription circles. tion between two circles. VII. Rude bust. inscrip- ii. Around. in two lines crosses. Wujhard. generally diademed.

Soc. Around. cross patte'e. a. PI. Soc. var.ficlJ and [Cf. in. . circle. dec. VII. [Trans. Obverse. above and below.] Type viii. star of eight rays pom- VIII 1] . above and below. 1864. below [Cf.] Type Small tion vii. across between two lines. I butweeu two | Moncyer's name. Chester Arch.scrip Moncyer's name across field . inscripcircles. PI. Around. [Cf. Around. . mes. inscrip- Moneyer's name.. divided by saltire formed of rosette and four bn rs pomm^s . cross patte'e. vi.] Type Rosette icithin circle. VII. 186i. divided by pellet between two rosettes of dots . abovo between two ami beluw.. tion. 13. I I Similar no lines above ami muneyor'd name. I Moneyer's name across field.EADWEARD THE ELDER. Small tion cross patteo. [Trans. enclosing pellets. Around. I V. 12. in two lines across field. Chester Arch. circles. 85 Type Small cross 2Mtt^e within inscription. &c. curved lines pommes. vii..] Type Same. ri..

VIII. tion between two xiii. in field.. across field cross. by building 14] Type Small cross pattoe. tion between two Around. above bird l.] Type Rose formed by cross pomme'e with Voided centre over Aruuiul. Type Around. [Cf. 7 and 16. ix. feeding fn/m branch (Dove and olive brunch) . field.. Moneyer's name. field. [Cf. moneyer's name..] Type l^mnU crosf patt&. &c. MoDcyer'a nnmfi. in two lines moline. Moneyer's name. Moneyer^ a name across field. inKcrlption : Wtiveen tiro circles border of dots. acroBS uiounted or ilividtd by sign. &c. '" border of dots. voided in centre. PI. inacrip Hniall croHB imlU-c. Moneyer's across name. I I xi. .] Type Small cross pattoc. : [Riul. Obvcrao. VIII. inscripcircles. inscripcircles. across field above. between two ' circles. cross patte'e. on w^hich church below. Reverse. inscription cross i xiv. 16. below.. lino. PI. in two lines divided (fa9ade of church?). ri. . tion between two xii. Bur- floral de- VIII. between two circles dividing legend above and below. . &c. A. Around. &c.. 8(1 WESSEX. n..* [Cf. &c.. VIII. liou botwutn two circles. Around. 2-9. 15. Hand of Providence from clouds. Till. [Cf. 13. PI. PI. inscrip circles. Around. 10-12] Type Small cross pattc'o. [Cf. 16] • This fafade much resembles the type of the Prsetorian Gate on coins of Constantine the Great and hie successors.

87 No.EADWEARD THE ELDER. . Description op Coins.

EDM~0>^ "\Vt. VII. ^^ ^ 24 7. VLFMO Wt. 24-5. ^ .88 No. 12 «5<E7SDVVEXCRD REX /EOER ^^^ EDMO Wt. 21-5. 2. WESSEX. Moii'-yr. HhETXDVVET^RD „ AEBEL *A^ *A^ *i* VVLFMO Wt.f.J . 27-4. 13 I<E7\DVVE7XRD REX >) 14 » /EOER EDMO 15 EZfDVVEARD REX /EOER EDMO IG 17 'i'EADVVEARD REX BEAHX 4^ >!-< iXi TAN MO [PI. ^E«DVVEZ[RD „ TJOEL't' VLFM"© Vit. ^^ 24 2. •pEADVVEARD REX AOEL+ |h iE«cluulf. 11 E7\DVVE7\RD REX /E€)ER ^^^ EDMO>i< Wt. 10 ^EADVVEARD „ /ECER •^ Miered. ObvcfBC.

89 . No.EADWEAED THE ELDEE.

No.90 WESSEX. .

Obverse. No.EADWEARD THE ELDER. 91 Reverse. 37 ^EADWEARD RE^ 38 "I'EADVVEARD REX 39 "^EX^DVVETJRD REX 40 41 ^EADWEARD REX 42 ^ETXDVVEARD REX- 43 EZtDVVETXRD REX 44 45 46 .

02 WESSEX. . No.

No. 93 .EADWEARD THE ELDER.

94 WE88EX. . No.

MONE Wt.'. * * • 7G DVDIG Dudig. VLDUO Wt. VISM-O Wt. Biornuuald. 25-7. 8'2 GRIMP •^ •!• Grimwftld.'.EADWEAED THE ELDER. 79 i«EADVVEARD REX FRAMV J* 4* I' Frnmuuia. ^ 4. VII. 81 ^EADVVEARD REX DARE Qaroard. 4^ ALDM'O Wt. . 4< . 2t-3. ERNT^ Wt. 7. 6.) <i* • 78 »i<EADVVEARD REX ealh's 4* Ealhstan. ARDM"0 Wt. Reverse. 95 «i<EADVVEARD RX ^ BIORW 1^ . 19 [PI. 27-7. (Double struck. 24-8. 80 ^3flaflA3VVaA3>i< viiAflk' •J" ^ •t' OIISIV Wt. [PI. TANMO Wt. 23 4.) 77 I^EADVVEARD REX DVDIC 4* !< "^ MON . J. ^ 4" . VII. 24-5. 75 •i^EADVVESRD REX CVDB Cudberht. • (Broken.'.] 25-4.J.] 3.

.on WESSEX. No.

EADWEARD THE ELDER. 97 . No.

.98 No. WEBSEX.

] 110 •i«EADVVEARD • REX IR FA Irfara. Vm. »i<EADVVEARD REX AL HJ TA N • Var. No. [PI. •i^EADVVEARD REX EA DV Eadmund. •i^EADVVEARD REX [PI. vfithout nimbus. VVLFLAR Wt.] Type 109 xii. 105 "J-EADVVEARD REX OiVLF Above and below. Wt. MO witli crucilbrm nimbus. VIII If). 240. 99 Reverse. I'^ulfgnr. Wt. 108 D X MO DM »i< DE or Var. Type 106 xi. m ND [PI. RA MO Wt. 251!. A«ulf. 9. VIII. [PI. VIII.] 24-4. Hand open.] 24-6. curved branches forming 3.] 107 R REX A Q L Var.EADWEAED THE ELDER. 11. Osulf. [PI. VIII. VIII. 10. 13.] II 2 . Hand open.] 'Type 111 xiii. Wt. VIII. 18 4. and fingers Wt. 21-8. Obverse. [PI. Hand giving benediction (La- Deormod. Monevcr. 12. [PI. tin— third fourth closed). V F Z wt. 24 C. Alhstan (Ealhfitan). 14.

No. .100 WE8HEX.

Bernard Alfred (Wareham). Beorneard]. see also Elf-. JHiered (Chester. [cf.Sknu-sbury). Alet. Beorhtidf or Biorhtulf (Batli. A^elmod A^elmund. (Langport. iESelwold cester). Mlfno-f>.( 101 ) AETHELSTAN.D. Cenapa or Cnapa (Chester).ondf. Btrngar. Arnulf. Biorhtric.d. Berhtelm [Berhtliel] Byrhthehn. Barifer^ \_l>(irnj'erd !']. [cf. Barbo (Norwich). JE^elstan [yE^elstaii]. A^ulf ( Winchester). Diarnwdd. Boiga or Boigalet (Chester. Domences. (London). A^elwnlf ( Winrlirster). Cristign. lic. Eadiaf or Eadiilf (Chester). (GlouCenherht or Enberht (Shrewsbury). Byruwald (AValliugford). JE^elred (York). Bconiwald and Byrnwald (Wallingford. Abonel (Hertford. Dart[cf. Brylituald. Dcorulf or Diorulf (Chester). Abba [= Abun Abun (Exeter). JElfric or Elfric (Canterbury). Ecgkcrd (Sh rtwsbury). Beorard Eardulf (Oxford. Eadmund or Edmund ((Jln:ator. Burdel [= Bardel?} (Norwich). Alfeah. mouth'). JBSelmod [ASclmod]. Cyneivald. Jb'iehioTS or E«elnoT> (Derby. Asalf or Asulf. ?] (Chester). &c. borough). (Chester). Warchani). Siirewslmry). JE^elsige (Cwderhury). Adelbert ( York). Biarnmrd. &c.^ helmed?] (Winclioster). Stafford). Clad? CnaTi ? (Chester). Bardel or Burdcl (Norwich). Derby). died a. Deorerd (Chester). Burnhelm. Beorncard] (Chester). Biorhtivald [= Bryhtuald]. Biorneard. uElfntan (I. Ealkst. Aielm ( [A<5elraod or A<5elmund] WalUmjford). Muldon). Ha«elwold] JE^elicine (Shaftesbury). Enrnnlf. Eadgar (Norn-irk). &c. A^elwold. see Bcrlitelm. (York). Arc [Ere ?].n). Succ. Ihdd trine. Beahrcd or Ih-anred (London). Eel H Tilt (York). &c. ?). Burneld. Eadulf. Balilric. 9i0 or 941. 925. [ = Dominicusl Borlfe? Drylituald [= Bryhtuald?]. ^Ifwald (London). Clac. Berhtelm] (Ward- jE^elberM. Amclric (Winchester). A. Duriaiit. see also AiSel-. A«el-. jESclfcrS (Canterbury). London). Credard.in. ^^elra [. Begn. Eadqild (dniferhury). Eadric (Lewes Eadstun. Cugeli ? Cugem ? Cunidf. Arnalf. Notting- Bus? Byrhtehn. Moneyers. see also vESel. . Burhtehn [cf. Cialelm. Eclaf or Ellaf (London). Alhstan. ham). Bernere. JE^cl-. Dominic. Belcja or Brlfje. Mlfwine MU-. Deoruuidd.

Panics or Paulus (Chester). Oslac [= Oslaf ?] (Chester). Sigedrald ? Sigefer?) (Chester). Smahi. Man. Grimicald {London). Binkdd [= Regnald?). Tiotes or Totes (Chester). Kcgnald. &c. Elfric. Tamworth). Frotgcr. Otic (Wincheeter). Oda or Odo. Hrodear [ = HroSgar] (Norwich). see JTnrstan. Norwich. &c. Sigfold[es]. lohann. Steland. Manne. Fmrd [= Efrard] (Chester).'e Ei'liif. Klranl Phnnrd. MegenfreiS (Canterbury). (Exeter. Genard [= Conard?] (Exeter). raid. »ev ftlHo Elhif. Turstan. Elfwie. Begengrim. lUdulf lllildulf]. Gota. Sota.ihI. Fri^ehriht. Hcldalt (York).102 E<lr<<l WESSEX. «ee MUrio. Nybahl (Shrewsbury). MM: London. i>.rgenrede (Derbij). Tda. Regnald. Uulfstau or Wulfetan (Chester) . Pitit. Oxford). Rotborht (York). J^iiqiUHrht. Hunric. (("I. or A^el-. Igere or Here (London). Megrt'd (Chester). Jlde})erht. (Chester). Stefan us. (Shrewsbury). Ingelric (Oxford). Bcinere. Magnard. see Exgencdd. Litihuan (London). No?ier. Salces ? (Exeter). Hiiugar. Landac? Lei\tric ( Wincliester). Sprone ne. S>gar\_es'}. ? Gareard (London). Snel (CItester). (Chester). Giongbald (Norwich). Ha>olwold [^Selwold?]. Fre^<ird.hl7 [= IlaTSelwold or Mf>ii\- Euferimmd. Garidf. Ua^elberht [JETSelberht?}. Giencea ? Benard or Binard Boghard. Torhthehn (Canterbury). Tidger. Elf-. IlngenaJd. Gisl Gislemer. Fulrad. &c. &c. Faicle [Pawlo?] (London) Folcred. Liofliehn (Lomlon). Etram {Canti^hury). Ismll= Snel?]. Fram. M(Cf-ehr<. Mali. Sigeicidf.ij7.YoTk). Uulfgar (Chester). «ee ^Xcl-. Ele? (^Lnmlon). Oswart. Herebtar? Horntod. i/()i*/. Inga. &c. Kifillxrhl lluigilbcrhl ?]. Mon«ign [Mon pegn ?] (Warwick). E/ermund. Hargi'r [= Hcrigar?]. Frotierm Fugel. Unilric. Osulf (Chester). Mantian (Norwich). luiiplberht. Sihares (Derby). Landac. lljcgcnulf and Rsenulf (Chester. Tidgar. E?>el-. Liting. [Fadrod] (Shrowsbury). Hunlif (Hereford). &c. . Uulfsig or Uulfsige. Manna. Siuard [=Siward] (York). Sigebrand. Begenicard (Oxford). (Canterbury. Oslaf. (Xoncich). Manninc. higellwrld.Brjc. Uuealdhelm. V Mn^ldomon (ChoBtcr). H. woldV](Oj/orr/). Miurtcn (Chester). Frofger (Shrewsbury). Uulfhoard (Winchester). Uuilluf or UuiUaf (Shrewsbury). see Sandae. ?] (Chester). TT'inchester). ILni<'(r>ath). Eranl [= Efmrd Ere (London). Sigeland (Exeter.t).

Type L Small cross pattee. [Cf. X. n. 2 & X. [Cf. PI. Wyltsig. Around.] Type V. Small cross pellets. IX. Description of Types. &c. pellets.] . &c. Same. Uuynsige (Langport). Welnberht. the [Cf. Type V. 7. Moneyer'e name. Witil. across field . [Cf. Wulfhelm (London). Moneyer's Around.. Small cross pattee. above and below or wholly Ixlow . Small cross pattee. IX..] I I Type V. inscripfield three pellets between above tion between two circles. Type Star of six points.n-iri-bs I IX. 1. var. X. name. &c. Reverse.] ii. PI.. Around. Around.] .. [Cr. &c. I h. II. Around. inscription between two [Cf.] IX. TPdelric {Oxford). Same. across field. floral ornament. purstan {Lincoln). I'l. PI. 103 Winele. Obverse. circles. Cross pattee voided. field. Moneyer's name in two lines across Small cross patte'e. 8. tween two [Cf. between two circles. a. 3. and below. . between two pellets. inBcrii)tion becircles. inscription between two circles. Uuynelm (Oxford). Wihtemund. in two lines &c. &c. PI. inscriptiun between two circles. in two lines crosses. lino. Wiard (aiester). Straight line dividing field alwvo.AETHELSTAN. inecripbetween (w. pellets. var. crosses. Wilne. inscription building (church ?) moneyer's name. . lidu Around. inscripSmall cross pattee. Type iv. patt(fo surrounded by four Around. 5-6. 9. purine.] Type iii. symmetrically arranged in field.. tion between two circles. symmetrically arranged in X. PI. Wilebald. Wimund. Wul/man or Uulfnuin. Around. (Stafford).

] I [Cf. var. vii.. Type Same.] Type Bu. Smnll cross patte'e. var. &c. I Same. WESSEX..] . Same. field crosses. inscription between two circke. vi. Around.] Type viii. crowned. 2. divided by bust. Type Bust diademed. Around. crowned. IX. IX. [Cf. 4. lUiHf'tto I I of (lots. 10. I Bust r. ri. IX. I Small cross patte'e. IX G. in Small cross patte'e. PI. n.] Type KoHcttc of (Idts. divided by [Cf. inscription between two circles.] Type xi Bust biph relief. inacription lK. [Cf. Around. divided by bust. Around. Around. PI. name. divided by bust. with traces of crown. inscription between two circles. vi. Around.t\vccn two circlcB. Moneyer's across bust.. symmetrically arranged in field. Around. [Cf. 10.104 Obvene.'^t r. 3.] circles. r. c. inscrijition Ix'twcen two circles. S. 13 & X. IX. inscripcircles. Aroimd. in two lines pellets.] [Cf.. between two [Cf. &c. Around. inscription between two circles. a. . in Cross crosslet. X. a. inscription circles. inscription [Cf... PI. &c. with traces of crown. ix. I Kosetto of dote. inscription between two circles. Around. IX. 5. var. Around. inscription between two circles. Around. Beverae. Around.. PI. | between two 9. tion between two r. | Small cross pattce. PI. PI. r. inscription I between two circles. [Cf. IX. Type Sumo. but bust 1.] Type Bust hisb relief. PI. Type X. 4. inscription between two circles. X. X. V.

inscription circles. xii Cross crosslet.] Type xiii. hclmcted and crowned. between two [Cf.] Descbiption op Coins. inscription between two circles. between two X. Around. PI. [Cf. inscription and crowned. Around. Around. divided by bust. H. circles. inscription between two X. 105 Obverse. PI.. Type Bust r. liclincttd Around.. . 13. Head r.AETHELSTAN. No. circles. Cross crosslet.

. WE88EX.106 No.

AETHELSTAN. No. 107 .

WESSEX.108 No. .

AETHELSTAN.
Obverse.
Reverse.

109

Sfonej-er.

»i«/EBELS-TAN RE»^

TO BR
•i</EBELSTAH REX

•J-EADMVND

MO LED
CF:
Wt.
24-4.

Eadmund.

TO •i-EADMVMD M-O LEGE BRT Wt. 23-7. TO I^EFRARD
BR
fyrO LED CF Efrard, Wt. 25-4.

i^/EBELSTAN

RE-i^

•I</EBELSTAN RE4< TO

•I<M/ERTENE

BRT
Var.

MO LEDE
EF
Wt.
24-8.

Marten.

Aunukt

on
of

cither

side cross patte'e.

«I<0$LFE

MO

LEDE CIF
Wt.
25-2.

Oslaf or
Osulf.
Paul(c3).

^PAVLES M^O LEDE
CIF4< Wt. 24-2.

^PAVLESM'O
BR

LEID EF
Rwnulf.

(Chipped.)

BRT

^R/ENVLFM'O LED CF
Wt. 240.

/EBELSTAH RE^ TO
BRIE

-i'SIDEFERB

MOH
lEDE EF
Wt.
2(J-5.

Si<rcfer'8.

p/EBELSTAN

RE«iH

TO P'SIDFERB MO LEDE
BR
Wt.

CFI
24-2.

/E&EL$TAN

RE>1<

TO
BRIE

«i«TIDDER

MO

IN

LEDE
EFI"!*
24(J.

Tidgar.

Wt.

>i«EBEL$TAN RE>^

TO
BR

I-VVLFDAR MON

Uulfgar.
25-6.
Uiilfstaii or

LEDCE
Wt.

«i</E&EL5TAN

RE^ TO tVVLF^TAN M~0 LEDE
BRT
Wt. 21G.

Wulfbtiin.

/EBEL5TAN

RE«I<

TO
BR!

-^PLFSTAN M~0 LEDC
Wt.
24t).

Type

V. var. c.

/EBEL$TAN RE TO

I

I-ABBA

MO

IN

EBLXE

LEDE CF
Wt.
2:t G.

AblKl.

I

[PI. IX. 8.]

no
No.
Obvorsc.

WESSEX.
lI.viTH".

43

/E&ELSTAN RE'h TO BR

I

^OSLAC MON LEIEC^
Wt.
24-4.

Oelac.

I

Tijiyi vi.

44

^/EBEL-ST-AN RE-h TO BR
Var.

I-BE-OR-ARD MON
LEIE EF
AVt. 24-5.

Bcornrd.

Above

rosette, co.

[PI.

IX.

9.]

45

*/EBEL$TAN REX TO
BR

*DEORVLF
Var.

MOI LEIDC To loft of

Doorulf.

rosette, tmnulet. Wt. 23-5.

46

i</EBELSTAN

RE-J^

TO *E-ADMVND MON
LEIE
Wt.

Eadmuud.
23-6.

BRI

47

•i-EFRARD

MON LELEE
Wt.
25-2.

Efrard.

BR
48

*FRARD M~0 LEIDE
CIF
Wt.
23-4.

49

/EBELSTAN TEX TO
BRI

*M/ELDOMEN MO
LELC
Wt.
24-4.

MfeldomeQ.

50

i</EBELSTAN RE* TO *MELRED MON

LEDI

Megred.

BR
Wt.
51

CF
23-8.

*OSLAC MON LECEE
Wt.
24-6.

Oslac.

52

•i«PAVLES MOI LEICC
Wt.
23-3.

Paul(ea).

53

^/EBELSTVN TE* TO
Br

*TIDL7XR

MON LEG EF
Wt.
24-8.

Tidgar.

54

i-/E&EL'STAN RE^'

*TIDLER MONET
LEIE CF
Wt.
24-3.

TO BR

55

^EBELSTAN REX TO
BR
4«/EBELSTAN RE* TO BR

* VVLFLAR MON
Wt.

UtdfgM

LEIE24-0.

56

*VVLFSTAN M-O
LEICC
Wt. 250.

Uulfstan.

Struck ou a coiu of AelfrcU

?

AETHELSTAN.
Xo.

Ill

112

WESSEX.

No.

AETHELSTAN.

113
Monovor.

Type

viii.

«J</E€)ELST7XN

REX

^VVYNELM-M-0-OXVRBIS
Var.

Uuynelm.

Four jHllets in field opposite
each end of
cross.

Wt. 240.
[PI.

IX.

13.]

SCROBBESBYRIG.
[Shrewsbury.]

Type

V.

}<E€)ELSTAN REX TO BRIT

^BERHTELM SCROB
Wt.
2i-3.

Berhtelm.

•i^BERHTEL M"© BRIT
[PI.

SER0B
23-8.

Wt.
IX.
14.]

Type

vi

EELZTAN RE^ TO B& •tEDRED hrO SEBOB
Wt.
20-4.

Edred.

^/EO- EL -STAN REX

«^E-0-FERMVND

T0

B

M SEROB
24-8.

Eofermuud.

Wt.

•^ECELSTAN-RE'I- TO ^FROTCER MO XCROB Wt. 250. BRIT

Frotprer.

SNOTINGAHAM.
[Nottingham.]

Type

V.

•I'EDEESTAN RE

SA^ORVM

HhEBELNOB ON

Erclno*.
7.

SNKTENCEHAM
Wt. 22

[PI. X. 1.]

114
No.

WESSEX.
Moncycr.

P/ERINCPIC.
[Warwick.]

Type
85

V.

va r.

c.

p/EBELSTAH REX
TOI BR

^mO\AB\L\A
Var.

MOH
On
r.

VERI
of ro-

MoiiTiig^

(Men pegn?).

sette, 8.

\Vt. 22-7.

PELINGAFORD.
[Wallingfurd.]

Type
86

viii.

Ht«/EOELSTAN REX

•J-BEORNrSLD- M"0
Wt.

Beornwald
or BjTnwald.

PEL
23-6.

87

*/E€)ELXT7\N

^BVRNPSLD MONPE
Wt.
21-6.

88

^/ECELSTAN
[PI.

«I<BYRNPALD
X.
2.]

MO
PELINLS
Wt.
26-8.

PERHAM.
["SVareham.]

Type
89

viii.

Hh/EOELSTAN REX
I I

"t/ELFRED MO- IN PERH-A
Wt.
3.]

iElfred.

24-6.

[PI.

X.

AETHELSTAN.
Reverse.

115

Moneyer.

WINCEASTRE.
[Winchester.]

Type

viii.

^/EOELSTAN REX
REX

^AMELRIC-M-O-VVINII
Wt. 24G.

"i^VVLFHEARDVar.
cross.

MO WIN
Wt.

CI

Pellet above
24-6.

Type

ix.

^/EOELSTAN REX TO ^/E€)ELM"MO- WIN
BR
Var.
patte'o
tral one.

CISmall cross above cen-

Wt.
[PI.

23-0.

X.

4.]

Series B.

—Without
Type

Name
i.

of Mint.

•I*/EBEL$TAN REX

ABBA

MON
4^/EDELSTSN REX

I-/EBELSTA-N REX

^/EOELXTAH RE

116
No.

W ESSEX.
Hcvcrsc.

Moncycr.

97

AAEGLXTTTN REX
i

ZtREM

OH ETA
(CLipped.)

98

•t/EOELSTAN RE-

ARNY
LFMOI

Amulf.

^ 4« ^
Wt.
22-2.

99

^\E€)EL-STAN RE

|

ASVL
"i^ *I^

FNEN

^
Wt.
22-5.

Asalf or Asulf
(cf. Oslaf).

100

^/EOEL-STJKN RE

ELSE

Clac.

^ t' 4< MONE
Wt. 237.

101

^/EOEL-ZTRl/I R

ERISJ.

Cristign.

^^
Wt.
22-3.

TIEN

102

/E€)EL-$TAN REX

DOMEN
CESM-0
Wt.
22-0.

i< i^ -^

Domenceg Dominic
cus).

or

(= Domini-

103

DOMI

^^^
NIC-M
Wt.
23-8.

104

»I-/EOELXTAN REX

EADMV
j^ 4<

Eadmund.
Wt.

NDM~0
24-8.

^

105

t/EOELSTAN REX TO
BRIT-

EZtDV
•t'>l<^

Eadulf.

LFM~0
Wt.
21-3.

106

^EBELSTAN hEX

EEBE RHT
(Chipped.)

Ecberht.

MS

AETHELSTAN.
Obverse.

119

Moneyer.

127

/EOEL-STN REX

SOTA
J. }, ^4

Sota.

NOUE
J,

Wt.

23-4.

128

-i«/EOELSTAN REX

WEALD ^ ^ 4*
l-ELNVIO"

Uuealdhelm.

Wt. 17

4.

129

/EDELST^KN

RE^

VVIL

Uuilluf.

^^^
LVFM
Wt. 240.

130

•^/EOELSTZJN REX

VVLFI-E
J. 4,

Uulfheard.

ARDM-0
Wt.
23-8.

^

131

'i'/EBELSTAN RE

4<

VVLF ^^
ZTAN
Wt.
23-4.

Uulfstan.

132

PINE

Winele.

^

•J' "i*

LEM-Q
Wt.
23-8.

133

/EOELSTAN REX

PINE
4. }< !<

TEM^O
(Chipped.)

Blundered.

134

/EOEL$TAN REX

ASAEL
4^

Asalf?

^

"^

N ± V O
Wt.
2 10.

135

^EADE^cuTAH REX

^

IEA30
.^

Dioralf?

}

Dl

O R
Wt. 23
5.

WES8EX.

No.

AETHELSTAN.

121

Obverse.

Type
145

viii.

^/EOELXTN REX
^/EOELSTAN REX
^/EOELSTANREX.
•i«/E£)ELSTAN

^/E-DELFREO MON
\\L
21-7.

Ji3?ielfie«

(^Selfert).

146

^AOELFRMD M"ONNE
Wt.
17-4.

^«elfreS?

147

^7\LFEAV MONET"
M't. 21-0.

Alfeah.

148

REX
[PI.

^DRYHTVALD MON
Wt. 230.
X.
11.]

(

Drvhtuald = Bryht-

nald?3.

149

^LIFING MONEl/l
Wt.
23-2.

Lifincr.

Type
150

X.

/edeltv/ian rex
I

-I'ADELnOD+ARNVLF
I

A'Selmod

Wt.
12.]

23-0.

and Arnulf.

[PI.

X.

Type
151

xii.

^/EOELSTANREX
[PI.

!

^BALDRIE HOMT
Wt. 220.
13.]

Baldric.

X.

152

^/EOELSTAM^EX
"t/EOEfrv^T

^EINARD MOIETA
Wt.
23-8.

Einard,

153

X

ElUARD

M0H

.

.

(Broken.)

154

/E€)ELXTAN REX
«i</E€ELXTAhfiEX

i^SMALA
'I'PIARD

MON ETA
Wt. 230.

Smala.

155

MONETA
Wt.
21-4.

Wiard.

Type
15G

xiii.

/E€>;EL$TAN rex O
[PI.

I-CfiMALA

MONETA
Wt. 25G.

Smala.

X

14.]

122

WESSEX.

EADMUND.
Suco. AD. 910 on
'J

11

;

died

a.d. 94G.

Moneyere.

Al.l.un(Abbu?).
AhilK'l.

Byrnferfi.

Byniwald.
Cenherht.
or iESelwino.
iElfric].

Adtlirerd,

Addwine
^dtilf.
iEi'lric

Cialberht, CiolberJit, &c.

Clac {Exeter, London).

[=
'I

Cnapa

or Gnapa.

^gii uce
yl'fl/rrd.
yT'i/'rir.

Oundferi. Dxodulf.

Demonec,
nicus].

Domences, &c.

[

= Domi-

il«:ifs(an.

il'^irwalJ or
yT'lfirine.

Elfwald.

Deorwald, Diarwald, &c. Diarelm.
Dorulf. Drcgel, Dregl, &c.

jElficinig.
iEl'f.-, Hvc

nlso Elf.-

y7:,>(/7)i [

yErnulf or ArnuJf. = Mielmund'].

iETielinod.

Dudelet Dudig. Duraint
Eadgar.

?

[

= Durandes].

J^J^ilmund or A^elmund.
y]-J^elul/ or ATielulf.
.3<37itlwiiie

Durand[c3].
Eadgild,

or A'i^ehcine. iE^cl.-, see also ASel.-

Eadmund.
Eadred, Edired, &c. Eadstan. Eaduueard. Ealgeart ?
Eardulf. Ecghriht. Edired. E/eireos ? Eferbrd [Efericerd
Eferulf.

jEiered [^^eZred]. Agtardles ?]. Alberic?

Amund
Are.

or

Amynd[es].

Arnulf or iErnulf.
A>:h1/ or Asulfnen.

Atenn?
AT>elulf

?].

[=

^«elulf].

A^eluueard.
AJ5el.-, see also

^^el.-

Baciager or Bacialer.
Baldric.

Efgeulf? Egered. Einard.
Elaet. Elferd.
Elf.-, see also

Balduuine. Barbe [Barht] (Norwich). Beahred. Bencdictus.

^If.-

Eofermund.
Erconbald Erembald.
Ere^ic.

[=

Ercimbald].

Beoncald (^Wallingford).
Bcrhtclm.
Jlerhtred.

Ergimbalt [= Ercimbald].
Ericil.

Bcrhtwig. Jkrna^.
Bernsige.

Bese or BeseJ. Bianulf.
Biiirhtulf or Biorhticulf. Biriieanl, Biomcanl, &c. Boot; [ = Boiga?] (York?)

Eulg-art [= Ealgeart?]. Eielsige. EtSel.-, see also .^?el.-

Furaman, Farman. Faromia? (Leicester).
Folcard, Ftilcred. Frard[= Efrard?].

Boign, Boga, iVc. Boinsulf, 'Boinul/l= Biornulf?].

Fredard

[

= Fre<Sard].

Fref<ic[^es2-

Bonsom.
Burnhelm. Burnric or Bijnncic.

Fugel. Gciindfer^ or GundferT* Giongbald (Xortcich).,

EADMUND.
(xis[lemer Gnapa or
?].

123
Oietiorcel.

Cnapa.

Paul, Paules, &c.
Pitit.

Gota or Gotaf.
Grimwald. Hadebald.

Hana, Hanen, &c. Hereman. Horemod.
Hereuuig.
Hildeomert. Hotaf.

Frim. Bxgenold. Handulf. Regnulf [=Raegenulf].
Reg^ier.

Eeingrim, or Eegegrim {Oxford).
Bodherht.

Bodmr
Hrd^gar (NonvicW).

or

Bodgar
?

(^Norwicli).

Hrodear

or

Salciarene

Hunhf.
Hunsige.
ledulf. Igere. Ingelbert.

Sarauuard. Saxsa.

Scurua ? Siadcman or Sideman.
Sigar[e8] or Sigear[es^. Sigeher^ ? Sigwold. Smerel.
StefJian.

Ingelgar (York).

Land wine.
Leofric. Liafinc.

Ligeberd [= Sigeber«?].
Liofhelm. Litilman.

Telia.

Ulf (Chester).
Ulgebert
?

[Ingelbert

?].

Mield or M?Dldomcn. Mserten or Martin.

Uuihtes or Uuihtseg. UuQaf.
Uuitelm. Uulfstan.

Man, Mana
3Ianeta.

or

Manna.

Manticen or Maunicen (Norwich). Megred.
Nansige.

Uuynsige. Warn [ = Warin]. Waringod.
Werlaf. White.

Oda. Ondres ?

Onunman 7
Oslac.

Wigard, Wigeard, or Wigheard.
\Vinuc ? Wulfgar.

Osmund.
Osulf or Oswulf.

Wulfhclm.
Wulfric.

Oswald.
Otic.

Wvnhelm
Peodulf.

or

Wyunclm.

Oneiric

[=

JE^elric^.

permod.
Description op Types.

Obverse.

Reverse.

Type

i.

Small cross pattc'o. tiun between two

Around, iuscrip
circles.

Moncycr's

name,
;

&c.,

in

two

lines

acTdss field crosses?, pillets, iVc, syniiuetrically arranged in lield.
[Cf. PI.

XL
ii.

2-6.]

Type
Small cross formed of pellets. Around, inscription between two circles.

Moneyer's
across

name,
;

&c.,

in

two
pellets,

linos

and ornaments symmetrically arranged
field

rosette,

in liild.

[Cr. PI.

XL

7.]

divided by bust. [Cf. [Cf. 10. seven. . name in one line across above. XI. Around. fiolrl . Around. inscription between two circles. Around. tiou between two Around.] Type Small cross pattcc.] XL Type vii Kudo helmoted and crowned. between two [Cf.. ri. inscription between two circles. crowned. iii. XL vi. PI. 1. inscription between two circles. PI. 9. Type RoBottn of p«'llcta. in two rosettes linos sym- metrically arranged in field.124 ObTone. inscrip circles. iv. PL XL 12. 8. I | Small cross patte'e. PI. No. Moneycr's field . inscription between two XI. inscription circles. WESSEX. [Cf. five l>ctwoen two circles. inscription between two circles. Cross crosslet. circles. straight line from wliich springs a rose between two curved branches below. | Rosette of dots. Revenc. Around.. &c.] Type Bust r . Aroimd. 11. divided by bust.] Type Small cross patteo. Arnuml.] Description of Coixs. V. Around. bust r. ])ctalled flower. [Cf. iiiHcription Moneycr'fl ftcross name.

125 . No.EADMUND.

Xo.126 WESSEX. .

No. 121 .EADMUND.

128 .

3. [PI. 38 »i«EADMVHD RE CNAP J< . 45 fE-A-DMVND RE ' DRED Jh J^ 4. ^ Cnapa. 25-0. 22-4. 39 ^EADMVMD RE«i« DEMEN EEMOT Wt. 24 0.REX DOMEN CESM"0 M't. ^ "^ ^ Dcmonec or Donienccs ( = Dominicus). 24-8. 24-9. LFM-O Wt. Reverse. XI. 20-0. 44 EADMVHD REX DORV !< 4^ 4.) 41 »I<ESDMVND. Obverse. ^^^ 43 ^EADIAIVND RE DORV Dorulf. 129 Moneyer. AMO~N Wt.J. LMM^O Wt. 22 0.EADMUND. 40 DEMEN EEMOT (Chipped.J 42 i«EADMVND REX DIARE Diarelm. . LFEM W^t. LETM O Wt. 200. Dreffol. LMOTWt. 4G ^EADMVND REX DVDE i" •} 4^ ( Dndolet = Dudig?).

:!() WERSEX. No. .

^ET^DMVND REX EADVVE i^ "^ CO 1^ A R D [PI. »}<EADMVND REX EADS ^ ^ 4. Keverse. M wt XI.EAUMUND.] ^EADMVND RE^ EARD VLFM ^EADMVNDREX EARD YLFM"0 ^^ 4. 131 Moneyer. 4. 23-8. TANO CO Wt. Obverse. ^EADMVND REX EFER •^ VLFM-Q ^^ J^EADNVMD R EFER ^ "^ t' VLFrO ^EADMVND REX ECERED ^ ^ ^ MO N ETA ELEERD •^ MO N ETA ^ •!* ^ EOFERM "^ VHDM^O ^ .

lO^ .

No.EADMUND. 133 .

134 WESSEX. No. .

EADMUND. No. 135 .

. WESSEX.lao No.

5. 23-2. No. MONE Wt. 24-6. ^^^ 119 •i^EADMVND REX T© PAVL ^^^ ESMO Wt. 137 Reverse. 121 >i<EADMVND REX PITIT Pitit. 23 0. 117 REX ^ ^ OTIC^ . 250. IIG •i'EADMVND RET^ »J< "t" ^ LDMO \Vt. M-ON-E Wt. 120 Pauses).^ roMo OZFA "Wt. XI. REXM0T AVt.EADMUND. ^EADMVND RE ^ ^ PAVE . Eegnulf. lis OTIC^ MON"E Wt. ?A-S. Otic. Obverse. [PI. I . 124 ^EADMVMD RED»f REC»E Rpg><er. 21-3. 19-2. 250.Ji LSMO Wt. 23G.] 122 fEADMVND RECN VLFM 123 >> ^^^ Wt. » Wt. 115 •i'EADMVND RE^ OX>A J< 1^ .J. 22-0. Moneyer.

FEMO Wt. ji !< MOIIE . Wt. 125 "tEADMVND RE SARA •i* Barauuard. WARD Wt. 128 EADMVND REX ETMOT Wt. 131 EADMVND REX VVLF>J< Uul&tan. 22-4. [PI. 21-5. . 130 ^hEADMVND RE ^^^ VVILA Uuilaf. Ucversc. T T" T 133 RET PARN »}< Warn (Warm).] ilBAR Sigar. XL 129 EADMVN REX VVIHT Uuiht(c8) (or ^ "^ J" EriMOl "Wt. 22-6. ^ J^ ^ G. No.REX VVYN Uuynsige. . MANM^O Wt. 24-4. J. 20-6.138 WESSEX. 25r. •b 'h 12G •frEADMVND REi* SAXSA© Sax8a •333W \Vt. 23-3. 132 •i^EADMVND.. Moneyer.f. SICEM"0 Wt. Uuihtscg ?). 22-7.J- me fecit ? 127 ^EADMVND REX SIADE Siadcman (or SiJcman). STAN ^^ Wt. 24-7.

EADMUND. 139 . No.

WESSEX.no No. .

141 .EADMUND. Ko.

^Ured. Gislcmer. GisleJielm. Cilieni. Dreml ? Dudig. £orofi [ = Fro^?]. Eodin. Amulf. Erimes [ = Grimes?]. Rcinfir?>. Lifine. Herigar. Fredard or Frcdrod. see also A8el. Grim. [ = Wynnelm ?]. Winno. or Burnard.142 WESSEX. Agtiird[e8] or ^tard[e8] Albert. Asphr ? Hunred. Reg'cSer. NorSgar [=Hro*gar?]. Oneiric. (Xurwich). Htmlaf. LandferS. = Oneiric?]. Binuc [Rinulf?'] liinulf. Heremod. Iiigelgar. Moneyers. Mannecin]. Uihlulf. iESel.d. Saruurd r=Saruard]. Boga or Boiga. Griper. liiculf. Anoeret. [ Cenberht. Elfred. Martin. Bcrnfei-tS. Eferulf. Biorhtwulf. Eardulf. Duran. Eadmund. Bese. Crist in. Deinenco [Dominions]. EADRED. Osgod. A.-. Huscbald. Fro<5ric. f^njrua ? . Manna. JFJUiiu. Culein[ = Culfin?]. E^elnof>. Cali Calismert Canceret^ ? Munred. FretSic or Ferric [see FroSric]. Ai^elwald. Mannecin. Bernard Bernere. Rodbert.-. Deorulf. Godin. Prin. Hunsaft. Ilroigar. Suco. Maneca [cf. died a. Rffiduine. Fynnelm Gilles. Burnard. Baldiuiine. AUige [ = ^lf8ige?]. 9o5. Rei^ereil. Inguces Ive. A^cl.- Frard [=Efrard ?]. or JE^elmund. Copman. [ = Ingulf ?]. 946. Aje. cf. Clac. see also iE?el. j'Elfnipc or ^Ifsic. Oslnf. Oeirheri Osfer^. Norbert. litedes. Anna. Oswald. Leofric. Osicine. ^tard[cH] or Agtard[e8].D. A^elmund AMirerfi. &c. FrotS [= FroSric ?]. Engilbred. JE«elm [^Tiolinund ?] JE'^eJmund or ASclmund.Baldric.

pwr/tT?!. Wijnnchtim [ Wymielm]. across field &c. Around. peodmaer. Uualdfre^. field. iv. Around. cross patte'e. PI. Sigar[e8]. insrription between two circles. purulf [cf. Winuc or Swerlinc ? Swerting. . PI.] [See No Type Small tion iii. Wigerofi. inscription Moneyer's name.. rosettes of dots syui- nictrieally arranged in field. Walter. between two Floriate stem with two branches enclosing moneyer's name. XII. = Secgcstef ?] (Norwich). i. 2-4. Tyleadrex [= Tyleadred Wealdfred ?]. Sicgred. Uuarin or Warin. symmetrically arranged in [Cf.] Typt' V. 154. inscrip tion between two circles. Wulfbald. in two lines crosses. crowned. [Cf. 1 XII. rosettes. Around. PI. Uuerstan. Deorulf]. Type Rosette of dots. Warin or Uuarin. circles. Secge [ 143 Uuilfred. [ = Winulf?]. divided by bust. Sifert]. Description op Types. pellets. Around. SieferetS [cf. inscription between two circles. peodulf.'i. \)eodhnrht. XII. p. Uuinetin.] circles. Smertcali. Around. Type Small cross pattee.] Type ii. Small tion cross patte'e.. &c. XII. Moncycr's &c. Uulfstan. Obverse.] . inscrip- Rosette of dots. name. Sifert. 103. Around. Reverse. . ri. Wulgar[c8]. \)eodred.EADRED. Suince. Uuildaf[=UHildul/?l Uuilehert. Bust r. I | Small cross patte'o.. across field. [Cf. insoriptiun between two between two [Cf.. Uuilaf. A- 7. Around. Unbein. in two linos between two circles. purmod. inscripcircles. G.

144 WESflEX. Description ok Coins. No. .

17 EADRED REX BERN ARDfn Wt. 14 -^EADRED REX- BALD 4< 4^ 4< Baldric. Bemnrd or Burnard. 23-2. 19-5. Wt. FmONT Wt. 21-5. Balduuine. 15 I^DH EADRED REX BALDV IVINH^O Wt. M. In field. "I^EADRED RE AETAR ^^^ DEXmOT Wt. IG ^ERDRED REX Var. RIEM O Wt.EADRED. In field. lu field. Var. >{EADRED RE^. 180. 20 7. ARNVL Arnulf. 20-5. 21 -2. BALDV ^^^ VNHO Wt.) 11 EADRED REX Var. ^ 4« >I< MVNDWt. . thrco pellets. 12 •J-EADRED REX AOEL A%elmund. M. 21-2.^tard(es) or Ajjtard(e8). 20 0. 13 ACELM VNDM-Q Wt. 145 Reverse. Moneyer. . 10 EADRED REX ALTAR '^ "T* -i^ DESmOT (Chipped.

23 Var.11 (. Wt. 19 0. 24 EADRED REX AN6L0R-~ [PI. RHTM0 Wt. 210. . In field. 19 i-EADRED REX O BERN Bern ere. RcverBC. 19 WAZO 0. ESmOT AVt. 22-5.) 20 EADRED REX BER14F Bemfer?. . Bese. EREH (Chipped. CENBE "^ "^ «^ Cenberht. 21-5. ^^^ CEPflOT Wt. 25 EADRED RE^ EOPO i. No. WESSEX. ERomo Wt. 26 DEMEM Demence (Dominicus). 230. ^^ "f- 21 ^EADRED REX BESE MOllT Wt. M. BOILA . 22 EADRED REX BOCA Boga or Boiga.^ >^ >5h ExmoT Wt. Moneyer. "f 4< Copman. XII. 20-8.] 24-8. 18 ^E??DRED REX BVRH ARDM O Wt. 2.

147 Reverse.EADRED. Obverse. 27 EADRED RE 28 I EADRED REX 29 i'EADRED REX I 30 fEADRII REX 31 ^EADRED RE^ 32 EADRED REX 33 ^EADRED REX 34 RE»^ 35 ' ^EADRED RE-i* O 36 >^EADRED R E^^ .

J^fl .

50 •I-EADRED REX HVN Hunred. "h "h IIETM Wt. 20G. 149 Obverse.] Grim XII. 53 I'EADRED REX HVNR EDIAIO Wt. 21-5. . 4^ Wt. No. 21-3. 54 i^EADRED REXl HVNR EDMO) Wt. 22 0. 49 EADRED REX CRim EXmOT Wt. Moneyer. 52 ^EADRED RE- HVN REDC Wt. ^^^ 3. 51 "t-EADRED REXX HVN REDX Wt. 210. Godin. 47 "^EADRED RE^ DISLE •i* Gislemer. 20-3. ^ ^4 !< RE'Di W'L 220. 23-6. [PI. 55 ^EADRED REX' HVNR ^ EDMOT 4. Keverse. 48 ^EADRED RE-i* O CODIN MOTI Wt.EADKED. 23 0.

Obverno. 63 •t'EADRED RE-i^ LAND Landfert. 21-5. t' "t" !« pellets. 2G-8. NEMO Wt.) 60 •I-EADRED •I^EADRED REXO Wt. 22-3. ALDII O Wt. 23-3. 58 "tESDRED REX I INCEL 't' Ingelgar. 20-5.I Lifinc.ild. Leofric. Moiieycr. 56 •pEADRED RE'I- O HVN ^AFT Wt. 65 •I'ERDRED RE ^LIF. No. LM-3. In field.150 WESSKX. LAR'MO Wt. 62 EADRED REX I NGV . • HVXEB four i Huseb. 61 REX" Wt. 57 HhEJ^DRED REX Var. ^ >^ 59 •i^EADRED RE'J': INGEL J< p. 230.J^ Inguces ( J< !< = Ingulf?) EE5M0T Wt. 22-5. FERO Wt. 20 0. ncvcr«e. CAR- ^ MO (Chipped. 64 REX LEOF RICM Wt. . HuDsaft.

151 . No.EADHED.

Moncyer.] 81 ^E7\DRED REX WARIHM~0 AVt. FMON Wt. 83 i-EADRED RE TANNO Wt. 230. Uuarin or Warin. 20-3. No. 21 [PI.) or Wealdfred ?). Sifert).) 78 EADRED REX SILAR 4< 4^ »Ji Sigar. 80 •1<EADRED REX VVALD Uualdfre'8. ^EADRED RE-P- O 5IEF-E SiefereS (cf. E5moT Wt. 82 P7\RI ^ NMON 4^ "P Wt.152 WESSEX. Keinfir%. Ena3flaA3fl«^ lYLEAD J^ ^ 1^ Tvleadrex (=']}ieadrffl T0mX3fl (Broken. FREO Wt. 16-2. VVERS O "^ O Uiierstan. 20-6. 84 EADRED REX VVIL7\ Uuilaf. Obvprsc. Reverse. 4. REOIO (Chipped. 22-2. 17-4. 0. XII. . 7G HhEADRED REX REIN FIRO Wt.

EADRED. No. 153 .

peodulf.'l 6. 9i) JCEADRED REX BEOD VLFM \Vt. Moneyer.1 Ciilein (Culfin?). 17 5. No. purmod. XII. 25 4. ^EVLEIH m~0 Wt. 21-8. 22-2. 200. 20 [PI. Obverse. G. I'EADrED PFX- DVpy purulf (cf. T Type 103 ii. 08 4«EADRED. 23-7. 5.1. Deorulf). 4-EADnED REX [PI. 102 "i-EADRED REX OYRM •r T* ODH" Wt. Norbert Type 104 iii.>1 WEHSEX. 4«EADRED RE«i« 1 NOR BERT Wt. . 101 EADRED REX OVRM o»i<o ODMO'H Wt. XII. Rcvenie.REX OEODM ^ ^ ^ AER M Wt. UO 0. . Type 105 iv. 100 I-EADRED REX ORMO DEMO Wt. FLmo I Wt.

EADRED. No. 155 .

Type i. eircles. A. ?). Wul/gar. Baldwiue (Bedford). Fro«gar (Bedford). see also yEtard [^=Afjlanli'\. Jierenard. Moneyers. Otic (Winchester). Clac (Newark ?). Grim (Bedford). Wilehert. JEiiri'ij. A^eluuerd or /Edeluiwurd. Sedoman [= Sideman]. Fro^ric or Frederic (York). yUftlgnr. EADWIG. EoroTS ? Erim [ = Grim?] E«el. Eadulf. ^8el.a or Boga (Bedford). Succ. J)tidema[n']. Gijtd. Cuape[es]. &c. yj^rhtan or I'Jiehtitn. Afnl/ {Linuloti). Driuning.] . Biruer. Leuinc [= Lifiiic. . GodeferlS. uii. Abenel (Htrefunl iElfred. 055. XIII 1. WESSEX. purulf [cf. Cntel 0TCytc\ [=Gytel?]. pellets. Heremod. Manngdd or Maneod (South- Copman.-.lt„rd. Manolet. Reverse. Briuninc [ = Bruuine].. iiiscrip- I Moneyer's name.o. Small tion cross pattee. Oswald. across tield.». 959.u. Boi<. yKI/Ki(][e'\. LifincV]. . I [Cf..u a. "Winchester). Demence [DominiruK V]. Mann or Manna. JiithJn'c {SoiitlKimpton).Fanael ? Efrard?] (York). Herewig. symmetrically arranged in field .I r. Obverse. Uuferin [ = "Warin ?] Dunn. see C'ytel. Litclman. Deorulf]. ])urmod (Yorh). Around. Aiinind[eg]. Heriger. ri. Duiiinc (Huntingdon). Description of Types. Deorulf [= purulf V] (York). Crin . Efrard. Eaenolf [= Ecnolf?]. Frard [= FreXic [= FroTiric ?]. Eadmund (York). A.. Leofstan (Bedford). rosettes. \)urfer^. »S:c. ampton. Eofercd (York). in two lines between two | crosses. Wihig. 2.

Mint) b'twi'en tiro rircli's. XIII. 3... ri. [Cf. [Cf. tion {Moneyer's circles. Around. circles. symmetrically arranged in field. T [Cf. inscrip- name. inscrip- Small two tion between two circles.] Type iii.) between [Lindsay. Sec. XIII. tion between two Around. 5.] Type Small cross patti'e. PI. [Rud.' PI. Av. 8-13. tion between two circles. Ac. Moneyer's name field. Above and below. PI. inscrip- iv. &c. divided by name of mint crosses. in two line. awl bust. inscrip circles. inscripcircles. Obverse. (Moni'yir's Amund. cross pattee. Around. 20. Small cross pattee. pellets. in.EADWIG. vi. MoiK-yor'd name. Small tion divided by cross pattee. PI. Around. 1] .. 115. 4. ' Coinage of the Ileptaicby. field. XII. . . tion between two r. Around.] Type Small cross pattee. Type ii. V. rosettes. lo7 Keverse.scrip- Moneyer's name between two lines across rosette. inscripname. iu one line across divided by mitre-shaped ornament below.] Type Bust. crowned. tion between two Around.s across field. Small cross pattee.

No. BEDANFORD.] Type ii.] ^EADVVIC REX":-- BOIDA •i^BE^'DA't Boiga. xir. 23-3. Leofstan. DEscjuirrioN of Coins. Moneyer. Obverse. VLFM Wt. EOFERPIC. Reverse. BE'l'DA Grim. [PI. 22-3. MON"E Wt. 22-2. Series A. 18-2. FroSgar.RE- CRin.-. i-EADVVlG REX O FRODBE-^DA CAR M Wt. XII. [ri.-^ BALD BE-i^DA PINEWt. [B.xlfunl. 9.ins WK8HKX. purulQ. 150.] Ti/pe «i<EADVVIL RE-.VVIG REX LEOFS BE^DA T7\lhMO Wt.] . MONETA Wt. ^ETXD. Baldwine. •i«EADVVIQE RE DEOR 03«^N^0 Deorulf (cf. [York. 20-5. With Nami: ok Mint. ^EADVVID. 8.

EADWIG. . 159 No.

DODMO Wt. Ill field. AiSeluiierd. 14 [PL XII.Hid WESSEX. 1. •MOIETA Wt. 12.] 2.] Type ii. 180. . [Newark* Type 1:5 ii. T'or.] Series B. Reverae. [Winchester. Without Name of Type. 15 ^EADPIC REX I /ELFRED iElfred. 20-7. NEPE. 13. No. 23-5. ?] 4-ESDVVIC RE-I- CLAC ^IIE'l-PE Cliic. JIint.Sscuulf. 17 4«EADVVI RE ADEL VVERD Wt. MoDeyer. 18 •tETXDVVIL RE>i« BOr^A- Boiga. M ^ ^ EXM0N J< Wt. 21S. 13 In Korthamptonsbire.] IG ^EADPIL REX /ESEVV"T* •r' "r" . [PI. H ^ESDVVID REX MANN Manogod. PINCEASTRE. 0. ObveiM. XII. LFM-QWt. i. [PL XIII. MONE Wt.

DVNN M. Var. 27 't'EADPIL REX' . 2. XIII. 18-8. No. Wt. 20 ^ETXDVVIL REX CYTEL ^ "^ 4* MONE Wt. In EXm^ON Wt. 207. Obverse.-.] 4. 22 [PI. IGl I'evcTso. 21 i-EADPIC REX field. ^ "^ "^ 22 I«EADVVr RE^ E7SEH 23 ^EADVV[I]D REX 24 •I<EADVVID REX I 25 •i<EADVVIC R-E^-.- 2G {"EADWIG REX. Sloneycr.EADWIG. 19 'i'EADVVI RE-i* I BRIVl/IIHC Briuninc ( = Bruniiic).

\{\'2 .

Chester. . Ei^ehn. Albutic. a. Eadniund (Chester). ^ielgar jSa&elfer^ (Ilchester). Lincoln. Exeter. ^iehviiie (^Oxford). Exeter). Bruninc {Xonrir'h).'orulf ?] (Chester). Farni. J-:ilr. Albart ? (^Cambridge).ffiscmau {Chester.iElfsigo (Ik'dford. Ealfsigc. Byrhfir^ [ = BemrerS (Maldott). Lymne). Bofjea. Careen [^FarScn?] or Corbel m. ^tfer^. Baldric {Bid ford. Eofcrmund. JElfstan or Elfstau (Chester. of all E.iim\\{ (Lincohi). Cylm? (Southampton). Bernfer<5. EADGAE. Baldwin. ^(Selsie or J]]^elsige (Bath. see also Birgstan. Berenard.s].'^tan [=Eadstan . Eiinnd. King of ^Mercia ad. 059 . Cna])a (Stamford). Capelin.d or Andreas. iLondun. p]Scluine.iElfnocS [ = JEielu-uhl] (London). Eoferulf (Tem|)sford ?). j^'fielstan (Canterlnnj.-. Cynsige (Ch ichmttr). Alfer^. Bi/rhtric (Lymne).- A^ulf (London). Wilton). Colenard. (Southamjiton). Eadmcr Eadtil/. Khd'ti.-. yl^fichjar. Alfred Byrhticold (Shdj'teshury). Boga. Elfstau. or Brihti\r'!S'] iElfgar (Thetford). Deorulf (Tempsford ?). l\. Wiuchelsta). Chi-strr. Derby. Elfwald.- Elf. Ei^el. Azjua ? (Linroln). Durand. Eat.in M 2 . . see also Fiis- /E?il - tolf (Canterbury. Adelwold Aden. . Exeter.d.ngl. died ad. Aldcwine. Eadwino (Wilton). Copman.S. Benedict U. Adelavor or Adelgiir or Ai*. Dun (York).Elfrcd. uE^elwold or Adelwold (London). Winchester). Eoferard. London). or Adelgar. Sec. Stamford).'ilcr). Boign. JE'tielaver or Adelaver. Dodnor^. Erronhald (Xoririrh). EoroS (Chester).\nd Moneyers. iEsculf. iETielred (London).r^. Eifern. Snuthumpfo)}). JEtelbrand. Deorlaf [ = D(. Dcniencc [Doniinipu. Dudeman or Dudsemon. see Adol. ^<5ercd (London). 957 .elaver.-. ?] (WinHio. Britfer?! or Brihl/.( 163 ) KINGDOM OF ENGLAND. AsferS. see also iElf. or Elfrod. Staffonl Wilton. and /E8cl. Cohjrini. Beorhtric {]\'allinriford). A?cl. JE^ehcecird. 975.-.

OUlriht. liegenold ( Winchester). (Winehester). Oeeman [ = Otjernan ?]. ^[iinmil or Mmitnt (Southampton). Himbcin or Unbein. Maning. (Ipswich'). Wull'stan or Widstan (Leicester. loles. see Cylm. Rafn. Manne. HihJe. Jlilttrine Saydtine [=Saduting?]. Wiferd [ = WiufcrS Uuilsig or Wihig. Ogt'imm. Ogca (Norwich. see Fastolf. See. . Sydeman (London). Hacuir. V. Eiecolf or Ricolf. MarHcalo or Mursrenle (Winchcbter). Lyfmc. AVinenr [ = '\Vinern].irk). or Sedeman.IfU Ffti^on or Far^ine FftHti. Osmnnd. &c. Leofirine (Tempsford?). Noriberd (Norwich). llrrcfonl). Guuund. iSIanlieon. TI7?- Leofsigc (Oxford. Hiugolf or Ingolf. &c. Winchester).. Styrcar (Leicester). Pirim ? see Wirim. Leoffjdr (Dover). Badstan. (Gloucester. Lecfert. Ivc. Stamford). peodgar (Lewes). Gyllis. Unliein or Hunhein. Wnlfbald (Bath). Wode. Levig ? AVyiistan or chester). Leofinc. (Chester). Sexhyrht (Lewes). Jia'gemdf. Niiniin. Winemes. Mertin [=Mii'rtin]. IMorgna [=M()rena?]. Wynsige or Wihtsige Winchester). lohan. ion). Wunstan (Totncss. purfei-t. FKidf^cr F(>r'^<l(ir (( 'hostor). I. Win- Liofstan (Bedford). Ma^lsiu^an (Chester). Heromod Hi'rijror. GiJm. FoU'iiitrd (Nonrich). Lowman. Hcrcbert. Lenna. = CarScn ?]. Gillys. Lcfinc. Tuma (York). Wine. Ingelberd. [ ENGLAND. Wirim ? (Huntingdon). FftHlnlf mill Uuigft. see {Jiid/onl). J. Liofirold ( Wilton). Iicrolf(roj-/0. \?inern [= Winern']. luban [=Iohun] (Exeter). Ingolf or Hingolf. purmod \?urstnn.ll'(V('rk). Wihfsige (see Wynsige). TAofnil[=Leofhelm?]. Iscmbert. Fri/'^mu>i<l. Walling/ord). see luhan. Wuifmaer. Fiot^i('[os] or Frc*icin (Derby). Siferb. Manna. (Chester. ITuifer'8 or ?]. Ma'find ( Winrhe-':ter). (Wallingford).tn/ric. Wulfgar or Wulgar (Stamford). Southampton.eofhelm. Wuifred (Oxford). Sidcman. Grid. dsferi. Manan. FnoSric or Fro^ric [=Frc«ic?] (Clii'stcr). Fastolf a 11(1 Ihifn. Wilsig or Uuilsig.stolf. Oda. Osulf (Derby). Mnnna. Inficlhn'rg or Ingehics. Marcer. see Fa. Grim (Bed Cord). Fivstolf imil Odii. Fiddimn. &c. Giilus. Guunulf (Yorl-y Oswald. Wui/rir (York). Ui rc/erf). IngolfcrS. JIan (Tempsford ?. Oslac or Oslaf (Norwich). (LeiceHer. Hercman. (Rochester).

c. name. Sujue. Around. Moneyer's patte'es . ri. inscripcircles. ri. var.. Similar : ornam<nts varitd 4* "t* "i* [Kud. var. ornaments varied "t* •r' 4* [Cf.s varieil "i* "i" . { Similar: oru. Similar: ornaments varied O "t" O [Cf. XIV.] Type i. b. Type Small cross patt(?o. tion between two i. 1. XIV. divided of dots JL. XIV. &c. Similar. three crus. l>y in two lines across field.] Type vur. i. ri.] Type var.] . Same.EADOAR. I- Suiuo.. d. I(j5 Obver-^e. XIV. a. Kevcrse. 3.uneut. n. 2. Desciui'tiox Of Types. ri.^ •r [Cf. "t* [Cf. 2. 1. 28. i.-es above and below. triangle T" ^ 'T' j.] Type i. Same.

vnr. inscripcircles.] Type Small cross patte'c. divided bv bust. | between two XIII. Around. XIII.i in centre. Around. 7. Similar : riKsette of d(it. Around. between in two lines which name of mint : ornaments field symmetrically arranged in O [Cf. IVIoiieyer's name. ri.] Type Small cross patt<5e. g. XIII.. 5. I [Cf. 5. Around. Stiim-.KKi ENGLAND. iuscrip- [Cf. inscription between two circles. ' Similar : ornaments varied [Cf. Siiiiiliir : ornauienlw varitJ O O O [L'i'. Obverse. Same. PI. across field. XIV. I'l. ist. Bust r.. tion between two circles.f. C] i.] Type var. Type V. PI.] . ^ O 10 & 12. PI. I Kosetto of dots.*•: :•: :•: [Cf. Type var. iv. inscription [Cf. e. ri. XIY. tion between two circles. ii. Similar : ornaments varied . inscription between two circles. Si tion between two Around.] circles. Revene. PI. in-'cripI iii. XIII. crowned. | Small cross patte'c. Tyiie i. 6. 8-0. inscription on betweeu two circles. XIV. i. Around.] Type Eosette of dots. &c. I I Small cross pattc'e. Around.

inscrip- I Small tion cross pattt'e. [Rud. 7. 4. [Hud.] Type vi. circles. U & 13. Around. intcrip- | between two [Cf. circles.EADGAR.] Type V. Eevcree. b. 28. 1. var. a* : Similar four crosses pattccs arranged around central ono.. Around. 167 Obverse. tion between two 1. . 20. 37 & 211) in the National Collection are too imperfect for illUBtratiou. Similar: three pclhls and cross paltee arranged around central crvsg patt^e.. ri. Bust diademed. V. Type Saiuo. var.. ri. PI.] * The specimeus of tbe type (Nos. name. XIII.

•I«EADDAR REX ANCLCWl +LRIM I IVJ-Q BEDAFO (Pierced.] 21-8.108 ENGLAND.] Type 2 V. De8(-UI1'TI0N of Coins. [Canterbury. Moneycr.] Tijpc vi. ^EADLAR REX ANCLCnX •I^BOCA M~0 C/ETPARA Wt. [Bath.'j a. XIII.] Type iii. Sebie. With Name of Mint. Var.) Liofstan ? Type vi. HhLI TA BE (Fragment. Obverse. . Wt. I »i>EADCAR REX •i'/ELFSIL MONETA BE ^Ifsige. +EADCAR REX ANLLORVM ^:/E€)ELSILE MO BACA EIFI ^«elsige. [Bedford. BEDANFORD. Boga (or Boiga). 5. C/ENTFARABYRIG or CANTPARABYRIG. BAOAN. Small cross pattee above central one. No.) 'i'EADC. 23 5.) Grim. [PI. (Broken. Reverse.

i(jy . No.EADOAR.

No. .170 EN(JLANI).

VDUAl!. . 171 No.E.

. No.172 ENGLAND.

173 .EADGAR. No.

I 250.] Type 4S iii. 23-4.Wt.171 Obvcmc. 230. i«EADLAR REX I-HEREMOD MO PELEL-AFOR-. ^EADDAR REX ANCLOPC ^/ELFNOO M~0 ^lfno». [ri. Heremod.] Type 51 vi. 49 I-EADCAR REX ArCLOix ^/ELFXILE i MO FILTV ^Ifsige. [Wincliclsea.A\h. 4(i HhEADCAR RE EOFR OT'J-EO Eofcriilf? LFNO (Cliippcd.] Ti/jy. FEfCLES Wt. [Wilton. No. Reverse. i:l] PINCELSEA. PELEGAFORD ou PELIGAFORD.) 47 t> » MOl/l Man. Eadwine.) 50 I ^-EADPINE M-O FILTVNAVt. XIII. OT'I-EO HAM Wt. M<ineycr. (rierccd. KN(iI. [Wallingford. ANLLORVM FILTUNE. 24-4 . vi.

17.EADfJAR. .' No.

. No.17G ENOLANI).

15 5. ZIEHO Wt. 20 1. TENO ALBV 72 i«E7XDC-7^-R RE>i« TEHO Wt. 7G I-ESDCAR. ^ ^ ^ anoNWt. 74 "i^ERDLAR R-E-I^ A$FER "t" J" CMON- ^ Wt. 70 •i'ET^DCTXR RE^ ALBy- Albutic. 69 ^EADCAR RE /EOEL ZIENO Wt. BERN Hh *I^ *i" BcriiferS. sige). 17 0. 11 G.EADGAR. Moneyer. C8 I<E-7^-DC-AR RE /EDEL ^Selsio ( = iE«el. 20 2.REX Var. 73 J^EADCAR REI A$FER AeforiS. Kcvcrse. 71 »i«E-A-DD7\R REw ALBV 4< 4^ ^ Wt. 18-5. In ikM FERO Wt. Bcncdictus. 210. . 75 i-EADDSR REXt BENE oiht:Wt. 190. T T" T TEMO Wt. 181.

80 tET^DC-TXR RE«I< CARD Eiimo Wt. ENGLAND.178 No. Uncertain. 77 4«ESDLSR RE-h BIRII 'i' . 79 HhET^DG-TX-R RE^t CAPE Capelin.-. Moncyor. 22-3. 18 5. 16-7. ^ . 81 ^EADLT^R RE'tO CNAP 'i* *i* Cnapa. Careen (=Far8tn?). FERO Wt. Reverse. VllllO 78 •tEADL7\R RE^ BRIT *^ -^ *^ Britfer«.) 82 riE^ CNAP ^ ^ ^ EMOI • 83 RE^^ 84 ^'EZfDCTSR IJEX) 85 ^EADLAR REX^ . ObvpiTic. "h "b \Vt. *i* em5i(Chipped.J^ "i^ LINO Wt. 190.

179 . No.EADGAR.

XIV. Moneycr. 1. Obverse.] 9G ii^EADLAR RE 97 98 . No. Reverse.180 ENGLAND. 95 4«E7\D[L-7\r r-E'i' criD MOUE [PI.

No.EADGAR. 181 .

182 .

EADGAR. No. 183 .

.. N.184 ENGLAND..

No.EADGAR. 185 .

MVl/ID 200. OCM (Broken. 4. O "^ O LYS Wt.) 156 •^EADCARE^ ©4-0 BRIE Wt. Q XIV. FREO FreoXrio. 21-2. . [PI. 22-2. SILE Wt. 20-9.O NYN Wt. 151 RE4^ EAD Eadmund. 157 ^EADCARE GIL Gillva. No. 155 ^EADC[A]R RE EO[R] Eoro<5. 'i' Q \Vt. 19-8. 22 9. 153 »» >» EALF O O •!- Ealfsige. Obvorne. 154 REX EALFS 1 GEM 'i'S> Wt. 150 ^EADGAR RE ALDE © >!- PINEM Wt.18G ENGLAND.] 152 RE O EAD !. Moncycr. 23-4.

187 . No.EADGAR.

173 20-2. 188 ENGLAND. 21-8. . 7. fEADQ-A-RREX" •^ESDGSR REX AC •I-EADLAR-. i Dudcuian. 21-4. XIV. Wt.REX-T- 'i'FSSTOLF >X< HOI Wt. 20-2. Monoyer.• Duraud. 21-4. 168 t'EADCAn. Pellet in Wt. Wt.^E-A-DCAR REX -$• •^EADLAR: REX) ^FSSTOLF MON : Wt. 172 I-ESDLSR. I-EADCAR REX Tl 1<DVDEMV MOETll Wt.REX-. ^EADCAR- REX-. Pellet in field..HOI Var. 190.) MOT lS-2.ES (Broken. J. In field. •. 174 I •i^FASTOLF! MOKE Wt. Type ICG i. [PI. 178 ^FASTOL-F-. 210. *F-A-STOL-F -J-MON Wt. 21-8.field.-F MON Wt. Var. 175 i«EADDARTRE-X ANCL ^FASTOLF! MONETA" Var.) Fastolf. 171 "^EADCAR! REX! ^F-A-$TOL-.. 177 20-7.* Wt. var. 19-8. 240. 169 J^EZtDC-AR- REX ANCI ^DVRSNDIES MONETA Var.REX-S •^DVRAND-E$ ]'(tr. g. OliVITHO. ^FASTOLF-. EDM~0 Wt. — Wt. 176 20-3. 179 •i'FAXTOLF ) ES MOT Wt.] Type 1G7 iii. MOT •. In ficM. HhEADCAR RE /E€»ER iEXcred.. In field above and below cross patte'e. 170 •J-EADDAR REX •i<FA$T-0-LF M-O-N (Chipped.

Fasti ilf and 19-5. 188 ^ESDCSR-REX 1 = 4-HEROLF O MONEWt. 19-6. 18-2.st(ilf and Oda Fastolf and RaCn. No. XIV.- REX-S- 'i'F^rSTOLF^ ES MO 22-2. Wt. •i«EADGAR RE'i« MT- ^IG0LFERDE5 MOT Wt. In field. MON: in Herolf. Pellet in 191 i<EZ[DGAR: REX "i-EADGSR. • This may be the initial of a mint. angle uf cross. 21-2. 20-4. i-EXCDGAR REX AK. Var. 20-7.BOILA ^\ t.] 182 ^ESDDAR REX •i-ESDL-SR 5 ^FSSTOLF- BOIGTf Wt. LcofLelm ? 19G HhESDGSR) REX SrC I'LEOFINCiEJ MOTWt.R-EX T\ ^HEROLF) MONE-TWt. 195 ^LEOFNEL M0NET Wt. 211-9.REX I Wt. The nioncycr'a name Fiwluan . Wt. 189 Moneyer.- ^HEROLF! MONE Wt. 181 ^ESDLAR i REX L [PI. 220. 18G >i<E-A-DC-7X-R RE I ^GRID NONE't'© Wt. 185 ^EADDAR REX ANGLO • • -^FIODVAtJ MONETA Vi(r. IVlkt one 18-i. — •i^FSSTOLF RSFN Wt. 24 0.1 EADGAR. does not occur on the cuina^^e of any Bub8C<iueut reign. Reverse. Ingulfcr}S. 21-4. 190 REX field. Fa. 180 •i<ESDCSn-. iluiga. 187 ^ESDCS-R: REX "1-liEROLF A \'iir. 19-7. 8. 20'4.l. (iri. 18-8. I^oofinc. Wt. 193 ^ESDGSR. 189 ^EADGAR REX^ «i<EADGAR-.REX: Var. I-FS-STOLF. in field. 22 191 2. 183 REX 4-FS5TOLF V OD-SWt. Obverse. 184 i^ETfDCAR. 20-5. Cross puttee G* Fioduan. 192 MIEROLF^'ES MOT Wt. I MIEROLF: MONET Wt. Gifelceaster or Uliioswic.

•^EADCAR REX TO "l^EADGAREX ^/ELFSICE MOl/IE Wt. Obverse. 20-9.•.) Bruninc. 10. 208 REX RE -i-LIOFSTAN MONETAI (Chipped. 20-7. 199 TO [Pi. 9. Kevcme.) Liofbtan. I . Baldwin. i<Tr. Elfatan. 22-5. (Fragment. 4^ALDEYYIHE© Wt. 207 REX •i^EADCAR ^COLENARD mONET Wt. 20 7. I ^EADCAR [REX] "fBIRLSCTAN MO]NI (Fragment.] 200 -i-EADDAR REX TOD REX TO BR RE't- i-EADMYND MOH Wt. XIV. Manticen. 202 t'EADCAR "i-EADCAR •i«YYIUIC MOT Wt. 20-5.190 ENGLAND. ADLAR REX "i^BAL • • IN MONETA Ill field. 17-4. Ci>lcnard. Type 205 • • V.) 20G -i-EADDAR RE4- «i<BRVNINC [n. Wulfbtan.) Birg&tan. 22-9. JEUa'igc. 21-9. 201 •i«EADLAR i-ELFSTAN MONETA Wt. purmod. No.] mONETAE (Chiiiped. 209 "t-NANTIEEN MONETA Wt. XIV. Moneycr. 22-8. Eadmund. 21S. 11)7 't'ESDLAR) REX Tl I-PVLFTAH MOI/IET Wt. 210 ^EADCAR.RE^ »i«SAYDTINE ^rmONV Wt. . 203 REX TOD +)VRMOD MONET Wt. a. 201 RE^ T +)VRM©D MOm Wt. Var. 22-2. Aldewinc. Uuilsig. Type 198 iv. Saydtine ? (Saduting?) Type 211 V.

II. see Boia. or Elfwald (Stamford). Surclos. Leafen or Leo/rne (Ipsicich). Sumlos. wick Fastolf. a. London. iu the above list.D. Uuiijnr. Cnapa or Cnape (Stamford). Boga. &c. Oiinnidd. Sehyhyryht or Sthxburht. Osniaer (Wartcich). A. O. (LuffWilli r [cf. Eanulf (LiucoLo).- Escmaii. Eadnof> (Southompton). Huitan. see /Escman. Brantinc {Norwich). Wigl'irf: AViiit!<ige or Facer. Beola.( 191 ) EADWEARD (The M... Ilancrent. Ostadd (Southmnplon). ^Ifwald bury). 975. Lewes. Ldmuudsbury. Sinjrclinc. see Nancrcnt. are C'uuibriJge.rtfnrd). Biirhstnn or Burnstan (Gloucester). see Lacer. 3Iannic. &c. Boia. JElfweard or Alfweard. Tunulf (Buclingham). The names of moneycrs without mints attached to tliem are rlilefly taken from Ihnlinn's As tliat writer (fives the list of moneyers separate from that of the mints. Nancrcnt [=Haacreut?J (Southampton). St. Manna. &c.vutyh. Mana. Jlangrim. it hut l>e»n imposslhle to ronm-ct the former with the latter. A^dirold. = Baldric] Beaniene (York).E?elm?] Lacer] (Stuuijurd). Eadtcine (Wilton). see WullVar. Dun (York). Wulfi't'iii or Wulntau (Stamford. [=. Chester. Biegenulf ( Winchester). Brilitfer« (Bath). Rodbert.E^ehmld. McRD. ^VullVar or WiilC'iir (Stamford). Wacer^ (Stamford). \?eudgitr. Canter- Hild (Stamford). Alhstan. Melsdon. lohan (Extltr). [cf. Sccc. aud Ihetford. Ogea ? (Stamford). Lydl'ora. Culm. Wynsipo (^Vincboater). The mints piven by Uu. Styrgar. Knapa. Mantut (Soulhnini)ton). 979. Cyne? Deorulf. Hat'irrim (Lincoln). Bermene. Levig [ = Lifing?] (Lincoln). Win'rhisii /). yE^cstan. Isulf. Lvmne. Stamford). (Cuntirhnri/. AVulfm. Oia. Wine Grind (Linculn). Eanute? Elf. Megered ( H^inchesttr). see Ciutjui. Saccr. Wynsigc (Wiuchcster). or JEtstan (Lyuine). ESehn or E«elii ?).^Sflred or jEiered (London).see iElf. JE^elmild or Atelwold (Jjondon). (Canterhnrij. . J^ulfnd ur Will/ml.\ford. {Tamicurth). (Bedford). . Boiga.vr (Il. Ifunic. Wilebeart (Ii)s\vicb). Bemene. Mxhuien. Oda. Indolf or Ingolf. see Lacer.llnK ami not rrpntkntrd * list. Lacer or Sacur Leficold. liuldic [ see . iElfstiin or Elfstan (Bedford. Grim Glonmilf? (Stamford). JE^ehtan. iEscman or Escman (Stamford). Stnmford). (York). Osulf (Derby). &c.d. MoTieyerB* Adelnver. Cvlgrim.

Around. Around. circles. T>. PI. inscription between two circles. inscription between two circles. (liaflrmed. pointing down- iiuH bdicetn tivo circles.. i.IG. Type lind r. [:Montagu Coll.. Obverso. between A 10. Around.102 ENGLAND.] . Around. inbcrip- I tion betwoin two | Small cross patte'e. 11. XIV. inscrip- Hand of Providence.] [Cf. Roverec. ii. dindcracd. 1. u-itrdx.pe IJusI. DEscniPTioN OP TypEs.

EADWEARD No. II. 103 .

AH EL 214. XIV. 7\NGL0 15 ^EAD>EAR E^i- •i«HAFCRIM N"0 LlhCOL Hafgrim. Grind. ^PINE M"0 LIMENEWt. [Lincoln.] Type 13 i. LIMENE. Moneycr. 13. 20-2. 23-7. Wt. -^EADFEARD REX ANCLCOX ^-/EOESTSN M"0 LIMENWt. or Xancrcnt Hancrent ? HEORTFORD. 22-5. [Lymnc] Type 11 i.] LINCOLNE. Eanulf.194 ENGLAND.] Type 10 i. 20-6 Wulfmaer.] Type i. 22 2.^ •tCRIND N"0 Wt. 4<EADPEARD REX ArCLO I "tPVLFM/ER M"0 IIERT Wt. Rpvprnc. [SuutUitmpton. «1<E7\DVV7\RD E>p •i«E7XNVrb AHLL© M-© LINDCOL Wt. 14 riE. [Hertford. HAMTUNE. jE^cstan (^:«elatan). 12 [PI. 22 7 ANDLCnX . Wine. ^^EADPEARG R4* I •i«l/lAI/lEREI/IT HAUI AVt.

207. 16 •i*E7\DVV7\RD RE^ NQf ^LEVD N"0 LINDOLNE NVt.-JIT. LVVEIC. o 2 . II. XIV. [n.. ^'E!'clr«'<l. [Stamford. 19 "i-EADPEARD REX ANILOVC I •i'/EOELRED M^O LVN Wt. -210. [PI.] MO STANFWt. 17 ^EADFEARE'i- Al/ILLCnX -^LEVIC I H^O LUDCOL-.' i. 240. LUNDENE. 11)3.jp. In Kortharoptonsblre.EADWEARD Obverse.\Vt.ElfwftUl. Wt. 21 i-EADPEARD REX Ar^LCW 1 •i«/ELFP'ALD MO STANFORWt.Wi. 2J 0.] E?cln •. XIV. . Lcvig ( = Lifiiig?). Type 20 i.• ( = iE?elm?). [PI. 23 i<EAD>ARD REX hHL\-~\ I •i<ESCMAN 16. [LuflFwick?*].] Tyite i.] T. -Esomftn or K. U»5 M'jncyer. -jin. 14. STANFORD.soinnn.] 18 •^EADVVARD RE4NCLCnX •ThrEVIC N'O LINDCOL-. 213. •I«EADPEARD REX ANCLCW i^EOELN MTO LVVEIC 15. [Luuduii. I 22 ^EADFARD REX AMILOVC 4</EXCMAN MO XTANFWt. XIV.

1% No. . ENGLAND.

JKjlrhh Kee Eudwine. . Winchfitt. iEfestan or Efentan [= .).. loi:!.. Tbeff.ffilfwcard or . Alri>iq.). ^Efthrold.. or E-wig (Stamf V Anftri ( York). ^Selstan (Hunt.^ifwinc or Alfirinr. Wareh. A^elwold. Wore). Wore).. ^Ifstan. JEilno«.). Stiunf. JErgrcd. ... Elfstan. JElfrcd (('aid. RUG.. Cambr.S/(. JElfgef. /Elfcdh. Lrir. Winrh> •:(.).). Orf. Burl.Ewtli. Oxf....... (Hrrrf. (Hoch..E^^ibrod [ = . Wore).</.... jEhrine [ = /Elfwine i'\ (Crichl). (Camhr. Lond.Ef el trig {Jfvref.. Doul. Chirk. Arfur.. />«'/o.D... jElfiri.. (L^md... Exct. Chost. Crirhl.'). Oxf.).. {AxminM.t. Sec. ^?ulpar (Shaft. Oxf. WuUlncff.. Exrt.Elfwine ?] (B>df. JEfelm (Chirk. Wunr...Sudb./. Hunt. Alfwuld. Lond.).. . Chest. n»c .. (Aylfsb.. ^?Llni:ur or Efrhn/vr (Line. Mahl... Lcwca. Alfijnr. Aificrd [ = .. Lond.d.Elfijar.. [ yE?el. (Here/.. Lond.. 117//. South ic. Arnfur.. itc.).«t.).. Ware). Hunt. Lond Siulh..).Shr(trK. &c.. ^?el\verd. Leie. a.Elt\V(ard] (Haft). vev.. Oxf.). L(>nd. Lond. xee Ead-. JE^ehnjrd W'dlinqf.. Yiirh). Lymnr. ). dec td*o E?el..E^eLstan] (Bath. .... JLlfceM [= Ulfcefcl] (Derhij. Arnrytrl ( York).). Warm. Siull.. . Staf. /. Jlrh.Eftltcold ? j ( Lond.-.'Elfwuld [«-»• aho Alfwold] (Lond. )>.).. Aorytel. Wincht'd. Winchel. Southamp. (SJiretc^. SoiiUunnp. Leurn.d. 'Wareh.. Thrtf. \Varcli.Sn/lieiih. nvn/] (Brift. Chirh.. jElfn-ig or Elfirig(Camhr... Thetf.il. Ailwald or AltV.).t<l.). Hir. Lond. jElewine or Eluwinc [= ^Elfwine] (Chest. p. Alfftiau.. None.f. Ilrh... Crirhl. ( York).Elfwold] (Bath. .. Wincht'l. Lond. JEmririg (Stanif. Winrktiit. Shaft.. Tlietf. ^Ifsifio (Burdn..). Mfged...). JEfchigr (Bath. Line..).. .Soutliw. Asewij.. \'c... Oxf. II. Wallinpf. Southain/i. Mi< .Efelwiii or -Eyelwrini] JElfmur (Ej-tt. Elfno's.. Shaft... (Chi*!..///. liomn. *... jEiehn. Leiceit. Utrti'.' JElfmdd or . .. Hunt. Sdif. dikd a. Elfyft. JEfic {Shrews. Stanif. &e.). jEJelwiiieor ESelwine (Crirhl. Wore). Wane. Moneyers..). 979... Colrh. JEfiflric (Bath. &c..ESelric (Bath..s/. Tamw. ^Ifric (Until. Bedf. Aldr'td (Loud). JEijthcine {Loud... Slanw ii'k.-. Sididj.ir( n f'. Ac.{rn>or.. . ^Eacmaii (Line. ( 1^'" ) ^THELRiED Sccc. Skaft.). Lond.t.l>f/irt<ird?] (Stamf). Aitnld. Thrtf. A. JEfflman (Haric). hkst. Auril (Loud).).. Heref. Stmnf.. Lond). ^ifehn (Bardu... AbnXorb (York).... Slanjf. JEUryi or JElfnfi (Cant... Lond.Lydf'. Lond... Cainhr. Stamf.. Stum/. Lydf.Li<i\i\..Xurw. (Bedf.. (Lond.). .. HiiM... Maid. . JE'qenulf (Loml. Alf'iar. = Totn... -lElfpar. AJ^rtl. (Harie.. Bndqn. Tlietf. Ilrh.l [= . -ESelnoS or Eielno^ (Line.. [ = ..).. Line.). Winrhr^t)... Shaft.. JEJmair ( ]Vinch<»t..). WiuchcHt.Elfweid \_»ee tdso Alf- Win<lic.. UVhV/k. a. Stamf). Ex..Sudb. luli. JRad-. A'c.L«/((Z. Milton.. Winchf'st.)... [ = yElfwig or .vES^ered or /ESenjd (Lond.). Shaft. WidUwjf..).).. .. Shreirg.). Winrlo-t..). Ai>r./. Widiingf. ^dwino.. Lydf.. Cln'.(. Chirh. &c. &c.ElfHtnn.. Skaft.).. All'i'taii. tlxct. liond..

Dranting.'. Sidb. Lunil. &c.). i>outhw. Bvrlilru)^.'ul. Winrlii-xt. Lond.)A?ol.). Diirand or Durant {Wore). Norw. ( . (Ojrf. TjoikI..). Bhicemnn {Ikrhij). Duncild {Guild/. Ciimige. Winclicst. Daiitin[x] (Y(irk). Byrhlno^. Bnininc or Bryiiinr Diliun (Heref. Bryhtric....). Boia [= }} lijra] (Caut. Doda or Dodda {Dover.). Carhi (Exet. Colgrim or (jolgrim (Line. Byrhtio'S [Byrhtno'&] {liinii). CiolnuS. BuorlinocS. Jinstiui.)..). Direicine or Dyrewine {Tliet/.). or Ojlnu^ {Lund.. An'^rif' (. Byrhtrfm {l>iidh. Yorh).S/ocifs.).st..).. York).)- Brumnn Brtin or (^Lond.). fic Bcrhtnmr. Byrhtlaf.). Exet. Guild/. W'incheKl.. Ki'p.). Burhxiiin . we Goldwine. C'ltel. Byrhtwold (iojuZ. Diidrig..s/. (Soiitliainp. Brihtiriild or Windiest..).). Clem {Ciiinbr. = /liir/7:'] . Byrhiidf.-. Crintin. Byrhtfer^ {E.)(Sitilh flinriiiilf or lUnriiiilf {Hi itf. Heref. &c. {_ Brun.. Wallinijf. Ci)tii { Wiiichext..). Byrhstiin or Bi/mstan {Kyivt.tri. Jiijrhtxiiji'.. Exit..).).). see aim) Ai'iv\. Byrhtwine.)Jt. Yorlc). liyrnlmj [= Bruning?] {Suuthamp. Wdrn:. H. Jl.).. Cristijin. or CristUn {Stamf.).a..).). Line. Jtorh. H7«r/. CculiioS. Byrhliriiir.). Jfiiliixiiji.. Sniilhw. Byrhsige [ = Byrnslije'} L)un {Leic. Coldicine. = Bryhtrir'] (Exet. y»rh). Win- chid. Aitiiil [ KNCiLANI).). nre ncorbnoiS. Dirsi[ge '?] = Deorsige ?J {Lond. ( Yiirh). Ikrlitna*.).. Soitthw.Tlitnii* [=l{c()rlitn(..).. Bntnti^ ? Bryhtred ( Winchr»t.).)..).). &e.)..l. lirdi r„l {York).- Windi. JhihU. Ditran [see Durtan] {Yorlc).| Deursiqe {Lund. sec Dioremun.. Exet. \c. Dyrewine {Tliet/. (L'ant. Bruiirjiir (.. &c..). Drhii-old IDrildiroldri {Land). BurlitnoX.. Dnulf {Lund. Lond.).. Jhrul [ = Diendf.ir. Thd/.). [see also Direicine'] {Bed/. W'lirih.). lUjilitmnir..). Ckicc {Lond. Bvrlitlaf (Hortf.).).. linhiiriui'. Lond. Sltaft..). Cytel {Exet. York). Dreng (Line).. [see also Cnif^ {Camhr. Cliexf. Citit or Coiyrim Brnntinc {Ipi<a:. {Chest.). see Brihtlnf.1 (hind. Cynt [ = CnM<?] {Camhr. Lund.).1!»8 AfiiKin (Line). Cyid..).. n.nrhixt.. liiiUlm:ir.). Byrhtmar. llhhljir^ [s/c uJ^o Jh/rhtfir^'} {Loml).. Totn. Bruutat (Line.. Brildiriiie. Boga. Brilitlaf or Sii.). Shim/. Warir.. ..-taii (Loud. Deoruhg? {Clint. Loud.). ]yiirih. &(. Ai»)lj\)r «!///( Yorlc). rhlirhir.). Lydf.). Cylel. Windiest. Brildric or Bryhtric (ll'are/t.. &c.). Cytlrx 1= Cytlbern'^'] {Line. Dyremun. Jtiil'iiit.s< *' Duru-ine. Cinrir {Dunr. Xonc. »ee Bvrhtluf. A?irllllf (Luli.ihhil/.'] {Cant. &c.] (Lond.<rt Dud. Totn. Jtyri [= Byrnin'i'i^ {Southaniji. Durtiin [ = )?urstan ?] {York). Cytlbern or Cytlern {Line. Ihrtj'. Line. . HI I' lirlhl irini'. Diorenuin or Vyreman {Lond. (kiixi(ji'. Cuna. Jl'yrhtrcd ( W'.. Brihtnof'. «»-'• Ilrihlmtld. (Ui'l-rr.). Wanh. {Biiriln. Boitj.... DyrhtmnT. lit rill iii.)..). (Dover). Totn. Dudel or Diohle {Exet.. [cf.?i] (Windiest.J.). JJyn.rlt.u.Vorir. Ac. Byoija {Dover). Bynic (^Soiithdinp. ('iirifj (Loud. lirihtrir or Byrhtrio. Du/ndm [ = Dy/nehn?] (Bardn..' { Siidl..). Duustau {Chich. Bruna (Exet. Siiiitliamp. Loiul. or Cynna {Chich.) 'I'Im'iI'. Cunua.. Deorulfi'\{Lond. Lond.).<'. lioije. Cltelhe [Cytel?] {Yorlc). Windiest. AVindust. Cynsige or Cunsige (Dover. Wilt. [ = Bniustau or Byrhstun?] (Winrhi-st. Herir. Diida [. ]{yrlilwold..).).. Coleman {Ox/.. ]yinclted. ike. Cudi {Exet.lb.). [ = Colgrim ?] {Lxmi'i).

Kh(Minc l-Elfwinii] (Chest. Ealhstan. Wiuehest. see Eadici. Siulb. Exd. Efdrine [Efdicinc^ (Lond. Edword.../r/(oS or El/no's ?] (Cheit. Elolniht [= Ellbriht ?] (Stanif.. Cioda or Godda (Chest.).. Wincliixt.)..). Exct.. Edsigo.). Dover.)..ond.-4. ii(i(Y«/[. Eadwiiif.). Eadwod = Eadirold..).). Lond.).). Kocli. Clioilivine. Eoda ( \\'ullin(jj. (Stanif. Eijrsifje (Wareh..). liorh.. b.. liach...). Sudh.i\vin<-] {Sidhunj). Thitf.)... Arc. Eadsme [ = Eudsige?] (Lond.). SontJiic. /. Staff...). Stawf...^THELR..see also iESul. Godrii'o Godu-ic [ = (. Tliott". see Ealdivd (Lond. Lijnine. 'I'hdf. (Tddiog.- (•<( iniaii. Tlwt/. Esrea (Stamf.. see Eadwino.). or Edwunr (Xonc).. EseiU'i (Limd. ( Fasulf. Iloch... Eijrhitd (Exit. Will. Toni.. see Eadwinr.. Eilofa-ine (Sotithw. WullYork). see Eihif..). Gandf (Wore). Loud. Edfecer-i (Yorh).). Glour. TIatf. Camhr. (I. Exrt. TIatf... Eadwiiic and Edicni'] (licrtf. Koch..- Line. Eilaf or Eiloj[.. Eadiriov Edwi [cf.). see Godcnmn. (Loud. Edsige..)..).. Loud. I^isiv. (Stamf. (iodric (Ihdl'..)• or (iodcro (Li. and l'>ycl.. H7/<. Gudihf. &c. Elenof. Fierseih ? Folcard. {_ Lond. Gmlleow. kc.)..). (Jlouc. Eadliij (Loud. &c. E5el. 'lorCK I|V-. [= Fastulf] (Thdf. Jvlwiiic. Norw.).. Edidhriht (Line).. Eadnioi [ = Eadno^?] (Land.-e ( Thelf. (Lond. Euililiit or (f (tjnul. see (dso JE^cl. see Axewig..). Ell. Fiielnii (Lijmne). Eahtan. Elfij't (Lond. atiiinf. Sudh.//.)..). E. [ = (i'("/(/V?J (liiiar. &c. lioch.(/. see Godll'g. Loud. I. Erowine (Derby. Win- clicst ^ Frost iilf or Fros^nlf ( York). Godwino. Line.. Lijmni'.. Eadsige. llanr. diidrii or Godiiil. Thitf. see Eastulf.llch.-. i. Lijdf.). Malm. Salish.). Fast. ewes.w. /^wir.). (iodolcof.\et. Winrheh. (Jodinc(L/V. Hast... (Xnrw. Eudiitan. Edwiij (Lond... Edwino. Winchcst. Lond. York). Elewinc [ = Kitwinu ?J (Cliost.).). E-iwig.Ecl<t/f\(\'nk).. (Dover.. [lor CJodman ?]. Thdf..-.).).. Edid.. \Vini-hr.. ..)... W'm'xw. Totn. Er/eri (Lond. Sid- mes\ Sta'wi'. Edtlrir(Lon<l.). Edric. or Eadwerd Edwcrd Lond./.ts^ulf. [ = AV/„oS?] (rh. Eidstan. York). Coluli..). Colrh. Godferh or Godifry^ (Gidb.).... ^Y((».).. Eddiitiur (Exit. (Cadb. 7ij'.. Cliicli.. Eardnoi (Lond....d Jjeices).lf. see Eadwerd. Far man Borh.). M(dd. Maid. Eadwdld or Ediculd (Caut. Lond. Fij'hdt..... Godt-man or (iodnmii (Cant. Codi'ij.. Tow Totn..). Edwi... Lond.-. Thttf).o. Chest.. Eadsig. Caul. (iarlin (Linr. Eadnmiid or Edmund {Camhr. Stamf. Eadwacer Bath. Cridd. Loud... Godifer^. Lijuinc.'. Thet/. Eodman Eadric or Edric (Cambr..(/.). H ore). Letce*.. Fastulf.t. E.EiL'llan (York).. Taunt. Farenian \_ = Farman7'] (Line). Edi-red (Lond. Edstaii [= . Coldi./.).. (life (Line. liridqn... (.Elf.)..).).\f. Godra (Lond.). Sndh.r'] (Hunt.i. EaduoS (liridijn.ESestau?] (Hatli).)..i>rii'a^s^(. Frv?iniuiid (Winchcat. (Tamic. Lond. Umf. Earner (Line). DiiVir. Elem<Hl [ = 7.. Shaft. 'i iVo.iid. Lond. WaUiwjf. Sre also .). Colrh.). see Eadric. Sduthumi).. tihnics. Cant... Lond.. E. Edclm (Lond.. Erosiulf l=Erostuir}(York). Edwinnc. Folcoard.-... York).). 199 = Ead8ip:e] Eihbu (Wimhest. Ctilch. A:o.rrf'i n (J^inc). York). see Eadsige. Eahl<i(ir (Loud.... Thitf. Edaf.). see Eadstan.).. l>vdf. (Canihr. Godwiuf (Canilir.'] (Thctf.. Jedb..i (Ashdoicn?. Eamnnd East id/ (Jjind. Liue. Edstan.).. Drrhij. Thef/.). yionc./ ?] {Dnnw. Lond.ED Eadeafge Eadf^ur [ II.... in(jf. Eda (C<(mlir. Edwinei [ = Ed\vint. Exit.

). Ijjsir. Leolnigo {Omdir. Ilcicliyrlit. Wilt. (Aylesh. see Litinc. Lund. = Hoa\vulfy] iChich. Line. Lond.- jM/e I. Winchest. Glouc. Line./>'.).). Bed/.)..).. Sndb.). Leojine [ = Leolwine] {Windiest.)- (CaiiL.riiii <. Leqfriiie. Totn. Lefric. Lenfhyse.). Umdamdii.). ('hint. Lytchuan. Jliiniryttl. Ifiiiicmtni (Tdtn. "Watch.. Ljye/ea or lAjva [of. Line. (Hast. Isgod. Manning Manicine {Coldi. Lcofric.). Liof.. LiofnolS. Sotitlutnip... Ilurd. Ipsw.. Iru. GuithofuY (lu„nhof{(:h<d. Wiiirhrsf.)... Leotlit'lm (Slirews.-. Hereht'ilif. Ijisii\. ddmhr.).). Lufinc. Lyfeman. Lefa] (iMml). <tv.. Loud. Leo/d..).ll. Mdn or Miinn {Wtdlinnf. Mangoti (Exet.).. see Leof. Lewes. ^lanrri nt. Leofa^lm [= Lcoflielm?] (Shrews. Jiilsfdit = Lufini'] W'lirr.). see Lcofsige.... Lcofstan.. LeofrjiS (Lond. see Lifinc.[ ( ]]'i7irh('Kt. fn\ (Drrlnj).. T)mr.' {B. Lyrinc... {Ihrt'f.). Wiinr..). Miinn or Manna (E.Sndli.dh).. None. Lineri [= Lio/rir']. None.). York).). Tint/. Luda. Hlireicn.. Winrhrsf. Bornn. Lcofno?i.200 Cohi or <. llomn. Lenfmon Leo/mo^ (('lirM.).. see Norw. Jiti'ijd (Hdtic. (York).. Jjeortuin.- Stam/. ^^'/. (Joldwiiic ]V inchi'M . Korli. Nevir?. Norw.y Ki/iiKi'ije. (iiiuhiriit {York).)... Koch.. Lei/foTt)? (Of/ord?). Stdm/. Cdnt. I. Lond..).. Mxrtin or Murtin {Shreics. Ynil..). IJvegod or Liu/god {Lond. (Li'wcs).. (iimni'(l{cdf. . Stdnif. &c..). Living or Liwing {Lond. (('ant. [ = lus(a>t ?] {Line). or XaniTcnt.). 'Wulliiujf. Ingelrie (Wincbcst. (ioldiis (SiiUhU. (li<hjiiiii... JIuniiia (Ihirdii. Will. &c. Ihiver.. see Ijcofwinc.. &c. Chest. Wore). Cant. Leiifijar {Here}'.cta. Dover.). Leofwohl or Liofwold (Cant. (tiinvr.iiiid (Line. Colrh.. {Dover.). Loml. Loud. Lefa] {Hast. Line. see Leofric.). Lcof. see (dso Lefinc. see Lilinr. None..).]. see Lytclman.. Tiiniiv. Slireifs.r»//. Jlanrrt'iif. Jlicdi^mdii [Ifiridcmdn^ {Xoni\). Hwafenian..^Sudh. inu\. Mdhn.. Ire. Lond.. JfitiiKt<ni {C'Duhr.. Lcwcs).. Jjeofmer {Norm. Wane.). La?of. [of. Leo/ddg (Stamf. Leo/n[oif]{llitnt.enfsittiu {Exef. Lifiiig.). (York). or Leofhuse {Dover. (Line). JUIdnlfor Hildnlf (York).?)..).).). Guild/.. Hiiitiit [JIitni(i<i'} (Bardn. Southw. Walling/. Liofstnn. Jiisic. Leifwiue " = Leofwiuc ?] = Linnar {Here/.xct. York).).).. or Jncitqad (Exct. or Luddn (Exct... {Bed/. Leo/ijnil ((V/VA7. TnnuB.. llerebn-lit. Thilf. Ilch. &c.. Ilch.sv ( or Hwatmau Leo/fefjn {Thef/... see I^efa.. JA/.sigc. iSoutlidmp. Hunt. Tulii. >:ri' Ariirijtil.).). liCf.. llvii\\u\( (Chirli. Ilimni. &<. Wore). Oxf. Southump. TlielJ'. Leo/ij't {Mdhii.... Soutlidnip. [ — L<-ofrio}5 ?] (7>>n/Z.).. Lu/d {Letuj \c/.). Line.). Hundolf or llundulf [= Hildulf?] Leofwig (Colcli.. Ijeices.). Southamp. L(HuL. Jiifiiic [ Line. Wore). Lecfhese.see Leof. TT'((/ir.-.iyfinc. Hiviilf or Hcnnilf //. Wilt. <... .). (lied/..). see l3yn.. Leofiuc.)..J. l.. Ilrh. Lind {Lond. Leafred.... Lera. Looiinf.. Ipitir.)..).. Lifinc. &c.. CohUInn (LririH)... jrianii > Shrews. Ludia. South ir. Lcwei)./'' [-Lnfsige?] {Dover). Ijeva. Urtf'i. Leoivsige.[ Litman.)... or I^itmnn (Ipsw. jMatiing or Leofinc.. Tdiint.. Leo/man.. J^'orir. Ijond.). ( luxtiiii {I^iiic. IIuiKwini' {Ex(t. see Hanerent. Windiest. Irra.. Xoric.).i ( ENGLAND. Imjod. or Liofred{C(deh. lAofrir. Lefa] {Slui/t. Lcofwinc or Liofwinc {Bnth. Leiifnuin {C'liisl. Sonlhiunp.. Jjeo/iiod. (liiiKir.). Cant.). Uihh'iq. Colrh. Lyiniir.. T^efing. Tliotf.... Ezel. (Iitin'tiiii ? (Lhif. Mdlm. Htr Ciilf^rini. Mdld.).... Mniini'iit.

). Line.. Luud. Hicwini! er Sin-ine (Criekl.<•. Sudb.swi[jr] (Bcdf. / I Unbeiii.jcul'/f} ( Walliwi/.'lit (Winehest.). Hienlf (Chest. Winchtst. Wareh.). [M'/7/<. Stircol ( York). see OJSgrini. SunnI/ ( Yorh). Loud.). \e ( Yorh). Jl/egenhidd. (Line. Yorh). [ = Ba.). Ulfeetel. O^eneitr (Loud... /vr/c.). jA»id. Won-. York). &c.. Yorh-). Stegenbit (Line). nee yidwinu.\'iiiC'llt'st. (Xurw.. Otlirrim. Tlietf.. Ipmr. Osulf.). fewartgar.). V'l/hi (Soul hum)). On^<irim. Soi'iiiud [ = <'><«'»« 1/ HtZ ?]... Sidwine. II.. (Stanif. Swertiiie. &c. Exel.u.. Odcofel [= O^cefi'l ?] (York). Si(jeul/ or Siijelu/ Siejeirine (Chest. Snmtrlefa.. Odii.. L-. (Hunt. SilM)d. York).rl'is^ [= Wiehjisfl] (Thel/. York). Yorh).\et.il. Tiietf.). 0.). Snol/ (Line). Odea. Xoni\. Snelinij (Line). Shiift. ISwetine (Colrh. Tuna (E. Osmxr ( Osmund Osverd. (Line. Seertthrdnd (Sttim/. Ac. Swetman (Loud. I'nimnnd. Shrews.. Line. Suiuerleda....x^eyvt {Thttf.).).. Onl. Sirert [= Swertgnr'i^^Stam/. i'ntln V.).).). Loud.if (Lewes). Oban or Odun [cf. Oxcetel.k<. Stefjeneiel (Line.). York). Line).). Swvrtine. Lo7id.). York). Wih^ilje (Clour. Stirrer.. see Osalf. Oxfnnii ? (Line). lJI/[= Wnl/j (Clint. York). Osalf.. Osgar (Bed/.u„ld Itiifei. Swerteol.. Siol/[ = Si. = Of/<(?] ? ( Oierhd {Hunt. SildodiCi (Mixflmii).). &(. Wallfer. Winciie..).i'](Winehesl. Swe<irtcnr. Sidcwinc..). Hancrent. see Stolen. 201 ( Siije/eri Wore). Surteff (So no. sir Winns.). &c.).). InUgn. Oda] (York). Wilt.' ]\'ihninid ((.). l{. Onheren or O.) [ = Tuma?J (York). Toca or Toga (Cleh. Crirhl . Sired (Clour. Sibw iiu> (Lciiid. ]\'arw.. 0(5grim or Oii^grim (Line. (lp»ir. ( Walliug^f'.i Off? Of/M [ 0/j7„ ?J ( Yorh). Shrews.. Derhij). sir Wilmund. . Seoleii or Sijoird (Soiithump. OsferS (Udvcr.).T [=Codsnnu'f] (Line.).).). Oscyte).'\. Sicilnc? (K..).dtist. Wilt..).ejenold?] (Line. Os(jod.). Wore.).'<iml>r.. Odu [ = Od. Siiwine.»H?J. 'J'uni mnn (Sonlhic. Loiul. Welgi^t. (hhht. Lond. WiiUiiKjf. Wwyiling [= Swerting?] Sijolat.). ^TIIELR. Mna'i (Thet/. W.xet...) (llorh.). Sib?ine?(L()nd. Wim-hi si. Yorh). &..). [cf. (Line.ED Mercicine (Leices). Sienian (8alisb. Slyrctr. Stum/..). Sideman IIW/7e Wi n'liis. Hunt. lAind. Oswold (Lcwcs.).). U: n'siiie I'ohh. iVe (Line. Wiireh. see Nancrent..).. IJcieli)..).l Miild. [ = Wiii^'iqe] ( 117//.iist.... Line.).^t. (Tlietf. York)..). Wore). Winelost. {Cainbr. Ae. Li nits. Swcgen (Client.). Xurw. Ur(ll)rij.). Thetf. Rorh. Swelijs (Lond. (Curbrhhje ?). fewileuian oi Swilman (Southinnp. Sihf. see \VtinHt4in. Sihodii or Sdieodo ( Winehest. Jt-eqeinilf' ( Wiiichest. Siuiierlid... Siwtdd or Siirold (Ipsw. . Onolf.. A'ott.el....)."" (IpHW*). S(disl). 'iiswoe ri (Shn Scot (Slum/. Siric ( Winrhtst. (Line). W.. see Winri/os..).. Vorl:).). Kodl)urt or Ilodbert (Line).xLciit. &c.. Wnnstiin. Sereloms [ = Stereol or Snurteol ?J ( Yorh). Loud. Kigeric (Watch. I'lnnnie Oiulf 'I'liniiif (Buck.\ (Thclf. (Cnnhr Creenirieh. 0?ibeni or Oufhern (Line).. iic. Cliext. IW/t).. Stcureer..). Sitniijod J\o//. ws. O.). Sunol/ \. (Chest. Stum/. &e (Sundw. Udhrmf (Line. see O^j^rim. Lond. Ul/ijrim or Wul/ijrim (Line). W. or Osidf (Derhij. Loud. (York). Osgdt..

\)uTccte]. Wore)...202 Will or W inn ( W'nIliiiriJ..ANi). i.-t'un AVun.).l AViiI.)Wiilt'wi or Wnlficiij (Cant.. Widfiid. i/e)</. W'l/iiKjiiH. Southavip..). Lond. &c. Torksev). Stamf. WuitVic (C/»W... Loml.).. WullnoS Itoinn.r. Verljy. Ilth. Lond. Line). (i?arrfn. York). Jlirif.. purnll. \ ruii. ?J (Lond. pL-odrrd (Line. Thiif. \'c. KN(. &c.). Chich(Kxut.. : I. &c. Wilt. poniid (Chfst. Jedb.).Exiii.).-. I [Cf. W>ilf[sernUo'UI(}{CaHt. (Leie.).in. WultVliui. pif..Y WijIhifiChiHl..).). Wnlfijit.. pon<t.: in /runt. I Small tion 2... Wyiisitjr. Wintrrlxlu II '/(//)( ()/•. Letcen.)...stiiM "\Vynsi<. inscrip- | between two XV..l . Line.Li/nd. Lond.)..uir (Lond. ir/m/[x] [=)i7/i«?j '(cv«z/>. rv. Sfiimf. &c. i.. ri. pond/. &c. diademed.. Cant. Line. ]y(. WuUwiiii(i.. Widumr. Xorir. crosss pattc'e.tnul. pore/ [ = porril \?or(jrini ( AViiK-lifst. ((Ainihr. Wurw. Xf/c.] Type Similar. (Line. var.). Yorh). Southamp.in] (Stamf. York). (Le/c.). Around. xtc I'lfijrim.. ]?ciid(iiir (LciiX'n). &c.&c.'u [«< uho WulfHt. inscrijiBuist 1. i.. iJovt-r. \\uW\i:c (Cumbr. Widjiji-ini.. Shrews.. . Obverse. Hunt.). Lcir. l><jiid.. piiifjod (L'j:it. Around.). Simihir hii4 cross pomiue'c.. Co/c7j.rt:.. Wiimiifi.r. b. AV'iiiclifHt. (Line). a. pnrstan. Wiiu'il<iH. Same. ( Yorlc).. Desckiption of Types. Widford. Wareh.). Jhrhij.. circles. Totn. (^y.. Winclifst. Land.).?. York). Dorr/t. I Same. I. (Ciilrh. [Cf. Shrews..j Tyjye rar. por. XV.). f'olch. &c.. or Wuinwlm (Cudb. Tnmir.. Wnlfiintt. (fee. Line. Norte. {L'j'tl.. (Line. Wn'UvUn ^Vulft?ar. Lond..iiu'.H-/. sceptre. EzkI. (Cok'h. Ildi. VI. Lymiir. por. Vnrk).. u.. porcetel.). Loud.. l. (Liiic).. ic.). Ynrl). Wuiiina.. Whit: {Ihiihjn. ( ' Widhif Wiiiiintrf). or Wul/njd (Lond. \-c-. Wlllfhrnrn.. tion between two circles.. bu?^t r. or Wjnstan {Bath.d\irhl pi'odfjyld. Slum/. SlimrK.-^lun.<i(jc (Lund. Wiiilali {Liiir.. Jlrh. Southamp.). Type i..

Same. liitd //o/( /. Im. i. JypiSiiiiil:ir. ri. [Hild. ri. Type A. Around. fundi crogs pidt^i. Siniifdr. ri. Tin. <Ic. aov.] 7'. I [Cr.. rar. iliiultmcd. vur. c. T. I Similar. Obverse. I bud I.XD II. nir. rliiitd^. e. rar. I'l ::.*- Hand iif I'roridi'urf inituiiuj (jJ... rar.JE'niELB.-Iritj/Hf/. li. no suejitre in fn lut of Imst. a. from bttiriTU hro c•//v•. \ Same. [Cf.. Kl] Type Similar . 'j(i:. no inn>:r circle around huM. i.»//» ii.. :i. ctnlral i<uv hirgeat. 'J. 1$. XV. d. S] . Similur. I XVI. 1. /. Kcveree. five crons^ea jinltt-Vrt tirmnged in lurm of cross. Type Similar. l'\. c] T(/y)e i. .-I r. iiiiicription hetirn u tiro virrlm. nHLithertddi.^^•.jpr A n/r. a$ [llild.. [lliia . dhkling hyend. A.-/.

1.e. h. [Cf. hrntf. lines curved ()U_twards issuing I I from clouds. . a. Similar . e. /. [Hiia. ii. I. Hand of Providence giving tlie Latin benediction i. I clouds. and 10. .. <1. rar. sceptre. 3. 2.'] Type Similar. XVL 14] . rar. ri.€ii. ri. 3. Type B. on cither fida (f Unni\. e. 1.204 ENGLAND. [Hild. ri. ii.. Type Simihir..] ^ W. I I Similar. A GD. Kcverae. crofs pa ttec. Obveno. [Tlild. ^pithout letters on cither side I of Hand. ii. c] Type Similar. rar. VI. Shiiil'ir I on cilhcr k'kIc of llanil. I'nr. U) A. Type B. Type Simi'htr. cross | Similor . vor. in front (f 'pomm. ii. var. Type B. vnr. Similar. ii. vitr. Kcrptrc. XYI. [Ct. ri. 3. third and fourth fingers closed cross in .} Type Similar.

Around. frcquenlly witli centre in uii'. b. Annnid. cross in iii. Tyjyt' C. iii. d.] Type Jhtd diademed. hast r. voidrd. inscription hrtircen two circlcn. c] var. iv. 3] iii. Similar . sceptre. inscriiition outer circle.'k8.. Type Bust 1.. tar. Type Similar . XVI. I Same. 205 Obverse. XV. iii. C( litre. Ueveree. ri. 4. c. 4. front of bust. cross patt^e. Long iiu/j rr(ni». [Ilild. n ] . 4. var. pummee. inscription circles. Ty2)e Type C. var. I Same. sceptre. ri. ri. [Cf. belwecu two [Cf. | n. [Hild. C R V "p. 12.JETHELRiED II. jiellet voided. fn'/uintly trilh pi'lUt in in tarh limb ttrmimicriHrtntt. Tyi>r D ror.] Type Similar.. a. diiulcmcd.. Same. ill tiou between two circLs. h. PI. : Around. iuscrip- Short crosrt. thric : Around. [Mild. vcir.

| [(Jf.] Type V. in armour and radiate helmet. inscription divided by \ tion between two circles. Bust h. Around. tnscrip- Around. ri. 4. v<ir. &. var. coin C RV circle. c. Reverie. I II. Around. Around. Bud I. each limb terminating in three crescents : pellet in centre. in armour and radifde helmet. bust. (liviilcil rudo bust by bust. Bmt I...} . inscription : outer circle. Type E. in armour and radiate helmet. 1. Long Around. Piniilnr. PI.] Tijpe vii. inscription divided by cross. 4. bust. voided. I Small cross prdf^e. [Ilild. inscription : oider [Hild. 4. Type E. reaching to edge of pelht in centre . Long cross.20() ENGLAND. 4. inscription divided by bust: outer circle. Tijpc iv. voided. a.. . var. X. XV. [Hild. var. iti angles. Type E.. PI.] Type vi... ri. Around. Obverse. ins(!iii)tion Sjiino.

rude bust tion. Around. [Cf.ED II. .] Type Bud h. . ri. Around. Reverse. each limb termi|H-llet in three crescents iiatint. PI.. Type F. var. mttiiKj in three crc»rnit» and ith angles. in armour and radiate helmet. 207 Obverse. in centre. I. Bust 1. belon. outer circle. ix.. limh tcrmiin I ft Around. a. Long rroKs. roidtd.: : : ^. in nrmonr and rndiate hrlnut.l. Type V. 5. I [Hild. inscription border of dots. voided. 4. crescent. var. Around. X.* 1. each . outer circle. inscription divided by bust outer circle. XV. inscription divided by bust outer circle. inscription [Hild. Pi. ix.. ri.] Type Similar .. 7^ • C : vithin : The Holy Dove. Around. 5.] <b Bf yle of this nnd the next type certainly Danish. a. inscrip- [Ilil.scription outer circle. tion : outer circle.] Type TJie Agnus Dei r. Around. . loHf^ cross. in. the sidi-s.THELR. I dividing inscrip- Same. • Tlic Type G. bisecting. Square with tliree pellets at each corner: over it. Ti/pe viii.

xi. Type Thr Aiinn* Dei r. inscription: circle.. Around.208 Obverse. ri.. No. tithlet. . Eevene. vnr. [Ilild. ENGLAND. Around. Small cross patttfc. on ACN. a] Description op Coins. inscription outer between two circles. halow. 5. Type G.

Wt. BEDANFORD.-7. 2bi>. [Bedford. f'/r. AVt. ^Ifric. 2«.\i. 2'. .2ETBELIIMD No.. (t. [IJutli. Obverse. 18«. 20 >^-/E€>ELRIi: MnO BAO (ricrctd. 7'(/j)e iv. „ ' I'EDSTAN Mn© BA€> ( Kdtitnn . Reverse. .J Type i. 12 ^/EOELR/ED REX ArcLcnx I i'/ELFSTAN MO BEDA' :>. «i^/E€)ELR/ED REX ANCLCOX -i^/EOELRIC MO /K?Llric.) iEiSelric. •i'/EOELRED REX AN I</EOE57\N- ON BRO Wt. far. ii. 209 Monoyer.] Ti/ih. t'/EDELR/ED REX AfCLOR 7\rCL© 9 „ | ^-/ELFRIE MO© BAD 7. ^'CVNNI Mt© BEDA Wi 27 2 j (Junni. I^/EOELRED REX ANILOVC i 4-O5PI MONETA BEDAF Wl. I (7. rar. 'I'ALFFOLD ON BA€) \Vt. 08wi(g). ANC [PI. viir. Alfwold.] Tij2)e ii. II. tvir. n. I 10 ^EDXTAN M-n-O BAO ANILCOX Wi.i:ifBtuii. Wt. = JE»cbUu?). BAOAN. a.'} iv. ^/EDELR/ED REX ArCL© II. Wt. 2. !• ' I vol. 21 Typt! 1. XV. BAOAN 211. 2U5. Tijpe ill. (Z.

. ENGLAND.210 No.

4. KaJnoJ^.lclio. XV. I'. OcHlmnu. ( Wulfwi = Wulfwig?). 27 XV. 25 "f/EOELR/ED REX ANGLCaX ^^PVLFPI MO C/ENT Wt. [PI. ArsCLOVC 29 I-LEOFRIE MnO C/ENT Wl. ^CODPINE M-0 C/ENT Wt.] Type 34 i. 25 8. I tJ. -JlL'. Lcofrio.] Type HI viii. 20 CISECEASTRE.. I Wt. '». 2G0. 2J0. 1 <(. [a. . Lcofstaii.Khviije. wir.] Type 33 iv. 32 ANCL ^L•E0F$TAN Mt0 C/ENT Wt. ANLLCW [I'l. lill Ko. 2t. 2G */E€)ELR/ED REX an:l0 >^E/\DP0LD Mt0 C/ENT \\i. 22 3.stor. Moneyer. 28 >->GODPINE MnO E/ENT Wt. Endwold. 2.ED II.iETHELR. 30 R-EX „ I I >^LE0FSTAN M\Q C/ENT "\Vt. •i«/EDELR/ED REX ANLL ^-/EDPINE MQN vlMwino. [Chichester. 4. •t/EOELR/ED REX i«EADN0O 5.] MnO CISC 0.»3 I- COLEN 2 Wt. iv/r. Obverse. «i</E€>ELR/ED REX AN: „ ^D0:DMAN M0 C/ENT \Vt. 27 t/EDELRED AfCLO "^/EOELR/ED . Ti/jte iv. Lcofstnn. COLENCEASTRE. 182.

Cynsige. •^/EDELR/ED REX AN! I •I'EREPI-NE MO DEi 16-4. 4^/EOELR/ED REX ^LEOFPIG MQ© COL19-9. 6. God wine. Cvn. Type iv. 25 2. 21 5.212 EN(JLAND. a. ^/EOELR/ED REX ANCLCOX Type I ^OSFERO M"0 DOFRA (Chipped. "I--/EOELR/ED REXAf^L I ^CyNSICE MOO DOPE Wt. H/EOELR/EJD REX i [•I-TOJCA M^O i:OLE[N] (JJroken. 190. Wt. a.] Godman. var. I'ar. DOFERAN. XV. Ti/pc 3r> iii. ANGLO Wt. Type 43 viii. . I var. a. 25 2.p. ^/EOELRED REX ANCLOR ^DODMAN M-QN DOFR Wt. Lcofwig.] Type 39 i. COLN Wt. N. [Dover. I iv.sijjo. Muneyer. var. 20-4.) Osfer«. [n. 42 ArcLcax ^LyNSICE MQO DOFER Wt. a. 41 l«-/E€>ELR/ED REX AhCLO „ ^CODPINE MTO DOPE Wt. d.) Trica 3G ^PVLFNOO M^O Wulfno«. Tyiw 40 ii.] Type 38 viii. Erewine. v(tr. [Derby. DEORABY.

JiTHELli^U II. . 213 No.

21 I ENGLAND. No. .

20 4. Wt. I^VLFLETL MO EOFR Annult't in 2. purstaa. 20 5. Eikf. Crops Olio j>iitt«'<' untjlo of cros. a. rar.i. ( = Tuuiii ?> Type 70 iii. i'ODA MOhvETA EFERFIE Wt. Wt. 2o 2.iETHELRiED II. 74 •^/EOELRED REX ArCL ^F/ELLAH M~0 E0FE AVt.'. Type 80 iv •»j<-/e€)el-r/ed rex am: ^EVTEL MQ0 •i-EADRIE E-0FR 2. rar. Eutlric. Sumcrloda. 22-5. Ix-Sifstun. p/EOELR/ED REX Ar^LCW 4<0OCRIM M0 EOFR Wt. 27 2. 21 G. 220. Moncver. •tEOELRED REX ArCLO ^EILAF M-^O EOFER Wt. 76 [•i<]/EDELRED REX ANC-- ^^CHVJNDOLF M'O EFO (Broken. 21 85 4. 84 HhEOELRED REX ArCL t-iVMERLDA MT0 EOFR Viir. 72 •i«/E€)ELR/ED REX AN:L0 I «i«£)yRSTAN MO EFER Wt. O^prini. Oban.) Ilundolf? ii</EOELR/ED REX ANLLOK REX ArtLCnX . Obverse. •i-/E€>ELRED HhTVnnE n^O EFERPIC Tummo Wt.i Wl 2 . 82 •i-/EeELRED REX ANGLO 83 ^<LEOFXTAN Mt0 EOFR Wt. Type 73 ii. O. 75 "t'/EBELRED REX AtilL J'FAXTVLF MO EFOR Fastulf. i'/EOELR/ED REX AfNCLCnX | I'OBAN M"0 EOFRPI Wt. FiL'Uun. CytL-l. 21G. RfVirso. 215 No. • llfovliL ANCL0 \'iir li.s iiiiil pollft iu in nnotlit-r Wt. 172. 21 4.la. 22 81 t'/E-DELR/ED REX an:l0 Mt0 E0FR Wt. a.

[Ilohcster. I'J-2. 90 •I^NEOELRED REX . Wt. Col grim. Ilil. 92 •i<EDERED REX ANLLO I-OOiRXTrAN Var.lulf. porstiin. bcliiml Type 87 viii.] GIFELCEASTER. [Jedburgh ?] Type 93 viii. Ol. 91 REX 7\fsCL0 i "^PVLFZICE MtO EOFR Wt. var. »i-/E£)ELRED REX 7\n:lo [PI. 2. 21-8. 21-8.-) Wt. 22-3. 20-4.an.«s. •i^OEODRED ON EO Wt.^OBAN M~0 E:-OFR Wt. . Obverse. 97 GIELE Wt. Reverse. >^LE0FSILE M"0 CIFEL Wt. MoiipyjT. I'F'VLFM/ER Ml© LE0€)A Wt. 8G "i^NIEVNCII I'ar. 21 89 •i«IRR7X MO EOFR Wt. ^/EOELREO REX ^/EOELR/ED „ TVfSC «^EOLCRIM MO EO Wt. Wulfmaer XV.21G No. GEOOA. 18-7. Irra. ENGLAND.] Type 94 iii. 95 •t/EDELR/ED „ „ . 200. Wiilfdige. <t. ONT CroHH pattc'c liUHt. 22 0. Crescnit in one angle of cro. 170. ^EDELR/ED REX AMILOVC . MO EOF Wt. peodred. 22 8 Ijcofsiffc. 8S T^r^LO I-HILDVLF M :0 EOF 1. I 96 ^PVLFELM M~0 „ CIFELj Wulfelm. God.^/E€)ELR/ED TXfSC . ^LOD M~0 LIFELE Wt. 7.

iETHELRiED II. 21' No. .

.218 No. ENGLAND.

. Obverse. . ^EDELR/ED RE:X AhC I ^EDELXTAN MT0 HV Wt. 25 0. Wiilfgar.rrlonl.Elfric. [I -owes. 22 f). 7\ISCLCrV( HUNTANDUNE. 7. >^/E£)ELR/ED REX ArcLcnx I 4^/ELFRIC M HVNT Wt. 219 Moneyer.j Type 115 iv. Wt. I IVlkt iu li. HEREFORD. 2J 2.Elfric.] Ti/pe ii. •h- „ . Wir.ld. n. 1 Type 118 iii. "^DILION MO0 HERE Wt. [li. Jilfwcnnl.] 7'i//ie i. I ik. i-ar. [Huntingdon. ^/ECELR/ED REX Ar\CLav( ^/ELFRIC MOO NVNT Wt. I Type 119 iv. 21-1. Dillon.. .gut. n. . 22 0. Type 121 viii. ANLLO . 117 'i'/EOELRED REX AfSCLCnX 1 i'P'VLFC}\R M ON HVNTAN Wt. 21 2. 122 ^EOELRED REX ^^/ELFfERD ©N :L/EP:Ei Wt 21. a. L/EPES. ivir. 21 S. •^©SDVT Mt0 NVNT 7\fLLQI <). tvir. «. vnr. Hyrbdtan.i:D If.^THELR.i%I%elfl(aii. I •J^/EGELR/ED REX AN:L0 ^ByRHSTAN Mt0 l-ERE ^Vt.

Moneyer. [Chester. var. Obverse. 23-2. rnr. a.) ii. ^ 'h „ „ TIN }<LEFA ON L/EHPE-A Wt. var. d. 131 ^LEOFPINE M~0 L/EPE AVt. Type 135 i. Loofwine. . ANCLO 121 Wt. L/EP 2G-4. 131 «^/E€)ELR/ED REX AMLLCnX M-EREByRHT Mt0 L/EP Wt. 12G -l-EeELRED REX ANDL- ^ONLAF MON LEFE Onlaf. 125 „ „ 7XNCI ^LEOFPIfJE ON L/EFE Wt. LEIGECEASTER. 21-5. 20-7. 21 G. \'J-5. Ilercbrcht (Uereberht): Ti/pe iii. I ^lfno». Lcfd. : 123 •^/EOELR/ED REX ^/ELFFERD ON I L/EP:E. a.) „ LeofnoS. 20 0. 18-7. ^OXPOLD M~0 Ty/je iv. 133 22-5. Leofwino. Oswold.^EADCAR M"© (^{base. • L/EPE Eadgar. Reverse. 129 •1^/E£)ELR/E[D] REX ArcLcrpc •i^LEOFNOO [M]-0 L/EP (Broken.] Etc. 4^/E€)EL-RED REX ANC «^/ELFNOD ©N LEC-C Wt. 132 Wt. 130 L/EPE Wt. rnr. Type 127 ii. Hh/EDELR/ED REX ANCLCnX 4-HEREBREHT M'O L/EPE Wt. o. ENGLAND. Wt. ANGLCW Type 128 I Worn. 4-/EOELR/ED REX I . 24 0.220 No. Ilercbyrbt.

22 L No. .iETHELRJED II.

l. Rodbert. (todwino. mo ^/EOELR/ED REX ANCL I -I-LODPINE- MOO LINCOLWt. 20 3.l.i 4^/EDELnED REX ^\ALL [I'l. 15:5 "^/EDELRED RE^I^ AUGj ^RODBERT I/I O Lll/ID 4. Wt. «1</E€>ELR/ED REX Af^LCW •i^RODBART MO LIISDCO Wt. 22 151 ^/EOELR/ED REX ANQL AfSLLOR I -^VLFCETEL MO LINE Wt. IGl ^/EOELR/ED REX ANIL- •^DRENC MOO LINI Wt. Rodbart (Rodbert). 157 •I^/EOELRED REX AISCLO ^VNBECN M~0 LINEOL Wt. 152 ^/EOELRED REX ANDL 4-OOBERN MOO LINE (<lii]. 162 ^EOLLRIM MO-© ArciLox I Col grim. Ulfcctcl. AVt. 21-2. var. a. lin: wt.•. Unbc<jn (Unboin). Obverse. pSTECENBIT MO LIN LIN 2.•>•. far.po. Wt. Ucvcnic. l». 19-2. 20 2. . loo •t'PVLFRIL MO LINEOI Wiilfric. XV. 20 G Type 15G ii.. Stegcnbit. 210.) OSbcm. 22 159 AISCOVC ^VNBECN M"0 Unbegn (Unbein). 158 «I-/E€)ELR/ED REX AWILCW . Drcn?. 2G-2. 20 4. Moneyer. Wt. 21-4.j (Jrin. X-/EGL-RED R-E-X 1\-\(D X/E-^CMAM N0 L- HE JEscman. ' -fCRIHD ]A~0 LIHEL W't. No. . a. Wt. rar. KNOLAM). Ti/pc iii. 25-2. ^SelnoS. IGl ^/EDELR/ED REX ANIL •^/EOELNOO Mt0 LINE ^Vt. 1G3 ^/EOELRED REX ANCLO Wt. 24-2. Type IGO iv. ir. n. 280.

223 1G5 171 172 173 174 175 177 .ED II.iETHELR.

^24 No. . ENGLAND.

201 208 209 VOL . 22 0. 19 G. 20 7. rar. LVNDON Wt. 135 „ ^LEOFSTAN MTQ LVND Wt. Moneyer. d. 23 7. ' 197 J«FVLFM/ER M-Q Wulfiua-r. •i^/EOELR/ED REX ANGLCTVC I •i</ELFCAR M'O LVNDO Wt. II.iETHELRiED No. 19G „ „ -^OSALF H ON LVWDI Wt. 22 198 U. 21 3. Osalf or Ubulf. 199 T-PVLFSTAN M^O LVNDO Wt. Obverse. ' : •i'PVLFRIC M^O LVNDONI Wt. Type 200 ii. Lcofstan. 22 7. I Wulfric. God. 194 ^/E€)ELR/ED REX ANGLCOX „ ^COD M"0 LVNDONI Wi.

22G No. ENGLAND. .

IITHELK.ED II.. . 007 No.

S ENGLAND.22. No. .

/ETHELU. II.KD No. •1-1\) .

No. 50 ENGLAND.2. .

ED II. XV. 1 ^/EOELR/ED REX AfCL i^/ELFRIC MO-0 N0RO Wt. Reverne. •i'/EOELR/ED REX ArCLcax ] "^SPERTIfSC MO NORO 25 1. 21 1.] Hwnteman orHwatuiun. rar. d. Swurtino). | vur. 210.ETHELR. Type 291 ii. >i>(InscrintiondouhIestruch. 287 •t'/EOELR/ED REX ArCLOVC "I-EALDRED M"0 MALD G. 23 NORDPIC. i</EOELR/ED REX ANELOVC ^SPVRTirC M~0 NORO I Swyrtinc (or : Wt. 22 7. u. . ntr. 1:5.] Type 288 i.. I Manninj. 231 No.)\ ^M AN INC M~0 NORPI Maning. Swcrtinc. "^HPATEMN M"0 NOROP: Wt. Tyi>e 29-1 iv. Type 293 iii. Tijpe ii. vur. a. Nvt. ^FOLEERRD XVI.).. [Nuiwicli. . . 289 ^/EDELRED REX ArCLCW [I'l. Wt. 25 2'JO I<M7\NNIC T^NILOVC M~0 NOROPIE (Chipped. Typi viii. 19 8.Elfrio. I 295 4«/EOELR/ED REX ArCL- •i'HPATMl MO N0RC Wt. 21 8. NORO Wt. Obverse. Ealdrod. Moneyer. ' "I'EDELRED REX A-NLL-OI [Pi. W 292 t.] MO FolccarJ. 0. 1. IlwaU-mun. n.

.232 No. ENGLAND.

.MTBELTiJEB II. 233 No.

315 J^/EOELRED REX ArCLO „ J-ZEDELPINE ON STT^NF^^'t. 25-2. 26 6. i^/EDELR/ED REX ^EIOLNOO 0N SIOEXTEB: "Wt. 23 0.2151 ENGLAND. 320 AHF i'OEE M^O STAHF0 Wt. . Godffig. [Sidbury V] Type 31 . ! lU-i. ANLL-OR STANFORD. 21-3. 19 2. 24-2. var.5 i. [Stamford.] 4. 318 „ ANLL' »I«L©DELE©E ON ST7\-NF Wt. ^iSelwine. Reverse. I 322 4«/EOELRED REX T^fSCL Wt. 170. IS 0. Ofe? I Tij}ic ii. XVI.] Type 314 i. SIOESTEBYRIG. CioInuS. Obverse. No. Godeleof? 319 ^/EDELRED REX ANL„ "i'DODELEOE M~0 STA Wt. Moneyer. . Wulstan (Wulfstau). ANCLO[I'l. 316 7^N "I^EXPIL M-Q STANE Wt. a. 317 •I^/E£)ELR/ED „ AND- •i^LOD/EL M"0 STAN Wt. 26-2. 321 ^/EOELRED REX I ^^PVLSTAN M"© XTAN Wt.J</E£)ELPINE MO ST-A-NWt. Eswig. •J^/ECELR/ED REX ANLLO .

/ETHELR. .EU II. 235 No.

230 i:N(iLANl). . No.

1^37 .^THELRiED No. II.

.2:. .s enclanh.

ETHELR..ED II. 239 No. .

240 No. . ENGLAND.

241 .. II.ETHELR^D No.

.212 KNULANlJ. No.

J&dhcrht or . JFAilfdm.. jEUl^m. JFlfid/crii Lond.. yElfred or JElfnjd (^Cant... JEgdicard or .lfric Moglu (None).). Lend. \c. Hell. Lond. ^ad.). Lewes. (None). WaUiufjf... Cadb. ^gelmxr (Bath." fon of ..xet. (AxmiuKt. -LV/xiV. Cunt. Chi ft. (Aijltub. Wore. Hunt.. Liic.. Aria or Aden (Cambr. Buck. None. iEUrir-. Lund.iEisman [ = Jilscnian ?J Southamp. . . Jtdb. >$^H>i g. Ileref.)..h'l- llaat. Hire/.).. Line).. &c. jTj' Hunt.. illouc. from Ai>ril lo Xnvcnibcr. JEfdred (Winched). Southw. lie. I. Moniyers. Soutlianip.. Southw..). .). Jh^ddan ( Winchid.. Biiihjn.lric or /Eyerie (Datli. fVill.. Southw.i or El/wi Loud. iCfard. Stam/.. Hch. yh'Igi'l trine [ (Crichl. Winchett). Brid. Leic. iEgehvig or L'gehcig {Hch. Wincliesit.. Southw. (None). Soutliw. «b«j rrlgtu-d.^gelwine or Egelwine {Bath. kingiiom (Wessex... Taunt.. (St. jE^i hri or -4 ?( ltd [ = JEf'dtriq or ..).Si>v.. yTJI/icard.).Mahl. ^l/ere Al'lftr^ ( Yorh). Chest. yiiaft. Lydj.). fre Alfwold.). Wilt..- see Ead.).. xEX. Linr. Brid. None.. Crichl.r... York). [ = . Wilt... JElfici and Swencel (Limd. ml). Loud.). E. Winchett.. Winchcst. . and East Aiigllal. Cant. . Thetf. /milm (Chich)....)..r (TIch. M\i\i\xT JElfgxt or /W/git (Lond.s7<i)/i/. jEstan or Estan (liath.gelhrihf] {Ii>nc.. yEdan Loc ( Winchtat.. Loiun. York) /L7/(rnR'J/us(/7<./i. yEl/icoll.r] (Bch. JElfeh or ^EU'en {LonJ. \Dorrr.. Lond. Wiucbest. ^gelsige (Hast...... Cambr.- JEthmin (B>ilf. Mflieah or /Elflieh (Slinw*. Wilt). JEijelUriht (Cliich. 1016.). Shaft.. fhnan ( Wini-hmt. Chest..d.. Ijisu:). Breici... Wallingf.7i7/r/cr] (Lmd..^E^relwcrJ (Loud. Thrt/... uElfstan. = iEgel\Nine ?] ..). i/r/i.).)..). &c. Tumie. York).). Htnf.).^ie. iEgelric (ChM. Line). Chest. rir»i MoK In . iE?ebnii..).).» Rrcc..). Lond.. Wiucbest... Line. (Bath...).. Ib-h. JElfige (lioch..j<. Brist. tic.). More. Southanip.... Maid.. Ji:gclm (Cbich. ^mdtcerd(Uunt.. Slirtics.iElfwinc. Chich..). lOlG. (Bardn. Sha/t. Totn. aioiic. . Winchuat. ^gfrye[ = iElfiydVl JEgifinun or (Lond. Salixb. ie.^ 2EUv. None).). Criekl. Southie.. Ltic. lAind Maid.£lcric. JEscwme ( Wallintif. Ca.f:tbilr»«l II..). uE?ebln^ (Line).Ehvine.".. iE?el\vin<\ E^ehvine.. Southw... ( ^-^•> ) CNUT.lilfwouTil. LonJ.. Batli. and dtrd the sam« niontb.). South te. Line.. Lane.. JElhriht 1 = . Oxf. Aljft<in. Ilitnt.). Winchiisl.. • No coins arp known of fxlmnnd " IronsWo. Boch.... Winched. (Ai/bdi. Colch. ^ilsige.). m • R 2 . . Salisb. A. JElric. or JEKwine ?] (A\lesb. Or/.. Cant. Essex.. Lond... York). E.. yElfiioTS (Cbest. Salijtl>. nib«r b* obUln«^ bjr uckly »«»• b«if of Om to Cnut. Cainhr.. Shaft.. JK\fvn iiI..). Walliiuif.Umxr [ = -iV//Ha. War eh. ^Eltwig (Cambr.. Lcic... jTJf dirolil ( Sorie ). Hast. Windiest.xet..Etdhriht (fptw).. Miicc [= yEifric?] (Extt. died a. Chist. Ox/. . 103o.. JF. jUgcnutn (SUnii/. yld/nje [ = .).Ei'el- wine](/W(. tee iE^cIric. Winchcst...). Criekl...D.. &o.. ("C «?!.Eltelm.EIfwig.. (lirewt..

-l. (Guild. Clint (Line). Their.).).) Itrnnrtnn.). Brnnman. Eadijar or Edgar (Lend... Cnytcl Bnvntinc or Brunt iito (Line.).. &c.).). Brihirir (Linr. (.). Eoch. JliM-h.)..r Binla.). Jl. (E.-tuii I Ali'Hi oi J//-/ .). Colbciu (Chest. Yorh).). OjcJ'. Brihtiio?.'. Jlri/niii ' Air. l. Coleman. (Lond. (ixt.. C-orlae Creiewine.). Hunt..?). Jtnrhirold or Biinrold { Winch:d... Loud. Arm..rol. Ala [of. Winchcst. Coliini [ = Colling?] (Lewts).. Cnofeln (Richb. lirnnirln.-^. (Lond.). Briluhn [= Brihthdm'] (SoutJno. Crucau or Grucan (Y'ork). 13liu-aiiuin.. Ea'^nof'... Aglac [ = ()«lac] (Line).•^?] (}'„//.. An^^out. Brand {l<lamf. Byrhlno^. Yorh).c. Cwtil.-.l. Land. (Glouo. Lond. see Cairelin. Brutistnii.). Iknrine Ihnlda (Thetf.ret. Cas (SVinchcst). Stmn/.)..). &c. Mtthn." =Cant. J>nruig (Lond. Lond. BrihtwiiK' (Crichl. Bhimian (Xott..).). Ax^rif) {Xorw.). Jhnn {Lond. Ada] (Bardn. {Line).).). Bryngar.). BrilitnocS.. &.l. nrt.). C^onlliw.i:ij.). Brindiin. York). Lond. Ceolnafi. BnfrroliYorh). Brilmtiin or Bruhstan [cf. Ciliwf. (Line. . Croc or Crorl (Chest.fcc..l-/////•=. Xorir. Iuiriiryttl. I{ojrji[ = Boipi](Dovir).r^ or Brildfr. Brihtwnld (Lond. DoUiv. Colic (Lond. Ciinhof. If. Brun-nir. ncfi BrilitnocS. )*. Ccolno<5.. ... (Bath. Bronstaii or Brehdun [=Brunstau?] (Malm). Bolhi. stc Brunstau.). Ac. (Line. &c.l (Until.<' uImo . Dunstan {Lond. Axriitrf A^Jrrf' ( [. Won-.. &. Lond.\(Yorh).). Cyniht or Cniht (Cambr.). Crurn or Gruru (York).vi (Lond. or Crunan Lond. Colgrim.Klf. Itrnnltil [ (•III = Briin8tnn?] (Line). Cwulin.^.w/](Chesr.). Ik-oni (Y'ork). kc.).. AHwiil. BrimUin (M(dm.).). Itiiri irinr Widliuiif). Borstiix (Lond. Briht/.Ariii'flcl. Drojia or Drowa (Winclicomhe). Land. Yorh). or . U inched. Shrews.). Southamp. Jli/rhdiin or Jlyrndun (Taunt. Brenstau] {Midm. Sand.tlliir »rc Blacauiiin..).i.tiiMyl (Simiif. Tiu Winchcft. (Cliich . Hi )..).).Kir>i-Vj (Clii. AHwul. Oxf. gf'c CetcL ('(iJdiirim' (Liir n). Ci/til. Ci/nna (]\'inchest. Shrews. JaiihI. Eaclno?. Brihtrcd (Cant. WinflioHt. Cftol or Cijtil (York). kc.c.. see Cyniht. J)anJin[j-. see Godric. Brunnir. If (York).).ENGLAND. see Guuleof..(Staui/.). Brid (Hast. Asguut.) Bum mini. Cindan (Dover).. York). Bruniuo. Catoelin (Stanif.). ( /i::".. Nott. Y'ork). Dtrlrij. jrast. Ciniicig (Line). Ihumjar [for Bruugar] (Shrcics. ir. Piorsige or Dyrsige (Hert. Curil (Lond. Jidh. Colcrim. ««> Brumau. Codric. [ Abgod.rf. (York). Malm. Briudint. Cniht. Brnina [ = BrunianVj (Lijdf.. Aiifi/lil. Blaccnian. «< Brunstan. Shdji.Oagod ?] Cicrla or Carhi (Exd.. Byrnni [ = Byrnsigc ?] (Bardn.. Carta.). Croa[ = C. Jl.). liriitiinc. Hce Cserla.. Crinna. src Cctel. (Chest.. Tlutf.).)... Crinan. Colaman or Coleman (Lond.im:.).)..ol. Brihticin {<>. Wallingf. Cin.. Yorh). Bruniin or Briinuiaii (Colch. Jheni] (Line).'. Brijninr.l^/.).r. &c... Yorh).Lond. Maid.). see Colaman. Xott. Ctoca ( Winched.sige (Dover. Ihorinc (Land. York).).).).) Brihtina'r (Jhnr. Kadmund or Edmund (Lond.). Southic).). (Hast.. . [ = C///e/]("Cuet.K''. Brildiri [ = Briht\vinc?] (Creirk. C'/i/'l (Ilch. &o.. l-. {X<itt.). Briining.

Eacrn (Li)nd.«< Crne.Sontlnc. Goodn'r...'amhr.. Godric and Calic (Lond. Godefro?. Lomi. kc. Winehest. Fadolf. see Go Imaii. Colrh.odninn] (Lond. Shreic*.).. Giiuwine. Jjond. see Eadwiuc.ond. Grim (Cambr. Tpxir... Widlim/. (J lone. &c.)..m. Edsige. Gotcild..). Gnorine (Roch. York). Godela^ (Hunt. Fre^en-iiie or FriSiwiue (Steyn. Ficri'ciii.. see . &e.. llomi. Lang. Southamp. Crickl.)..). Godwin.. Tlietf.). Dov«t. /'Vc/^of. I^xit. Euldrcd (Litvcii.. (Here/. .... Cant. (E. Godeleof or Godleof (Hunt.. Edwear Edwiiie. Exet. Ox/. Loud. Edwerd.. lioiim.. see Jlistan. &c. Sidish. 8t.). Griman... &c. Crirhi.. see iESel. (. Ednuer (Exet.). God. Eadwine. (Iodine (Land. Folherd or FoUired (Ip-sw. (Ol^iis'O.. Eadulf \_ = Eadwulf] Eadwc'urd. (Ipsw.. G ridigar. Hunt.Fxrgriin.. Thrt/. (Lnnd. Edsie or Edsii [ = Edi3ige?] (Dover.see .Edgar. Egligt?(Bed/. Luiul.).. Norw. Lyd/. Godeman. . Eardnoi or iVc/«o<5 [of Eaduo<5](Zo«(?. see Arncotel.imf. Lond.. Eh. Exct. see /Egclwinc.).... Shrews.. Lino.). Gotiie. Maid. &c. \c. Swot (Lino..). Cant. Staiiif.).). Goldus Gonian (Salisb. Godwine. Eadsigo. Edel. Cunt. (Jriinolf.).).. Jodefri^i. Winehest. Stand'..).). see Eddijar.)..... Shaft. Godd. see Grimulf.ic.. Jjewes.. Oxf.E?el. Vh c>. Gloue.).. Godan [ = Goda <>r Gudinan?] (Exet).... Hast. Goda. (iimulf. = . Lymw.).. see Godman. Godleof.).CNUT.).).. Uoeli. W iucliixt. chest.). Eadsi [= Ead^ige?] {Dover.).. (Jrimulf. Loml. (Dover. See (iodwinc. Wln- Land..).. Lewes).). or Gorman (Br 1st. Edwig. see Eadwold.. ^h'stn7i:] (Here/... &c. Winehest. Ijoud. Winehest.).. Loud. Southw.. Eilu-iije-^ [ = yElfwig?] (Th<f/. ( liontn. 245 Ealgar [ = Ealgar?] (Land. Fri^col (York). EuMabeard or Ealdeberd (Exet. Shrews. Loitd. U'aunt.... Godiuiin. (iodric and Godsiine or Cant. Chest. Ilrh.). Waliiiigf.. Fadred. Shrews.).. Coleh.. Golsidin (Ipsw. Ealgar (Loud. Eadsige. (irncan. Tjond. Egelwine. Godsnnu (Cambr.Eir.. Line. siee Godgnd [=(to(Z] (Lond.. LomL).ifl (II( ref.. Ynrk). Godeman.). Hunt.. Edrcd. Endiwern Eoli (I. lifwes.). (Lond. Godcira (iMud. &c... Estaii.. ifcc.). iSouthamp. \c ('LM\{\. Edric or Ediric [see aho Eadric] (ILrrf.). Ijond... S(e Godeleof.). Ejic (Xorw. [ = (. Godcild.Eir\vlg?i (Chest. Eadwenl.). .). Cant.).). Eadwold.). Goddere. Godwine anil Widia ( Winehest.. . E5ii.). Godiri [ = Godwine?] (Chest.)... (IJrdf. Giidic (Gh)uc. Egelwig. [ = EadweardV] (None)..... Godaman. TlietJ'. Godwine Cas? (Winehest. Earngrim or Ennin'm (York).). Eduar or Edward (Lewefi).). Fastulf. &c. (Slam/.). Edwiiie.)...).).. Edsige.). Walling/. Edsigcwarc Eduta (Lond. Wore). (Extt. (Loud. York). (Cant. Gcerlaf (Ipsic). Fereman. Garidf(]nnchest.. \_see also Eadsigc] (Dover.). Fargiim. Ivhvi rd. Stamf. tttaiut".). J'Jadric (Ai/ltisb. ( Winehest.). (Bed/.). Etiige [ = Et8ige] (Shrews. Godwine and Ceoca. Ear?ein. Maid. fee. Taunt. see iEgelwig. Stdi. Dover. Eistan [cf.). i/. Thil/. Eudichi or Edwig (Loud. (lluid (Jrinieclel or Grimcytel (\Ano.. Goderc. Loud.-.). &c.. Lang. Godrie. Oxf. Derby. &c. Etsigc. (Cant.).. (Gimlir. Exet. Lane.^b.- Eht(U(tst.. York)... Edwuld.. Norw. Goerc [ = Goderc?J Goine (iMnd. llidf. Ilch...).).. see Eadicig. sec Eatlwcard... Lond. Fre«i[c](Loiid.xet. (Wateh. Ac. (York). Ilc'i. Earncijtel. Mylf.. Edicold. Ac..ri<i [ Warw.. Elf. lliet/. Oxf. Chest. Eerie [ = Elric y] (Stevu.-. Godaman.

).).. Lewes. Liofwerd] (Lond). Leofstan. Le/d.. Liofwerd Liof. Leoftriff(Cnmhr. &c. [cf.. Wincliett. Wiirw. &c. WinelnHt. Li'ifwine. IjOc ( Windiest.). Shrews. Leices. see Lidne... MacsuT>a[n] [ = MateTian?] (Chest.inr.-. Chest. Jlil. Winchest. &c.).. Lond-. [ LeofiioriV] (Here/. MateTian. Stamf. ENGLAND. ?] {Chest." Windiest. Dover. Wallingf.. Tiadniier. St. Lcoiwaf. Maid. Wiiichest. &e.?.. Olm? Oda.). Nunc). (Li/mnc). Leofsige.).<l (Crirhl. Liwinc [ = Liof\vine?] (Chest.-. = Liofhelm (Line.. Ri-tf. Moglu (Norw. Lffxtan and Swcnc {Lond. Lcofmg. Line. Leo/red and Brun (Lond.. Iliiun or lliiuiiti (iU'i/m). Y'orh).).cofd.)..). Iiutin.). lluiiiin:m (Kxft. Lcomred [=Leofred Jjeowi [= ?] (Loud.. <liiu»iij ( Itnnr). Leo/si.. Lyiinc.. Lond. Wavfh.. Warw. Lnii'l/tri. Maninc (Dover).. Yorl:). Lcmman.. (Cant. &c. Man. ludan..).. (Camhr.). = Luferic [ = Leofric ?] (Wore. llrdC. iriihmnn or lIicatiiKtn (^Uurck.. (Fxind. Soiithw.. (Cant. $re C'rnrn.). or Ode ("Dnceniti" = " Meonre.). Loda Lufa [ = Goda?] (Cswa?)..... Lond.. LeofnaH.lr.). Leostm. . (Line. Odea. lubtt'in.). Lerman Jjewerd lr.). &c.- liadiuaT. jAmd.).f. Lenfirig ?] (Chest. H Leowidi (Che*t. Norw.. J. llch.-(Y(irk).. Hall. Lio/'man (Lond. Gloiie. Leofii. see Oxf. (liinc). Leodmajr..).lilO (Jrurn. More).). Crleld.). l^ajoil {Kx(t. Southiimp.. (Jmiliof or f 'iiM/«(»/(ClicHt. Lifine. see liCofa. LcofJesCn] (Stamf.).). Winrhent.. Leof rod (Lund. IMatSan.. (IuhIoii. see Lifinc.. or Manna (Exet. York). Thetf.).. Wane)... see also Leof. Nor'fimin (Lewes). Lond. Watch... Leof Stnnif.. Kx<t. [«« nlno (Mil. Honin. X^i/iri Q. Linfstan.).. Shreics. [=Leof(legn?J (Staiul'... Imirttnl ( Winrhed. wold (Lond.. Sec (Lond. Orisf. [ = Lpofwino?] Leof ric ?j {Steijn.. (Jimlin. ini.).). Southic. Ufwidya (None. Totn.rrif [ Lvfit.). &c. Lond. Chieh..)...). Chest.lolf or IliMnlt(Ynrk).). Lntul. Lewes).).). Winche*t.). Leoi)uvr.). Ipsw. lA'0(liiia>r. Lrfti [ = Leofa?] (Sonihamp. Soulhw.. Lio/no^.. Line. Hert. Ijeofstegen (Ipsic).. (T<jtn.). CUi'h. Leojlii re litofiiic I (Hen/.. Wal:ini. &c.. (Stamf. Ipsw.. Godman] (Bedf. lirist.). Ijyuw. Lend. Hunt.). Ci'ilrh. Line. Ijoofsunu (^V inoliest. B'df. Ipsic.). Or.). lluiicwino (Exct.).).). Cunt. luBtffrt'ii. Sidisb. scr I. Wahlurjh..)..-vn.. Cliest.. (Bath. Liofn (Bedf).. Hast.. Lcmriuin. (Siidb. St<im/.). Leo/sig. Here/. Leomman. Southufiip . (JIiohL. Orst.). Iliihl (TA^nd. (Iiiiiliiritt ( York). Wanr. Lciiftlicu (Siiaft.)... (Line). Liofwiiw. Mas (llch. LeofiioS. None. Warm. Moleman (Lond. Lond..). Lond.).. IjCinheii. Lufestan [^Leofotan?] (Salish. (Chest.). (Chest. Leof. JIaua..).. Wiiu'lu'st). Ilrh. &c.-cr] (Jedh..inif. Mangod Mansige [cf. Line..iric (Heref. ILrl. Norsv. Lufwine [ = Leof wine?] (Dover). Thetf..).). Jiiiiniis IjCoSan (Line. see also Leof.. Lio'fnoii [ = Liofhelm?] (Ijond. Warw..).. (" Acxewo*' Cant. Exel. or Leofing.) [= Ilwnliman?'] Ifitirf'rrnut (J. Leo/qixr or Leofgxr (Here/. Tlietf. Mutaian and Balhw (Line. Caiubr. Welmcsf. Theif. ^lann.. 8idl(..Lindwin (Line. Lewis. Shrews.. Ipsic..). Diinic. Ia(. Itnrh... Leofric (Dnch.). Soutluimp. Noridf (Stamf.. Mutan [ = Mate«an?] (Line..).&c.. Leomnr [= Leodtn. kc. see Leommmi..)..). Nieici (Lond... Glonc. Lcofidxg [ = Leofdegn3 (Stamf. (Line. lustiii] Ilntimin i>r llutnmn (Sorw. Line. Ordltriht ( Winchest.).

{Dover).).).. Wine] (Thetf).). York).. O^au.. .)- Os(jar {Dorch. Lond. OiSgrim or Oc^grim (Line. {Bridgen. Widrefan. Wdsit {Thetf. Wine or Winne (ExH.. Sieman {Salisb. Staner {limit. Ulfgrini {York).).).). Sihriht {Ijond. None. Osgrim. Wihred [cf. Swcarta. Oswig. Syboda. Unlgist {Thetf. Line.). Osgot. Trotan (Chtst.). Stirc. Loud. " Ustla. ( York).). Wesig {Lond. Sumerlu<5a.). Sneeoll [see also Secoll. liienidf. Ontnnnd (Line). &o. Siric [ Sired (Glouc. Nott.). Southie. Wineditj. York). {Lond). Sivafa {Line).). Stircar. (Line. &c.)./-//.). Sertino [ = S\vurtiiic?] {York). Southie. Stamf. Lond. OMii. Owulsige (Here/." York). &c. Riciuilf. JUehb.). Sweartabrand. Wa'dlos.) Kuiistiin [=Brunstau?] (Thctf.).CNUT. (York). Lijdf. Swota] {Bedf). Winrcd] (Cant. Oswald (Norio. Sumerlida. Ot5grim. Tooca.). (Cinit. liichb. Tidred {Tlietf. Wincdcig. (Ilcli. Osgod. Swarnfuc or Swerafuc {Windiest. Wine] (Cadb. Stircol. Sibivine {Oxf.... Osulf (Loud. . Oustman ( York)... Godsune'} (Line). Swertafa. Uceadc or Ucede (York).). (Line. &c. SiL'grim (Xott. Surtinc. Swileman (Winchest. Hythe.). Swenc. &c. or Stirrer (York). Sprafu! (WiiRdiist. Syrtinc. Umer^ {Line). see O^grira. [gee 247 also Oibern] Osfram [ = Osgram?] (Line. Swot or Swota (Bedf. Wicdd {Baih).).).).).. Widia or Wudia {Stei/n. &c. Thetf.. Sigar or Sigear (Winchest. Windiest. Sipoda.. Mijlt. Ofi^encar {Lond. Wataman or Wateman None). M'inas or Winus [cf. &c.). York). O'iharn or Other n (Line). Stvrfol. Sunolf (York).. = Wxhjist {Thetf.). Svrtinf. .. Sicrunt {Thetf).). Widna [= ir/rZm (Stevn.). Sunegod [cf. [ = Swyrtinc]' {Line. Theff. or Iiinidf CS or w.). &c. Sirioiid (Loud.). Derby. {Line. Suetinc. Ssewino {Brist. Norie.. Ware? (Exet. = Sihtric?] (Norw.Vo. {Land. Suurtcol { Wi i/h. Dorch.).. Ulfbeorn {Line). Weddes. Swert... TJietf. 0«?>in. &c. &c.). Winedicig. Swegeu (Chest.).). Toca. &c. Winchest. Spot. Suinolf = 8unolf\ {York). {Line). Sigbuda. Osliic (Line. Totn.. 1 1 7///(-. Lond.). Sumerleda. &c. Wiitehc. Snecull^ { Yorh). Stanmnr {Thetf. Stcrelinc [ = Swertinc] {Soutlue).). Scula or Sculaa {Exet. itc] Snel or Sitell {Cliest. see Ou¥grim. Shaft.).). Yorli)..). Ustman { York). Yorlc). Sidewine {Crichl.). Winchest. Swartafa.). s?e Sigboda. Sweartinc.). lAnc. Stamf. None).). Swetinc.). (Chest.. Oxf.). Oibi (No7-w.)..).. Stcetinc. Sti«nlf(Lond. (York). Wedles.. Siboda. Seolca { Winched. &e (Line).. \_ Swart.). SinoTS {Ijond. Swet or Siceta {Cadb.. Swartinc. Secoll or Sdecol [of.). (Line). Swertebraud. Ulf (Line.). or Sibode {Souihamj}.). Uifcetel {Line. Osgut. Sola [cf. see Sigtxida. s<'e Swot. Oswi.).(/. Wiiteiiod [ = Godwiui'] (Warm). Kicfen (York). Osferft (Liuc). York).). Stiuiigriiu or Steingrini (Caiiibr. Oslaf {Lond. Winean [of.see Surtinc. Sigodia [ Sigboda?'] CWiuchcbt.). Crcwk. Swencel. Onioard or Oswerd (Stamf. &e [=Toga?] (Crickl. &c. &e {Line). YoHO. Snuiwine or Sneaivine {Guild.). Osharn or Osborii (Dorch. Walrxffen. see Suetinc.. Swan (Lond. Shretvs.). Wihtsigf or Wihtsic (Wiucliest. ?J Sneling {Line).).<t. Exet. Weeilos.. York). Swcrtiiic.

'WitniH. Wulnaf'^&c. Wulfsig] (Camhr. Coldi. 300) in the National of an uucrtain nint. Ljond. Gudd.)..)../Hm/frf. "NVi^riii.248 VVinrman (f^iJioh. dir ir/ri'/K. (Louil. Wull'innl ( Kxcl. Exet. Lond. Stamf. " Totrl. inscription between two circles.). Hunt.inr.) AVulf'.. or Lond. mr Wiiliii.. pvrali (Line. Oxf.. Ijcic. T\..i Y^'ork).)... Qiest..). Around. (Jjond.. kc. a are Danish. Wiiilid. Shaft.. "\Viill«rii. pureferh. Wnlu-i r = Wulf\vig or Wulfwiue (Oxf.. &c. Ac. Type A. Stam/.).).). Jjind.. limnn.Tr.). Siuithic. &c. pure>:tan.. ' t Type I i. Line.. [Hiid. besides being . Lond.. Shrfwt. Wiilfrocl..'ar(Lnn.dud..). Shrews. Slirews. S(dish.).. Slam/.~tratc<l.. p.) Wiil/fjiii or Wiil/fiii (Line. (C((»/6r. V\'ulfiio«.). and D. Jlerl. perman porcitl. ^ynrw. Collection.). \Vulmiod [=\Viilfno«?] (Lond. pegcnwine (Exet. PI. liomn. WiiiKtu [ -Wiiihtaii] (Ihnf). Taunt. ENOLAN'l).). ^Vytl8tan (Ijond. "Wiiir. Wulfu-iri (Cant... (York). punstnn = purstan Wunstan] Wulfric ("Ecornc.).] • Ilildpbrand.l. pjircil [cf. Around.. (Dover).. iiii (Hell.. Wiroriiic. purgrim../). Winched. York). &c. (Chest. ('(inf. IIVhiii fcf. Liic.).. Stamf. AViiirrlor ir. Wihrrd] (Cani.. York). WiilfMtni). Southw. Glouc.. 5. Me al.- MulOrd r^Wnlfred] (Land.). Ox/. Wuifwiiif! or Wulwino (Brist. (Lond.). purcetl'} (Lond..').). Lond. H'v/ic/) (hniil). diademed. (C'ninbr. (Land.).. Crirhl.). (Line. purferd. and are therefore not included in the following list. Wwm or Wyngi [ = Wyn8ige?] (Lond... W'lilsige.. AViiichest.").). WiiIniiLT. Wid/Htin.. AViiuln-Bt.rh. Lei'c).so "Wulf. purgod (Exet. York). Small cross patte'e. Line. None. Description of Types. Wulfbcm. Types D. &c. purcetl. Hercf. &c. ?] "WiillVi f =:\ViiIf8ig?J (J). Bust 1. ir«7/*!/ [cf.. iVulMfir... (LJnc. + The slnpl. (T. Wiil/ri/d. 6.. Thitf. Southw. far. AVultrii. H7l(/lr•^<..* Obverse. Jedb. Tliotf. Wiillirorn. Leic. purstan. is too much worn to allow of being illu.).. 'WitiHluii or Wyn*tan (Sivlisb.). Wlinicid (Cunt.. York?). JIunt.. Land./n or n7<icJSc£^n (C(in<.. (Xorw. Tories.." Line.. [ &c.. Mulhh Wul.. South ic..). S]ireicg."\Vulno«. ^Vnrc. itc. Wynsigc (Jiri*t. "W'ulMfj.specimen of this coin (!«e No.. Ivxct..y Glouc. W(dlinrif. peodred (Lond.oT Wiilntan (Brist.. purim. inscription betwccn two circles.-.. peorxi) or porei [= peodred] (Lond. =York?.).. J.. 609. Thetf.

TypeE. shield. over ichich long cross raided. [Ilild. 7. Type Bust I. inscri2>tion : outer circle. CNUT. inscription : outer circle. bust Over qnatre/oil zcilh pclht at apex of each cusp. ri. Around. inscription : outer circle. PI. I.: . crowned Quadrilateral ornament icith three pellets at each angle. lung cross voided.'\ . pelht in centre. each limb terminating in three crescentJ< pellet in centre. Around. 6. voided. each limJt terminating in three crescents . pelbt in centre.. var.. inscription divided by bust outer circle. . Type B. Around. 249 Obverse. Around. inscription : outer Long cross circle.] Type Bust in front. inscription divided by outer circle. TypeC] Type Bust I.. n. 6.. A round.f. each limb terminating in three crescents . Around. iii. . ii. [Ilild. iv. [Hild.

rroirited.] . sceptre in lift hand. 0. [Ilild.. inscription bitwven two circles.. car.2:)U ENOLANK. wiiliiii : quatrefoil.. I lUiKlemi'il.] Type Dust crowned. Around. PI. Revcrne. a. [Ilikl.J Type i^f/jf/ /.'] Type Ihist diademed. 5. h. I var. Type A. 7. var. a. var. Around. vi.. biiicvcn two circltH. V.l. Type Jtu»t I. ri. n. 'J'yj'i: E.. V.. Same. I. iv.. \ between tico circles. a. n. 5. [Uild. [llil. Type A.. ObverM. </. iiiHcrijition Same «« lad. inscription Aruund. Aroniiil. 7>/v= A. outer circle. inscription between two circles. inscription outer circle. Around. var. r. I Small crosa patt^e. I i Small cross pat tee. Around. var. inscrijition divided by bust : I.

. PI. bust 1. (J. h. inscription : outer i qnatrefoil. a. inscription : outer circle.] Type Similar . qnatrefoil hrol-en hy huM. vii.. croivned. var. iuscrippellet in centre. crowned. 15. [Hild. No. 220. XYir.* 1. 1-3. with pellet at apex of each cus]i. sceptre. I [Cf. Around. var. [Ilild. 7. viii. PI.] Type Bust qnatrefoil . . each limb terminating in three crescents. long ero?s voided.CNUT.] Type Similar. witliin with or without pellet inside eacli . each limb terminating in three crescents. | Same. | arched. var.] Type Similar . On cusp. 251 Be verse. Same. l:. Around. 271.] arc on pome specimens the angles * The qnatrefoils on the obverse and reverse vary in form much arched on others very slightly so that the ruiatrofoil approaches the lorra of a cirtli-. PI. inscription : outer circle. var. [Cf. Long cross voided. . c. Type Bunt I.. Aronnd.. p. viii. viii. angles of qnatrefoil slightly tchich divides inscription. var. circle. &c. Obverse. XIX. PI. Type E. Around. viii. [Cf. I Similar . tcitliin qnatrefoil.. h. in front. Ty2)e E. . bust r. tion : outer circle.

Around. ?.] Type Dust 1. 7. ri. 7. inscription outer circle. Aroinid. Long cross voided. : On Around. viii. Rcvenio. On qnatrefoil. each limh terminating in three crescents . inscription: outer circle. inscription outer circle. Tijpn Finiiliir. in angles. PA C X. each limb termi- minating in three crescents. crowned. [Hild. Arouud. { XVIH.. ilirided hij IniHt. liiliriin tiro cirehx.. Around. 15] . icithin qnatrefoil.'. with three pellets at apex of each cusp. xii.l. within [Cf. Obvenic. XVIII. [Cf. . /i. iiuiilri'ftiil. inscription : outer circle. IhihI 1. . dituli'inrd. urejitre. inscription : outer circle.. Type E. quatrcfoil. var.] Type Bust L. Around. XYII. var. n. with pellet fit apex of each cusp. inscription dividid by bust: out< r liid..] l. ri. Type E. Around.] Type scojitrc in loft Bust 1. Long cross voided. : [Cf. d. each limb torminatiug in three crescents. crowned. witliin quatrcfoil. Sumo aa 2. Type Bu»t icearing pointed helmet . xi. each limb terminating in crescent in centre. I var. in 1. pellet in centre.annuht enclosing pellet. ri. X.. [Ilil. long cross voided. in each angle. inwription front. n.itt.. 12. ix. inscription: outer circle. Around.'>V) KN(JLANI). long cross voided. diudomod hand. circlo enclosing pellet .

aud II. insciiptioii divided by bust outer circle. [Cf. 8. annulet enclosing pellet. imcription divided outer circle. Same. in rack ciugle. 7. sceptre* Around. inscriplion between two circles.l. PI. I [Cf. diademed. l'\.] Type XV.. inscription between tico circles. 5.. in centre. xiv.<t : Aromul. 6.ist xiii. b. pellet. Short cross voided. limbs united at base by tico circles. var. xiv. 8. a. jjellet in each an^le. [llild. closing i)ellct. circles. PI. tion between two XVII. in front. circle pellet. 1. inscription between two circles. XYII. divided by bust. ]'l. Types H. Reverse.). bnjken annnlet en. a flnlal. h J>ii. Aroimd.s in centre. by Short cross voided. limbs united at base by two circlf. rar. Around. Jliist /. 253 Obverse. Ini. 13.. terminating either in a fleur-de-lis. PI. limbs united ot base by two circles.. var.] Type lUist wearing^ pointed lu'lmot in fioiit. Around. . Type J}. or a crozler (see HiUlebrand. 4.st r. Type G. The flciir-de-Iis t. Type G. H. PI. Around. var. rrdinied.. XVII. Short cross voided. . in centre.] Type Similar.\ pe is the ouly one represented in the National Collection.: CNUT. Short cross voided euclo. .-sing . inscription between two [Cf. brohen anmdet enclosing pellet. . inscrijdion between two circles. Around. a.] * The sceptre varies in form. sccplre. c] Tyjje xvi Bust ]. inscripcircles. rar. Around. in each angle.. [llil.

8. in Around. 7. Type Similar . . xvii. var. Type I. Around. PI. I. Over short cross voided.. c] Type Similfir . lerminates in Jleur-de-l is. a. | sci'plre rude hmt tcithout diadvin.s.. var. front. inscription between two circles. Beverae. Around. var.. PI. cZ] r»/^e xvii. [Cf. inscription circle. Same.. I tM/orr hiixt. xvi. Around. b. var. PI. inscription divided : bust outer circle. a. in centre. [Ilild. Type H. var. I'l.2. 8. inscription between two circles.. [KM.] Type Dust ?. wearing pointed lulmet . a. fl iiidenicd .. Same. 8. XVII. quadrilateral ornament with pellet at each an^le and in centre. pennon. c] . ri. Similar . bttwten tav divided by bust. Type xviii. [Ilild. pdht ohJij. ^cci'tre. xvi.] Type h'milar . var. Tyj^e H. Over short cross voided.sceptre in k-ft liiiiul. quadrilateral ornament irilh pdlet at each angle and in centre. var. 8. \ srepfre not held by hand. lUist l>y 1.-1 ENGLAND. [Ilild.

] Description of Coins.. [Cf. Around.] Type XX. . a.^od of four oval. 255 Reverse.] [Cf. : XIX. inscrip : Cros-'. din(l(nif'd. inscription between two circles. xix. PI. XIX. inscription outer circle. sceptre. 9. Similar. a.s united at base by two circle.t. Around. \ Similar. sceptre Aioiiiifl. in front of hnf. iiiscriiition divided by bust ! outer circle. Bust 1. var. (liadeiiK il . pellet. qundrilateral ornament with three pellets at eiich angle and one in centre.CNUT. No. ronipo.. in cent re of cross. Type Bust 1. tion divided by butt outer circle. Around. 3. Type XX. PI. iu front.. Ty^yr K. [Ilild. PI. Obverse. 4. var. Over ehort cross voided.-*.

. •^QODPINE M BED AVt. I-CNVT REX ANDL0R: 4</ELFRIC 0N BET^ON AVt. 13 ^/ELFRIC ON •1«/E€)ESTAN B7^€)A . •^ENVT RECX.) •J-SL-FPZtLD ©N B7?€) 17-3. [Bedford. "Wt. 22-5. 11 •i^ESTT^N ON B7\€)7^NN : Estan( = iESestau ?). •REEX. 3.^Sestan. REX ANCL© RVM Type «i^7lLFF©LD ©N BET^ON Wt. Wt. 17-5. U •tENVT REX ANLLO I RVM [I'l. 170. XVII. . 2] R[EX A]NLL-0 [ ^/E€)E[ST7\]. 220.- ON B7\0 Wt.2r)fi EN01-ANI>. „ RE^I^ ANCLORVM ^/EOELRIE ©N «f/E£)EST7\N B-7X07^ iE(5cIric. Rcverao. -^^estan.] God wine. 22-3.N 0N B7^£) RVM 7XNDL-0RV „ (Broken. 16-6 Type xvi. 227. 10 ^ENVT R EX ANL: ON B7\D7V AVt. ©N BTXeTXN Wt. Wt.^Ifric. „ REt [PI. xiv. I XVII. Wt. Wt. BEDEFORD. [IJiith. Obverse. t'ENVT RECX: I ^/EOESTAN ON ^/EOEST7\N : B7X 15-3. Alfwald or Alfwold.] Tijpc viii. Moneyer. 20-0.] Type viii. lS-5. iElfric. BAOAN. No.

257 No. .CNUT.

[Canterbury. No. 6. I >^/ELFEL-M ON CAD ^Vt.] ^Ifelm. Type 26 xiv. ^CNVT REX ANLL0R I ^PINEDEID ©N CENWt. . Rcvoree. [Cadbury. Hi •t-CNVT REX T^NDLO RVM [I'l. I XVII. Moneyer. ! 15-8. Type 28 xvi. 11-7. 16-8.] Type \in. ' Winedeig. 27 TXNLLO •t'PVLSTTXN ON EENTP7\ Wt. : Wulstan (^VullstaIl). C/ENTPARABYRIG. ^CNVT REX 7XNLL »i*LE0FN0O M-ON LeofnoS.] Type 25 viii. 12-3.258 ENGLAND. 01)vcrie. CADANBYRIG. CENT: Wt.

259 No.CNUT. .

\ Leofwine. •i-ENVT REEX: ^BOEA: ON DOFR Wt. Cinsige. Moneycr. I XYII. •I'ENVT -. (Broken.] 49 l^ENV. 52 . Obvoron. CRUCERN. 17-0. ESclwine. 10.'iCO ENGLAND.] Type 45 xvi. Gr>dcman (Godman). "t-CODEMAN ©N CR©C Wt. Reverse. .) Wulfsige Tijpe xiv.] Type 46 viii. [Dover. 16-8. Wulfci 47 [AN]DL©R I •i'PV[L]FC:l ON DOF: (= ?). ^•ENVT REEX [PI. 14-6. . 42 I-CNVT REX ANLL© •f-EOELFINE ©N CROC. 48 I^ENVT: RECX A: [PI. 16-2.T R-EX A- •^L-EOFPINE ON DOF Wt. Toca. 9. 23-2.-REEX: •I<EINSICE ON DOFRWt. lG-0. Wt. [Orcwkerne. D0FRAN: Wt. 15-5. XVII. 14-8. I ^PINVS ON CRVCE Wt. No.l-CNVT REX AISCLORV „ ^QODMAN DOF Wt. RVM 48 MINVT REX ANDL0 RVM [I'l. Type 50 ' xvi. XVII. Godman. 13o£ra (Boiga). 8] 44 „ ANLLORV I'TOCA ON CROiC CIL Wt. 51 . >^ENV T RECX- ^EDPINE ON DOFERA' Wt. ^EINSILE ON Cinsige. DOFERAN. Edwine. 16-5.] Winus? 17-0.

261 No. .CNUT.

202 .

Obverse. 263 No. 81 82 83 81 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 .CNUT.

2G-1 E^ULAND. No. .

.CNUT. 265 No.

g KN(iLANI). No. .2{.

.CNUT. 267 No.

KNULANO. .208 No.

269 No.CNUT. .

.270 No. ENGLAND.

16-6. Type 222 viii. A. Type 225 xvi. 22G ^ENV T R-ECX I'SIRED 0N CL-EDE: Wt. d. I Type 230 xiv. 1 . 17-5. 110. 150. 2. Bella. 16 3. Stasngrira. 3. Sired. 17 Pullut in each angle of cross. Var. Moneyer. Bcfuru 6 Ti/jje viii. WuliioTi (WuIfnoS). 271 No. Godwine. 21 'J »i<CNVT REX ANLL0R liLt. 18-8. 11-3. DL-P Wt. I^ENVT REEX A I ^ADA ON CRANTI Wt. GRANTEBRYCGE. I 221 REX ANLL-0R ^LODPINE: ]'ar. I'E-NV: T REX 7^-N- i •i<B0L-L-A 0N CL-EPE Wt. 7-5. Obverse. Godwins. [Cambridge. ' 4*SIRED ON CLEP Wt. 224 I<E-NVT R-EX TX-NC . 17-4. J Godric. 15-8. Wulfaig.d. 't'ENVT REX ANLLO I 4^5T/ENGRIM O LRA AVt. b.- tPVLNQO ON CLEP Wt. la.CNUT. 11-2. Reverse. I 220 ANCL0R 1 -J-PVPZIL ON LRA Wt. ^CNVT REX SNLL-. 227 •^ENVT -RECX-. Godric. -^CODPINE O CLE Wt. 't'C0DPINE XVIII. 220 I^CNVT REX ANCL0: «i<ENVT . Sired. var. i<ENV T RECX: tCODRIC ON LEPE: Wt.] Type 228 viii. var.[Pi. Type 223 xiv. «^C0D-R-IC 0-N LL-EPE Wt.] 0N CLEP Wt.

No. .KNGLVNl).

17-5.] Oniric. Lcofric. Wt. 7. [Hertford. 246 i^E-NVT: REX A-rC I «^OR-DRIC: ON HER-E: Wt. 18-3. 15-7. 244 ^ENV -T REX-.'o) r I . 17-4. 15-5. is-n. 14-7. tCNV. [PI.- Wt.] Type 245 xiv. Pellet only in centre of cross. XVIII. [Hereford. 247 i«-CNV T REC I I 4-ELEPII ON HEREF Wt. 242 4<EE0FRIC ON HEOR Wt. HREN Wt. R-EEX A •REC-X: HEOR Wt. 240 T REC ^LEOFRIC ON HEO: Var. I Wulsige (Wulf8ii.CNUT.] HEREFORD.T REC •I^CNV ^CEORSICE ON l-EO Wt. -i<CNVT R EX ANI »i^:FLEC-BIFL ON FleclSifl ? 13-5. HEORTFORD. Obverse. 243 I<CNVT: -T REX-.] Type 239 xvi. i^L-EORIC ON HE-ORT Wt. Tyi)e xvi. ' Elfwinc? 248 4-ENVT R- ECX •I'PVLSICE ON HERE-: Wt. [PI. 273 Moneycr. Deorsige. 17-8. 241 15-7. XVIII. 8.

16-5 Godleof. 4«CNVT REX ANCLO) I •i'DODRIC MO HVN (liroktn. = . 252 *CNVT: REX AN VNTDNE Wt. 10. 15-7. Monejrcr. 15 3 Wynsige. ©N VN Wt.REX AN ©N L/EP Wt. Beveise. 2'A RECX A: "i-LTEOCDINE I-PVNSICE: O [PI. [Lewes. Leofno'b. 4«CNVT R-EX ANG ^'CODLEOF ©N HVNT Wt. I •i'S/EPINE | OL H\£)A Wt. : Leofwine.U £NULANL>. XVIII. Godefre*. ANGLORVi 255 ^CNVT: REX ANLLORV [PI.) f^xlric. [Hythe. 13 4. HUNTANDUNE. XVIII. xvm. No.] Type 254 viii.. ^LEOFNOD M 11.] Type 249 viii. 20-6. ObvetM. Type xiv. 200. Colliui ( Colling?). •i«CNVT. 256 »i«CNVT= REEX 7^ •J'/ELFPERD •i'C©LLINI ©N L/EPE Wt.] L/tP Wt. 1 257 *CNVT. . [Huntingdon.Elfweard.] Typ>: viii. t?aDwinc.] L/EFES. 11-8. . 253 *CNVT REX T^NDLORVM [PI. REX- •J-DODEFREO: N LE Wt. 9. 14-2. I Type 250 xiv.] HYOA.'J.

. 275 No.CNUT.

'I'PVLNOO ©N LEHR \Vt. 200. 170. Reverse. 13.] '2(5'. LEIGECEASTER. ^/ELF$IL ON LEI Pellet before head.T REX ANGLOR -I-CNVT >i<ELEPINE ON LEG (Chipped. 14-2. 21-7. 15-3. I i'/ELFNOG ON LEI Wt. No. . ISO. ^ELEFINE © LEGE Wt. 10-2.liTG ENGLAND. Var. H. behind. 2G8 HhUNVT: RECX A [I'l. uElfsige. 20-3. 15-5. „ Wt. Moneyer. Before head. 20-2. (= Alcsi(g) Alfdig or -^Elfsig?). lG-2. I XVIII. 275 „ 7XNDL0RVM "i^ALLSi ON LEGE Wt. 273 ^CNVT ^/E-DERIC ON LEG Wt. ^CNVT REX ANGLORV [PI. Wt. 17G. . 278 REX ANCL0RVM 279 Var. ^Xeric (= ^Selric). 201. 2o2 ON LEI v. Wulstan (Wulfatan).•. 277 ^ENV. WulnoX (Wulfiioft). Obvone.] 271 •I-DNT REX 7JNDLORVM •i>/ELFS\ ON LEI AVt. 274 «i</EORlC ON LE-LE Wl. 276 „ TXrCLORV •fCROFL 01/1 LEI Wt. Godric. XVin. Godwino.] Etc. 2hl •^CNVT REX Z^NLLOR -^LODFINE 0N_E Wt. 272 V(ir. •'. 280 ^CNVT- „ •i'CODRIC- ON L-EGC Wt.t.) Elfwine. iElfuo«. .) I-CNV T REC: pPVLSTAN ON L-EHRWt. Crofl. Pellet before head. 20-9. Type 270 viii. [Chester.

288 „ ANLLORV. 17-3.WDA ON LEI Var. 298 RELX A t'CEOLHOO 0N LEIE Wt. Liwino ( = Liofwiue?). 14G. .CNUT. Triitan. 2yo •i^LNVT „ 7\NDL0RVM 'i'MALS.ANCLORV Wt. 28G ^ENVT REX TtNCLORV Wt. 293 „ ANCL0RV: i^^PELEN ON LEG Wt.' i-LVNLEOF ON LEC Wt.Elfsigo. JIacbU<5a(u). Obverse. 17-3 291 „ UNLLORV. Swcgen. 16-2. angle of Wt. Gunloof. l. Wl. 289 „ •I«LIPIN-E ON LEC Wt.. 20-4. Ceoluo'S. 1-2 5. 277 Moncyor. LEI Lcofno^. 172. 283 •I^CNVT REX 7SNQL0RVM •. Wt. 7SNCL0RV I^LIFIC- ON L-ELIWt. 2 IS. 287 „ ZSNCLORVM i<L/E-OFPINE ON L-EC Wt. Lifiuc.Vf). pullet. Wt. 297 Wt. Swartinc. 150. 299 REX AN i«CR©C ©N LEICES: Wt. Buforc 1k. ^ENVT n-EX AN 1 "^/EL-FSIGE ©N L-EIEE IT) 5. Pellet in oiio crosa. . Var. 16-5. 294 ^CNVT „ SNCLOR 7SNLLORV: ^TROTZfN ON LEG Wt.-. 200. 285 ^IINVT- REX T^NCLORVM ^LEOFENOO ON Var. Pellet iu Held. 10 Type 296 xiv. 292 ^ENVT ^CNVT „ •i-SPARTIN ON LEC Wt. 16 3.. Lcofwino. 19").iJ. . 21 0. behind. Cioc. 284 . •i-SPARTIC ON LEI Wt. 295 „ ^TR0TA:-N 0N LEI 0.

. No.278 ENGLAND.

.EX ANC ' ^SVMERLIDA MO "fSVMERL-IDTX Lll G. Gu.stin (= lutitin).- 7^N ^LEOFINE 0N LINE© (Fraguioiitd. 318 >tENVT REX »i«ENVT-.EX an:: "i'lVSTEIN ON LINE0L Wt. 111. . . i^ENVT REEX A ^LIQFUEH O L-ILE0LILE: Wt. 13 0. 3. Wt. Obverse.) Oslac? 325 ^ENVT-.CNUT. LcoSau. 316 EX 7\NC ^IVSTELEN ON LINE: AVt. 317 ^CNVT-. lustein (= lustegen). IS 0. li-5..) 319 EX AND: •i-LEOFIND MO LINEOL Wt.- EX ANC: •i'SVMERLIDA MO LINE Wt. Wiilfwiuc. 279 Moneyer. 't'CNVT REX AN I</E€»ELMER ON LINE: Wt. 17 0. i<.-. 15 xvi. Cnut. 170. Type 314 xiv. EX MO LINEOLN (IJrokcu. Sumorlida. 323 ^ENVT R-. 15 G. 15ti OsfcrS. 3n 322 ^CNVT REX 7XN •^LEO€AN ON LINEVL Wt. 329 I'ENV T REX REX.. Liofuen ( = Liofhelm?). 14-3. No. ITtj. 330 ^ENV T •t-ENVT ON LINE0LN Wt. 320 ^•ENVT REX AN 'I'LEOFPNE ©N LINE©L Wt. /E^clmaer.-7. I«/ELFN0O ON LINE: Wt. 315 4<CVSTIN i'LINVT R ON LICOLNE Wt.- EX ANE: A. 324 •i-ENVT. ' •J'OSFERO •I*[OSL]AE M© LINEOL Wt.'Elfiio«. 328 R EX ANC Type 'I-PVLFPINE ON LINE Wt. Lcofluc. 14-0. 327 "fENVT R-. lustegcn. 17-0. Leofwine. 17 32G i<ENVT: EX ANC ON LIN Wt.

ENOLANI).280 No. .

©ISLVNDEI Wt. Ea.- •t'PEDDES ON LNNEOL Wt. 17-2. Borstig. Eudwine. Wulbern. 3G2 ANCLOR 4^EADPERD LVND Wt.CNUT. «I<ENVT REX AN t'OCCRIH I Ol/I LIUCOL Wt. 358 ANCLOR ^BRIHPOL-D LVN Wt. 352 L-117-2. 3(53 ^EADPIN O LVND Wt. Wulfric. IDC. lG-3. 355 •RECX: ^PVLFPINE ©N LIN Wulfwino. 359 ANCLOR: I^BRVMAN LVNDI Wt.O. 177. WoildcB. 3G0 ANLLO- ^EADMVND .] Type 357 viii. Wt.hvokl. 8G1 ANCLORV l^EADNOD. lG-4. Type 356 xvii. Eadwcrd. [Loudon. 17U. "t-CNVT REX 7XNLL •i<BOR$TIC M LVND Wt. IG-l. 353 ^PVL-BERN ON L-INC: Wt. 21-3. 354 I) I) t'PVLFRlC ON LINCO Wt. Brihtwold. UG. Eadinund. 15-5. 14-8. 21G. 21-5. Bruman. 3G5 RETX ANCLOR I-EADPOLD O LVN Wt. 350 ^CNV- -T REX: REC- 't'SPERTEBRAND ON_l Wt. 0(5 grim. 130. 351 ^CNV T -I^SPERTEBR ON Wt. 3G1 ANLLO "fEADPINE ON_VNDEWt. ^EHV T -RECX »i«ENVT -RECX-. . No.ri-VNDi Wt. 281 Monoyer. LUNDENE. 15-G. EudnoS.

.2i>2 EN(}LANl). No.

. 283 Ko.CNUT.

. No.•2S\ ENULANI).

CNUT. . 285 No.

No.280 ENOI.AM). .

I ^'BRVNMTXN ON LVND Wt. I XIX. 2. 4. 176. (Judcro. 463 •i-CNVT- REX: : »i<BRVNCAR ON LVND: Wt. uA MaliiK^. 16-3. Type XX. 16-2.* [INIaldun] Tijp< viii. 14-7. I XIX. 17 0. 4G0 I^CNV [T] RECX I I I«PyNSILE ON LVN Wt. 461 ^CNV. -i<PVLC. (Ji'dwino.\R ON LVNDEN Wl. i-CNV T RECX -l-CODERE I ON M/ELD Wt. 460 "i^CNVT REX ANLLOR | fCiODPINE MEL Wt. 15-7 [PI. 287 Moneycr.] 465 REC'i' ^PVLFRED ON LVNDEN Wt. * It is not possible to distiDgulsb wltb certaiuty between tho mints Ihlaldon See Introduction. 467 ^CNVT. Wulfrcd. XIX.bory . xvii. '213.CNUT. 464 •tCNVT R ECX AN „ LVNDE: Wt. Wynsige. Type 470 xiv. Obverse.CLDUNE. 168. 468 ^CNVT:RECX A.] ON LVNDE Wt. JEIfrcd. Type 4G6 xix. 153. •I'CNVTE: RERX: [ri. I "J^/ELFRED 3. No. 15-6. 4G2 MINV T RECX Typi ^PyNSIGIE ON LV Wt.] Bninman. Wulpnr (Wulfgar).RECX 7\ [PI.T RECX I •i'PyNSILE ON LVND: Wt. 15-'J. Bruiigar. M.

No.2HH ENULANI). .

. 289 No.CNUT.

ENGLAND.290 No. .

291 \.). .CNUT.

510 ^CNV T REX: ^-CNV 4«/ELFRED ON SERE Wt. 511 T REX: 4-CODPINE ON SERWt. . Blaccman or Blacaman. *ENVT RECX •REEX -J-ECRIE I ONN 3TEE Wt.] Type 517 xvi. I XIX. ' RVM Tijpe xvi. 16 3. 0. 51G ^ENV -T RELX [PI.] SNOTINGAHAM. 1 RVM "^LEOFPINE ON. No. 130. [Sidbur)'. 181.2!)2 ENGLAND. iElfrcd. I Eerie (=Elric?). [Nottingham. ^CNVT REX ANDL© [PI. 16-6. " " lU-7. SI€ESTEBYRIG. FriSiwinc. 512 »i«CNVT REEX AN[PI.SIOE ' "\Vt. XIX. Leofwine. Obvcrs".] Type 514 yiii. i<ENVT REX AVDLO I ^BLACEMAN MO XNO Wt. 518 •^FRCIPINE ©N ST/E: Wt. 15 3.] 513 ^CNV T RE-EX ^DOLDVS ON SER\Vt.] Type 515 I viii. 11 5. 1G7. Blacaman. [Stc^yning. Godwiiie.] ST/ENIG. ^CODPINE 0N SERE: Wt. 17-3. I ^BL-7^E7\MAN ON SN "\Vt. RcTersc. Moneyer. Tijpe xvi. I XIX. 10. 11. GolJua.

293 No.CNUT. .

Tyjye xvi. 540 •i-ENVT R EX TtrC I ^/ELFCTXR 0N SVOD Wt. neverHO.T REEI I-/EL-FRIE ONN SVGEE "\Vt. 170. 13 2.'20 [ ENGLAND. •i-ENVT REE-X 1\ »I</ELPINE ON SVO Wt. Obverse.lric. TANTUNE. [Southwark. 1 Type 543 xvii. 159.] Type 544 viii. 631 *CNV^'CNV T -T REX: REX: ^NORVLF ON STAN AVt. lG-0. iElfric. No. Norulf. lG-2. 537 REE: \Vt. SUeCEPEORC. 17 0. 170. Moneyer. . 14-6.] Type xiv.^(Selwine. . 5il 1 I^ENV T REEX. 53G *ENV T REEX: ^ENV-T 't'BVRSTAN ON ST7X \Vt. 539 T REX: •I-OVRVLF ON STANWt. 15-0. 538 ^ENVT •i«ENV -REEX. iEIwine (^Ifwine). [Taunton. •I^DVSTAN ON STTXNFOT Wt. purulf. purstiin. IGG. E. •i«CNVT REX ANDLOR I •I'EDRIL TANTV Wt. lG-5. ^ENV. iElfprar. 535 „ STANF ^Vt. 542 : 1 -^/EcoELPINE ON SV AVt.

CNUT. . 295 No.

•i-EIV -T •i^EDPERD ON PELIN ^^^t. 551 ^ENV. No. 17 9.^Ifwine.T R-EC-. POE: Wt. . I XIX.] Type 551 viii. t'CNV -CNVT: 553 'i'/ELFPINE ON „ PELII . no. AVt. ENGLAND. 555 REX ON PELI "\Vt.^Ifwine. ^CNVT REX A-NCL-0 RVM I ^C0LEM7\-N ©N PELI Wt. [Welinesford.] Type 550 viii. ^CINVT R-EX 7\r€ •i</EL-FPINE: ON PHRTX-. I MVIT^N 14. Olivrrnp.] Type 557 xIt.REX S- i-T^R-NCTEL."SVt. ["Worcester. «i<LEOFPlNE Edwerd.O-N- ' Arncctel. 16-9. 13-2. XENVT REX 7XNLL0RV [PI. PELINGAFORD.'jix. Leofwine. IlovprKo. 17-3. Man.] ON PELMITXE AVt. 17-0. PIHRACEASTER or PIGRACEASTER. PELMESFORD. "fCNV: T RECX PELIN Wt. 558 >^CNVT. 17-5. 1G:1 Coleman. ' ! . Type xvi. Moneycr. [WiiIliDgford.

] Tijpe xvi. 568 •i^sicoDiA ©^pl^^I:$T Wt. FILTUNE. 5. Wt. ^Ifsige. K. xiv. Moneyer. 18-8. 564 . •t'LE©FSVNV ©N p>INES Leofsunu. 567 TXNCLORV ON FINESR Wt. Sigar. 5C3 „ T^NGLOR- •i«7^LFP©LD OH PI Alfwold. 16-2. ^Ifwino. [Wilton.„ ^/ELFSILE ©N FINEST Wt.^/ELFR-IC ON PINCSTR Wt.CNUT. ^Ifsiffo.. i<ENVT R-EX T^NLLO . 15-G. 19 7. 13-4. PINCEASTRE. 571 •i^ENVT REEX A-. 569 REX ANLL0 RVM- ^XPRAFVL 0N F-INLST Wt. Wt. (BrihtnoS). 170.- I ^/ELFSICE ON PINEE:! Wt. 17-2. 22-8. 5G2 T^NELLORV "t-ZELFPINE ON PINE$T Wt. Wt. 5C5 R-EX AND LCRVM-. Oda. 5GG REX 7\NLL0 RVM „ ^©DA ©N ><SIQ7\R FINESTRWt. I .] Type SCO viii. I iElfric.T^NCLORVM "^BREHTNOO 01^1 NEST Brchtno^ Wt. 22-2. 17-7. 570 REX ANGLO RVMType I'PIHTXILE 0N FINEST: ' Wilitsige. 200. [Winchester. 559 ^CNVT: T REC-X: I -^/EL-FR-ED ©N PILTV ' iElfrL-d. Sisrodia ( = yigboda?> Spraful. 297 Obverse. RVM 5G1 ^CNVT RE^ 7XNCL© RVM-. Wt. 19-7.

2!)8 .

CXUT. 299 No. .

No.:>()(> ENGLAND. .

CNUT. . 301 No.

Cineinne {Uast.).). Norn:. (Chest. Li/df.).). Thotf. 103'). etc.. JL'Wrilit yEI. Minuyers. JlAjrhrig (Ihrf. Ghmc. {Hythe. &c. Cinevcicj {Lond.. yl'ljinr.). York). Ncnr. Wiiirfuxi. lUlO. iElwig. &c. Coldsir/e or CoJtsige..). L'diridd. Arcil. Windiest. see Goldsige.).). Brihtric {Crewk. Lond. iEl'fwald or iElfwold {Load..l>. or Edwuld (Lund. Edsieie l = Edsige?] {Exet.D. &c..'l (//)«//'..).«<. Stamf. Caldeitine {Catd. (Colch. Veorsif].<(. Alf. = JE<]<lmxr'Q {Bath.//(/':'] {Stam/. yE^ihrine {Lond.. Edwerd. {Ilcrt. I.. Man {Wilt. Glniic). Blacainan (Nott. CoIgriiH {Loud.-.^Ifwinc. Courim Crucan [^=Grucan t] {York).). Lane. Staff. Windiest. Oxf. get' (Stamf.).. Ediriig.).). Lydf.DuracanQ (York). Nunc. Wore. None). see iElfric. yEj^clric {o'louc. Southaiup. Edraed {Lond..lilwinc.) oilman l=.. Norw. or Corrf (Lond. iElfwold. Edwald.). TjowL.:5()ii ENOLANU HAROLD SUCC....lEIfnoS. \_ JElric.. Thctf. Derby.). Win- olu'rtt. Hast.. WaUi»(if. JEl/tcard or .. Ikh. Oxf.). Biorn or Btornn {York).).. Brun {Jjund. Theff. &c. ^Ifwine] or JEJfiri [ = ^Elf\vig {Camhr.. Ljond. . Cimsitan or Cinstan (Dover).. . Brnnman {Lond..'Elfwcrd (Brist.) Brihticine { Buck. Brunwine..l {Stam/. Cambr.).). Edmajr (Exet.L\jrlman?] Ji7m«r JEbwt. ..Ahan/l = Al/stan ?] {Tamic). Edicard.. Cytil {Cant. ^ItVrc HmU.).).). ]}rihtiu. Alfwine. Chicli. Deorsie..). Duddinc = Dudinff] {Lond.. JU'id or Bridd {HaM. Brihtred {Cant.). or Bundine ^Elfwinc. {Lond. {Leices. York).). see Cunstan. see iElfwig. Salisb. or Arncil [ = J/. «<(' .). Wallingf. Cille {Chest. Corff.). Oxf. ^il'nuS {Line. Line.stan (Thttf. see Eadwold.). Edricc. Edric.).)... Thetf.Elfwald. Crichl. see Gyldewine.).t'r. DIED A. York)..). Wallingf. see ^If.). Brihttmxr. Bruinn.).. Walliiuj/.. Edicig.). Winrh'd.. JEltsiu'c (Cl"u-st. Winchr. see .). Jl-)l CeoG { Winrhcst..). "NViuchfst.. Ijond.).). Cyldcinne. Colamau {Oxf. Edwacor (Cambr. Laiuc. . Romn. see ^Elfwinc. Loud..). Arcyl. A. Shiijt. /Elwine. iElfwig or . Bnrfa {Ihnur. Lond. Croc or Crocc {Chest.'r. Cajrenan (Loud.). Eadwold. CricM.. WalliiKjf. Cinewold (Land. Cxrla {Ex. Duracan { York). rS {Line). York-).).<t.. = JKlftiTcr\(Yorlc).T'tire (None). J^Unc or /Elric {Cant. [ (Bedf. York). Ox/. Dufacan {^^.).).).). Brun.t. York). Cinstan.). JEstan {Wincki.. Asj'i Edhie {Lond.. EdieaUl and ]'?ealda {Lond.... Corf. yEgdiriiie {BrM.. &c.. (Lond. iElt'roil (Cant. Dorch.. Ojt/. Arwil. Bruncar or Brungar (Lond. u^l/ipir {Bdrdn.). Yorh).) (Line. Jllacan [ = Blaoaman?] {lJ<rhy).).Elwig {Bath.

. Godau(Wilt. &c.). &c. Buck. Gudaman. Norw. Lrof<5egen (Bedf.). Leofno^.. Godwine. &c.. see JEstan. see Godwinc. Lond. Hirr/.. Snd.-.).. See Lcot'no^.HAROLD Edwine. Goicild.. Sumrrlr [ = Sunurleda?] (Oicst. Ipsw. i\auinin [=Aor<5man?] (Line). see Eadwold. Winchest.) Leofmser or Leom. Stamf. Winchest... Glouc.). York).. Line.. Gonwiiie [= Godwine?] (Dorch. &c. Chisl. Oslac (Line..)... Sicart or Swi rt (Stamf.. Sco.).. Oiberan or Oierun l=Oibeorn?'] Line. (liidf.).diof(E.... = Sum<. Sand' id (Cant. see Godric.. = Elewine. (Chidi. Wallinnf.) Derhij. Wore. (Line. Malm.)..'). (York).. ErniKi {Ileref. see Godeildd. Godinc cr Godine... see Goldsige.. llast... Sffiwine (Brist. &<: (Cant... Godeildd ( Watdi. Kiiifuir (Thetf.. Pororie.).)..) Liling. (iyldcwiiii' (Cant.. Egdinne. Wore. 0. &c. Sunn rh da.).). Line. MU. 'f [_ Swafa (Line). South a:.). liincolf?] (Norw.). Hch. O^grim. Norw. Salisb. Sioertibrand. Lcwcs.. Chest. Ermjrim or ( Yurie). Jfiratamitn (Dorch. Lond...- Eiereman (Loud. Sicili T//. &c. &c..). Exet. Lufric [ = Leofric?J (Winchest.- Eonred Eowine (^Vorch. Lifnic. Malm. (Line). Eilwene. Dirby..).).' York).). Line. Ladiiuer or Lodmier (Windiost. Ilunna (Exet.. Lifred. York)... Wilt).vr (Jedb. Winchest. Mann or Manna (Line.). (Dover.).)..). Goric. Shrews. Godsii.. see see ^Ifwine. "Wallingf.). Leofwig (Chest. Scula (York). st-e JEgeludne.). Uar^ucnnt or JJar^ecnut (Line.). Smil.). Grimnlf(Yorh). Shaft. Lond.) Lcofrcd..). Brist.) Estan.). Leofwine.).). &c. O^urim... (Loud).. JAne. Mi. Godaigc.. Line.. ? = (Line). (Line). Swartcfrand. Goda. see AVororie. Cheat. kc. Goldsigc. Lond.-.).. lliurra (Exet.. Suimrlid. Windiest.. Lodnuer. see Godwinc..). E<5ei... Swartebrand. Sumerhjd. = Sivgrim (Xott. Elf.).at. [^ Leofwig or Leofwine] [ (Lond. Warw. Lcf.. Liuc.. Wuric). (C7«c7i. Ox/. 303 Edwold. Ouclincar [^Ou'Kencarl?] (Lond. Swartine. Lcfciia?*. Gowine. Lond. (Chist. GloHi:. Thetf.). see Ladmrer. Fiergrim or Fargrim (Stam/. Sxwtrd ( Wiitchcst. Winchest. Lefstan.). lladir ? (Lend. Stcwer (Lond. iV'c.. Gillacria [^=Gillechrist?'] God. Roch. &c. Swegen(C//'W.). Stirccire (Cinnbr. Line. Im-ida ( York). &c.). Godwine and Stcwer (Lond. Godric. Ordric (Hcref). (Cant..).. I.).. Uu^t. Elbrilit (Ipsw.) Loofric or Lefric (Chich. Swortinc. Lcostan. Wilt. Oxf.. or Godmon (Hi rt.//'. Malm. Leofjitan.). LcfcnoT). Li film [ = LioftSi'gi'n Vj (Line. or Snell (Chest. see Godwine.-. (Vorch. Jiinulf [ Sudnnan (llinf.<mund (Line. Godmun. Leowine. 8tamf.). l = Eoficine?'] l Erncijtd = Arndtdi'\ Enjrim {Land. Lewes. Oxf.). Leo/wi Liadrafen Litinc. Fri^euine (Steyn.. Stircol ( York).). Southw. Eleidcj [ ^lfwig] (Ucref. &c. see also Lcof. Osfer^ (Line. ninn ( Winrlnsl.).).Leo/dai. Lifred. Loud.). Etsige = Eadsige'} (Dover).). Godwine and Ceoc ( Winchest. Stainf.. Windiest. Gilacris or (Chest. Sunrddc.). Colcli. . (Chest. Goldsigc.). York). Godwine and Widi (Windiest. Swola or Swote (Bed/. (Stamf. Noriman (Lewes). Chest.. Lond. Lifidii...).). Loud. Southump. see Leofred.. Sec. Goric. Lond.. (Cant. iStam/. Shrews. Lond. &c.rletla?2 (Line). GvUsige. JInhl (Lond.). see JEiel. 0<5in or Oiinn (York). Cant. Oirim.. Linr.

Will ira nl M. Kn. Witlj'ictrd (Lond. &c. TyiK A.). Wuhiqe. Wulfiri or Wul/icie (Ciinl. \)urcet[l] (Stam/. Shaft. H'.). Lond. Wnlfric (Line.).). Cli'Kt. \Vudia.). Around. pialda (Lond.)./(J{iith).] Type Slime : i. Lond. Ex't. Wulfwinc. Colcli.r ENGLAND. C'ltmhr. &c. Wulwine..... Shrews.</. hut o/ rude icvrk.rim (Slum/. Type i.). Lcic.r!. united at their bases by two circles enclosing pellet.).. purgrim (York).). " Worime ").} . tifi: Widia.st. and Wamanea (Lond. Windiest. Worurie (Line). \Vnii]in>\ M'C perman (Lond. HV(//(f. Wynfiige.id..). M'iiixl.. Maid.ilr. purtdf (Stam/. W. liomn.). [= ]\'ulfiri<i](Cant. Clicst.).'ar] (Lond.n Wallinfi/.« [=Wuirno?i] (Dri.). ]nil„H [= ]\'(idl. Cant.r/'. = ( \\'itichr»l. Wiimmi'it (Lmid. inscri^'tion outer circle. Wyn^if/.. Hunt. Wulfgct.).r7v.(Y«)rk)IJI/ril i.'iir York).iw.. Wydia..). WuiiHige [= Wynnige] (Lend. WynKifj'' Wulborn..). Wiihrinr [=Wuirwinc?] (York). purstan (Line Stum/. (Lond. Winnil (Ciiiit.i Wih.). Lond. Wulrot...). WiuU. WuHwini'] Wnlfwiiic. riiw [ = SwLTtinc?] (Lhrhy). gre Widia.). pudini^i? (Lond.iiijiCiii'it. Land..). Wi?iriuno or WitSuring (York).. [= Wiil/irard] (Glouc). Wulfwino. W.).. Wiilf. XX.. PI.). WiiHiini (Ipflw.MOT WiiMlrll <. WuJj.ilf. Wudia.). a... inscription htticeen tico circhi [llild.r U'iiflo^il. &c. 1. inscription divided by Lust outer circle. Ltie..rh)i).l. V\ It.ine.. VlftilU'i'iiil. [=\Viilff. Reverse. Lond.»i'>} (Line). a. Description of Types. Wulfgi't or Wulcett (Line.). Wnll/n-ine. I Similar. rar. Win- diest. [= Wul/a-i(j or Wulfwinu] 8K' Wulwiue..). Around. Cant. (Line). ]Vin- chiKt. Hunt.. Wulxir. (IJriHt. (Line).h(l).stiin [ = Wulf8tan] (Cant.). [= Wul/irifi or &o. Wuin. rar.). Wullinirn../r.). W.)..). Obverse. (Here/. : [Cf. &c.. . Wnlfnd (Shrtirs.{0i Sw(trlriilf?] Sicriirul/ [ IVrili! .)- AVidi^' (»r Widifje {Land. 1. Witistau {Siilinb. Bust diadoiuod.. Wula-ii (Hunt. (Lond. Wynnir.. : Cross comjioscd of four ovals. Wul.

tion between two [Sec No. Type D. G. var. rar.IIAROL]) I. in centre. croi^s nd irith between two circles.] [See No. P A C X. I).] Type iii. circle Around. Arouml. inscription : outer circle. Type E. a. inscription divided by bust : outer circle. Around. 305 Obverse. Gl. Around. PI.. a. Same. in centre. and pire.] .'//. circle enclosing pellet: in angles. /. Aroiitid. quadrihiti ptlht at each angle Around.. p. Bust (liadcmcd. I var. [Ildd. Lon/f cross voided . [llild . sceptre. : Short cross voided. 10. ri. diddemi'd.. inscription in centre.. in front of Inist. 7'.. Type J5«. inscription divided by bust outer circle. ri. 10. bust !<<< In iinwur : in front. I On short \ onmui-nt (Dill voidid. 314.s< iv. Kt.. p. 1. 313."). inscripcirclea. inncriplion divided by bud: outer circle. [Hild.] Type Similar: slii' III iv.] Type Siniilur : iii. a. | Same. enclortint^ jiellet. ii. Type Suitt L. diademed.

. in fhiihl (uul ^rtptre.iliailiiiw'il. armour. Around.. double outer circle.] Tijpe V. Lonfj ami H<'i|>tr(>. c] .] Type Buft 1. vi. I 1 Similar. Around. : [Hild. XX. trefoil of three pellets in second and third. n. in first angle of cross. fleur-de-lis. flcur- [Cf. [Cf. PI. armour: in front. by in front. 2. inscription outer fxlletd. bust 1. n. h. 10] V. Same. limbs united at baacH by circle. diviiiud Aronnil. var. XX. fleur- tion divided by bust outer circle. in Hliiclil V. fleur-de-lis I between two pellets and in fourth. hclmeted.. [Cf.] Type Similar : V. between two pellets. Similar I : de-lis I in each angle of cross. in each angle. oro. Fl. XX. Obvorio. R«vcrac. Tijpe HiiHt l. c. enclosing pellet in cacli angle. Type B. 4. circle . vnr a. pVIontagu Coll. 0. iubust: outer voided. Similar : hu»l r. . trefoil of three Around.. inscrip: Long cross voided : enclosing pellet de-lis in centre. var. :}0G ENGLAND. Hcriptiuu cirdo.s3 tlioir : : circle. var. Type Same. inscription between two pellets.

307 Description of Coins. No.HAROLD I. .

[Chichester. Gyldewine. IG-5. 138. I'ype y. RCVCMC. Wulno«. CICESTRIE. LefenaS ( = Leofno<5). Wulwiiio (Wulfwinc). I-HAR ©LD RE »i«LEFSTAN O CEN (Broken. . OLD R: I -I^LEFENSO ©rCAN AVt. I I«HAR: -OLD RE: IS «^QORIC ON CONC Wt. 17-3. [Canterbury. Wiilwine (Wulfwinc). [Colchester. U 15 I^HAR LD REC M CE: 13-6.] Type V. ObvcrM. I) 4-HAR.] Type 10 i. ^HAR.] Ty2)e 11 i. iElfred. c. rar. Ni.^Ifric. C/ENTFARABYRIG.'508 ENCILAND. 10 4-HAR OLD REC-. 12 J-HI/IR: OLD RE ^/ELFRED ONO CEN Wt. ^PVLPINE O BRIC \Vt. I •t'HAROL D RECX •tPVLPINE ON COLWt. ^LVLDEPINE O CE Wt. OLD REC •J-DVLNOO 0N BRIC Wt.. 15-3. Monr-yer. 16-4. COLENCEASTRE. 13 I^HARO. LD RECX. Wt.) Lefstan. c. . 15 0. "i-HAR OVD R 'i'/ELFRIC ON CICES Wt. 140.. far. Goric (Godric). 17-8.

I.HAROLD No. 309 .

310 No. . ENGLAND.

311 . I.HAROLD No.

14-0. 17-2. "i-ELEPINE ON L-EICE-.'Bti'r. Kcvcrno. LeofnoS. Liadrafen ? 53 ^-HAR- •tspARTiN: o lin: Wt. 14-8. ^-HAR OLD REX ^'/ELFSIICE ON LEIEE: \Vt. 8. Type 41 i. Wulwino (Wulfwinc). c. 48 REX I-PVLPNE: ON LEIOC Wt. var. [Lincoln. XX. Wt. Muueyer. •15 i-H?^R- OLD REX [PI. Swartinc .] Type 51 V. 50 ^SP7\F7^ ON LINCOLN Wt. 4«LI7\DRAFEN LirC Wt. ^EONRIH ON LINCOL Wt. ^HARO LD RECX •I^HAR «i«CODRIE ON LIN Wt. Conrim. Wt. c. ^HAR OLD REX ^HAR. iElfsige. 52 OLD RE OLD R-EX.] 4G "i^HAR DLD REX I 'I'LEOFPIL ON LECIEE Wt. 7. Lcofwif Type 47 V. 7. 170. ENOLANl).- Ehvino (. var.] Type 49 i. lG-5.OLD REX [ri. [ClM. XX. LINCOLNE. ^HAR OLD REC „ ^LEOFNOO ON LEIC 17-4. 15o. 15-7. LEIGECEASTER.312 No. Godric. 17 1.I'Ell'wine).J Etc. 17 : Swiifa.

L-FPINE ON AVt. XX. Will born. Type G4 iii. 15 8. 15-7. iElfno«. lf)-2. . Casrcnan. IG G. i^C/ERENAN ON LVD. Wt. 20 0. 59 I-HSR OLD >i«HAR- "MLOLDSILE ON LVN Wt. 9. OLD RE »f/EL-FNO£) ON LVND: Wt. Leofric. L-VN Wulfwine. •i«L-EOFPINE ON LVNDE Wt. [London. 17-2. •I-NAREII I'RE ^^OVONEAR ON LV Wt. Wuljrar. Jloneyer. Wt. 54 •i^HA-DO D RCX: •i-PORORIE O: LINZ Wt.V. Obverse. 58 i«HAR OLD RE „ i-CODPINE ON LVNDE: Gudwiue. 313 Reverse. G2 •i^HAR- OLD REX I<P. Wororie ? 55 ^HARD: LD REX •tPVLBRN LINC: Wt. Goldsigo. 17G. LUNDENE. 57 I^HARO.] CI "i'HARO- LD REX t'L-EORIE ON LVND-. 17-G. I. G3 "i-HAR OLD „ "i-PVLC-AR ON LVNDE Wt. GO OLD REX [PI.Wt. 17G. 15-2. 15-9. Leofwine.] Type 56 •i<H-7\n i.LD REX. Ou?>ncar ( = Ou>eiu'arl?).: HAROLD No.

. c. Brihtmajr. Lifin.- 'i'CODPINE ON LVN Wt. Reverie. Bnincar or BruDfrar. Wt. 173. •Sl{ ENQLAND. 1 "i-HARO LD REC-. 73 i-HAR- OLD RE ON LVN Wt. Typi' iii. 70 »i<HARO: LD „ LEOPOLD ON LVN Wt. Godsige (Goldsige). »> i» )) Edwold. HO. 71 i^HAR: OLD REX RECX : Wt. 10. Type C7 V. var. var. cs VJ NO yiADNVHSvl* Wt.[PI. var. 72 15-5. No. REE REC: [PI. God wine. CorfF. •tHARO LD R-ECX I i'LEOFRIC O: LVN Wt.] Om LVN Wt. Obvorac. •i^LEOORED ON LVD: Wt. 17-2. II. 7i ^HAR OLD „ RLE-. b. Lcofred or Lifred. 13-6.] 15-5. llD. a. Lcofric . IC 7. i-HAR OLD REC «i-BRVNC7\R ON LV Wt. 16-8. „ ^LIFRED XX. 11-5. C5 •i'HAR: OLD RETX | t'LEIFINE Oil LVND Wt. Moneycr. 11-5. I XX. 12-7. ^BRIHTM/ER O LV Wt. LD REEX "i-CORFF ONN: LVN Wt. »i«HAR-0lG-3. Type CG V. •i'HARO L-D ^COD ON LVNDE -J-CODSIIE : God.

HAROLD No. 315 . I.

316 No. . ENGLAND.

IG a. 13. Moneyer. [Wilton. t'HTVROL D RECX [PI. [Wallingford. >t/EL-PIC ©NN PELINCT^ Wt.HAROLD No.] Type 97 V. 15 7.-i Wiidia Wt. Lcofwine. 99 tNAROL D REX LD. ^HARO. 15 7.Egc-lric. lG-3. KJC. 17-2. Liliiic. . iElfwig. (Widia).- OLD REC ^LEOFPhNE O: PEL Wt. i . 317 Reverse.] Typr 98 i.LD REX «i«/ECELRIE ON PILE1()().] Type 95 V. I Type 96 V.D RECX A I i^/ELPINE ON PELII W'i. Obverse. •tBRVNSTAN ON PIN i-PVDIA i- | Brunstnu. Wt. PINCEASTRE. ^Elfwiiio. rnr. •I^NARO LD REEX ^LIFINE OI\N PILT Wt. FILTUNE. I^HAR-. [Wincbcstcr. 100 ^HARO REX ON PlNCEST-. Xi. PELINGAFORD. ^HAROL. I.] Type 91 i. Wt. | c.

ENOLANI).:h8 No. .

. .IIAROLD I.319 No.

Thetf. Line. Alficine.). ( Arncitel (Lond. Tl'crr.). Godwiuc and Golda JEf'neine (Brid.). Leof^eejen. &c. Caid. Godric and Calic (Lond.). C>o[ra] ( Winch' at).).rf. Ilch. Earnvi (JLnf.). Brunnd (Smtthir.).).'o ENGLAND.). Line.).). Thetf. Leofstau..). 1012. iElfwine.. Chi. Jjimd. Alficard (Lowrf. Jhitnrtiin. Ciirl. liruii or ]}ninn (Lond. 10 10.Elf wine ?] (^WalUngf). lindf. JEgfUvlnc {Bri»t.it.-.. Noric. see Leof. JHKti'in (^WinrhiM..Leofnoi.). Osferf> (Line).). Cinntiin or Ciniftan (Dover).).. (Lond.. Colgrim (Line). Jihumnn [ = Blacamau] (Dorch... Leofred (Lond.. Thitf. Godric (Glouc... &c.)...)...). (iStumf. Lond. Bock.). J'JI/ric ?] (Glouc). Southw..).!. HARTHACNUT. B(X}a (Ihn-ir). Wal- Glnuc). Edric Oj-f. Soiiihw...). me Brnnstuu.. JKIfMan (Chmt. yW/rrd (Cunt.). Lofirine. Courint'cof? (Line).).. llildulf (Line). or Liofivi Lxfivine ?] [= (Cant. JElaine. Gloue.). A. Auvlrir (Uorch. Wane).). Corf (Lond.). uiiiiJ A.)..).). (^Cumhr. Calic (Lond.). Stdmf...). Lcfstan.u. ESedan.).or Iin(if. Alfnd (^Iliid. Win- Dnnhird (Lmifjs... Ex. = Godivine and Ceo[ca^ (Winehest. Line. Shaft.).). (Brift.. Line.). Alt'.). 'Jlrh..).i.)..). Witham).). (Exet. FriSi (Stovn. Etmjf (Dover). Lefcno<5.. Hunna (Lond..-. iEf^tlwnrd (Lond.). (Brist. Soufhomp. "\Vudi[a] (AViuclKst. Ox/. Leofric (Cant. Maideof (Exit. .). Lond.. Ladnuvr Laftri Nott. Lond. (Cant. Stamf.u. Dover. (Tlnff.). Ordroc (Hrrof. JElffiiil... (IlnnL. . liilinc (Lpsie. Aithic (Lond. also iElf. (Malm. Oxf. Windiest.ixt. Buruine Wul- Leifii-ine. Winchest. NorSman (Letves). Kic.) Godcild ( Wdch.- Uiratiman Ldd' Ahrard \^ = Alf tmrd'] man [ = Sideman'?'] (Warn:). Hercf. = yt7/'7( (Shnws. Lcf.. clirxt.). Oxf.). Southamp. Goldgige (Lond. Leofred and Brun (Lond.t.. JElftw^ (Line). Alfeard.. Cnni. JCdmrer (Exit.. Fxrgrim or Fargrim (Stamf. Oxf. Stamf.. I31ucamun (GuiM.).:] (Chrst. Exit.). Ih'idd (H.). Succ. (L^ond. Edwig (Lond..). &c. Cilhcrid [=aillvrri>'t'\ (Chest. Oxf. Lond. Leonig (LAne). Goldcytel (Exct. Salisb. JElvinuirii [ JErnqrim ( Yorh). y%/W [ = yE^'<'lwino ?] (Prh.).. Mojipycre... &c. Brunxtdn or Brunrtan Briinirim.).). Oslnrn (Sitiin?)..).. Winclird.). Chest. JFAcrie or ^TJrlrir [ Eilipird (Lnces). Jii/ric or Alfric {Glouc.). AtfiM^ (IJnc). (Uorch.. Wiiu'hcBt. 0.. IL-vrra (Exet. Chich. ^Ifwig Godwine Godi<une (Cambr. Yorh). Edirine (Jjond. Jhxlda or Ihxh (Exit. J>udinic (Lond).).

] [Cf. var. Wuhicud(Hiri/.-ewino (Brut. PI. WUcrtrinn^ (York).|>lo. 'Sou. Siwerd ( Wurir. Wulb^m (Line). [Hild.). Leic. inscription between two circles. XXI.\. Obverse.). None). ( W'iurhi !>(. p. (|ua«lrilater. Wulno« (Exit. i>f the Knullsh iiiliit«. tbcy are iiit'liiditl in tlic fulUiwiiig libt. II. inscription divided by bust outer circle. WiucLest. Wuliniif. and" lypc i. Around. Y . inscription : outer circle. VOL.). [ left : j I Over short cro^-s voidcil. no sciptre.-s enclosing pellet. cf KiikIIi-U I'l'lii:*. a. I'lit a» tliey York. (Winchett. 12. 2 a.).). Saute.). Wul/wint or Wtdirine \Lanqp. Swirt [ = Swortinc?] (Stain/.'<cinl)lc ill Is ui>t dcsrriliol \-2.).). PI.). 11. m. a. Oufiiuriirl. pttrcil [xte also pwrct/tV] (LviuL). I Same. var. Around. united ut their ba>C8 by two circlt. 10. (Loud.* Reveree.). 1 . al. Oi^iurar. Li-ic)..). Oudrel or Oulfcd \^=Ouicit<l] (Loud. \?ori<tan or \?uriitann (Lotul. I'l. WnUi. [=Tocu ?] porcetvl (Loud. Descrhtion of Tyies. (ilouc.). Ul/citil (Limd. [ Wracu Wu(li[a] = "\ViJiu?] cf. [Cf.i 321 (Wiiichtst. inscrip: tiuu divided by bust outer circle.. [=Wuluo«?] ? (Liiic. Type B. punjrim (Line). Wuicird l=Wnl/wtrd'] (Glouc. (liiulcmcd. i.. bubt r. XXI. bccptrc hand.s<i Ik> I>aiil.) pMji^iiciue (Ejcit.) Wul/iri Wul/ici-rd] ?] (Glouc. W.-h <<. S.).] Type Similar . U. 326. Chmund (Line.vle and fabric. a.).HARTHACNUT. Nnrwli auil Type II. as It is of nanUh li I'l. var. l. Wnl/rh (Drrby). vai\ a. ri.. ii. Cross composed of four ovals. Ilumin'i d Wul/rnl [= Loud.} * Hlldeliraud Tvpo E. Around. &c. 1.). ii.).s tlieir ro\'ci>c lyin-. var.). i. (Uiri/. ftt Wtd/iciiU'.). Around. Toci (Lwid. Tlicy uVf given as 'lyiK. Snell (Chid. Swfrti7u' (Dtrhy.).j Type Bust in diadeiued in front.' and iy\>v vii.t <oliit.). llineulf or Itiunlj (Xonr.). Windi[^(j'] [= Winidti<j] (Cant. may l.. I Type Similar. Line).d ornament with pellet at each angle and in centre. Swot (Bid/.). b. Type UuHt.idil (Bath). Sxvard [= TT'i J/irt nt (Hunt. [Sec Xo. rf. l{ulni.). vtr. PI.

-] Type J^uxt 1. Around. 7»/.. in»crii>lion (lirid'tl hi/ hunt oud r rirrlr.] .ANI». 11. in front. in mitre-shapfd hdmet . \ b'twnri two circhs. Short cross voided: linibs united by circle. Around. in inscription . Around. eceptri: Around. PI. T'l. V. dividid hy huxt vi. inscrip- htween circUs. inscription : out<r circle. illniliu'il. prlht in centre . 11. [Hild. [Hild.. Tyf»' Iliii>l I. : AroHHil. unit>d crescent by circle j i in each closing pellet. 11. inscriptivn biticicn tico circles. [Hil(]. inscription between two circh s. TypeC. ti<m C R V ^. [Hild. .. in angles. Itevene... sci plri hcttceen tico circles. front. Sliort cross voided. \ Slurrt cross .ditid'mfd. 1. hmrriplion j Smull croKs jmtM.] Type Bust l. voided. iii..322 i:N(il.. Around.. limbs anffle. 11. Around.} Type Dui>t iv. PI. TypeD. eninscription between tico circles.. PI. divided by bust. tipfi Around. G. Typ^-Y.

a. ri. var h. 1-2.'.. var. [Hild. Obverse. Tyj. vi. inscription : outer circle. : vii. inscription divided outer circh. ri. PA Hil. lUviih'd hitxt. n. C. 323 Type Simihir . (liadt mrd . rj. ri. T. I in front.. a. in centre. ecejitre... circh'X. cross voided . Typ. Typ. ri. endusincf pellet : in amjles. eojttr.r a b. 11.] y 2 .r I.: Sliorl hyhuM.l. r. Around. I. var. 1. Reverse.HARTHACNUT. and mitrc-ghapcd beticeen two Samf. circle C X./}. 1'2.] Type lust Similar hclmetcd 7io .] Type Bui^t vii in front.] Type Similar : vi. II. Same.. [IliM. each terminating in : crescent.l. in armour and sceptre. „. I rnr. Around. Similar the liml>s of cross extend to edge of coin.. [Ilil.r. var. hu>'t urariiuf ini^rri/itinn III/ liflmit.

11. 11.J .] Type J)u»t r. Typi lluM /.. in amour.. ri.. mid pelkt at end of each limb of no pilUt on either side of fleurs-de-liif in ungleg. Around. Ix'lwctn two pdlcts. liinfjs . p>lltt in centre in each angle. Around. [Uikl. Ijftmj rriiKK rnidtd. before. imcription ottter circle. fliUT -di' -lin Arouml. ami aceptre. Type H. :{2i KN(iLANn. 11. var. hunt in armour . helmeted. Type U.. o. var. : Arnund. inscription : outer circle. [Hild. 6. viii. : Long iwcription divided by hu»t circle. var. outer cross voided. ix. . n. ObVMM.. PI. fleur de-li« beticeeii ttco ]uUei». vi iliitih nil il.^ Type Similar. shield Similar crofis. Typo 11. ingcrijition : uuttr circle. a. unltid hy (iivul'd by bttfl in each antjle. rirrlr jitlbt incUming [Hild.

I a. 4-HAOAC NVT RE i •t'/ELERIC ©N GL-EPEP: Wt.HARTHACNUT. Descriptiox of Ck)iNs.Wt. Tyim i. Obverse.*:ifric?). [H. I XXI. 10 :!J 0.XCttT. Moneyer.] Type i. Qoldcytel. 17 0. Golda. Reverse. [(Juildford. -^LODRIE ON (Jodric. [E. I i-LEFENOOC ON hEREl Wt.Wt. . J-HARO ACNVT RE [PI. Lofono?! ( 1 I - Lce. [Gltjiiciator. I 4<HARD CNVT RE [ri. 2. «I«HAROA CNVT RE -i-BLACAMAN ON LIL-: Blacauian. ECXECEASTER.] AXSAP-. 170. XXI .] Type ii. 20' 1. LLEPEEE: Wt.) I GLEPEGEASTER. 17-2. (Chipped.] Type C 1 ii.J Etc. xxr.fIlo^). var.^HAR : OCN/ RE [IM.] HEREFORD. iEleric ( = .Toford. •i^HARCA CNVT RE ^GOLD-EYTA ON CAX-. GILDEFORDA. ^COLDA ON 1. var. 325 No. n.

320 ENQLANIJ.] 11 4<HAR€> ACNVT R •i^LIFINC Om LHEOE-.] Type ii. XXI. 13 •I-HAR- OENV i'/ECELFARD ON I-BRVN ON LVNWt.) Ti/jh' ii.] Type 12 i. i-HARO CNVT I •tS/EVINE ON LEHER Wt. HO. 13-8. [Luuilon. Ssowine. LINCOLNE.^Egclward.lrw. (I'ierced. 17 0. Godric.-. Obverse. 2. [Leicester. . •I'HARO AC:NV 10 ^COLGRIM ON LINE: Wt. IG 11 fHA RAV Brun. [Lincoln.] Type ii. Revcrac. 170. LV. . G LEHERCEASTER. t'HARO. Wt. Lilinc. •i'HARO LWT R: [PI. LUNDENE. "t-HAROE CfVT RE 4-ORDRECON HEREFO \Vt. No. Moncycr. Wt. Colgriin.-ACryT I t'LEOFSTAN ON LVND I Lcofstan. •JhCODRIE ON LINEO Wt. 18-5. 17 Or. 4.

I "i-FRIDI 7. WulnoS (Wulfno«). 21 tHAROA CNVT RE [PI. OXENAFORD. . Wt.] Typi: i. 17-8. 8. SNOTINGAHAM. SUDGEPEORC. Obverse. 5. •i<LEFSTAN XXI. C] 17 -I-HTXRDA CNVT RE ^/EDLPINE ON- coxe:wt.tEfrelwine.] ON ST/ENIGE-: Wt. 15-3. 150. ST>€NIG. "JiHARO ACN/ "i-PVLNOD ON 3N0T Wt.HARTHACNUT. [Nottiugham. I XXI.] Type 20 ii. No. [Oxford. 18 15-8. I'/ELVII I I ON SVOCERWt. j •ti/ECELPINE ON OXA: Wt. yElfwig ? XXI. Reverse. 18-3. [Sti-yning. 10 5. I XXI. 15 *HARO CNVTE [PI. Godwine. 'I'HARO CNVT [PI. far. a. 15-2. Lcfatan (Lcofstftn). Edwig.] Type 16 ii. 19 i-HARO ACNVT RE -i-GODPINE ©N COXE-. 22 1-HARO CNVT [PI. «I«HAR£) ACNVT ^EDVIL ON CROXANA Wt. 327 Moneyer. [Southwark.J .] ON LVNDE Wt.] Typ> ii. Fii«i. 15-7.

iElfwine. 25 •tHARO CNV REX [PI. 24 ^GODPINE. \Vt. IG 8. Obvornc. 1 •tHAROA CNVT RE [PI. vnr. 10. a.PVDI ON PI-: CirMlwinn and \Vudi(n).] ON PICE: Wt. No. 4^/ELFPINE 9.] Typr 23 i. [WiiichcBtcr.] . 180. ^S/EFINE ON PINEEST: Mt. Tijpf ii. Moncyer. PINCEASTRE. 16-6.. I XXI.528 EN(iLANl). XXI. S«3winc.

. HfTC'f... Thetf. Line. ElfVI rd... yEgelwcr [iEgolwerd] (Lond. or EllVic {JIdrdn. ^ilsio (Thftf. . Wilt. Brist.. Thetf. iElfgct(Linc. Lcic..^rfrc . Sali^h.).. yElfwald. Ilythe. Anderboda or Anderbode (Winchest.) yJJgtmur or Extmar {Lond. iEgelmair (Bath).^elric see \_see Eadward.. ^Ehvinc. ^Iwig.). . ^Ifwig.d.. AsefirS [ = Osfer« ?] (Line). York). .lEgelwine]..iEilwino [«ee (Crickl....). Lewes. or Erngrim(^'/J. Allsie.. iElferc. . G/<*ue. ^Elfhcro. Amcetel. Lond.^gelric or Egelric (Glouc. Elxige &c.. Mitnn [ = iE. Ipsw.. &c.).l. Southic. iEdward.Elfwold?] (Lond. Exet. . jElmur {Both).st.lEgelwig or Egelwig (Lond. . Elricd.. a. iEgelsie (Thetf. Norw.).lElfric. Oxf. kc. Y<>rh).. Aldgnr (Lond..). Lond. (iuild.lErngrim.. iElfward. Lond. ^Iffet (Lond. &c. Line. Windiest. ?] {Winch sL). W'lirw. yl^lftjJan. Chicli.). Oxf. Loud. Winchest. Lond... .Elfwond [= . Tamw. iElfwi or J-Ufa-ie [= ^Elfwig or yElfwine]. Aliiniuiid (Nott. ^<:ifsig..Est4in.). sr. Thrtf. Astan..). Agamund (Line).. or'Elfiro {Stam/. xr.). (Brist. Alxxi [ = . yEgclward (Lond. ' Ilch. Estan {Brii't. Cant. ^Joneyers.). (Lond.. or Arfra] (Stamf. Loud.). [=-Slfric?] (Glouc.. ^^<>ln^^.. Elfsic..stan. also . {Camhr. Arhrtil.).). (Cant. Winchest.r/.. iEilwig (Wallingf. Stamf. WaUiiuj/.). . Edric.. ftlouc. York). Lydf. The Monoycrs' names without Mint places . (Cant.^Estan. Leic.lElfsvinc. &c.. iESestan (Brist.). Arngrim. Southamp. Oxf.)..). (Brist. Thif.. \-e (York). Warw. Alfwald.)..).iElrie.stan ^(Igar (liond. died a. Crickl.. Lond. also Jilfric] (Glonc.).Elncd. 1042. Crickl. York).).).).). iElfch (Shrews. Si I' . ITere/. Ilert.Elfwold. lOOtJ.' . .). Leic.ire chiefly taken Troni the list in Riiding. iElfsie.Elno«.). Southw. (Bri..)... Colch. Arbctel [= Amcetel ?] (York). or Elfno» (Line... Wilt. JE^ehcpard. yElfgar (Chest. ^IfwoM.... iElfno«... &c...sere (Thetf. York).l.. .). .. Aleof(York).d. Ansira. JEstan and Loc (Winchest. Lond. Arfra [ = yErfaraV] (Stamf. see Eawulf... Lond. jEl/mrrr. /Elfrod or Klfred(Cant.. Guild.. Lond.. Staf. At. JEMicine {Thetf. «(» Lond. Lcic.. Lond. Winchest. Cant. C. yEwulf. ^tlric.Elfwal.). iVc.).. .). (Ciiest.Elfsig?] (Chest.). iElfsigc.tEgelwine {Agticor?. ... Wore)..).). Wore. &c. .. Cambr. Alfwald or Alfwold.^7.). Alric (Lond. Oxf. . Lond. . Shaft. Lond.. Exet.Elfw. see ^Elfwald. Arnc(d. (lloHC.Elfwcrd. Amcytel.( 320 ) EDWARD THE CONFESSOR..).imbr. Slxc... Thetf.). Dovir. 0.. Astan. JEgelsig {Loud.Elmon J<:iric (Bedf. Alfsio. . Elfsige.. Hunt.Elfsie.. (Cliest. Ilch. . [cf. Nott.). .. Thetf. Heref. Llf.ar. Elfwiue.

s. Wiillinf. Brunian.)MricHJi.)... Brifrir. Bruinnan.).).).). Cto/tan. JUlric. Ipsw.l or llriiid (I last.).).). or Eadward. Brihtric. Stamf. Caut.e] (Colch. Ciirff Jiri^ric. Lond. (Coloh. Ealdulf (Lond. IMiin re [cf. Vxf. (llch.. /y/«r.. ]triliiiw[ l?rilitiu)> = Jirihtinc?'].. Droinlut (Aijlegb. Brihtwiiio (Lond. Ynrh).). Rocli. &c.. Taunt.).). Maid. Deornian or Diorman (Colch.). Coltsue. CoUiraiid (Clicst. Bryninc. Jirurhi/iii'. (Lund.). Lend.. or lloif^a (Dover. &c.oiiil. Itliiniiiiin [= ?] (Dordi. nil or llitirn Cillrcriwt (Taunt. Edward.. &e.). C^lhin (Dcrl)y). x< »' Deorsigo (Hert..r ( riii-ll'. lilficer] (Thetf. Colstan.). Jlriiiit? (jSVfim/. Malm.). Uruinni' [ = Bruii\viuo] Brum Brun (I{)sw. H'< (Waroli..).<//.'litiii!i!r. till/.). or Ciola {Whichtet. Dirinc or Dijrinc [=:Wirinc?] (Cant. Brunfrar (Lond. Uraiid (Must..).. &c.). Lewes.). Edwald.). Cin. I or Aiilli (Line).). or Bruiin (Ipsw.). P^adweard. l{().). .)... Durhrd Durul.). R.)..).. i. (Lond. Eauicrd (Cant. Colinc (Tamw. ItuldiiiiK {SI. Cimna. .). Cilliii ? (I-iiif. or Edwig (Chich.).). "Wallingf. Lino. ?] (Steyn. ^vv' Eadwald.). Tainw.. Duninc.).stan (Thetf.). Dcftlien or Dcorhan (Lond.). Colswcgcn (Hast. Ijitiw. Brun. Dthjin (None)... Hoia.L Con el in (Norw.. Duning. ((ilouc).).ad. Edwino.Htan (Dover). Cliich. A lit It. Ciolwi.). Norw...).. Ccmli? (Line). EaUlwig (Maid. Brixi (Wilt. Ealdgar (Lend.. Hast.).. ItliK I'liiiin. sec. Bruninc.). Htcyn. Brinwold (Oxf. Ipsw. JJrilitrii'. Dudinc (Hnriid..). Eiulwinc... Lewes. Eadwold.. (iuilil. Eadwig a/t. lllaraman Clnciin: Ciil or Cola. Burod Buhnd (Lond..\ Brin.). Wallingf. Diremc. Coolwi or Cilwi (Dover). Brunic. (Cliost. Notl. York). or IMaciiiiiii Itiiiri'il (l. ( ild (//. Winclu hI.. Burnrod. Brilitmsor.f. [ = Dudinc?] (Lond...:VM) i.). (Cambr..Cytdl.). Lond. Biircwinc [ = Brunwino?] (Wallingf. Edwold.). Cohi. Cedoniiiii (Shaft. CytelloT Citvil (York). Cinciiiiur (Lond. Exet..).. Malui. Bruniiic. Oxf.).). Line).. Land. Ipsw. IJcdwiii). Hliic. (Cheat.'ewine [ = Cent\vinel (Exet.). Brunwine or Bnjmcine (Stamf.. Cu%ftr^ (IJnc). Edwcrd.). Eadric (Lond.).) Brunnusel [ = Brunliusel?] (Chest. CJolgrini (Line).'!) (Loud.. Dunninc. Line. "WiDchest. Lond. (Loud.). ISriinhyse. Durreb (Lond. &c. &c. Lond.rilitrcd(Lond. Lewes).-e] (Colch.). nri.).). {Iiisw. Winchest). (j'ihvi.. BrunuLSO [ = Brunhy.).\Ni».. Lond.. Duducol (Shaft. WuUiugf.. Brihtwuld {OxJ\. Dermon [= Doorman Direman (Lond. I5ri. OTBrntiman (Cant. ('Ugil. Eadgar or Edgar (Berkel. Brunninc. Duriuc (Lend.). Ronin.). Centwine (Wilt). Bryninc. Tiiimt. Exet..i... Burnhere (Lond.. Eadmund (Loud. Ct'iyja Eidcsi.). (l>orrli. Dodnic liruiidiriiii'. Wallingf. Earcil (York). Itlut-iiiiiiiii. Ceorl (Brist. Winehcst. &:c.. Dulwic (Lond.. Bruuhysc [ = Brunsij. CitttI.). (.'ii. (Leic. Oxf..)..N(ii.

^^tmjor. Geldewiue. Erngrim [cf. see iEdric. (Sttiin/. see also JEgc\.). FriidnHud ( Wiiirh'iit. Godeiio.). Thetf. Dtrl'ij.).). Lond. Chich.. Fromn] (Derby).).).).)..). Ilch. Southw.).). Eadwig. or Godwine (Bedf.. Leie.. ir.).)..).). Bedf.). Grinule. Elwiiic[ = Elf\viiic?](Oxf.. Godiiinc and C'ncn (Winch' iit. Maid. Gu^tnt. Winehel.. Geola (York).. (Ilert.-.. Lewes.. Estaii. Goldwine or Goldewino (Hert. E«cl. Edin?(Lond.). Giidwi. Lond.).). &c. Shaft.... see (teldewiiie.. Watch. Ermwi (Hi *•</. see uEgehviuc. Forinan (Nott.). Loud. S(dish. GoSrie.). Erncilor Eriicytel[cf. Grimulf. Edmund (Line).). Arngrim] (York). Godcild (Ihd/.. llunewiiie (Exet.. GuSred Eargiim or Fiurgrini (Cheat. Elfstan or ^Ifstan (Lond. Wilt. Godesbraud (Shaft. Ilierred <..-... Godwine. I 331 Garulf (Windiest. Exluuer. see al'do ^Elf.).or Goltsigc (Lond. Edelic..).). Godire (Loud. (Jiouc. see iElfred... Gohi. Elurcol.).. Koch. C^dch.). El/sine. Grimolf. Gifc or Girt' (Line. Goderic. sec Eadwald. Dover.). see Edward or Edwerd.)..tt.- Dorch.^Egelric.). Eadward. Thctf...). Folewiue (Sudb. York). (Cheat. G(dd8ige. Goldan (Lond. South w.. Edwald or Edwold. see Godsunu. . WincIlGSt ^ Godwiu. W inchest. Eddan {Canthr. Fri^eic'uu.lina3r(Kxut.). Ox/. Thetf... Ecwig (Loud.). &c.). gee . Godwic. Eola (York). Norw. Gotsuuu.e. see Eadwine. Godiamb (Cambr.tiuund (Loud. Elewino (Tlutf.).sige?] (Exct.). Froma or Frome (Derby). Gilpin (Oxf.). Elric [ = . (Jodel/uld. Edwine. C. (Bath. Egelwine. Edric or Edriic.). Elfred. Goldman (Coleh. Ed wig. (Jodsunu. Lond. (Yorii). Ox/. G(UUH-i. Esther (Lond. Edred (Loud. Stamf. Godeuian or Godman (Heit.).)... Egel. Goiirie. Line. Hunt. (toltsine (Lond. Guolfwine (Glouc). Eilno^. Stam/.). GoMsie.. see Geldcwiuc.imbr... Etstau [= Edstan] (Gaiubr.Arnoytcl](York).).). El gar.i?^uln>r llcJiwulf (Wiueliest.). Garliu (Liue). Leic.). see (Jodric.. E-. Erfric [=iElfric?J (Exet). York).-.rred (Wilt..). Wore. gee Eadgar. &p.. Wore. Ilarciii [ = MarfinV] (Slamf. Etsige [ = Ed8igu] (Dover.). Edwie (Wiuchest. see .. sie iE. Winchest.. Goilcleof (Thetf. Chest. IIaldene(\(. Eastmitsr (Wore.. Endri'' or Enric {Derby). Fron [ef. Loud.). Fodicinc (tStduif. E.. see Godrie. Godi (Lond.-tj.). Eorfl=Coiir?^(Ii'(id.- Eilwinc [=iElfwine?] (Laiigp).). Shrews.). Lijmne. Iliurgod or Haregod (Oxf. Lond. i<.. Salisb. Loud. (Tiiltkwine... Ewiewii. or Brist. Eawulf (Glouf. Wurch. Winchest. Ihiyearl.).. Godwig (Lond. Maid.).). (iyhlewine..r Il.^Iroed. Egelric.. Horn (Hoeli.).). Godesune.. scr JE^clEarchir (S^iudw. Hunt.-jtan. Glouc.. (ilifwiue (Loud. Lewes.. Elrajd or Elred. Shrews.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. Earinvi[p] (Hcrtf. Elf. see (Cambr. Godwine and Widia ^Winchest. «Sl"c. Foloerd (Tlietf.. G»trn-(TI.. Stauif. GiMewinc.). (^welic [ = Godelif?J (Tiutf..). Illanguif (Norw. Winclicst. IVinclust. (Ilvthe). Steyn. Cant. liert. or Gyldewine (Cant. Guldewiuc.EUVic] (Hortf.. 8" ^E. ('otsuun. llythe. Eltau[=ElfHtan](York).)...). Edsie [= Ed.

. Soiithw.). Salish. or OuSulf (York). Sprot. Y'ork).'otol or IoceUl]CYork).). Lond. Siiuthauip. or loll! (V(. LddmnLoofno^. [= SxfugeV] (York)...)..i- also Leof. |. &c. Selcwine (Glouc. Stanif. Line...xTtcl..).). &c.. Southiimp. Hunt.. Scule. Ra3dulf(IIert. sr.-.). Chest. Spragelinc. Styrcol. 0<5beorn. Thetf. York). &c.. Richb. Sa3wino or [ if-j'r.rlv)..rn'. Thetf. Liofstan.). AVilt.trl.... Mima. (Cant. Ox/nj^.o/<Lrcj. l/iUi:. Oxf. Iludcarl (Cant. Soemasr (Hert. AVilt. LufwiiM!. Ricfin.. ThetK. AVarw..V|( U'iitrlfxl). Lifred. Ipsw. see O'^fin..iufrcd. Roch. Marein Mi. Tp»ir. Lewes. Dnnr. OtSborn. lulii. (Y'ork).... eee Sa)wine. Tint/. 0«olf. (V(. Oian. 0(5slac (Line. Jjiofnig. Lcofsio [ = Loof8igc] (Lond. locitrl.)..). Oaward (Ilch. mi: Leofrie..).. ic. Romn. ^Viuchest. Manne. AViiiclnst. &c. Southw.. Line. Scula... Sec. (Exet. (Ipsw. Sueaburn. Spot. 0<5en.). «. Illlfcr. Stamf. Wane.. or Liofweard Price (Norw. Lufrli. 0<5grim or Ou^grim (Line. Ac.. Oiuund. Lond.. Sna3born.. (Colch. Lond. Lcofwig.). Siewine (Exet. Eafen. Sajcol or Sascolf (Cambr. (Hunt. Wiuchest.). &c. (Norw. Sandw.. Snebearn. Luffinc. Loiul. «(« Orlaf(Lon(l. Ivofnmn. Winchest. Sired (Cant. lonl. &c. Leofword. Liofno(S. (^Chest.).. Edmunds). Loud. Nott). Lond. ( Ilwiitiiimii LuH'tii llliir ( : IJri. Sidemau (^Vareh. kc. OtSin. Norw.. &c.tc (Y'ork)..). (Crickl. Ou«olf.. \nrw. Manna. mr Lcofwini'. Y'ork). Lfofwig or LeofLewes.iof. [ = Harcin'-'] nee (Stanif. (Line. Otiniw. Exet.).^ ((iloiir. Leofrie.. Osfer<5. Lond. &c. kc.). Leofword.. f =:Iiif. r.. Newp. Lifing. liiaannn. Derby. Leofwine. I..).nnd. Liofinc.. see Swot.. Umund. Chich. Shrews. Loud... ^Vinche3t.. Sncxciiw [ = Siewine?] (Brii<t. see Swot.. Hunt.). Osmajr Osmund.' or Lifng (Xott). Marccre or ^lorcere (St.l. I.Nonr. &c (Y'ork). Loud. \c. IJfred. Spraceling. Lcofu'1*... lukct.). Sefuel. JAiw.. Buel:. (tIouc. or Oniynd (Lewes. liudiimir or Li/C.. Silac (Glouc). Lcf. Liofwine. Lofwig. Siewine.). l„ll„. Ilch.). Stannia>r (Colch.. Man.). Sigod (Bedf... Lilic [ Lifine. Sajfuhel.). None). Lofric..).). (IJatli). Iii. Southarap.. Sxfugel (York).- Lic (\Vatch. Spreacaling. Ea3fen. BincuJf. &c.. Spnxcelino. or OSinnc (Y'ork). Leof«egen (Bedf. Lofbtan.. licufnian.... ^Vorc. Iiiliiiiii Lufff [zrLumnc?] (Wanr. Leofstan.ilin.. Sbeiman? = Swetnian?] (liond. Loofred.- L. Lond. Hytlie. Liofric..:. Snoter (Nott. we Leofred... Leofwinc (Exet.).. Liofwi or Lefwi [ = wint] (Chest. OSin. or OuSbearn (Line.. Ijiifntiin. Lcofward. Ior a. Stuinf. . (Aijhsh. Leofwold or Liofwold (Ipsw. Dorcli.).). Shrews.). Leic.).. (Y'ork). Glouc. fin Lcof. Stircol. 0<5bern. Sajfuccf irzzSxfugeWl (York).. Luciuc [=Lcuing] (^Va^w.)... Iiiivkl [ = liu-(tcl?](York). Lifwine.).rk).).. Cant. (ir IrnriiY (l.).).). tfrtt Lfofstan. Li/rrc. (Cant. Lcofu {Chrd. Sneborii.. AVinchest. Yorl. Norw. iVIanwine (Dover).•a:v2 KN'fJLAM). Horef. f>if Lcofward.. Wareh. Lufi'DoiS. Sneaborn.. Leic. Cant. Norw.. = Lifinc] Lifwine and Horn (Eoch. Oswold (Lewes). (Lewes).. (Lond. (tIouc. Glouc). Osmund.). (Liii<:. Lewes). Leofwie. (Chest.-.).l'lot = Manna V] (None). Rinulf. 3/(j/w [ or loiKiiiii (York). &c. Southw. Hast.-il. Winchest..). Worr. Wilt). Y'ork)... Sigebode (Salisb.

. &c. Norw. I^eic..). Urlowino (Bath). (Chest..).in. Cant.). iVc. Wore). Dorch.). Wulfii or Wulsie [ = Wulfsige] (Ipsw.). Wurfurd (Thetf). (Line.. Roih..).).t(( uIho Diriiie] (Lowes). see Wulma}r. Wul.. Wiltrand [ = Wilfrid?] (Ilcrt).. Wulf.. Lond.)..)." Wulcred [= Wiilfred?] (Lond.).).).). Wulenuo!^.)..). )?iinur<S..). Hunt. Wulfwerd. Sicafa (Line). see Sicartinc. Lond.).. Exet. purgrini or ]?iirnfirim (Line.. Wulf [set also Ulf] (Line. purrim or pt/rr«/i [ = purgrini] (York).)... Swotric (Bill/. Wallingf... . Wulfsigo. sir Wulfgar..... Ulfcytol. Wulna?) or Wulnot^.. Winstan (Dover)..). EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.). Glouc. Wadel Auti] (Line)..).). Hyll. Warw. Wiutcrfngel.). Derby.).. s-i Wiilfnot^. Hast... Wiiuman Wintred (SalinJ).. Wynstan (Wiuchest. Wuldrie [ = WtdfrioVJ (« hidi. Camtfr.). Swot or Sicota (Bedf. (Tlietf. Thttf. Wulgar (Dereh.)..). Wulwi. Stumf. Widia or Widica (Winchest.). Windicild. S wear tin f^ (W inchest. porfir* or porford (Lmd. Nutt. Wuliied(Romn.. Wicing (Exet. Shaft.iurfurf^. Tidred (Hert.).. Swarcolf [ = Swartcol ?] (Stamf.). porctel. Xorw. Lond. [ Wore).. Land. Stuiuf. York). Wilfrid? (Ilert. Wulfgut or Wulget (Cant.).). ]?orstan or ]?urt*(an (Norw. AVilt. )?reodrod. &c. )?urfurS or purucrS (Norw. &c. Swetman (Loml.). York). Ulf. Wulstan.. (Bath). por or porr (Loud.).). Line. Cant. Uhitred = Wiitrcd] Wnlfwig or Wuiwig (Glouc. Wulmser or Wulmnr (Exet. York). {Line. (Dover.. Henf.. Winu8(Wilt. War'h. llrh. Wulfgar or Wulfrnxr. peodrie (Warw. TFM//fc«[ = Ulfcetel].. Wiuterfuhel. Swertinc [= ?] Wulfrcd or Wulred (Aylesb.).. Lond. ^. South w. Oxf. Stamf. sie Porstan. Swetric (Muld.. Simtham}!. Utti [of. Wuldar [ = Widfgai?]. Sumerleda. llimt. Sweart or Sictrl (Stam/..). Lcic. sie ). Wulfwiue or Wulwinc (Jirixt. Swartcol. Oxf. Thetf.. Wyd'coc (S/inft. Unolf (York).. Ronui Shrews.. Wiryn (Clu'. Peo?irt<l. Sweian. M'ulfuo^.).). WulnoS.). &c. WiJgrid [= Wilfrid?] (Stamf.). Swatic (Derby). Wudi:nian (Slirewn. Ulfcil [ = Ulfectel] (York).. m. Tolsi. Shrews. WigmasT. Lond... Wulbeurii.. .. orUlff(Liuc.). see Wulfstan.). Walrafan (Line). &c. Swegn ( York). I7Z/t.).-. Widred.-. Norw.. Lond. Udfe? (Line. tSce. Wiboarn (Cambr. Hunt. Colch.. X'V Wulfwi.). W'uhvig. or pureil (Lmd. Swartinc or Swertinc (Cant. Dovi-r. Line.). Wulgar. Wulsig. (Cliest.tl (Land.). Wirinc [. Lond. Wilt. \:'urulf (Stumf. Widfulf (Line). Swertinc. (BL-df. 333 Sumerluda. Wulfward. Camhr. Wileric [ = Wulfric ?] (Stamf. Wiilfrard. Southaiup. Swertcol. Line. (Ipsic Lond. ]?urr...).. (Winclie»t.).). Wulfwi [ = Wulfwine?] (Bedf... .). Warth.. Wulfric (Chich. . Hunt. al. Lewes. Steyn. Steyn.st. York).)... Swileman Wulfstun or Wulstan (Cant.'). Ulfcetel. Wurreb [ = purreb] (I^nd.. Sweartcol..- Wilcrif (Stiimf.). iV:c.vvr Wulfwig. Porcil. Richb. (York).). Glouc. j?iirbt. Wilffiprip or Wilgrip (llcrt. WulfnoS. Wirc^iia (Lond. Wulsige. (Lond.&c (Ihxs^.

i. inscrip- I Short cross voided . diademed.] Type ii. I h. XXVI.] Type Similar: in front of bust. var. cmwii. tion between two 10. Around. XXIV. [See No. n. | Around. iliadcmed sccpire. Keverne. var. in front. Around.. 420. n. as Type ii.!. i. Same as Type i. 5. 12.. inscription in centre outer circle. DKacmniriN ok Tvn:8. Same. Around. [Cf. jicllet : tion divideil bj' burit: outer circle. outer inspriptiifn divitbd l>y bust I . XXII. in front. var. Similar: annulet in I field. | b.] Type Similar: huet I. var.] [Cf. PI. [Cf.. a. Type A.] AmuikI.] Type Bust iii. 8] ii. [ | divided by bust : outer circle Over short cross voided quadrilateral ornament with three pellets at each au<rle and one in centre. a. sceptre (iMimme'e). Similar I : annulet in one angle of cross. iiiMorip- ciri'lt [Cf. eircles. a. G. ri. Ty)ye var. 1113.ANI). ri. . Type Same. n. Around. diademed. with nviliiitf' : Small cross patttfn. sceptre. 7. Type lliiHt i. inscription 1.: i IINCI. ii.. XXII. Same p. [Cf. inscription between two circles. I [Hild. . XXIV. Obverm. Bust 1.

1>. Bust 1. Similar : bust r.. inscription : front. ri. ri. Type Dust l. m n. Obverse. I Same. 13.. | XXIV iii. r«r. [Cf. var. : one pellet only at eaeh angle of qxtadrihiteral ornament. n. iii. [Cf. willi crescents at ends of limbii. with radiate crown. [cr. sliort cross voide<l. Tj/pe iii. c. a. h] Type Same. Type C. iv. var.l. inscription: outer circle. (fc. XXVII. cross voided. 14. a.'\ Type iv.] no Bccjitrc. diademed iu Around. and inscrijition bitwcen ttco circles. d. n.] Type Same. Type iii. as var. sceptre. b. and in angles . XXVI. 7\ C X. b. [Cf.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. Around. Similar. diademei}. Tiip. each limb terminating^ in crescent in centre. XXVI.. Similar short : pdUt at end «/ each limh nf cross voided. but | | Similar sceptre terminating in flcur-ihf-lis. var. iv. 7. [Uil. [IliUl. 13. circle enclosing pellet. I Same. var. var h] . Lonp P divided by bust: outer circle. 335 Kcvtrsc. .] Type Similar: bust 1. ri 13.

vidcd by bust outer circle.] liubt Warded. iiiacription iinil niiittil hctwtcn two [Cf. ri. PI. 14. XXII. Around. annulet. annulet in centiv. in each angle a martlet. inscription becircles. j two circles. V. wrjilri' iiiHcriiition Sliort crcHH iilly vr>i(lc<l.». [Cf. circles. Short cross voided.. Similar: cTosa. Same as Type XXII. \ helmet. Ravenc. frequently enclosing pellet. iliiuli iii'd . bu. at Iiuho Aniiuni. liy t\vi» circlcB. b. I Similar : annulet iu one anslc of cross. V. . p. 427. I [Sec No. XXIV. s<"eptre.] (liaiUnu'il . 1179. . in ecnlre. annulet. | n. Around. XXIV. var. earh limb terminating in three crcijoeuts. Type Similar: cross patte'e iu cacli angle of I cross. vii. scoptn. I inscription between two [Cf.. Type Hunt 1. XXII. 1. (^xpnndin^ d ividiJ \<y buBl : ouUr circh-. tween two [Cf. n. and : holding hand di- . a. pointed r. n. Around. lioarded. ill front. unless otherwise 8t«t<d. 2] I vii. ObrarM. Tyj)e vi.: •SM KNGLAND. inscription [Cf. in centre. inscription b( twecn Around. Type vii. b. Short cross voided. ri. circlcH. [Cf. Type Uubt r. XXVIII. ri. Ari'iiiiii. wearin helmet and holding in r. the liriilm fn-adii- (|Kiiiinu'V). inHcriptiun divided by bust outer circle.] nnnulot in one angle of I [Cf. inscription divided by bust: outer circle.-t 1. Around. the eccptrc terminates in a cross ' more common form. I5unt 1 . XXX. each limb terminating in three crescents. var. vii.] Type Similar.] Type Same.* tUur-dc-lisor three pcIKts (pommee).] Type Siiintv vnr. a.. 6] ihaX l<cing Uic • In (lc#cril>ing the coins of this type. which t«rininatta in cross. H. I 4. wearing i>ointcd in r. hand ticeptre. tvir. in front. Short croBs voided. V. Around.

: Around. ri. v(tr. 8. inscription divided by bust outer .. Small cross patte'e. II. a martlet. segments of of cross. pellet. 3. 2] ix. Type ix. orb Burniounted by eros. X. I'l. bciirded two arches. outer circle. inscrip- circle. in centre. surmounted by thrt-e balls in front. in front. Short cross voided. Similar to Ty|H. outer inscription divided by bust . xi. . ri. ri. XXIV. . bearded wearing crown of two arches. XXIV. sceptre. PI. Around. var. each limb terminating in an incurved segment of a circle. inscription outer circle. circle at but no ineuived ends of limbs XXV. orb Burmounted by crosH. h. PI. . in : centre. a. •ircles. XX\ I. each limb terminating in an incurved segment of a circle . circle. [Cf. King seated towards on throne. I [Cf.] Type Same. and in 1.s. wearing crown l)y threes balls suriaountcd he liolds in r. 'i.] Type Bust r. tion between two | i Around. [Cf. PI. xi. surmounted by tiiree Around. and in 1. XXVI. xi. on throne.] Type King seated towards r.. car. C] xii Type wearing crown of Bust r. inscription outer circle.. in r. Around. . a. annulet or pellet frequently in centre in each angle . Short cross voided. balls. I annuh-t in one angle uf cross. Around. [Cf. 10. .] Type Same. hand long scejjtre. I Type Same. inscription: outer circle. generally bearded. Around. pellet. 337 Reverse. inBcrii>tion be- tween two inscription .. sceptre. [Cf. XXIII. hand long sccijtre. Obverse. [Cf. : Short cross voided. Similar. 11. [«l. circles. r. generally boiirded. : Similar annulet in two angles of cross. wearing crown surmounted by three balls he holds .] VOL. Around. XXII. xi.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

in front. inecripcirclea. I I Similar annulet instead of pyramid in one angle of cross. twii tr. in each angle j)yraiiiid sj)rinfring' from inner circle and terminating in pellet. Same. Revcne. iM-nnl-vl . as 7. buldiiip ecoptrc directed sliouldrr in r. XXV. bust r. . [Cf. [Cf. rroHM.M|nintly Artiiiinl. wenring arched crown. Similar.] Type Siun . xiii. Similar to I I Type xiii. sceptre. a. Around. XXIII. cross voided. XXIV. hand and orb fmni each side of the crown ft | i ' depends l>elh'ts. Same XXVII. [Cf. : XXIV. | [Cf. wiiich dei)onds a in tliree pellets. 10] XXIX . Bust r. ri. Aruiind. . segment of circle curved outwards. wearing arched Short cMwn and liver r. circles. boarded . 12. Typr. «. VI XXII. ^imUar.'. ri. ri. KNIJLANI). in each nngle pyramid springing from inner circle and terminating in pellet. It. bust 1. iui-cription divided outer circle. . XXII. ntr. Type XV. annulet or pelfrequently in centre.ich limb of cro!^8. tar. cross. [Cf. IliiMi fiK'ini.] Type Biist fiicinp:. inscription between two circles. ri. fillet annulet or pelcross voided let frequently in centre. inscription divided by bust: outer circle. between two inncripticin iM-twein (livitK'l rircliH.] Type blatuu. by bu(<t : terminating in three Aro\ind. xiii. no sceptre. xiv.' nrclir<l hiirininintcil liy Srniill croHH tioii imttco. terminating let An'und. PI. Around. from iillet. 10] Ty}}€ XV. V(tr. b. [Cf. : pellet at end of each limb of [Cf. c. [Cf r\ I SimiliU": at I end of e. 13] rnr.338 Obvma. I'ur. n.. in 1.] Type sv. xiii. h. Tyite XV. rmwii. Short . : Similar I aiiuulct in fuld. inscription between two . winrin^. iiHinlly aljovo l«y bciul. 8] Type XV. 7.

in front. Across in lluT'c pellets. Biist wearin arclied crown. and terniinating in pellet. . inscription divided by bust outer circle. wearing arched crown. 14. from which depends a fillet. inscription between two circles. sceptre. Short cross voided each limb tcrminating in three crescents. No.] Type Bust r. XXIV. Around. sceptre.: EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. xvii 7. terminatin r. | in three jjellets. inscription divided by bust: and between two dotted Around. inscription P 7X X. field lines outer circle. in front. jiyraniiil springing from centre . annulet in each enclosinp: pellet in centre anfrle. PI. Reverse. from which dejieiids a fillet. Around. terminating . [Cf. between two circles.] Description' of Coins. XXYIII. Around. . 339 Tyjye xvi. . Obverse. [Cf PI.

var. BAD by one 17-2.: 840 No. ^CODRIEE ONN pum- Godric. Type V. 20-2. . BA07\NN Wt 20-4. I Type 12 xi. Vnr. Monpycr. Wt.D REX ^GODRIE ©N BADAN Wt. 2U „ 2. 20-2. Type vii. jEgelmecr. Sceptre. Osmirr. Ty^ye ix. Obreno. •tOcoM/ER: ON BAGEN Wt. „ I „ ON BSDEN Wt. 2(1 5. : REX •i<05M/ER ON BTXOT^NN Wt. RE "i-CODRlEC ONN B7\€»?iNN Wt. ? BAOEN Wt. 20-7. : Godric. Wt. EN(JLANl). 14 3. 210. 20 . [PI. [n. ^EADPAR RD RE •i'EADPAR „ „ i'LODRlE ON BADEN: AVt. 20-8. L3 »i<0a3M/ER ON BTkDEN Wt. »^EDPAR. T>inibH of ctohh united circle only. Godric. ^<EDPE RD REX 4</EIELM/ER ON BAO Wt. 20-8. Type 10 vii.] XXII.Tr. 207. XXII.. : Osm.. Godric. 2. 20-7.•i-. h. 15 + „ . 4-EAD PERD REX Var.] .EADPAR. 11 HhESDVVEARDVS REX AI^LO I »I-GODRIE ON BA€)AN Wt. RcverM.. : mee. IG •bEADPARD RD RE j I •I'VRLLEPINE ON Urlewinc 0.

17 2. 220. Type 17 xiii. Wt. 25-7. ]3o. BEDEFORD. •1<SP0T ON BEDEFOR Wt. 1 -^colLOD ON BEDEFOR Wt. ^EDPAD RE I ^VL-EHTEL ©NB Wt. "l^EADPARD REX A- ^OSM/ER ON •i^OcoM/ER BT^OE wt. Scoptro torininatinginflcur- ' . Obverse. ON BEDEFO Wt. Ppot or Swot. 20*. ^EADPAR RD RE [PI..EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 1. Ulfcetel ? Type 20 V. BEDEFO. "fGODPINE XXII. EADPARD REX AM6L- I i^LODRIE 01/IH BEDE Wt.] Type 19 ii.] Type 22 vii. Godric. Type 24 xi. 341 Moneyer.S-5. 5. 24-5. is-0. 20 0. 18 4<EADRARD REX A ON Wt. Wulfwi( = Wulfwinc ?). XXII. •I^EDPER. I^EDPE : -RD REX 4^/ELMON ON ^Imon. GoJwiuc. „ 2] REX[PI. l. [IJcdford. Osmfcr.] 25 Viir. Sigod. Type 23 ix.D REX I^PVLFPI ON BEDEFOR Wt.

. No.:jiii ENULANJ).

] . 343 Moneyer.- ^/ELFPT^RD ON BRICSTWt.-7. 42 •i^EADPARD REX [ri. Lt. Type 3(J xi. 10. 84 »i«EDPE: -RD REX. Type XV. [Cant<'rbury.] Krc.] (Joilwiuc. KJO. 2U(J. 40 I-EADPARD REX A [I'l. Ccorl. 20-5. Tf/^w xiii.Godwine. Wt. Hc«EADPAR- RD RE «i-/ELFRIC ON BRVCcoTO AVt. 43 ^EADPARD RE ^EEORL ON BRVEE: Wt. XXir. Reverse..EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.D RE I I ^BRVHAN [I'l. Tiipc ii. 30 ^EADPAR „ „ •tDODPINE ON BREEC. C/ENTFARABYRIG. 41 ^EDPH-. 38 "^ELFPINE ONBRVCSTO AVt. rrmnan. i »flELFFINE ON BREE Wt. 41 •EIIDDIIRI RECHh- „ BRVC Wt. 19-7. ^EDP RD REX 4</EeESTAN ON BRI Wt. 17fi. iEScbtan. X. Ol-CEN Wt. iElfwanl.Xll. I XXII. 20 4. 2U-2. 11. i(. JClfri" 37 I-EADPAR „ „ •}</ELFPINE- ON BRE: Wt. 20-4. I I^SODPINE ON BRVCE Wt. yElfwine or Elfwiuo. 20n.] : ^-T'^lfwinc. Tijpe V. 17-2.

:\u KNGLANIi No. .

Wt. Manua. Gi ^EDPE.Wt. 20-5.Td. Elr. 2S-4.D PEX ^EADPARD ON CENT-. IG 0. Gyldcwiuo. GO 4--EDPE RD RE J-EL-R/ED ON C/ENTC/E: Wt. 70 »i«EDPER. •i<L-E0F5TAN tcr- Loofatan. CENTPA Wt. ^EDPER.J^EDPE: -RD REX J^EDPERD ON Edwcrd.D REEX }</ELFRED ON . Sccptro tcrniinatinginflcur- ^SXLDEPINE ON CENT Wt. iur. Obverse.' ^MANNA ON CANTPA Wt.. ininiitiug infieur(Ic-IiM. No. NVt. Type GG vii.Alfred.RD RE ^MANNA ON CANTP Wt. Monej'cr. 200.D REX V(ir 4<EHDPARD ON C/ENT Wt. 21-5. Eadward. 72 i-EDPN RD REX V(ir. EETPEREEO •tLlFPINE XXII. Wulfrcd. . 25-7.] G3 •i-EDPNR-.-lis. RD REX-. 19-7. Wt. 190. 20 G.- RD RE [PI. G8 ^EDPERD ©N CENT: Wt. Lifwine (Leofwlnc). Sc-eiitic ONC/ENT: Wt. Var. Type CI V. C2 . G5 't'EDPER D R-REE tPVLFRED ON EETPERE: Wt. Sooptre ierminutiiigiufleur- d. 8ccptro tcr minatiiigiulleur de-lis. 21-5. 15-4. 7:^ fEDPE. 210. ON C/ENT-. 19 7.EDWARD THE CONFESSOK. (Ic-lis. Manna. G7 ^EDPE RD RE i-EDPER. 4<EPDE-. 13. „ V(ir.D RE^ REX HrELRED: 0:N CENTPA-.

Type 8:5 xi. is-s.:]!(] ENOLANI). I Wt. . I JElred or Klrod. 20-7. I "I-EADPAR RD RE •l-EADPARD ON C/ENT-: Wt. I'JO. 21-9. Wt. SI •I«6VDEPINE ON CENTPNR Wt. . 87 »i«ELFRIC: ON C/ENTN Wt. 20-2. SS •bEAEDPA RD RE ^LVLDEPINE ON C/ENT: I (Juldewiuc. 19-2. 19-0. t Eadweard. Ocldewineor Guldewine. Rcvcnic. +EADPAR RD RE 4<EADPAR.stan. Eadward. 21-9. ^ELRED ONN FENTNP Wt..RD RE "^/ELR/ED: ON C/ENTN Wt. ANG-0Wt. No. 21-2. ^Iraid. EADPLRD RAX ANCORV »tCELDEPIN£ ON E/ENTN W^t. S'2 EADPRD RX ANCOR- | >MV1AHHA OH EHET. EADPARD RDX ANS READPRD RX AUG© ' 4-/ELRED OHH FEMT Wt. i Manna. I .- ON C/ENTPA Wt. 190. ObTMM. ' Wul. •J-EADPA RD RE ^h/EL-EREARD ON iElfweard? I EVETN Wt. 19-5.-. EADPEARD REX ANSLO- ^-EL-RED ONN FENTN Wt. XEDPER D RE 4<PVL5TAN ON CENT. Tli. : Elfric. . 20-3. 85 •i«/ELR/ED-. Tiji»' ix. Wt. 84 16-5. Moncycr. EADPARD REX AH6L 80 "t'EADPEARD OLEUE Wt. l'J-8.

EDWARD THE CONFESSOK. No. 347 .

ANI>. .N(iI. No.IMS i.

349 . No.EDWAIJD THE CONFESSOR.

142 15-2. 4«EDPER D RD imting . Brminesc Brunlivse). IKO Tijfie XV. 17 0. 13G ^PVLFRIC ON CICEST Wt. RViir. AVt. I'M LAurAlUJ I»La a [I'l. 17-2. EOLECE: Wt. 13-1 ^lELFPINE ON EIEES Wt. 11-5. 16-5. 20-9.] Tyjt 137 iii. Wulfwine. 132 EADPARD REX 4</ELFPINE ON „ CIEEco yElfwine.{ CICEcoT Wt.D REX. i:{5 4-PVLDRIC 0N CIC Wt. Elfwinc. 15-7. 2(J4. Svi ptre teriniin llcurj ^BRVNNEcoE ON EOLEC Wt. •t-PVLFPlNE ON EOL-AE Wt. (cf. Leofward. 210. Wulfrie! NXIII. ( WuMric = Wulfiic?). '2 10.) 138 ^'EDPER RD RE •I-EDPE: ON COLI Wt. ^PVLFRIC ON CIC \Vl.K-lis. (Twice pierced.- RD REX i'l'BRVNHYSE •i«ELEPINE ON C0L-7\ Brnnhyse. 139 RD REX •J-LEOFPARD ON COLE Wt. [Colchester.•X)L) KN(JLANI). Ucvomc. Tii}H vii. 140 4-EDPER.D REX- 4^BRIHTRIC ON Brilitric.J I'M \\t. 21-2. 141 •i<EDPEA. . Wulfric. COLECEASTRE. l. 13. Moncycr. I'EDPE-.

' . 19-8. XXIII. EOLEEE Wt. -I^EDPE: D REX •}"PVLFPINE ON EOLECT Wt. 14!) ^EADPAR RD RE ' -i-LOLDMAN ON Goldman.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.Egtlwinc). Type 151 V. Reverse. lG-7. 2 10. ON EOLEEE Wt. 152 l-EDPER D REX- | •J'/EIELPINE ON EREE Wt.E'Tclwiue. [Cricklaac. Type 148 xi..XV. h/EILPINF ON vEihvinc (. 20-0. Godwine. CROCGELADE. Wulfwinc. vii. ^EDPE-. Typ. COLECE Wt.-RD REX [PI.] Typi'. 150 I-EADPARD REX \V\. H4 •i-EDPER D REX i^LEOFPORD ON Loofword. •I^PVLFPINE XXIII. Stanmair. 20-7. H5 14G ^EDPER D REX •^STANM/ER ON EOLWt. 2G-5.. Wulfwinc. 143 'i'EDPER D REX 't'DEORMAN ON Deorman.] Etc.] CRECGELADE.. 5. ERECELS Wt. Vd-^).. I'JG. H7 EADPARD EX ANSOL 4^PVLFPINE ON COLEEET: Wt. 21-3. COLEEE Wt. No. G. Time 'yp ix. . Obverse. Wulfwine. 351 Moneyer. 21)0. >J-EADPARD RD RE "i^LODPINE ON EOLEEE: Wt.

Leofred. iEgcIwi[nc]. I Fro. 2 18. Leofred. V'//y<t' V. Rcverno. 153 +EDPAR. 20-t3. Leofred. HhEDPE RD R I t'FROU ON DEOR I Wt. DEORABY. v. 2t-7. 207. Swatic I XXIII. XXIII. EREEIIELADIf). Type 15G xi. iy-6. tLEOFRED ON ERECLA Wt. 200. IGl •tEDPE: -RD REX. 15 EADPARD REX AN6L- Hh/EGELPI : ON Wt.] ON DERBII: Wt. ^FROME ON DEORBE Wt. Fruii (Froiuu). l'J-8.).{r/2 ENGLAND. lG-9.'! EDPARD REX ASORVM ' I-LEOFRED ON Loofrttl CREECA Wt. Type 151 xiv. 18-0. 8.uc 1 . EADPARD REX [PI. Oltvrrno. •frLEOFRED XXIII.[ri. . Mcmeycr.] Type XV. Liofrod (Leofred).] Type 15'J ii. I ^"SPATIC . 7] ON CROC: Wt. No.1 . Tyite iii. 100 •tEDPER D REX-.D REX [PI. 15S EADPARD REX | ^LEOFRED ON ERECLA Wt. +EADPAR RD RE I'LIOFRED ON CRECEL Wt. [Dell.

] 18-2. 16? ^EDPE RD i«SPRTINC ON D0RB Wt. 17 13. 12. 353 Mouoyer.] DE0RB Wt. I I ^CINSTAN ONDOF Wt.Wt. •tEADPAR RD RE I i'FROMA ON DORWt. •EADPARD REX- | .DREX:- . \ Leofwiue. XXIII. Cinstan. I XXIII. [PL XXIII. 17-9. 2 A . Swertinc. 170 tEDR RD RE Type 1-PIN3-. ^EDPER.-TAN ON DOFR Wt. 11. fEDPA RD R. I Type 169 ii. iii. [Dover. Type 1G4 vii. •i-EDPE RD RE R "i'FROME ON DOREBI (Broken. 171 i«EDPA RD REX: [PI. I XXIII. No. 277.^EOLBIN ON DREB Wt. 22-0. 18-5. 1G3 •i'-EDPE: -RD REX [ri. Cinatau. DOFERAN OR DOFEREN. 22-2.BOLA ONNDOFRAN: Wt. Etsif^c (Eadsige). Obverse. 162 •i^EDPE RD REX ^LEDFPINE ON DEOR: Wt. Type 166 xi. 120.] 3. [PI. 2 10. "i^. lUG.] Type 167 xiii.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. Froma.) Frome.] Type 168 i. 172 HhEDPNR D RE 'I'ETSILE ON DOFRR-. I •tElNSTAN ON DOIRI Wt. Colbin. Winstan. Swertinc. Bo»a. i^^SPERTINEON 10.

(=Ceolwi). : xi. . Cinstan. ^^CNcoTA-fi ON DOFER ^\'t. ^'EDDA RD REX 4«EDP: RD REX : ^EINSTAN ON DOF: ^Vt. Type IM-. 182 •tEDPE-. in fleur- de-lis. ^EILPI :• ON DOFCREN (Urokou. 179 . 178 D REX Vur.D V<tr. 183 EADPADD RX AH6- ^EILPI : ON DOFERENN ^\^t.\.. No. VJl. Godwino. Cinstan. Sfcptrc tormiimting in flonr- (le-lin. 177 PEX 't'ENSTAN ©N DOFER Wt. ^EADPAR. 19-4. Sceptre tcrmiiiatiiig Wt. [ 17G *EDPER D REX »i-EDPER.ojl Obvrrno.l\vi). 2G-8. 170. 20-4. Godwine. 21 0. 4«EDPR. Moneycr. Cilwi 19-8. Cinetan. 185 EADPEARD REX AN6LO I •t'SODPINE ON DOFER Wt. ENGLAND.D REX A . 200. 20-5.D REX REX •1-DODPINE „ DOFERER ^^'t. RE- •^CNcoTAN ON DOFEREWt. 171 i^CNwTAN ON DOFER AVt.. 18-6. 180 .i«EDPER D •i'EDPR. Reverse. Cihvi ( = Ctc. 19-2. ISl ON DOFER: "\Vt. Type 173 V. 17-4.) Cilwi (= Ccolwi). Tijjit i. 184 EADPERD RAX ANDORV I >I<EN/-jTAN : ©N DOFERE AVt. 19-6.RD RE •J'EILPI :• ON DOFERE Wt.D REX „ DOFERE AVt. Type 175 vii.

Wulfward. 201. DORE Wt. Manwine. Godwine. 1. Type 188 xiii. 190 (Broken. •f-HPATEMAN ON Hwatcman.] Type 197 xi. 14. IGG.] Type XV. . XXIII. Blacaman. PtUct in fuld. 4^EDPE" RD RE I t'PVLSTAH 01/1 DOR Wulstan.) 191 EADDARD PEX [PI. ^EADPARD RE 4-ClNwTAN ON DOPE Wt. Ccoiwi (cf. 189 ^EADPARD RE- AN ^MANPINE ON DOFRWt 180. Cilwi).EDWARD THE CONFESSOE.] TyjK 191 ii. DORCEASTRE. [Dorchester. 15-7. I'EDPE: RD REX [Fl. 192 EADPARD REX •i-EEOLPI ON DOFERE Wt. 170. Manwine. Type I'M V. Var. "i-EADPAR RD RE I ^BLAREMAN Or<DOR Wt. 193 ^MANPINE ON DOFER: Wt. ^PVL-FPVRD ON DO Wt. Type 195 iv. XXIV. Wt. lG-5. IS-G. 355 Moneyer. 25-6. Cinstan. Reverse. 187 EADPARD AN6L© I >i'6©DPINE: ©N D©FER: Wt. 't'EHREDR D RE I -fBIAEAMAN DOR Wt. 20-3. Bliirciuiin (=: Bhicuiuau 2 A 2 ?j. 200.

I PVLLAR O DYRWt. EADMVN Type 205 xiii.* [Dereham. 10-4. ObvcriM'. XXIV. 17'0. XXIV. 4<EADPARD RD RE •i^MORCRE ON Morcere. . EADMUNDSBYRIG. ^/EDA RD R [I'l.- "wt. 201 " Wt. 4<EDPER D REEX: ^MOREEREE ON EDMVN "Wt.] Type 203 V. lG-4. • Sec Introduction. Type 201 xi. He verse. 19-5. 9-2. ENGLAND. Blacaman.] Type 200 ii. •EADPARD REX- 1 ^MARCERE ON EAD Wt. Type 1D8 xiii. [PI. 2. ealtire in field. Marcere (Morcere).] DYRHAM OR DEORHAM.EDPE RD R-. Edmundsbury. Two crosses Blareman(= Blacaman ?). 17-G. 250. ii»a EADRARD REX AN ^BLAREMAN ©NDORC Var. Moncyer. 202 4. AVt.] Wulgar (Wulfgar).356 No. :EADPARD REX: ^BLACAMON ON DO A\ t. 3. 11-2. AVt. Morcere. [St.

No. 357 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

^Ifric. Obvcnw. zElfric. Sr('|itro torini- •tLIFINC /!« ON EXECESTR W't. Sfcwine. 200.D REX Viir.1 231 REI •I<PVLM/ER ON EXECEcoT Wt. . 20-0. 20-6. 21H HHEDPER. 21-3.3:>8 ENGLAND. 220 ^PVLMER ON EEXECE' \Vt. Lifinc. 221 PEDPER. Type 222 ix. Wulmajr. 20-0. Sccjitro „ tcrmilleur- EXECEE Wt. 225 AH6L- •i«PVLN/ER OHH EXC: Wt. 20G. Type 220 xi. 228 4«EADPAR RD RE A 4-/EL-FRIC ON EXECEWTE: AVt. 4. Lifinc. 227 I<EADPARD RD RE •J</EL-FRIC ON EXECEcoT Wt. 20-4. niiting in du lis. 2: to ^PICINC ON EXECEcoT: Wt. ^EADPAR RD RE A Hh/ELFRIC ON EXECEco Wt.Wt. 20 0. 20-2. Reverao. Wulmjer. 18-7. Moneyer. [PI. 224 AI/I6L0R •I^LIF-H-IC OHH EXECES: Wt.D REIV(ir. Wicing. in ur- 211) ^EDPER D REX- ^co/EPINE ON EXECEco Wt. 18-4. 22-4. Lifing. 220 •J-EADPAR RD RE '^LIFINC ON EXECE03T Wt. Wulrnrer. XXIV. No. 223 ^/ELFRIG 0N EXECES AVt. 200. iiiiling (lu-lis. 20-8. EADPARD REX AN6L0V 'I'/el-fril: ohh EX-EC-.

242 «I«DPER P REX A PARNDRIN ON EOF Wt. 15-7. 5. 244 t-EDPER D I^IOL-ANA OH EOFERWt.] Ttjpe i. Obverse. 240 16-2. 19-0. Eadward. lG-0. [York. Type 232 xiii. 16-3.V7. Lifing. Sa3wiue. eadpard rex: REX- ^SIEPINE ON EXEEE Wt. •eadpard re: rex:- ^EADPARD ©N E 18-0.] „ Wt. 18-4. EOFERPIC. 233 ^LIFING ON EXECE Wt. Type 234 XV. Arngrim. iElfwine. 359 Moneycr. Elewine. . EDP/R D RE>^ A >i-EDP/R P RE-4«. 16-6. 243 ^PPE P REX A RE"!^ A ^ELEPINE ON EOFEPI Wt. 236 REX Wt. Arncetel?). 160. Wt. 21-(j. EOFERPIC 241 •i^FDDER D RE^i- A (Tl. OTiinne (0«iii). Type 238 i. 1. No.A ^/ELFPINE ON EOFER Wt. 239 i^ARBETEL „ Arbetel (= Wt. 235 I'PVLFPINE A ON E«I<EEE Wt. 16-5. 1 lolaua.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. ^ARNcexeiXXIV. ^EDP: P RE-i*: "I^TfRNCETEL- ON Wt. 5 7. 237 ^DPA P REX A I "tOONNlNE ON EOFE: Wt. Wulfwine. var. a. Arncetel.

3GU ENOLANU. . No.

EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 361 . No.

ENGLAND.3G2 No. .

363 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. No.

304 .

EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 365 . No.

10. 310 EADPARD REX ANSORV ^lOLA Ol/I EOFERWt. 317 EADPARD REX AUSLREX ANS- •I^SCVLA ON EOFRPIC Wt. Type 349 ix. Ulfcetel. Moneycr.lx)rii). •Mr> >i<ARNGRIM ON EOFRWt.] 354 EADPARD REX AMGLEDPAD RX ANGLOR ON EOFERPIC Wt.//>'' ix. a. Sneaburn (Sna. a. Ulfcil (Ulfcetel). 20-4. 22-5. 20-7. 355 ON EOFRPICC Wt. 352 ON EOFRPICWt. 358 ^EDPAER. 350 EDPR RX ANGLOP •^OOCRIM ON EFRPI Wt. EDPARD X ACLORO- ^lOKETEL ON EOFE Wt. 21-5. Obvcrae. 314 EADVEARDVS REX AN EDFAD RX ANGORA- HHARMGRIM ON E0FRWt. 20-5.grim. Ocf'grim. porr. 22 0. 7'. 21-0. 353 EDPAD RX ANGLOR [PI. var. I Type 357 xi. 20-7. 318 "tSMEAEVRH OH EOFE Wt. Amcetel. 0?. 20-2. Scula. No. '^EDPARD REX •tARCETL ON EOFRP Wt. var. 2 10. Amgrim. Type 356 xi. 14-5. 19-2. 21-7. 19-7.D R 4«ARNCTEL ON EOFR Wt. 19-0.'MU't ENOLANP. *EADPAR RD RE I ^ODGRIM ON EOFI Wt. . •i^DORR ONN EOFRPC Wt. loketel (locetol). lola. licvcrae. XXIV. 3r)l EDPAD X AN[6L]0RARX ANGLOR ! •I'VLFCETL -J^VLFCIL ON EOFRP Wt.

367 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. No.

.•M)S ENGLAND. No.

17-6. 18-6. rar. 20-9. 13. „ EOFRPIC Wt. 0«born. 405 /EADPARD REX AN „ EOFRP Wt. 18-6. 400 ON EOFERWt. 19-6. porr. 397 ^EDPARDE REX ^EADPARD A •I-SPARTEOL ON EOF Wt. 409 Wt. 18-0. Wt. ^^OVOBEARN ON EO Wt. 16-3. 403 REX •EADPARD RE^ A- •tOORR ON EOFRWt. 12 0. Reverse. •101 /EADPARD REX Al- I'VLFCTEL ON EOFR Wt. Aleof. 402 «i«EADPARD REH>I< Wt. 22-5. Ulfcetel. 14 399 REX •EADPARD REX A «i«SPRTCOL •I-VLFCIL ONEOFR Wt. 398 RE"!* A- „ EOFR 0. 396 •i^EADPARD REX A I^SNEBORN ON EOFR Wt. 21-4. &c. Earcil. 2 11 . XXIV. a. 412 Wt. 410 [PI.] 411 ^lOECETEL ON EOFE Wt. 221^. 369 Moneyer. Ulfcil (Ulfcetel). 20-7. 17-5.EDWARD THE CONFESSOE. 20-8. 404 „ EOFERP Wt. Swartcol. 206. I Ou^bearn. 15 9. 15-5. 408 ^EARCIL ON EOFERP: Wt. locetel. Type 406 XV. 413 VOL. Obverse. EADPARD REX REX REX i-ALEIF ON EOFRPICE Wt. 407 •i-ALEOF ON EOFERP Wt. No.

370 .

371 . No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

Wt. 15 445 •EADPARD RX •^BRVM ON.EDPE -RD REX: [PI. 1:5:. Brilitric. Bruninc.. „ „ lG-3. xi. Typr 410 V.] 0N06IPESPIIC AVt. l^/ELFPINE ON 6IPPE Wt.VL-SIE ON LIP AVt. 439 . Brnman. 18-9. J) !1 -Elfwine. 17i{. Wulsio. 17-7. Bruninc. 1 "I-LIFIE 1. Typ' •i:j7 ii. RE 4. ^Ifwiiie. 270. 15 6.i7ii ENULAM*. I'M wife]. Type 442 xiii. I 449 ' >> i Wt. . Reverse. ^. Type XV. Moncycr.P. Obvorae. IGO. ^EDPI ON LIPESI \vt. field. 20-9. No. 448 EADPARD REX EAPARD REX E^ i •J'lELFPINE ON 6IPP Wt. 4<EDPE RD RER-- i 4^BVNINE ON DIP ^Vt.. 20-7. 444 EADPARD REX ^BRINTRIC ON 6IPE Var. 160. AliS .. 440 EAD>ARD RE- ON 6IPPE Wt. 413 -I-BRIHTRIE- ON 6IPP Wt. 447 ^LEOF>OLD- Leofwold. EDPARD RX •EADPARD RE-. Crescent in 0. Lific (liiUnc)..6IPPES ii^BRVNlNC Brum(au). XXV. Tui" 441 •i«EADPARD RD RE ^'BRVMAN ONCIPEcoPI Wt. Wt.

Type 456 vii.) ^PVLFCET ON ELEPE. Obverse. 16-9. 170.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 17-2. Wt. ^Ifsiie (of. 24 4. ' i 455 »I«EDPE -RD REX I ^LEOFN ON LLEAEE Wt. Godric. •l^EDPA- RD RE Hh/EILRIC ON 6L-EPEC: Wt. ^EDP RD RE I«EDPE: -RD REX . 373 Reverse. 4G0 (Donhh' ffnicli. lG-3. •I^EDPE RD REX J'PVL-FPERD ON LLEP I "Wulfwerd.] Type 450 i. 454 ^EAPVLF ON 6LEPECE: Wt. 452 ^pvLPiL on Wt. ^EDPE RD RE ^EDPARD-. Monever. iEgclric. Pellet boliina bust. Wulwig. •J-GODRIE ON 6LEPE: Wt. I</EIELRIE ON 6LEPE Wt. 17 4. 14-0. 200. Wt. 20-2. 21-3. EADVVEARDVS REX AN6L I J'SODPINE ON Godwinc Wt. 21-0. ^lf. Wulfgct Type 4G1 ix. Type 451 ii. 20-7. 459 ^IVLFERD O CLEP: Wt. [Gloucester.- ^LEOFNOO ON CLE Wt. 457 I^EDPAR.D REX ^/ELESIIE ON 6LEPEE Wt. ^Iric (iEgelric). Leofno(5.RD REI^EDPE D REVar. Eawulf. Type 453 V. 6LEPECST . 458 fEDPA. GLEPECEASTER. Leofn. lulfcTTi.sige).

I Wt. 408 •i«EADP RD RE [PI.RD RE ^GVOLFPINE ON CLEPC: Wt. I •EADPARD RE- "^SILAC- ON 6LE>E Wt. Wt. 1 Type 472 iii. 18-4. ObveiM. 470 EADPARD RE I -^SILAC ON 6LE>E Wt. . LcofHtan. 40 ( EADPEARD REX AN6L0- 4^8ILAC ON LLEPL Wt. Guolfwine. Brihtno*? (Pierced. 200. Type XV. 10 . i Silac. •fEDPER D REX I .374 i:n(jland. GRANTEBRYCGE. Silac. Moneycr.) ! 40(3 JEOPARD. Et8tan (Edstan).") HhEADPAR RD RE [•I-BRIHTNONO ONILEP:. 407 l-EADPAR RD RE i-LIOFPINE ON Liofwine. 40. 403 •EADPEARD REX AN- ^SELCPINE ON 6LEPEC Wt. Silac. [Cambridge] Type 471 ii. 20-6. 2. •J^PVLFPARD Wulfward. 4G2 EADYRD REX [ANJQLORX 4-LEOFSTAH ON GLEP Mf. Selcwino.Elfwine. 18-0. 17-0. 20-2. LLEPECE Wt. Reverse. Tiipr xi.^/ELFPINE ONE Of^R8. OISCLEPEEE XXV. 20-0. 19-7. 18-8.] Type 409 xiii. -^EDPE RD RE I •t'ETSTAN ON CRA Wt. No.

3. Type 473 V. *EDPA RD RE: ^EDPE-. Typp.fCODPINE ON GRANT Wt.] God wine. ix. Type 476 EADPARD REX AUCLO ^/ELFPID EADPRD REX ANCOR ©I/IUI LRA 20-6. 18-3. EADPARD REX AD RE: | ^SODLAMB ONCRA : Godlamb. Type 483 V. 19-8. Sfccol. I AVt. vii. Eadwerd. 375 Moneyer. 480 •tS^ECOL ON 6RANIV AVt.EUWAKD THE CONFESSOR. I .RD RE ^BLACEMAN ON 6YL Wt. 477 ^tODPINE ON GRANT: Wt. Type 478 xi.] Type 482 ii. Godwiue. Blaceman. 15-2. No. 481 REX A pPIBEARN OrCRA Wt. . GULDEFORDA ou GILDEFORDA. Elfwiuc. MUvfig.) ^ELFPIIVON CRA-NTEWt. ^EDP RD RI ^ELFPINE ON 6V. Wibearu. [Guildford. Obverse.. 474 ^EDPE: -RD REX: ^COTSVNV ON CR7XNTE Wt. 18 0. ^EDPER- -D REEX: (Double struck. I Type 479 xiii. Elfwine. 10-9.RD REX I i^EADTERD ONIRAN Wt. AVt. 20-3. I XXV. lG-2. Wt. 160. 26-6. Reverse. 484 ^BLAEEMAN ON DVL Wt. IGO. 2<J7 Gotsunu. 475 "I-EDPER D REX [PI. ^EDPAR.

Type •isr. Moneycr. XXV. Brid. ^Ifric. AVt. KNia.Elfric. . 490 i-EADPAR. J St. •tEDPAR D RE I ^BRID ON H/ESTI Wt. 493 „ REX AN . 4.ANI). 19-5 Blaceman. Type 489 xi. [Hastings. [PI.oi3ajiD NO omqjj\^ I Wt. 19-9. EDPNDR R DEX " I ^'BRID : ON HESTST: Wt. 17-5.. vii. 24-3. EADVVERDVS REX AN6LO ^BLACEMAN ON 6IL Blaceman. Type 495 iii. I (cf. •EADPARD REX: •^ I I«/ELFRIC- ON 6ILDE AVt. 488 6YLDE0K Wt.. 4<EDPNR D REXI ' ^BLACMAN ON LVLD. 20-3.RD RE Wt. I .'. Brid Braud). Type •187 ix. wt.] 491 •I-EADPAR- RD RE t'BLAEEMAN ON 6LDE Wt. 140.] Type 494 ii. 21-0. \'r. Type 492 xiii.7(.'201. lU-4. •I-EADPA- RD RE •t'/ELFRIC: ON 6LLDEF0R Wt.^. lG-7. Rerene. Obrene. i^BLACMAN ON LVLD AVt. H/ESTINGA OH HESTINGPORT. No. iJlacniiui (lilacenian).

No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 377 .

S ENGLAND. .37. No.

. Type 530 xi. HEORTFORD. <i'PWL\AO€> 20-3. [Hertford. HAMTUNE.) Leofwine. I XXV. 14-6.^ If wine. Deorsisre. No. "t'EDPE: -RD REX I ^/EL-FPINE ON HAM 17-4. Leofric. ^Ifwine. Wt. S(^eptrc terminating in three pellets.] Type 523 i. 19-«. . EDPE RD RE Var.»I<LE0FR1C ON HAMTV Wt. EADPARD REX ANGLO ^PVLNOO ON HAM: I Wt. Hortfonl? . I Type 525 vii. b. var. 52S „ AU6L" Tijpi' OMU HAM/ Wt. xi. ^/ELFPINE ON HA Wt. 22-2. 529 ^EADPARD RD RE I ^co/EPINE ON HAMTV Wt. a. »^EDPERER D REX 7^ | I'LEOFPINE ON HTXMTV (ricrced.^EADPAR RD RE [PL t-PVLFNOD ON HAMTV AVt. WulnolS (Wulfno«). Type 527 | ix. ^EDPAR D REX . 21-0. | var. J^EDPNRD: REC- I •i'DEORSICE ON lEON^ Wt. Type 52G vii.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.] Wulfno«. 21-2. [Southampton. 21 0. Type iii. 379 ]Moneyer.] Type 531 i.

b. Farthing. 160. 16-2. Moneycr. Goldwine. [Hereford. 533 RD REX RER--}-: ^CODMAN ON HEOR Wt.380 No.] Type 542 ii. Sceptre terminating in fleurtle-lig. •EADPARD RE[PI.- I^/ELFPINE ON HERTF I iElfwinc. Wt. I var. 17-2. 534 ^EDPNE •tCODPINE ON •tCOLDPINE ON HIR-. HEOR 13-7.^PILTRKD ON HEORT: Wiltrand Wt. Type 540 xiii. 4'EADPAP RD RE »tco/EM/ER: ON HERTFO Wt. Reverse. HIR. HEREFORD. 17-2. Type 539 xi. Earnwi. Wt. 535 14-5. ^EDPE RD RE 'I'ERndii on here Wt. 541 ^pildirp on HIRT Wt. Obreno. J-EDPND D RE Var. XXV. SsemsBr. 537 . 19o.RD RE «tR/EDVL-F ON HER" Wt. 17-4. WiL-cgrip or Wilgrip. 11-0. ENGLAND. . ^edpa rd r-e HhEDPE-.EI ^ vii. P. ^PIL/ESRIP7. Wilfrid). Type 538 •J^EDPER D REX i . Escdulf. I (po8. 53t) •^•EDPE. Wt. 15-6. 40. Godman.- God wine. Type :>:j2 iii.] ON HEORI Wt. Wt.

Earnwi. 552 'I'LIOFENOD ON Liofno8. 19 8 EIric (of. Wulfwine. . XXV. ix. 20-6. 197. 381 Moneyer.3. 19-0. XXV. ^EDPRD- -D REXVar.Elf\vi(g). 550 „ HEREFO Wt. 549 ^EADPARD RD RE I) >> >> •t-EARNPI : ON HERE Wt. EADPERD REX Inscription Var.RD RE [PI. var. ^ELRIE: ON HL-RELOE Wt. .] TyjH xiii. b.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.] Type 546 EADPEARD REX AN6L ^LEFENOO ON HEREFO Wt. 553 •EADPARD REI ^/ELFOI ON HERE Wt. 21 G. 9. . Type 547 xi. 548 t'EADPARD RD RE "I'EA'^PI: ON Earnwi. Sce^jtre terminating in three pellets. 01)vcrse. Type 543 iii.^eWc. Type 545 vii. 20-4. Lcfeno^. iElric). 20-0. •}«PVLFPIHE OH hER Wt. ^lfwi(g). 21-4. 167. J^EDPE R-D R-EX Var. •i-/ELFPI ON HEREFOR Wt. HEREFO Wt. [PI. Type 544 vii. 8. 551 ^EADPAR RD RE I-EADPAR. i^ERNPI ON hEREWt. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis. •J^EDPE: -RD REX- I ^EIEL-RIC ON HERE Wt. 20-. HEREFOdE Wt. behind begins bust. ItJ 9.

I Type 561 V. IG 7. Obvcmo./pi. TmI ^EADVVRD rax I HhDVDINC ON DuJiuc. [IlornJon. lG-2. 562 •}<LODRIC ON HVNTEN Wt.382 Ni. UlfcL-tcl. Moncycr. ENCiLANI).j T. HORNINDUNA. Wulfwig. .D RE ^/ELFPINE ON HV \Vt. 9-7. 171. 558 PE I * iii. Ilcvcr»c. VJ'J. Type 556 ii. Wt. Pellet iu two angles of cross. 4-2. AN60RV: [IM. RD REX I »i«P. HORNIDVNE: 10] XXV. ^Ifwine.. • HV Wt. Godric. Wulfwiue. 25-4. 17 2. [UuntingJon.] Tyjye i. . Type 559 •tEDPERD REX T\ ^/EL-FPINE ON HVNTE Var. Type 560 «i<E€)PA iv.V. Farthing.LFPINE O HVN AVt. \Vt.ix. 4<EDPER: D REX: I h/ELFPINE ON HVNTEN: Wt. HUNTENDUNE. 4«EDPE RD REX 4«EDPA. 557 4<VLFCTL ON HVNT Wt. 25-4. i ^Elfwine. 555 •i^EDPA RD REX I 'i'PVLFP'lL ON HVNT: "\Vt. ^Ifwine.

No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 383 .

No. .nftl ENULAM).

38. No.KDWAUD THE CONFESSOR.3 .

No. .386 ENGLAND.

nating in de-lis.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. XXV I. EDPA RD RE Var.V(ir. Type 612 V. termifleuri Dating in de-li. Wulfric Type ii. 18'5. 1. Scei)trc I •I'PV^EINNOO ON LEH (Broken. Obverse. 21-3. 387 Moiieycr. Sceptre termi- 4<C0DRIC ON LEHERWt.. or 616 ^[PV]L-EN0ID ON LE Wt. Wt. Type G13 vii. [Leicester. ^IDRIPA I Rl i^EDPNE ON LE:RIEDII AVt. 619 Wt. (iildowiuc. Var. 21 . IS -2. Type 618 ix. fleur- [PI.) WulcnnoS WiilnaS (Wulfuo?). 614 •^EDPER D REX Var. 20-1. . GU I-EDFE RD RE >CODRIE Or^6HER I (iodric. 2 10.s.] Type 610 i. : 18-6.REX-. 17"). No. Edwine. teriiii "I-CLLDEPINE in flcur ON LEH Wt. EADPARD REX AH6L0 ^/EGELRIC OH LEH Wt. Sceptre termi- nating in fleurde-lis. Ciodric. LEHERCEASTER.l^gelric. 210. Sceptre natiiig dc-lis. 617 •}<EDPAR D RE 1 "i-PVLNAO ON LE6R Wt.] 615 ^E[D]PEI D RE HhEDPARD. ^EPDER D REX A I ^PVLFRIC ON LEHRWt.

ENGLAND. .888 No.

EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. Xo. 389 .

20-6.i EADPARD REX AUGLO 4^C0DRIE ON LECA Wt. CAl 20-3. i Ti/pi xi. (Ic-Hb.„ . cm C"»7 4«EADPAR- „ „ 't'DVNIISC ON LECECE Wt. ti.I AVt. •^HVOJCALR ON_EGEEC Wt. AH6L- 1 •I'LEOFHOD ON LEIC Wt. Wt. IIuscarL •^EADPAR „ . Sweartcol.-.] j Bninninc.. XXVI. Scci. LEI. [I'l. ENGLAND. „ Godric.15 t-NDC RAIX Vur. EADPAR RX AN6L0 ^/ELFSIC ]'(()•. 4. Duning (Duninc). 21-0. 20 llcurPI. IS-G.390 No.] 0. 20-5. OI/IH LEICE nil ' iElfsig. •I'LIOFENOP I ON LECECC: Wt I'JO.-. li)-2. ^ EADPRD REX AN6L0 [ri. Reverse. r. 20(3. tM8 •t'EADPAR. XXVI. XXVL I ' (Bruninc). . ^Ifsig? G55 •^EADPAR RD RE I ^BRVNINC ON LELEEC Brimin? Wt. (Ml •i-EADPARD RD RE I >^/ELFcfi| ON LELEEEco Wt. c.. Obvene. Moneyer. »v/r. 21 -C.js EADPARD REX AH6L0 ^BRYHl/IIC ON[N] LEIC-. ' 049 „ AUG- »I<E0LBRAND •^DVNNJISC Ol/I LEI Colbrand. LiofnoX I . Colbrand. 7'i/))c vii. 19-6.tro ttrmiiiutiiip i-COLBRAND ON in LEI 'J.l.) GjO EADPRD RX AN60R ON LE6EEES AVt. Dunninc. (Pierced. ^BR-YNNIE ON LEG: AVt. 7'j/pe ix.] VAC. lG-0. 19 5.S the limbs of cross. Leofno«.3 ! 'I'SPEARTCOL OH Wt. AliIlulct. (•. h. Wt.

391 . No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

:{:»'_» ENdLA. (571 07-2 G7:J (-.-> CSG . ObverM.') C7G C77 C78 079 G80 C8l (. No.NK.s2 C83 C84 cs.74 C7.

No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 393 .

. ENGLAND.304 No.

200. 22-3. 395 Moneyer. Manna. Godric. Gifc. Tijpc ix. 170. 719 EADPARD REX AUSEADPAD REX ANGLO . . 717 EADPAP RX AN6L0REDPAR. 728 ^'EDPARD •i-EADPAR- REI- •i«ODQRIM ON LirCO Wt. 8. 0<5grim. 7:. OSgrim. Wulbcom. JEOPARD REX i ^AVTI ON LINEOLNN Wt. I I'ELFNOO ON LINE© Wt. Wt. 2U-8. 720 ^ODLRIM OH LINEO Wt. 190. 20-8.DX AN60 "^ELFNOO ON LINIO \\i. WL Wt 21o.) OSslac (OMac). Type 723 X. 72G i^CIFE ON LINEOLL Wt. I XXVI.2 2 10. 200.EDPAR. 722 EADPARD X I-PVLFRIE ON LINEO Wt. 20-3.] Elfno«. 721 EDPARD X.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. Godric. ANGLO- ^PVLBEREN ON LIN 18-5. 20-4. ElfnoS. 20-5. MVIANNA Wt. No. 718 ^QODRIC ON LINEO Wt. Obverse. 22 0. EDPAD X ANGLOR[PI. 727 ^LODRE ON LINEOLWt. Reverse. 731 H[<PVLBEORN ©NLINEOL. Eifno«. Type 724 xi.D RE: 't'EADPAR RD RE I^ELFNOD OH LINEO Wt.Wulbcom. 730 4^EADPAR RD RE *VLF ON LINEOLNE Wt. 729 RD RE ^OOc/^L-AE ON LINEO (15n)kiii. 21-2. Wultric. Auti? 725 ^ETXDPAR D RE4. Ulf.

n\ KNOLANIt. .:v. No.

No. 13-0. 12-5. Godesunc. Godwiue. 11-3. . 14-9. 751 4^FDIII OIIN LVIIDE: Wt. I 1 ^CODPINE ON LVND: Wt. 758 M REX REX-. 397 Moneyer. 15-0. Dudinc. 10.) Leofstan. 750 ^EDPNR. [PI. Edin? 752 REX -A- •I-ESTHER ON LVND: Wt. Reverse. [Loiulon. 12-G. 14-0. XXVI. Brihtmser. Esther.- I'LEOFRED ONN LVND Wt. 15-U. 7G0 •i^VEDNRD: D RE ^PVLSILE ON LVDE Wt. Obverse. lG-5. Wulfred. 140.] 17-3. 753 EDPA: REE:>^ »i<SODESVNE ON LVD: Wt. Wulaigo. 748 lG-7. ^EDDE. 746 *EDPE: RD REX: •i^/ELFRED ON LVNDE Wt. 749 ^DVDINC ONN LVN Wt. 10 0.RD REX: •1-EDPER.- A I-LeOFSTAN ON LVND Wt. •i^EDPNRD D REE •i^EDPER D REX. LUNDENE. Eadwold.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 'I'BRIHTM/ER ON LVD Wt. 757 REX: '^LEOFSTA[N] ON LVN (Brokeu. REC. Alfred.D »i<EADPOLD ON LVN Wt.D »t. lG-6. 755 ^EDPGR: D REX. ! Lcofred.-. 759 •^EDPAR D I-PVLFRED ON LVND Wt. Wt.E[DPjER D REX-. 747 tEDPER D REX 7\ : i</ELFPERD „ ^Ifwerd. 754 ^•EDPNRD REI: ^CODPINE ON LVD Wt. 7oG PEDPER.] Type i.

. No.!!KS ENOLANl).

399 . No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

loo ENGLAND. No. .

No. 401 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

.402 ENGLAND. No.

^EDPIIR: D RE- 4-/ELFPN ON LVNDE: Wt. iElfwinc. iElfwino ? ^EDPN. Obverse. ^EDPER RD RE- I-BRINTRED ON LVND Wt. Fahthing. . REX >^/ELFRED ON LVND-. 14-2. 13-2. 4-2. ^Ifgar. ^EDPED- -D REX t'ELFPINE ON LVND Wt. •So. 11-3. •^EDPNO: D ER"i-EDPNR D RE- ^/ECELPI ON LVNDE: Wt. I</EL-FPIC ON LVND Wt. 5. ^EDP ERD RE Var. 170. 't'/ELFPI: i^EDPN: RD EX V ON LVNDEWt. 2 1) 2 . I'everse.-. Sceptre tcrminatiug iu Ikurdc-lid.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 130. li-5. Alric. ON LV Wt. »^EDPNR.RD EX A •i^ALRIC ON LVNDE Wt. 150. ^EDPN RD EX 'i'/ECiELPIC ON LVND Wt. lirilitrod.RDE •'i'EDPE-. "I-EDPHED: RD E 'i'/ELESISE ON LVND: (Chip2»cd. 4U3 Moueyer. 15 t/ECL-PI. »i«-EDPE-: -RD REX ^/ELFPINE ON LVNDE Wt. I(y3. IG 0. «i«EDPE: R ERX- "^/EEELPI ON LVNDE Wt. irvO.-RD I'/ELFRED ON LVND Wt.) ^Ifsigo.Elfwig. lo-7. .Elfrcd. 14 0. ^EDPE -D REX P/ELFCAR ON LVNDE Wt. 13 0. iEgclwig.Wt. Tyjw iii. •tEDPNER-.- RD E A 1«/ECEL-PIC ON LVND Wt. ON LVND Wt. 15-5. D .

404 .

405 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. No.

. No.40G ENOLAND.

407 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. No.

ENGLAND. .408 No.

EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. No. 409 .

Wt. Sceptre terminating in fleur- de-lis. 9G8 I^EDPE. 21-0. 972 ^EAP ERDVttr. Glifwine.D I REX ^LODERE XXVII. Sceptre termiuating in fleur[PI.D REX T'(ir. Wt. '201.. . 1-1-7. 909 ^EDPER D REX REX »I<EDRIE ONN LVNDENE: Wt. 3. »i«CODPINE ON LVND Wt. 19-2. ENGLAND.D REX V(ir. Obv(>r(u>. Rcvorso. •tCLIFPINE ON LVNDE-.D REX ^EEPID ONN •-VNDENE: Wt. de-lis. „ „ Goderc. ^EDRED ON LVNDE: Wt. 21 1. Estmund.D «i<EDPiNE ON LVNDE: Wt. 16-2. Godric. „ HhEADPOLD ON LVND: EadwoM. 971 EADPE RD REX •i'ESTIVIVND ON LVNE Wt. EJwinc. 18-7. 16-7. 20-7. Sceptre terminating in fliur- di'-lia. 973 •i-EDPER.] Wt. 0G( 4<EDPER D REX ^'BRVNLAR ON LVNDG ^vt. Moneyer. 207. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis.7 ^-EDPER. !)G5 +EDPER- . de-lis. or. 970 •I^EDPER. EaMulf. 21-5. 'I-CODMAN ON LVN Sceptre terminating in fleur- Godman. 20 5. God wine.Wt. 97G •tEDPE D R[EX] •i'CODRIC ON LVNDENE: Wt.410 No. EJrcd. 977 4«EDPER. or. 20-5. 974 I'dr. Edric. 19-9. 975 •I'GODMAN ON LVND: Wt. OCG 4^EADPE RD RE[X] ^EALDVLF ON LVNDENE Wt. Ecwig.

411 . No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

No. 20-5. 1003 •i-EADRPARD REX ANLOT 1004 n LVNDEI Wt. EADPARD REX A60RV «^/ECELPER OH LVHD"\Vt. „ 20-3. 17-5. . •tEADPE -^^RD REX- l-^ETXDPOLD OW LVND: Eadwold. Rcvcnic. MoD'-yer. 20-5. 998 •i-ZELPERD ON LVND: Wt.412 Ohvene. Ealdgar. (Broken. ENGLAND. 21-3. . LVNDEN Wt. Edwig. 091 4«EADPE RD RE HhPVLFPINE ON Wulfwine. EADPARD R^ AN6L0R ^EALDSAR ON LVNDE Wt. . 1005 EDPARD RE ANGLORVM EADPA REX ANGLO- *60DR1C ON LVND Wt. Direman. 18-3. 999 ^DEORMAN „ Deorman. 997 EADPEARD REX AN6L0R EADPPRD RAX AN60RV EADPA REX AN6L0 E7\DPE7\RD ^/ELFPERD ON LVND Wt. ^Vt. 19-3. rar.ffigelwerd). 17-4. iElfwerd. 992 „ REX tPVLCAR: ON LVNDEN ^vt. 18-7. b. EADP7\RD REX ANCLO ^EDPI ON LVNDENEN-. 1001 EADPPRD RAE:X AN60R 1002 ON LVDENLDE Wt. 996 ^/ELFSICE ON iElfsige. rj-7. I'J H. Wiilgar. 2 10. Type 994 ix.^gelwer 19-4. 995 EADVVEARDV REX ANLLO EADVVERDVS REX ANCLO "1-/ELFRED OH LVHD: "SVt. iElfrei 21-3. 1006 LVNDE Wt. Godric. LVNDENE \Vt. (cf.Wt. 17-4.) 1000 REX AN6L0 •i^DIREMAN „LVNDE: Wt. Type 993 vii.

21-2. Wulfric. God wine. ANGLO 1009 EAVVARD REX ANGLORV •i^GODPNE •i^LEFPINE „ Wt. Lifinc or Liolinc. 21-3. 10 2.VL-GA-R 21-1. . Wulfwine. Wulfred. Wt. 1013 ET^DVVET^RDVS REX •i^OMYHD OVWA LVHD: Wt. 20-3. 221. Reverse. 18-4.] 1022 ^DREDND PENDREDRE ^RVLFRIIX OH EADPRD R-J- LVMHII Wt. Oamuud). Lefwine (Leufwine). 1011 EADPPEARD SEX ANGLO E7\DP7^RD ^LIFIND: ON LVNDEEN-.Wt. 1015 21-0. 1019 EADPEARD REX ANGLO EADPRD R^ ANGORV •tPVLGAR ON LVNDENE Wt. 1020 'i'PVLFRED ON LVND AVt. No. 1017 EADPEA REX ANGLO ON LVNDE Wt. 1018 EADPEARD REX ANGLO i^PVL-GAR AVt.Wt. 413 Moneyer.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. Ls. 1014 EADPPRD RIX ANGORV 'i'OMYND: 0:N LVNDNED Wt. 4. EADPEARD REX ANGLGVC J^PVLGAR Wt. 171. 1023 ANGO- •i^PVLFPINE ON LVND Wt. 18-4.!. 1021 EADPARD RX ANGLOR •J^PLVFRED ON LVNDE-. Omynd (cf. ANGLOVM lOlG Will fgar or Wulf'ar. 1012 REX ANGLOE AN6L •I-LIOFING ON LVNDEN Wt. •i^P. EAPPRD REX •i«PVLFCAR ON LVND Wt. 210. "20 -U. 1007 EADPEARD REX ANGLO •• ET^DPETXRD REX »i<GODRIC ON LVNDEN AVt. Obverse. 17 7. 1010 EADPARD RX ANGLO- ON LVND-. 20-7. 1008 •i^GODPINE ON LVND Wt. [TL XXYII. I'JO. iy-8.

414 .

- I-EDPINC ON LVND Wt. ItlO. KJG. 1057 EADPARD REX: -EADPARD REX A „ >I«EDriNE- O LVNDE Wt. . "tEADPARD REX A • • i^/ELELPI ON LVND Wt. Obverse.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. . 104-i „ „ ^OrSMVND Wt. 104G „ „ i^PVLFCAR ON LVNDE Wt. 18-8. 15-. Wt. 17G. 1047 I-EDPERD :REEEX 'i'PVLFCER ON LVNDEKE Wt. 15-8. 1056 •EADFARD REX AG- ^EDFINE. 20-7.RD RE i^EADD I-EADPAR„ HhGODPlNE ON LVNDE Wt. 15-4. 17-3. 1045 ^EADPARD "t-EADPARD „ „ 'I'PVLFCAR ON LVND: Wt. 1012 ^EADPAR. 1054 EADPARD REX EADPARD REX ^EADPINE ON LVND: Wt.li. 415 Moneyer.REX : A: ^^/ELFFARD N Wt. 17G. 17-8 Osmund. If ward. 17G. Godric. 1052 EADPARD.^irclwine.ON LVNDEWt. 1059 ANDL I •i-WPETMAN ©N LVN : Swctman. Endwino or Edwiue. No. 18-0. 1055 ANC-. Type 1048 xiii. 1049 EADPARD *r >> „ ANG <» • LVNDE Wt. -Iiyij. 1050 »> ^/EGLPI ON LVNDEN Wt.- i^/EL-FDARD ON LVND Wt. 17G. 1053 EADPARD REX A A-. Wulfgar. 15-3. 1043 „ J-OMMVUD ON LVUDE AVt. Reverse. 12 3. 1051 •^/ESLPIN- ON LVNDE Wt. „ . 1058 ^SODRIC ON LVND Wt.S. 14 8.

15 6. Four crescents in field. lOOU 4. [PL XXA'II. XXYII. Wulfgar. lS-0. Eadwine ? Type XV.^Ifsige. 20-3. 1068 RD REX A . 20-4. 1070 EADRARD „ •i-SODRIC ON LVND Wt. Obvorw. h.PINE ON LV Wt. 1066 Wt. Ucvornc. 6. ENGLAND.VISD Wt. Godric. Wulgar. . 1073 var. 19-5.W Wt. 16-9. Type XV. 1067 EADRARD REX A OK. 200. 17-0. 10G4 ^EADPARD REX AN: ^DVLFODI ON LVNDE AVt. Halfpenny. 1069 EADPARD REX A ^/ELFSI ON LVNDE:: Wt. 10C2 "i^PVLGAR Wt. 7. 1071 EADPARD REX A ^rVLFFARD ON LVN Wt. 10C5 ^EADRARD REX A- ^DVLFDARD 5. . 10G3 REX A "J-PVL6AR ON LVNDE Wt.. Moneyer. Wulfward. IGG. Wulfsige.\\r. No. [n.] Wulfward. 15-2. 1072 EADPARD „ „ ^PVL-SAR ON LVH Wt. 11-2. Var. 17-2.] ON. 170.] Swetman.EADPARD REX -A •i«3PETMAN- ON LVN ^Vt. [PL XXVII.. 4<ERDR D AC I I "i^wPETMAN ON LVI Wt. 8-3. lOGl EADPARD REX A •EADPARD REX: ^PVLFGAR ON LVND ^Vt.

No. 417 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

"REDDER D RE>^ 1\ •I«L-eOCDINE ON NOR! Wt. 10. Leofwine.] Type.] 1086 ^•E-DR- RDE ^BRIHPI ON Var. Wt. Sired. 1082 ^EDPAR D 4«EDPE :• REI- »I<EAL-DPIG OM MEAL-:-. 19-4. NIFEPORTE. and crescent. NOROFIC. ^EADPE RD RE [PI. Ilcvcrec.] Type 1087 vii. Wt. In MELME I opposite angles of cross. •J^-SIRED ON NIFEPORTGWt.418 No.EDPAR D REI- ^EAL-DPIG ONN MEALMAVt. REX •fiEAL-DPI ON MES-L-DWt.D RE- ^OJIREDD ON NIPEPO: Wt. Ealdwig. AVt. vii. »i<EADPAR RD RE "J-BRIMPI ON MELME I Brihtwine? opposite Var. 9. 20-3. [Nurwieh. 1084 4. [Newport. MEALMESBYRIG [MiiliiKhbury. ENGLAND. and [PI. [PI. XXVII. crescent. Moneyer. 19-3. 14-4. I'JO. XXVII. 160. XXVII.] Type 1089 i. 1083 D. 19-2. 20-0. Obvemc. Type 1085 xi.] 1088 •tEDPE. 11] . In angles of cross.

L-EOFPINE ON NORO: Wt. 419 Reverse. 17G. 17-3. 25-3. f^ceptri. porstan. Lcofwine. 2U-4. 2 K 2 . i:i-. •"J-EDPER D REXVar. HIangulf? 1100 ••i'EDPR D REX de-lis. porferS. l/IOR25. 7^. Cenelm. 25-7. nating in llcurde-lis. J'OORSTAN O NOROP Wt. Leofwine.f I *^LEOFPINEON NORO Wt. 1097 ^EDP. XXVII. 1094 ^EDPERD -REX "t-RINVLF Var. 1096 ^EDPER: -D REX i^. purfurS. Osmuud. Osmund. 1098 'i'OVREVCRO OM Wt. 11-5. [PI. Sceptre termi- •i<:OVRFVO ON NORO Wt. Type 1099 vii. 25-0. Sceptre terminating in fleur- 1101 •tEDPER D REX Var. ^•CDPE RD RE. 12. tcrniinating in fleurde-lis. ^EDPE. Type 1091 i ii.ERD R^ 4<EDPE: RD RE: »i«O0RFRO O NOROP Wt. Type 1092 iii. «^EDPE RD RE I "^LEOPIE ON HOR Wt. 180. Type 1095 V.RD REX i ^EENELM ON NORO Wt. Leofwic. 17-7. Var. Type 1093 iv. 1\ . fHLANGVLF ON NOR Wt. ^EhDDI ID PXll ^OS:MVID ON NOR Wt. PA ES Wt.1. No.] „ Iliuulf. 17-2.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. purueriS purferT) (= ?). Obverse. 1090 ^EDPER D RE>I« I-OSMVNDD O NORO: Wt. Moncyer.

nil . 17-4. i-EADPAR RD RE: ^ELFPINE ON NORe[P] \Vt. Wt. 1106 •tEADPAR RD RE- «i«PVLFc/5l: ON NORPPIC Wt. Elfwino. Type 1102 xi. 190 Wulf. [Oxford. Obvonw. Wt. 19-6. 14-8. Leofwine. 17-4. EADPARD RE -EADPARD REX ^EDFINE ON H0RO I Edwine. Gilpin. Lofwine or Liofwine. ENaiiANI). purgrim.] [PL XXVII. 12-3. 4<D0DPINE O NOR I God wine. 1109 I -^PRICE O NORO Wt.] Type 1112 ii. •tEDPE RD RE I "i-LLPIN ON OCXWt. Liofric. Type 1107 xiii. 1108 14-3.- •i«LEFPINE O NOROPI Wt. Price. Moneyer. 14-0. 1110 EADPARD RX j i'OVRGRIM ONMORO Wt. . OXENAFORD.420 No. 17-2. Rcvcree. 19-8. var. 17-3.. 13. 1103 4«EDPARD D I-EADPA- RE-. 1104 RD RE i-LIOFPINE ON I-LIOFRIC: NORD 20-4. b. I Type 1113 ii. Wt. 1105 i^EADPAR RD R ON NORPPI Wt. 4<EDPE REC •I«LEOFPINE OXF Wt. [D R]E •5-OVRSTAN ON NOR Wt. Type XV. purstan.-i (Wulfsigc).

21-5. 20-2. nating in de-lis. Reverse.] 1115 •i^EDPE: -RD REX ^EIELPINE ON OXENEWt. „ Var. Elf wine. Wt. XXVn. Sceptre termi- ^/ELPIC ON OCEXENAF Wt. No. 17-7. Haitgod). EADPEARD REX ANSOl ^/ELFPIC ON OX: Wt. 1117 21-2. Sceptre termi- ^/ELPII ON OCXENEFO Wt. 't'EADPARD RD RE •l^/ECELPINE ON OXENEX Wt.] 1121 EADPARD REX AUSLO ^^ELPIME „ OMl/l OXHE-. Elwino. 20'4. . Obverse. 21-1. TyjK 1121 xi. Brinwold.Wt. 1.- ^BRIUPOLD OhM ©CXE Wt. 11. 21-4. I'EDDE D REX-. t-nr.. 1120 EADPARD REX A-H6L0V I 4^EADPIHE [PI. OC-XCNE Wt. ^Ifwig. XXVIII. Type 1119 ix. 20-G. Ilforgod (of. 21-4. ^EDPER--. I j15gclwino. nating in fleurde-lis. a. [PI. 20-1. 1123 EADARD REX AN6L0V HhSETMAN ON I OXEN-. Eadwine.D REX ' ^/ELFPICL ON iElfwier. ^EDPER. 1122 AN6LI •fH/ERSOD ON O't'NEF Wt. Type lllG vii. fleur- 1118 >i«EDPAR D REI Var. Swetman. Type 1114 iv. 421 Moneyer. 23-9. OHH OXHE: Wt. Type V.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

122 .

Brungar. Sceptre termi- nating in de-lis.] ON ROFE-. 21-7.Kl'ENNY.' Wt. Wulhod? . Godwine.. Godwine. 1144 ^ D RE I ^. ED ON^V Wl.. WuUud. 110.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. •i^EDPERD REX A I i'BRVNQAR ON RV Wt. 19-6. Eilwinc. 0-5. Wulfric. Crescent at eml of each limb of cross enclosing pellet. Wt. 423 Moneyer. II. HhEDRE RD RE •i'EDPE „ •tEcoTIN ON RHV Wt.. Lifwine and Horn. Type 1142 ii. Type 1139 xi. 167. Var. Obverse. 1135 *EDPE: -RD REX- ^LODPINE ON ROFE Wt. Lifwine. 4<EDPERD -RECX- "HLODPhNE ON RO Var. »I«EDPER D REX fleur- 4<EDPINE ONN ROF: Wt. 1136 •i«EDPE: -RD REX ^PVLFRIC ON ROF Wt. I xxviir. 1140 •i«LIFPINE HORN OH ROF Wt. [Romncy. 13 3. 15-5. ^EADPAR RD RE [PI. 13 0. 14 f). Type 1138 vii. No. 21-7.M. I »J-L1FP1NE: 3. RUMENEA. Estan. Type 1137 iv.] Type 1141 i. 1143 „ •J-PVLHED ON RVM Wt.

21-5 Wulmoer. Leofwine. . [PI. 1117 •J-EDPE-. Type 1151 ii.] Type 1150 i. 12-4. Wulmaer. Wulmaer. Wt. ENtJLAND. SANDPIC. Sceptro torminatiug in ilcur dc-lis. I Type 1148 ix.] Type 11 IG vii.- D REI >i<PVLM/ER ON RVMEEWt. Leofric. Moneyer. CroHCt^nt at end of eacli limb of crows cucloaing pellet. Liofwine. 1152 ERD ARD- R- »}<LEFPINE ON SA Wt.- REE I I •I^LIOFPINE ON SAND Wt. Sceptre termi- nating in fleurde-lis. 10-5. Var. 220. •^EDRED D REVar. Lefwine. i'EADPAR RD RE | ^PVLM/ER ON RVMED Wt. EADPARD EX AM6L0- I ^PVLM/ER OVWA RVM Wt. Typn 1115 iv.424 No. H-4. 4«EDPE RD RE •i'EDP •J-FAREhlR ON SA Wt.RVM: Wi. Farehir. [Sandwich. XXVIII. 21-0. &c. 4. 4-EDDER: D REX •i^PVLM/ER Var. 10 5. Obvono. 150. •i«EDPNR-. 14-5. 1153 «i<EDP- ^LEOFDIKE ON SA Wt. ON RVM Wulmajr. i^LEOFRC ON. Reverse. I Type 1119 xi.

No. 425 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

Wt. Godric. var.\i. Type 1175 xvi. Wulfric. 17 11G5 5. Duducol? 210. 20-0. 11G8 ^EADP RD REX AN |>]hP. •tEADPAR.RD RE | . Rcvcrnc. Ti/2ic vii. »i«CODEcoBRAND ON coE Godesbrand. ^'EDP ED re:I I ^PVLFRIC OH SEEA-F [PL Wulfric. ^Ifwcard. I Type IIGG vii. "\Vt. EADPARD REX I I •I'SODEBBRAND ON 3 M't. 20-2. Type XV. Wulfric. xxvm.VLFRIC -ON^J I : $EEF 19-2. Wt. OoflcsbrunJ. No. ^'EDPAR D REX- "tDVDVCOC OH eCEFTAVt.-I Wulfric. [PI. ^-EDPE: RD REX- •I«PVLFRIE ON SCEFTE.i«/ELFP/ERD ON coC/ETE Wt. | 1164 4-EDPE RD REX 4«D0DESBRAND ON SC Var IJinhHCjf croHa united by one circle only. 200. Type 11G9 viii.] 19-2. Money <T. 20-2. Wt. . 1170 •^EADPEARD REX I ANGLO Type 1171 J^PVLFRIC ON SCEF AVt. 1172 Wt. . 1173 20-2. Wt. 20-2.l'J(i ENGLAND. G. 11G7 Wt. h.0O. XXVllI. Type ix.] Godesbrand. 1174 EADPARD RE I ^SODRIC ON SEEAFI Wt. 200. 7. 2.

No. EADPARD REX AH6L- | ^^LEOFSTAM OH SERO Wt. ^Ifch. 1177 I-LEOFSTAN ON Leofbtan. Wt.] Type 1176 V. SCROBESBYRIG. 20-2. [Shrewsbury. I Type 1182 xi. 25-2. h. 427 Obverse. SEREO: Wt. IGO. 20-8. 18 0. Type 1181 ix. . var. 250. •tEADPAR RD RE »J«EADPAR. i^EDPE -RD REX-. SEREO Wt. Moneyer. (Pierced. 1183 i^PVDEMAN ON[a)]EOB Wudcman. 1180 •*EDPE D RE- i^^LEOFSTAN ON WCRO I Leofstan. 22 0. 1179 ^'EDPE: -RD REX ^'PVLM/ER ON Wulmser. 190.EDWAIID THE CONFESSOR. 1185 Wt. Reverse. Godwinc. AVt.„ „ i'GODPINE ON wCRO Wt. SCREOB: Ty2)e vii.i^EDPE: -RD REX: i^/ELFEH ON SCREOBE AVt.) 1184 „ coEOB Wt. Lcofatan. 230. 1178 »^EDRE: -RD REX J-LEOFPINE ON Lcofwine. Ty2}e v.

1194 «1«S0DRIC: ON COERBVR: Wt. 20-1. 1191 Wt. Type XV. 1192 20-4.«i«60DERIC ON lERBIRSE: Wt. 18 4. Godria I XXVIII. .] Etc. SEREBYRIG. 20-2. Goderic or Godric. npvprso. 1189 »» » (Broken. EADVVEARDVS EX NSLO Type ^SODRIC ON SEARBIR Wt.land.) 1190 EADPARD REX AM6LO SERB1R6E Wt.] ©N SR0P Wt. 17-0. 1196 SERB: Wt. Tijpc ix. 20G. 1193 •tEADPAR RD RE [Pi. 190. 1195 EADPARD REX REX: ^SIEBODE ON SEAI Wt. 1188 EADEARD REX AN6L0. [Saliflbury. Type XV. Earn wig ? I XXVIII. Moneyer. No. WulmsBf. 19-5. I »^EARNPI 8.] ON wERBV Wt. 16-4. 1187 EADPARD REX [IM. I "I'CODRIC 9.•128 en(. xi. 118G HHEADPAR RD RE J-PVLM/ER ON coEOBE Wt. 18-5. II I) Sigebode.

16-2. 17-5. ST/EFFORDA.] SNOT-. RE'I^ i-BL-ACMAN ON SNOTI Wt. Snoter.] Alhmund. i-EDPER -D REE-X: [PI. jSIoneyer. «i«BLACMAN ON SNOTIH Wt. *EADPA[RD] RE »i«ARNCRI[M] ON SN (Broken. 10.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 12] . Obverse. SNOTINGAHAM. No. ^EDPE D I<EDPER„ Var. 11. [Xottiugliam. 1198 •i<EDD.] Typt^ V.] Type 1197 ii. 12-9. »J<HALDENE ON XXVIII. 1204 ^•EDPE: -RD REX [I'l. Furman. 5> >> ^wNOTER ON CON Wt.RD RE [PI. lG-6. Ilaldeno. IGO. [Stafford. Blacman. Elfric. I XXVIII. 1200 „ Pellet before head. 1203 REX A »i<FORMAN ON SNO Wt. Type 1201 V. ^EDPR. XXVIII. 2(5-5. ^ELFRIC ON ST/EFORDE Wt. 429 Reverse. 17-5. I •i^ALHHVND A SNO AVt." Wt. Type 1202 xiii.) Amgrim. Type 1199 iii.

. EN(1LAM».430 No.

„ „ "i'ARFRA ON STA: Wt. 1223 i'EDPE „ „ }<LEOFPINE ON STA Wt. 17-2. 19 0. 1227 •i^EDRER „ „ tLEOFPINE ON 3TANF Wt. Reverse. 431 Moneyer. 15-7.- RD RE«I* [VI. Obverse. lG-7. I ^DERMON ON 1. Edwine. Type XV. 1216 •i'EADRARARD RE^ A ^^DIORMAN O. 17-3. 15-7. XXIX.EDWARD TUE CONFESSOR. "HAIARCIN OhH STAN Wt. 1218 RE ^GODPINE ON ST/E Wt. 1228 ^EDPE-. ' Dermon. 14-0. 8TANF: Wt.] Type 1219 ii. 20-4. I XXIX. Type 1221 iii. 1217 EADPARD REX A [PI. Arfra l(=^ifara?).. 1221 ^EDPI •J^EDP „ „ tCODPINE ON S: Wt. 1225 4<EDPE: D REX ^EDPINN ON STAN FOR Wt. Diorman. 136. [Stamford. STANFORD.N wT/E Wt.] . 4«EDPE RD RE 4*EDE-. Godwine. Marcin or Hanin (Martin). ^EDPER D REX •I-BRVUPIHE ON STA Wt. 1222 „ „ ^LEFPINE ON STAI: Wt. Leofwine. 1220 "J-DODDINE ON S-Wt. Brunwine. H-5. 13-7. 2.] ST/EN Wt. 1226 ^EDPER: D RE'i' •tL-EOERINE ON Lcofwino. Godwine. 140. 15-4.

Wilcrif. Faorgrim. 19-4. 1230 . nating in fleurde-lis. EADPARD REX AH6L0V EADPARD „ ^^QODPIHE OH STANF Wt.T2 ENGLAND.EDPER I * iv. IlALFrENNY. Wt. 1239 EADPARD „ M STA Wt. Type 1231 4^EPD PPNXAC *PVL-N0:O ON STAI: I Wulno«. ^rfre (cf. Brunwine. God wine. 26-5. 1233 ^EDPER REEX- »i-f=/ER6RIN ON 8TANEF0 Wt. 140. Tijpe V. 21-5. 220. Monpycr. Leofric. Arfra). 1232 i-EDPE- RD REX -D ^/ERFRE ON STANFOR:| Wt. 1236 »i«LEOFRIE OH STAHF Wt.•1. Type sv. 21-4. 1240 i-SODPINE ON STA Wt. 147. GO. Type 1235 ix. God wine. 1229 "i-EDPE RD RE* i^PILERIF ON 8T7^NF: Wt. Swarcolf 2. Osward. Sceptre termi- i-BRVNPINE ON STA Wt. 20-9. 210. Type 1237 xi. 19 Swartcol?). Type 1234 vii. "^EADPAR RD RE I ^OcoPARD ON coTAN Wt. 200. 27-7. Brunwine. N STA-NI: Wt. 1238 EADPARP REX ^BRVNPINE ON ST: Wt. . 1241 ^SPAREOLF ON ST: •(: Wt. No. 4«EDPER D REX Var.

] Type 1242 : xi.D REX Var. )> » Wt.roMVND ON SVCE-. 20-3. »i«EDPAR D RE-i* I >i<L-EOFPINE ON SVO-: Wt. nating de-lia.] Type 1243 ii. Liofred (Leyfrod). Scei)tro termi- ^O. Sceptre termi- ^OSMVND ON flciu:- SV€)C: Wt. lilO. Type 1247 vii.EDWARD TUE COXFESSOR. SUOBYRIG. 1244 I^EDPA RD E ^LIOFPINE ON SV€) AVt. Type 1246 V. [Sudbury. Osmund. •I'EDPN: RD E-b: «J<ELFPINE ON SVOE Wt. I SUCGEPEORC. Leofwiue. : 14-2. Wt. 16 0. Var.D REX I'LEOFRED ON SVOC AVt.] 1249 I'EDPAR. rj-0. 11-7. nating iu lieurde-lis. Reverse. Leofred. Liofwino (Leol'wine). in 1250 VOL. 433 Moneyf-r. iy-5. [Southwark. XXIX. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis. "^EADPARD RD RE I ^FOLCPINE ON C/3VPBVC "SVt. Type 1245 iii.D REX Var. 3. 2 1- . »i«EDPER. Folcwine. 14-7. 1248 ^EDPE. Obverse. II. No. fEDPR RD R-E^ | 4'EIOFRED ON coVCE Wt. Elfwine. 14-5. [Tl.

20 G. 8. I Gorlman.EDP.E ' . [Tam\Yortb.EDPER D RE- •i«SPETMAN ON SVOS Wt.^grelwina Type 1259 xi. 140. ] Swctman. 1254 ^EDDRD D. 1256 EADRARD REI »I<SODRIE.3 EADPAR REX AMGLCW. .2 EADPEARD REX ANSLCOX I-CODMAN ON SVOIE: Wt. i2:.] Ti/pe V. I 4^C0LINE ON 4. i2:.^OcoMAND ON 8IDI Wt. . 20-1. Tijpp xi. 20-2. Obvcrws. 4«EDPAR D RE[PI. 1257 4. 17G. 14 Osmund. Osmund. D.i ENGLAND. Type 1260 xiii. TAMPEORO. i 1255 ^EADPAR RD RE ^coPETMAN ON coVOS: Wt.434 No. i2r. Swetman. EADPARD RE I I -i-BRVNINC ON TA Wt. 4.ON- SVDP Wt. 16-5. Colinc. 20-9.] TAM Wt. Tijpe xiii.E RD REI >I</EDELPINE ON TAMP Wt. T>j]>' ix. 1258 ^.EADPARD REX A- ! ^OcoMVND ON coVOE Wt. 20-G. Cruuiuc. Moneycr. : Godric.fiOSMVUD 014 SVOD: \Vt. I XXIX. Osmund. 2i)-9.

No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOK. -ioO .

peodric.. Brihtric. [Wallingfurd. (Broken. Sceptre termi- nating dc-lia. T>7i 4. 2G-5. 20 8. 436 No. Wt. l'J-5.D REXYiir. Var. 1275 ^BRVNPINE ON PS Tiji>e \\\. 1279 4'EDPn-. 20 2. Sceptre termi- nating in fleurde-lis. 1277 ^EDPR-. •i^BRAND ON PALING Wt. 210. Brihtric.D REX •I-BRANND ON PELirC: Wt. R«'VPrH I Tijpf xi. Wt 25-2. 24-8. 20-5. 20-5.] Type 1272 . . EKOLANI). -t-EDPE: RD REX I ^BRIHTRIC ON PELIN Wt. 1276 ! 4*EDPER. Moneyer. I ^/EILPII 7.- D REX in rtiiir- •^BRIHTPINE ON PALI Wt. Tijpe V. PALINGAFORD.X Brihtric. IJTO +EADPA[R] RD RE ^OVRaiTA[N ON P/E]RI puretan.. 1273 •i'EDPER -D REEX: [PI. 1274 ^BRIHTRE ON PAL •I'EDPE -RD RE. Brunwiue. ^ilwig? I XXIX.EADPARD REX I ^OEODRIE OH P/ER Wt. 1278 "tEDPA RD REI' 'i'BRIHTRIIE ON PAL-I Wt.] ON PALINGE Wt. Brand. 1'jr.) Ttji» XV.y 4«EADPAR RD RE ^AcoTAN : ON PERINI: Wt. iii. Sceptre tt-riuinating in tleur- de-lis. Brihtwine i Var. 21 0. JEstan). Aaten (cf.

137 . No.EDWAUU THE CONFESSOR.

j ^LODCILD. [Wfttchet. ^EDPER-. Type 1303 vii. [Warcham. [PI. 4<EDPER D REX l'((r.i«VD: ii. Loc. c. Type 1299 vii. Godcild. nating in fleurde-lis. I XXIX. EADPARD REX A [ri. 20-5. 4^EDP RD REX I «^ADECNTEP ON PE Wt. 19-8.] Brilitmfor. | Wulfwine. HhEDPAR D RE ^SIDEMAN ONPERHAI: Wt. Rcvenie. XXIX. 16-5.] Type 1301 i.] Type 1298 .] 1300 »i » >» >» » Var. 11. Type XV.438 No. Sceptre termiDating in fleur' de-lis. Burcwino. Sideman. Sideman. 10-7. lG-4. Sceptro termi- Wt. PECEDPORT.ON PEA Wt.ON PEEE Wt. 1297 vur. l'. I I-BRIHTM/ER ON PA: Wt. PERHAM. ENGLAND. . OliveiM. XV. 21-7. 11-2. Monpycr. Uncertain. 120 J •EADPARD RETtjp-- ^•PVLFPINE.. 10. Type 1302 ii. 200. REE RE I ^L-C ON CEPOR-IWt. I 12IIG EADPARD REfX] I •t'BVREPINE ON PA Wt.t-7.Wt.D REX- I •fSIDENAN ON PER-.

12 2. 19-3. Sidcnian. 20 0. 17 7 PIHRACEASTER ou PIGRAGEASTER. 1310 ^EADRARD RE II I "i^SIDEMAN PERHA Wt. 1311 EADPARD REX ^SIDEMAN ON PER: Wt. 200.] Ti/pr i. Sideman. 20-8. Sideman. 20-8. Tijpi' xi. I Biorn. Type 12. [Worcester. Wt. 439 1301 ^EADR. . 18-2. XXIX. Tijpr XV. .- Lcofstan. Type ii. Tijpr ix. I'COIDEMAN ONPERHA Wt. 1305 EADPARD REX AH6LO | fSIDEMAH OH PARN Wt. 1307 ON PERHAM : Var. Sceptro termi- nating in de-lis. | Godcman. 1309 ^EADPAR fPl. 15 2. Var.RD RE •i^EADPAR „ „ J^BIORN•i^BIORN ON PERHAM Wt. Sideman. .J xiii. 1308 i<EADPAR- 4<C0DEMAN OhPERH Wt 17-3.. 13H ^EDPA RD RE I I'CODPINE O Plh€Wt.RD REIfleur- ^SIDEMAN ON PERI \Vt. 1313 •i^EPDER.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.D REX-A- »i*LEOFSTArj ON PIHR-. In two angles of cross A X. 180. 130G ^'EADPAR. 1312 FER Wt. Wt. (lodwino.

440 No. ^'EPDER D REX -A- I ^LIFINCE ON PILTVN Wt. Type 1322 xiii. ^gelwiiie.] 1321 ^PIEINEL ON PIHRECE Wt. Liofstan. Wt. XXX. 1323 ^EASTM/ER ON PIHWt. 1315 •i-EDPAR. . 4<EADPARD REX A RE: I</ELFPINE ON PIHR Wt. 20. . Moneycr. •i«EADPAR RD RE ^/ECELPME O^PIHREC Wt.] Type 1324 I i. 160. I [PI. Scoptre tormi- 202. 20-1. ^gelwine. Eastmser. XXIX. in flcur- [PI.] ' Lifinc. 21 2.] 1316 JEOPARD- REX-. Type 1319 xi.in fleur- l »J«PIICINNC ON PIHER"\Vt. fianilf. Revcrae. ENOLAND. XXIX. 20 1318 Wt. 1320 [PI. 16S. I Tijiie ix. 1. 14. ObverM. PILTUNE. nating de-lia. [Wilton.1. HHCARVLFON DIHEREC "\Vt. Typt" vii. Sccptro torminiiting do-lis. j ^Ifwine. Wicing."21-4. Wicing Vur. 1317 EADPARD REX AUSLO ^/ELEPINE OH " PICR 6. 20 2.D REI Var. ^LIOFcoTAN ON PIHRE Wt. 13. 160.

D REI- t-ALFPOLD ON PILTVN Wt. 19-8. Type 1328 vii.D RE Type •i^DVRECIL ON PILT Wt. Purcil. No. Type 1327 V. Moneyer. [ri.^Ifwine. 1336 I EADVVEARDVS REX AN6L EADPARD REX AH6L0V(. 1329 >> 11 ^/ELFPINE ON PIL-TE-. ^EDPE: -RD REX. 1338 EADPEARD REX AN6L0 . 17-6. 1334 EADPARD REX ANSLOV . "l^EFDPINE ON DILTVNEN Wt 1G4. ix. 20 2. . 200.X HhEDPE- .- Wt. . G in uuc angle of cross. 1335 EADPEARD REX ANGLO- •^ELFPINE ON PILTVNEIC Wt.EDWAED THE CONFESSOR. 1331 „ PILTVNE Wt. 140. 441 Reverse. AlfwoUl. Sceptre terminating in lleurde-lis. 17-2. 1333 ^EDPE. Lifinc. Type 1325 iii. . PILTVNEWt ISO. "i^/ELFPINE ON PILT Wt. ^EDPE >) D REX »I^-/EL-FPI-N-E ON PILT Wt. 198. Alfwold. 1332 Var. Wt. 132G RD RE :X •i'LIFINEC ON PILTVN Wt. 170.^Ifwine.^ELFST7XN ON PILTV: Wt. 1337 ihALFPOLD ON PILT Wt. Obverse.] 2. ^EDPAR. Jh/ELFPINE ON PILT Var. Elf'stnn. 20-5. •i^DVRCIL Wt.. 4<EDPE: -RD RE. uElfwine. 19-8. 1330 19-8. XXX. 19-8.

. ENtiJ.412 No.AND.

CH. 443 M.vor^o. CONFESSOR. Rcvorse.jnoyor.EDWARD THE No. 1356 •i'EADPAR RD RE 1357 •EADPARD REX- 1358 EDPARD RE[X] -EADPARD RE•EADPARD „ 1359 13G0 1361 •i^EADPARD REX- 1362 .

.. "\Vt. •tEDPER -D REX: REX[n. I Leofwine. Wt.) ON FIND Wt. Moneyer. . Elfstan. Type 1382 iii. Loc. 1380 E R-D . Txjjie ii. Wt. Obveno. i:i72 »PEDPN RD E I«EDPA D HE HhEDPA RD RE p/ESTAN ON PIN: AVt. Wt. 7 3. XXX. .] Tijpe iv. . 1378 11-2. .•Ill KXil. 121. NC Wt. 12 0. 4. *EDP „ „ MFINE ON J^LIFINC PINT: I Lifinc. 1381 ^ RD RE: . 150.AM). | 1376 ^LEOFPINE ON . ONPIN Wt. 17-4. No. 15-8. 1374 PEDPIE ON PIN Wt. 10-9. . I 1377 ^EDPEI RD RE PI Wt.. IlALFrEWIES. I 1375 *EDPER RD RE: •i-EDPA „ „ I-ELFSTAN ONPIN Wt. I I ^stan. IN . Rcverec.frEDPeRD REX AUG I ^ELPINE ON PINE : : Elwine. Lifinc. 1383 „ -I-LiFINE ON PINCEE Wt. 13S4 . . 4<EDP RD REX '»P/ELFPINE ON PINCE:' ^Ifwine. 1379 (Legend barbarous. ••t'-CODPINE- ON PINZE God wine. 4. 170. IG Type 1385 V. PIN 11-4. 12 2. j Brun. 1373 "PBRVN ON DINEWi. -PLOC . Edwie. 6-5.

1390 Wt.^stun or Estan.RD REX Var. •i-LOE 1398 ^EDPE-. 26-4.] Brihtwold. Loc. 15-8. 170. one 170. 15-8. 1391 ^:ED-RE-RI D- REX: P?l. PI ^stan and Loc. •J^GODPINE Vfir. 1387 >^EDPR. 5. Wt. 1392 ' I'EDPER.EDWARD THE Obverse. 1389 ^EDPER: REEX i-BRAND ON PINEESTR Wt. circle only.^EDPI I 1 RE«I< ^ESTAN ON »i«/E$TANN PirCEST Wt. . pellet angle.- RD REX ON PINEESTR V(ir. 1396 ^EDPER -D REX ^LOE ON PINEEST Var. ON PINE Limbs of cross Godwine. Wt.) 1394 ^EDPE: -RD REX ' -i-LIFINE ON PINEES: Wt. i united by one circle only. Wt. 260. Limbs <>f cross united by one 24-8.D REX ^LIOFINC ON PINGEcoT Wt. 1388 RD REX -D LOC OH Wt. 1397 DiEFPE: RD REX •tLOE ON PlNEEcoT: Wt. 1395 ^EDPER. 16-8. Sceptre terminating in iiuurde-lis. (Broken.RD . 170. circle onlv. •I^BRIHTPOLD ON PINEE: Wt. Brand. 1393 -^EDPR RD REX HhLEOFPINE ON PINE Var. Limb-s of cross . CONFESSOR. 1386 ^EDPE: RD REX ^/ESTAN ON PINE: Vur. lG-8. 250. Lifinc. XXX. 445 Moneyer. Limbs of cross united circle by only in one and one 16-8. angle of cross. Pellet in one Leofwine. united by "Wt.

ON PINEEcoT Wt. Type vii. Sctptrc tcrmiiirttiug iu dcur- dc-lis. .D REIVar. Sceptre terminating in lieurde-liri. \V(.sr in fleurde-li. 1408 i *EDPER- 1409 . 4«EDPE: RD REX: l-PYNSTAN ON PINCEST.-. Sceptre terminnliiif^ dc-litj. 20o. 170. ObvvrM.^. 20 1. law 1400 ^i^L^UP: ARD RE ^PIDICA ON PINCEST: Wt. 1403 „ REi>f/E03TAN „ PNCES Wt.AM). Sceptre terminatin. 1407 4-EDPER D REVar. 20 5. 1406 I -i> „ Var. 1404 *EDPER. 19-8. REX 4^/ELFPINE ON PINZE^: Wt. 1405 «i«/ESTAN ON PINCEST Wt. 200. HUl •i-EDPER.D REX „ REVar. 200.IK! KNCl. REX "i^/ESTAN I ON PINCESTI Wt. 20-7. Sceptre tcrminatiug in Henrde-lis.«i</ELFPINE i ON PINCEco Wt. iu llcur- 1402 •J'EDPER D Viir. Iteverso.

No. 447 .EDWARD THE CONFESSOR.

200. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis. 20-2. 1434 ^LIFINi: ON PINEESTR Wt. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis. i«PID. lS}-4. in flour- H3l ^'EDPERD. Var. 200. naling in tlcurde-lia. Widia. Sci ptro 10-8. Obvprno.D REX t( ^^LICINi: rmitlciir- ON PINEEcoT ^\'t. j var.D REX Vitr. Moneyer. EADPEARD REX AN6L-: ^/ELFPINE ON PINCE Wt. No. 1130 •+EDPER. Type IIU) ix. i ^Ifwinc 1441 EADVVEARDVS REX ANDLO PINCES Wt. i Lifiuc. 20-7. •i^PIDTt ON PINCESI: Wt. . Socjitrc I-LIFINC tormi- ON PINCE3 Wt.. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis. h.\M).X DN PINCESI: Wt. i^L-IFINE ON PINCEST. Type 1439 vii. 200. 7. ^EADPE RD REX AN [n. 1435 ! -i^EDPER „ „ Var. 1433 ^EDPE•i'EDPAR D REXVar. Sco|itrc tirini- 4. ^LIFIND ON PINCECOT Wt. 1437 Var. 1436 "tEDPE D REVar. 1482 EDDER-. "\Vt. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis. „ 19-S. 20-5.L-ADM/ER ON PINCE: Wt. nating in dc-iia. lS-4. I XXX. Sceptre terminating in fleurde-lis. ^SARVLF ON PINERE Wt.i:N(iL. 21 4.] Garulf. 20 7. Var. tuitiiig (l( -lirt. 1438 •i«EDPER D REX 4^PIDi7^ ON PINCESTI Wt.REXViir.

1442 EADPEARD REX AN6L-:: i i -i^/ELFPINE ON PINES: Wt.ON PINO ! wt. 18-4. 1459 •i^SPRACELINC ON PING: Wt. ANGLO 1458 : ^LIFINC ON PINCE3T Wi.] ' 1457 I^LIFINE ONN PINEE Wt. 2 10. 1454 EADRPARD REX AN ON P:1NC: Wt. 1447 ANSI »^ANDERBODA ON PINCE Wt. ' 1453 EADPEARD REX AN6L: :ONn NO »I«CODPINE •BNISaOO'i' wt. Obverse. 8.ON Brilitmajr. Anilerboda. Goilwiiio. 144G I i^ANDERBODA: ON „ „ PI: Wt. 210. 1443 EADVVEARDVS REX ANCL „ -^/ESTAN ON PI1NCE$ Wt. 200. Li fine. 190. ANGLO I 1451 REX: i •PBRIFTMEHR. Ji]staD. No. 2 10. : 1456 EADVVEARDVS REX «I«60DPINE ON PIN6ES VCLO AVt. XXX. [PI.^^ANDERBOD ON Wt. 1449 EADVVEARDVS REX ANDLO i<BIRIHTM/ER. ^^estan. ^ANDERODA. 2 16. PINCE Wt.4<C0DP!NEi ON PINE Wt. 19-8. : Sprnctliiic. 18-8. 1455 EADPEARD REX AN6L. 2 a . 200. 21-4. I PIN 21-4. 19-8. EADPARD EX HN6L j I-DODPINE ON PINE: Wt. 1444 ANCLO "^/EOESTAN ON PNEESj Wt. 200. 1445 EADPEARD REX AN6L. IT'?.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 210.ON PINCES Wt. 449 Muueycr. 18 1452 7. 21-2. 1448 „ „ AN6L-. 1450 I't'BRIHTM/ER- ON PING Wt.

19 4. Leofwold or LiofwoLL 1473 EADPEARD REX ANSVar. 20-4. PINCco Wt. 200. 1465 ^ANDERBODE ONPIf^: Wt. [///)« IIGO •i'EADPAR RD RE p/ELFPINE ON PINCE Wt. 19 8. 1471 Wt. UG6 14G7 ^EADPAR ONPirCE! Wt. Goawine. EADPARDE.lS -2. wt. fBRIHTM/ER ON •}<60DPINE PIMIE Wt. . Antlcibodu.. 192.«> i:n<»lani>. Tijpii xi.RD RE ONPINCEOJ Wt. ^GODPINE: ON PINE Wt. 20-4. ^LEOPOLD ON PINCE Wt. No. HG9 1470 I-DODPINE ON PlIvCEco Wt. PIN l'J-4. l'J-2. 20 1. 20-4. pinceI 19-8. vKlfwin.i:. IIGI ONPINCECO Wt. 1474 ^EDPAR.RD RE "tEADPA„ .RD R 4-EADPAR. „ I'JG. Inscription continuous from left to riirht. „ ' j 147G . 2U-4. 14G8 ON PINCE Wt. 20 0. I 1475 ^'LIOFPOLD ONPINCE Wt. HG2 1103 ON PINCEwT Wt. Moneyor. 190. 200. 14G4 I 't'EADPARD •t'EADPARI „ 4^ANDERB0DA ON Wt. 1S«. 1472 LADPA RD REX «1<LE0FP0LD- ON „ PIN! Wt. I 1177 ON I PINIEcoTi Wt. Brihtrnjcr.

1484 •EADPARD RE: I) 1) >I«ANDERBODE.-3. lG-2. 190. 2 G 2 . 15 3. l(J-4. Wt. „ PINCE M't. „ LcofwoM. «1<EADPARD REX D •ZANDER BO DA ON P Wt. EADPARD RE- J^. 1488 )> )> PN 9. 1483 1(] 7. 451 Reverse. 1478 EADPEARD REX ANSVar. Spracoliiii HhcoPRAEELirC ONPINIE: Wt.ON Wt. lusciiptiun con- "tLIOFPOLD ON PINEECOT Wt. XXX. PI 17-7. 17 1489 EADPARD REX REX- A: >1^LIFING ON PINE Wt. liM. 19 1480 „ „ 4.. 15-8. RE- •^HEOEPVLF ON PIC Wt.J 1492 RE- ^^SPRAEALNG. REX •I-SPRACELINE ON P Wt. Lifin^ or Liliui\ 1490 I-LIFNC I'LIFNC[IM. Moneycr. Andcrboda. 1491 •EADPARD RE>1< ON PINEES Wt.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR./ELFPINE ON PI: iElfwino. 17 1486 4. l(. ll^Srwulf. Wt. 1485 Wt. 10 1493 Spracalinff or Spmcclino. Obvei'sc. tinuous from left to riKht. 19-4.ON PI 0. 1487 4* „ REX: 'i'LEOFPOLD ON PIN Wt. Type 1482 xiii. 19 7. 17 2. il. Wt. „ •tcoPRAELIHD ON PINCE: Wt. 1479 JEOPARD RD RE l^EADPAR- -J^COPRARELINC: Spracelincor I O^PINEE: Wt. 1481 "^EADPARD.

Obverse. . No.W>2 ENOliANl).

[Wiiicliclsca.Vil ^EDPER I D REX A: [PI. IGl. I ^ELSIJE ONN OEO AVt. 180. EADPARD RE I •i'SPEARTlNS ON Wt. TlIK CONFESSOR. I XXX. E. PI 1. II. PI 18-5. OEODFORD. 1515 4^SPRACEL1NC ON P Wt.EDWARD No. Swcarliii'i PINCELSEA. 18G. Wt.. 170.] I Type i. 1 Spraccliuc. Wt. 1516 ^SFRAEELINS ON . Wt. ! . Type 1523 ii. 1512 i EADPARD RE RE. 14-3. | i'COLDPINE OhPirCELE' Goldwiue. •i^LIFINE ON riNEE: Wt.t. I 12. [Tliftford.] Ti/pe xi. 101. Elfri. 10 Type 1519 xvii. 180. Wt. ^EDPE RD Rl 1 "^ELFRIC ON CE Wt Ii.stiiiiiiiil.] 1522 „ A- >^ESTMVND ON £)EO: Wt. l. 453 Moneyer. 1514 RE R riNPII Wt. IG 1518 PIN 5. 1513 Wt. 1517 ^SPRAEELINS ON .] 20-2. 1520 t'EADPAR D RE [PI. Elfsie? I XXX.

. ENGLAND.454 No.

I'J G. 1551 tEADPAR RD REX HhEDPARD RD RE ^coVMERLIDE ONPIODFO Wt. Wt. 25-8. i Gclclcof. •^EDPER D REEX: [Pi. -i-EDPER -D REX•I'EDPE -RD REX: "^/EIL^IE ON OEODFO: Wt. AVt. [ J-SODELEOF ON OEOT Wt. Atsere. 17-5. 14. . 1541 ON GEO Wt. nating in de-lis. 1547 -^EADPER RD RE ^•EDPAt D REi •i<ATcV)ERE ON PIODFOI Wt. I iEilsio. 1!I2. 1.to. ' Estmund. I'J 1. ' Blarore (of. Sumorlodrt. 1540 ^ESTMVND ON 'i'E^'i'MVND -DEO 2G-8. Tyjie xi. 455 Jloneyer. Blacer. I '. Sceptre termi- •^LEOFPINE ON tleiir- OEOT Leofwine or Lifwiue. Type 1543 •i<ED[P]ER D RE ^BL-ARERE ON eiTFOR Wt. 1545 •I-EDPER -D REVar. Obverse. Godeleof. 20-7. 154(5 i^EDDER D RE ^LIFPINE ON OIDFOR Wt. lit 0. 170. 1550 I^EDPARD ERE •1«C>ELIC: ON PIODFOD Wt. Type 1542 vi. No. : AVt.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 24-9. ' ( (Jwelie = Uudelif?). Blacer). 1 1 1549 I-EADPAR RD RE "J^FOLEERD ON •DATFOR I Folcerd.)52 4«SVMRED ON £)ET Wt. Type 1539 Y.] 17-8. 1548 I -I-BLACER ON GETFO Wt. I XXX. -^CODELEOF ON £)EOT Wt. 20-2. 1544 't'EDPE- D REX Sceptre termiuating in tleurde-lis. 2 10. Reverse. vii. F((r.

180. IGO.RD REX I ^HLIHHHOCHFHIIII Uncertain. No. I Wt. ](. ENCiLAM). 15-G.0.-s. RevrrM. Type 1564 V. ^Ifwine. Wt. Uncertain. Atsere. ' Widred. Lifinc. ^-EDPE. ^'EADPAR RD REX ?PVnFVRP ON PIODFO AVt r. 150.t. I 15:16 "fATSER ON DETF AVt. Type 1560 ii.4r>i.RD E 'i'PIDRED ON RTF: Wt. 15G2 ^EDPA-. [ 155D EADPARD REX . HhEDPER D REX- •l^L-IFINC 1 '(( ON SPES* r. Moneycr. Ti/pt' xiii. 111. Suiucrleda. -^eODPI ON OETFORDI Wt. 10-4. Wt. i Godwine.-. 15CI •1-HORCEP ON ED Far. Type 1563 iv.. 1557 ^EADPARED REX •i-EADPARD REX-^ Type •l^GODRIC ON OETFO ^Vt. Ill 2. M'mfurd (cf. -^/ELFPINE ON OETF Wt. purfuriS). 4*EADPAR RD RE 1551 ^'SVMRLEO ON OET: \\ t. 'i'DERE 'I'EDPE RD RE RD RE 'I'ELEIPREHPHIO AVt. Ptlkt in one angle of cro. Go<lric. 12-5. ? • Ipswich . ! UNCERTAIN MINTS. (iLvrr-. Cresoi'iit at end of each limb of cross enclosing pellet.t. Uncertain. XV. I 1558 pSVMRD ON OETFOR AVt. 1555 +EADPARED REXEADPARD REX- . 18-3. IS 0.

') . No.EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. 4.

4^8 .

1598 . . 5-0 1600 RD E ON N Wt. .EDWAED THE CONFESSOR. 30 . 4-0. Reverse. INE Wt. 30 1599 I-ED M Wt. PINE Wt. Wt. 1594 ^ED Type SBR Wl. . E . AR . 2-7. 1597 . 459 Moneyer. Obverse. . iii. 3 0. . 1595 [I-jEDPE t-PVL Wt. 1596 RE . 3-6. Wulfwino. . . NE ON E ON .

Tholf.p.).). or Elfwinc] (Herrf. M<>r!w [ = vi:ifwme] yKlVwiCK] (Oxf. [ = Dcrmon?] (Steyn..). TTul/red (Cant). Vtvq [ = Froma?] (Derby).). SentictHP. me nlso JEU. M Oct. Eomn.. IMiuroiufin." ( 1(10 ) HAROLD Succ. locctel or ?].). Win- Agamunil.). (Hodi. Alxxi [=. Sigod (Bedf ).. pennon pi/rcj/.).). Gcrctin. Leufwine Leofwoid Litinc or (. Rentwine [ = Keutwiue or Ccnt\vine?J IJrihtinair (WaUingf. . Onhlmnn. Swearting... purttan (Xorw. Oswold (I-ewes).). •Vorif.. Sweartling. JE\giVT [ef. spfi Centwine. l?ruinmon (Ipsw. Lo ifward (Lowch). Shaft.). Cfiitwine or Guntu-ine Ceorl (Brht. Hfref..vr.). IJrihtric (Exot. Winchest. diest. Col man.Elfwine. Jlrihtiioi {Ghmc). l\Ianna 'Xott. ilOlfwinc . (Jfldwino (Windiest.. H. (IJrist.).- Osninnd (Lond. "Wulgar [Wulfgar] (Lond. = L' orwige](Ijond.).. Foriia (Nott..). or Elfwinn (Prist.ri [ = ]-:ifwifr sc( (Caut.ulf(York). Wdtrman (Wurc).).<w also Swctman] (Lend.).'cat(Lim!. (iodric (Lond. .). Dikd a. iTl^'oIwino (Fl.). Yuik). Wulfgiat (Gloup.. Leisinc [=Leifinc?] (York). Ou^hvaru (York). = Briiitwine].. II. Elfwino. AVindicst.C/ ( Yorh)..).). WiiirliCHt. Wulm.).r?](Chest.-'c. or Wulfwinc] (Carubr. or Alf\v(>l(l(Wilt.). Jirilitiri [ (Wilt.. God wine (Chich.)..).Almcr [ = Ulincr? cf.).. Cinstan (Dover). IViiIfmxr. lOGG. Wulmcr] (Line).) jBo. G Jan.il':ifwnl<l yKir>.). South w.. Hunt. (Tliet/.).^eixlred (Hast. Thctf.aJ'cwi (Wincbcst. Tpsw.. G<xii\4)rand...). liorh. S(juthainp. Edric (Ilcref.). Tjoofsi [ Leof. lOCC. Winus (York).it'l (York). For^ii.).<»-»' Wulfnixr. Wiiute.). . ]?nin\viiic (Stamf. Knjnd. &c (Wallingf. = Arncctel] or AVulfwi [= Wulfwig Coleb. AUl'^txT (Lond.). Sprac( ling (Windiest..). Swetman or Sicfman (Lond. WuIjJ (Wilt..).cic.).T:ifsii. ic. . J. Ilrilitwold (Oxf.. Warch. Sueman ("Wilt. Wulmar.). (Steyn. Swearlciil or Sicartcol (York). Chi. Li>nd.). Moncyers. Taunt. Urstan. KkcL. Snasbeorii or Sneheorn (Colch. si-e Swearting.d. Ou?grim (York). Ulfcetel (York). Out. Southamp. MaJd. Wuifward (Dover. Aldgar] (Lond. ((iiiild.).. Alidf (York). ICrncetcl [ Folrir. Shrews.)..). [. A.•/•-V/MnS [" Cni "=Chehca lor.)..).).). Stamf.). I. Lond. Enstna^r (Wiiicbost. sir Purstan lUirpwinc (Wallingf.). . LufKnc (Exct.). (Line.. Or^ric ((iloiu-. Andcrluidii (Windiest. Edwino J:ij.). Warw. Lewes.-itan Ciiiit. Swcarling.: Dornion[= pcrmon?] Kudward.-li. Al/ried. Alt'. Ltn/rie ( Ware). purged (Thctf. Sajwiue (Southamp ).)..'liioli. Sutere (York).

head r. Obverse. Obverse. 4G1 DEScniPTioN OP Types. b. 5. in front. I "JIO. Around.] Type i. ri. Around. Sigod. Across field and l^etwecii two lines. [Cf. 20-5.i)tre. Leofwinc. XXXII. 1] BRICGSTOP. var. grade. no sceptre.] Type Similar : i. P 7X X. [PI. I i. XXXI. . Head wearing aiclicd crown from whicli (lepi'nd two fillets.HAROLD 11. 1. i-HAROLD REX AN6- I I-LEOFPINE ON BRI Wt. tion : outer circle. [Bristol. var. BEDEFORD. poiuiuee. I Same. Reverse.. Reverse. PI. Similar. 4. 6ci. . «I«HAROL-D REX AN6L i«SI60D ON BEDEFORL . PI.] inscription in field.)omnK'c. XXXI.. inscrip1. Muncycr. [Cf. Mt. in front. sceptre. No. [Bedford. retro- [Cf. inscription between two circles.] Tijpe i. | Similar.] Typei. a. Description of Coins. Type i. XXXI.

CICESTRIE.] Type •J i. 217. [ColcLcster.4(V2 KNCil. (Wulfwig or AVulfwine). 20-8. •^HAROLD REX T^NC Var. DEORABY. 3. var. JElfwine.-. C/ENTPARABYRIG. Obvorao. > Fron ( I = Froma?). . 2. I ANGLO [I'l. COLEIE$T Wt. Wt. 4«HAR0LD REX I ^-EDPINE ON CANTI M't. 210. | ^FRON ON DEORBI Wt.] „ ANS: I I-ELFPINE ON EAN : ' Elfwine.. to I 20 3. ^-HSROLD REX SN6L .ANI). . Revcrac. [( 'iuitfrl)iiry. fillets 1 J^/ELFPINE ON CICEl "\Vt. No crown. a.y. 1 XXXI.] Type 9 ' i. . XXXI. Edwinc. Wiilfwi 20-2. 'p'HAROLD REX AC. Moneycr. COLECEASTRE. 217. Godwine. -^PVLFPI ON COLEC Wt. iy-5. [PI.] Type i. No.] Type i.] Al HhSODFINE ON EICE: Wt. [Chichester. [Dcrl. .

2] 21-5. 17-5. Reverse. ^HAROLD REX AN6L i ^PVLFPVRD ON DO Vur. . 4^CINSTAN ON DOFI A\t. 22 0.] EOFERFIC. "t'HAROLD REXI [AN]6L| f-OVCVLF ON EOFERP Wt. [York. Lcisinc ( I = Leitinc?). ^HAROLD REX AN6I -^ALEOF ON EOFER Wt. 22-7.' DOFERAN. AN6L AN6I I^ERNEETEL ON EOF Wt. II. 20 Wt. [Dover. 21 2. i Sutere. XXXI. 463 Moneyer. 5. ^LEISINE ON EOFRI Wt. „ ANGLO •I«3VTERE ON EOFER Wt. 20-2. AN6L ^-lOCETL ON EOFER Wt. 19 AN6L 'i'SN/EBEORN ON EON Wt. 20-8. 4. XXXI. Wulfward. Oirl'-rim. loectel.] •^HAROLD REX ANG 18 | ^OVCGRIM ON EOF Wt.] Type i.] Type i. Cinstan. 20-3. 21o. 21-5. "MOCETEL ON EOFER: Wt.HAROLD Obverse. X 7X q Wt. ( Erncefel = Arncetel). 3. •^HAROLD REX AN6L0RVI Var. [n. Sn. 20 [PI.-cbcorn. vnr. a. 21 2. i Alcof. Inner circle around bust. OuiSulf. .

GIFELCEASTER. Ulfcetel. EXECESTER. 19-3. a. | ^LEOFDINE ON EXEC AVt. GILDEFORDA. 27 AN6L i-LIFINE ON EXECESTR Wt. »i<HAROLDE ANGL[PI. Moneyer. 200. 20 0.IESLPINE ON GIF Wt. 29 ^HAROLD REX 1\6 ' J. I I'LEOFPOLD ON 6ILDI Wt. ^HAROLD REX „ ANGL-. a. [Guildford. I KSCI.HAR0LD REX AN. 20 0.] Type 25 i. i ^gehvine. 20-5.It. Wt. 210. [Ilchcster. I Type 26 i. 7.] ON GIFE: Wt. . 1 i<HAROLD REX -l^/EGLPINE 0. I XXXI.- ^BRIHTRIC ON EXE Wt. 4. 22 +HAROLD REXI AN6L0 -^eVTERE ON EOFER AN6L -i-BPEARTCOL ON EOl Wt.] Leofwold. ! 23 Swcartcol. vnr. SNGLO [I'l. Type 30 i. 20-2. Leofwine. rar.] Type 28 i. 20-7.WI). [Exeter. Brihtric. 200. }<HAROLD REX ANGL I -^/EGLPINE ON 6IFELC ^gelwine.] Type 81 i. ' 24 ANS ^-VLFCETEL ON EOF Wt. I XXXI. Lifinc.

II.HAROLD No. 4(55 .

XXXI 12. ENGLAND.] Type 41 i. 212. l'J-7. •1<60DYINE ON HVNIED Wt. H/ESTINGA. -t-HAROLD REX I "I-OEODRED ON /EST Wt. 20 G. 10] I LcofataD. Tijjtr i. 21 U.466 No. I . 20 S. [Hereford. Godwine. Moneycr. Obvone. I :» 4«HAR0LD REX AN6L0 [Pi. XXXI.] I . 11] L/EPES.] Tijpe •10 I i. AN6L0 I HEREFORD. [Lcwfs. [Hustings. ^'HAROLD REX AN6 [I'l.] Ti/pi i. •I'HAROLD REX 7\N6 "I^EDRIC ON Edric. XXXI. -i^LEOFSTAN ON HA Wt. [I'l. n. Revene. [Huntiugdou. a.] Type 42 i. r(ir. . Loofward. puodrcd. HEREFOR Wt. j ' Godwine. 43 + HAROLD REX „ AN: ANIO •i-60DPINE ON LEPE: Wt. 213. var. 44 ^LEOFFARD ON LEPE: Wt. HUNTENDUNE.

[Chester. 51 I-HAROLD REX AN6L : CALMER ON LINCO Wt. I ^^ALXXI 2. Wuliiiir). Obverse. 47 ^HAROLD REX Al [PJ. 220.] „ „ Wulmer (Wulfmror). 20 0. 2 10. ^HAROLD REX Al ^/ELFGEAT ON LINCOI Wt. Aimer ( = rimer? cf. II. XXXII. 4G7 Moneyer. i^PVLMER 3. \ ^Ifgcat. [Lincoln. 100.] ON LLE6EC Wt. i. XXXII. 52 AN6L rri. LEHERCEASTER. I Wt.] Type 49 i.] Tijx>e i. 210. 2 u 2 .] Tijiw. 4G "fO^POLD ON LEPEEI Wt. Reverse. 20-2. LINCOLNE. 50 Wt. I i^/EeLPlNE L] ON LEHRI Wt. 45 'i'HAROLD REX AN6L•i'HALOLD REX ANS 1 i^OSrOLD ON LEPEI Wt. Alxxi ( I = ^lfsig?). 48 HhHAROLD REX AN[PI. 210.HAROLD No. iEgclwiuo. XXXIL I LEIGECEASTER. [Leicester. Oswold. 231.

. No.lf)8 KNULANI).

HAROLD No. II. 469 .

G. l«HAROLD REX ANGL-: 4<LE0FcnTAN ON ROFI Wt. [Steyning. ' XXXII.] Type 81 i. 83 „ AN6-L MVIANNA ON ZNOT I Manna.] Type 70 i. n.] Type I 82 •I'HAROLD REX AN6L: "^FORNA [ ON SNOTIh AVt. •i<H7\R0LD REX TN60 ^SODRIE ON SCEFTES i Godric. [Unclicstcr. No. I«HAROLD REX AN6L J-PVLM/ER ON RVMEI Wt. Reverse. [PI. 7. Fornfi? 200. 'I'HAROLD REX ANGLOi •t'DERMON ON ST/ENI I Dormon ()?ermou?).] [PI.170 ENOLANI). [PI. XXXII. XXXII. 18-5.] Typp 80 i. Wt. 17-3. [Shaftesbury. I Wt.] RUMENEA. 180. rnr. . [Romney. [Nuttingliaru. SNOTINGAHAM. i Wulmscr (Wulfinjcr). 21 8. ST/ENIG. SCEFTESBYRIG. ROFECEASTER. ObYtne. lAoktan. Wt.] Type 81 i. Money er. 2 10.] o.

P/ERINCPIC.smund. PALINGAFORD. II. 21-8. XXXII. 177.] Type 89 i.] ON PEARP Wt. Loofwino. ^HAROLD REX AN6LO ! «i«LVFFINC 0. [Southwark. [Walliiigford. Obverse. Swcartlmg. STANFORD.HAROLD No. . •^HAROLD REX ANGLO »^OSMVND ON SVDEP ! O. ^^BVRCPINE ON PALIN Wt. Luffinc ( = Liiinc). 86 'i'LEOFPINE ON STAN Wt. [Stamford. 20 5.] Type i. 21-2. Brunwine. 10. Burgwine. IMunpycr. 20 0.] Type 87 i. SUDGEPEORC. 471 UeverBC. XXXII.] Tyjyei. [Warwick. [PI. Wt.] t-HAROLD REX ANG I fSPEARTLINL ON PAL Wt. 21 3. ^HAROLD REX ANGLO' [I'l. 85 ^HAROLD REX ANSL "^HAROLD REX SN pBRVNriNE ON STA Wt.

i^lfwold or Alfwold. 91 I •i'HAROLD REX 7\N I ^SPEMAN ON FERH Wt. 98 T^N I-ALFPOLD ON PILTV Wt.] Type 92 i. 99 •^HAROLD REX ANG-L. PERHAM. . r. 200.) 0. 180.PITVI Wt.•172 ENGLAND. 19-4. XXXII. 97 REX ANI . 93 AN6L AN6L 7\NI •i^/ELFPOLD ON „ PILTI 19-2. •i'/ELFPOLD ON PILT \\'t. [Wurclmm ] I Trjpc i. 200. 100 19-4. Wt. Swetman.. ^HAROLD REX AN „ „ . 19 7. 18 8. No. 9G •i-HAROLD REX AN6L »i«HffROLD ON. Centwinc. 19 :>. 94 „ PI LTV Wt. . I'EENTPINE ON PITI Wt. t'/ELPOLD ON PILTVI Wt. FILTUNE."i^ALPOLD •^HAROLD REX AN6L [PI. 101 •J«HAROLD REX AI 102 't'HAROLD REX AN6L ^CENPINE ON PILT: Wt. 103 •^HAROLD REX 1\\ •I-G/ENTPIHE OH Wt PI 201. „ Wt. Bcvornc Moncycr. 95 ^"HAROLD REX ©N PITV 18-5. 190. Obvorao. 11] PITAl Wt. Wt. [Wilton.

I«H7\R0LD REX aN „ i ^/ELFPINE ON PINE Wt. Lifinc. Moneyer. I-HAROLD REX AN60L f'PlNVS ON PILTIA Wt. „ ANLO ' t'GOLDPIN PINCEEI Wt. 7^1 i Winus. ON PINCE3T wt. Anderboda. I [n. PI Pinaoclinp. Pll Wt. Wt. 4«PINVS ON PILTVN \Vt.] Tupe i.] 21-2. Wt.' ^HEADE>I ON >IC I IloatScwi. 10-9. AN6L All ^ANDERBODE ON Wt. 473 Rfvcrsc. 20 . "l^HAROLD EX AN •l-HAROLD REX AN6L . 201. „ PI 17-4. 180. P 11)7. PINGEASTRE. I R(ntwine( = Kentwiue?). 19-8. All >^SPRACELIN6 ON '^SPEARLING ON P: Wt. •I-HAROLD REX Al »i«RENTPINE ON PILTVN Wt. ll)-5. ISO. IT. Swoartinp).1. "l-HAROLD REX AN6L: •^SPEARTLING ON PI 0. -iElfwiue.210. [Winchester. „ ANSL:' ^ETXSTN/ER ON PIN I Eastnasr. 15-4.HAROLD Obversp. Wt. I-LEOFPOLD ON t'LIFIC PIN! Wt. XXXII. ! Goldwinc.irtliiii:(cr. 7\N6 Pw( arlinij or Wt. „ ANS: j 4^LE0FP0LD ON PIN Wt. S\vc. 12. 20. I'ANDERBODE ON Wt. 210. ' LcofwoM. KJO. 21 4. t'HAROLD REX AN6L.

Swcarling. «i-HAROLD REX N6LI„ | -i^/EDEPiNE ON OITFO Wt. Tyi^ 124 i. purged. PI ia-5. 20-0.S-7. I Gcxlric.) 125 ON Wt. l. ^HAROLD REX ANG 1 I^BLAGEMAN ON •i«BRIHTM/ER I Blaceman. OEOTFORD. 122 ANG ' "^GODRIC ON OEOTI Wt. Moneycr. UNCERTAIN MINT. [Tliotford. Wt. I Brihtmser. . 20-0. No.171 ENGLAND. j ^Egclwinc. Rcvrrnc. 120 +HAROLD REX AN6L: 4<SPEARTINS ON Wt. Obvorac. 12:? 4^€)VR60D ON GEOT.] Type 121 i. 20 7. (Broken.

INDEXES. .

.

ileet. building of the burgs. ib. liriee. Lady of the Mercians. xxvi. I. in 55). . of . and Wessex. causes of —moueyers. xxxvii. bust. of Cnut. ^Ifwyn. Ixxvii. divides kingdom. Wareham.Ethelrcd iEthandnne. coin-types. II. refer to the in tlie Cutulogue. Ixxxvii. xxxix. of ^Ethelfla. retires to ililthelney. list without bust. xxxv.' ib.. . massacre of . attacks Cuml)crlaud and tiie Isle ealdorman. xxxv. xxvii. Coinage : death. dau.. siege of Exeter. xxxviii. iElfred.. See Emma. . xxxii. xxxvi. .^Ifgifu (Emma).. iEthelflaed. . xlvii. moTiiage. 27 . martyr- Coinage xxvii. imitated by iEihelrcd of I. with monogram of London. 21 71. . accession. bis government. xxxiii. issues . and types moueyers. xxxvii. : —rarity . Ixxi. &c. death. Ixxix. receives n. li. Ixxiii. . accession. large issues.. lii.^Ifgifu (Alfifa). mint name.. . moncyers and coins. xxvii. of. coins. . «. xxvii. . dau. .. xxxiv. wifo of . xxxvii. riage. wife or mistress Oekley. xxxv. . Wessex. dom of. n. Ashdown and . 33 . li. mar. kingdom Ixix. -iEthelbearht.-xliii. A.. Ixxix. ib.. defeated at rebellion . destroys Viking Coinage coin-types. his coins.-xlviii. ib. .. besieges Vikings in Nottingham. *^* The uumbLrB in this Index. Ixxvi. coins. Wessex. uf Ixxxvii. marriage with Berchta. xxviii. (7/. . of it. yEthandune. ib. death. Coin-types. xli. xxxvi. .Elflieah. causes . 28-31 (with of coins.d. marriage. list of. xxxii.. battle of Ashdowu. defeats Gu^orm at ih. and . . Man. xxviii. II. list of. . of Canterbury. 22 at Wilton. accession.... of decline of power.. his red II. Ixxvii. munler. . refuge of iElfred in. siege of Nottingib. opposition of the jEtheling. 28 iEtlielred Biibriijiiet .^Ethelney. iElfred. the Ixxiii. ^thelbald. iu attacks Gu'Sorm . 32 . first k. Coinage : —types of.. bribes the . xxv. ham. his 38-82 (with mint name. 38 without of 'Unready. xxiv. rebuilds London. iElfric. takes bis refuge to Vikings. xlvi.. of. of Charibert. Abp. ib. St. xxxiii. . xxxviii. second wife of iEtlieland of Cuut. and in p(i(je tlic following Indexes. . Viking : raids. . accession to defeated throne of Kent.. ^Ifgifu. . treachery Normandy. .. first toR(5gnaldof Xorthumbria. . .— GENEKAL INDEX. of . 23-2G. battle of. Ixx. xxvi. 31). thanes and caldormcn. xxv.. coins. —moneyers. 21. xxxiv. betrothed li.. xxxiii. lix. his treachery. Ixxv. battle Vikings. xxxii. xxiv... . .

accession. Ixii. 21. war with decadence cxxiv. Ixxiii. coins struck in Kent. .. . 13-20 (with mint name. xiv. . of moneyers. without mint name. Coinage — inoncyera . iEthelstan. : xxv. his coin of ^Ethelbald. coin-types. 202 coins. vianH. Coinage Kent. Count of Flanders. of. relating to Ixvii. : Asbjom. XXV. bald. (blunileiod coins. ci. . moneyers. li. . . cxi. . Ivi. k. xxxix. . .. Lord of Mercia. n. -Saxon of.. xix. Baldreil. no coins for Earl. xiv. found tiicir in Scan- oin-tyjies. 103 B. . no coins at of. xi. his jjower. killed at Ash- 105.. ib. xxxii. battle of Ockley. I.^thclbald. to pil- grimage Rome and marriage with Bamborough stormed by Dunes. at Ashdown. burg built by Eadweard Hi. xxxii. coin- li»7. 13. ISIr. Ixi. . Emp. cxxvL killed death. Ixi. Abp. 'Army. defeats Army. of Vikings. xxxii. coinage. wide circu- xxvii. with name of. xxiii. 241). coins imitated umbria.». . 478 DiinoB.' the.. dinavia.ilthihvald. coing titles . coins. Ixxx. marriage with Judith. accession. ib.. his rule in down. Bivgsieg. battle Austin. k. of Dublin. iEthelwulf. Arrangement of coins Art of later in Catalogue. lation coinH of. ib. double cross list without mint name.». Bakewtll. largely Scandinavian. Governor of London.. sceattas and pennies. Nortbumbria. sou of iEthelwulf. . mint of. Ixxxiii. of earlier coin- and battle of Brunanbiirg. 208-242 types similar to iElfretl's. Ixxx. xxx. . xxxvii. cause of with Ilarald of Norway.Iiulilh. . constitu- Vikiugd Buttington. princes. by Ecgbeorht. coins of York. xlix. relations Ang. divides kingdom with of . . elected king of Nortb- jEthelwulf. . (light to . . instituted by Cnut. of Wesaex. Ixxix. defeated at Holme. xxxviii. . by lion of. ages. ib. xxxviii. xxvi. 115). war with Amulf... of Kent. coins. xxvi.. i10tliclrt««l death. xxiv. cxxv. list . of Kent.Sthelied I. . Bald. coins. Kent. xxviii. xlix.. anil return. xvii. . . I. — GENEUAL INDEX. coin-types. . tion its and leadership. list moneyers.. standing. of Ixxxix. defeats iEthclstan. 15). (7*. defeated of. yEthered. . Assandune. 101 . IScotland Ixiii. cviii. Alphabetical forms used in Catalogue. xxvi. Ixviii. Ixxvlii. xlvi. and Scandinavian. on notice. dau. moneyers. adds York to his kingdom. coinage Ixii. iEthelred. xlviii. opposed by British . and charters. . of Cliarles the . . 9 coin-typee. Ashdown. —strikes . battle of. Ixxxi. . Normandy . ib. . . tyi»e. death. xxvi.. Vikings. widow of . C(jinage classification : — moneyers of .. Viking king. Ixxxiv. k./Ethel- II. ih. laws of mints. 105-131 (with mint name. . ib. marks extent of conquests. of Germany. marriage. . Frankish xlv. defeats Baldwin. Canterbury. n. Ix. and imitation by ScandiuaIxxxii. . Ixxx. son of rebel- Baldred.

early influence cxxiii. xix. notice. his coin of Ecgbeorht. cx.. types of. accession. . Brunanburg. 'army of. i Bl. into the West-Saxon kingdom. battle of. of Mercia. xxxiv. Berchta to iEthelbeurhl. Rorik.. of.. marriage with iEthelbearht of Kent. .. Vikings. by Ead- dau.. of Beorhtwulf.-liii. Bribes to Vikings and Danes. xli. . l. xc. lii. on coins. attackLd by llalfilan. lii. W. of. iiis Burgs. coiu-tyi»e also used . xxxiv. xxiv.. of Paris.. ' Blundered pennies. Mercia. . Ivi. on English coinage. copied of Ecgbeorht. xxi. Ivi. xxxviii. notice of. deflated at See aho Roiseng. cix. 5. 41-45. and edict of Grcatley. type. INDEX. of. of. deposed by by Ilalfdan.. .. Castle Rising. . Cambridge. \V. li. CANT and DOR wulf.^thelllajd 479 Bath. slain by the Vikings. of xlii. Bust on coins. k. of ^thelred Camelford. of ^thelstan. Fmncr.. taken by Guthorm. burg built by .. struck by Alfred. xiv. ment. xlis. of ISIercia. Ixxv. submits to Eadweard I. coins xli. l. the port-reeve. mint of. the Dane. Ixv. dau. his coin of iEthelbald. cix.xviii. xx.\iii. Ixxii. of Charibert. list Boda. mint of. Ixix. Cadbury.. Five. II. Burgrcd. cvii. Hi. 1... weard Burgs... cxi.. of. burg by yEthelilajd. 21 n. of. 242. : I. notice. building England. Brcwton.. built ljy k. and tlie title of. copied by Ecgbeorht. xxxii. Ixiii.' the of BretWiilda.. illustrated I. . Ixxviii. republican. I. lix.. k. xiii.i. Bedford.. xxx. origin of of. Brihtnoth. types Buckingham.' incorporated Iv. attacked . k. of Canterbury. cxii. EUandune. xv. xx.^Etholloid. Ixxiii.. lii . Carolingian coinage. and by Alfred. xxxii. mint Bloneyers &c. ih.. Seven Burgs. Beoruwulf. xxvi. list See also Index of Mints. xliv. coins imitated by Ecgbeorht. Brice. death. defeated at . Charibert. k. Abp. xxxiii. Set Brcwton.. the ealdoiiuan. xxxiii. ib. cxii. burg built of. increased to by Eadweard Bedwin.' I. of Wessex. by Ecgbeorht. Ceolno?!.. Alfred.. Boyne. xv.. built Canterbury. . Carolus-monogram mint of Charlemagne Bridgnorth. xiv. battle Bruton. — GENERAL xl. xc. marriage of and Germany. xxxv. army ' of. xxiii. mint by Rorik. Buildings. title of. defeated by Buttington. cxi. liv. . xxv. li.. . . c. form of govern. battle xxxviii. xliv. II. of ]\Iercia.. notice of. of Blercia.. burg I. Ccolwulf xx. xxv. the Dane. 119. cvii. lii. xx. Beorhtric. its cix. portraiture k. weard of. jurisdiction and 71. of. 79. ' liv. ' by coins of Ead- Bcaduheard. under Eadwig. 82. k.. I\Ir. Eadweard of xix. Maldun. xv. Eadred. notice. in xxxviii. imitated Bretwalda. and . Berchta.. mouugram type I'eolwulf I. on coins of iEthel- Bremesburg (Bramsbury). xxxix.. mint of. marriage and death. types of coins.

Danegeld. INDEX. (jf . . Malcolm I. mint of. in Catalogue. Iv. nature Ixxviii. double.'!"' nccivcH Er^bt orht. . in Charinouth. his policy . on coins of Cuut. and edict Constantine coalition Scotland. Hi. of. i-Etholwiilf. rigiit its historical inonoKmin Judith t<) tyjK'.. Coinage . Northdebased institutes Btiindiug army and fleet. . levy of. -Ixxx. 301). notice. . nificance. . marriage to )j^ifu. Combe.. xiii. Ixxii. Cliartors.. of Olney and king of all England. . defeat nf the English by Vikiiiga at. of.. xci. their chronological . payment of taxes. coin. Hi. cvii. cxiii. Greatley. xc. . Chester or Leicester. Crown on coins of Cnut. n.. Ixxxv. against jEtliclstan. XXV. of mint of. Chcrbury. of Offa. Cliiirlcinai.. attacked by iEtbel- red II. I. I.. Ixiii. Ixxxviii. . . titles of -. xxix. invasion . National Collection. of See Leth-Cuind. of. types of and crowned cxxv. Ixxx.. Ixxxiii. Cletlemutha (Gladniouth). of not exercised by under- Clinrk'S tlie Simple..Ethclstuu on.. xl. li. &c. Ixxii.coins with his name : struck at Dublin. and edict of Greatley.. mint Cross. . 8on xiii. Ixxv. Ixi. . Ixxxiii. Coonwulf. of moneyers. by iEtliclflad. its origin. xxxv. Ixxiii.. xlvii. ChipjKnham taken by Guthorni.. Ixxxi.-lxxxvi. Ixxxix. number for of Anglo-Saxon coins xi. 37 to n. Ixxxvii. endowment of Cumberland.. xcviii. its fiscal sig- of. xiii. .^thclbald. . burg built li. Ixxv. iiuitiitcd GNUT on coins of TElfred. struck at. Ixxxiv. and government. battle of Assandune. 255-301 Danish invasions of England. Ixix. xii. extent of rule. . . Ixxxiv. •XriHliuiiii Uoligio' typo. arrangement xi. cxxiv.. of. Danebrog. cxxiv. Ixxvi. xlvi. in. . &c. coins Chichester.^thelstan Ixii. li.'btorht. by Eadweard Cnut.-Elfred in. by Harthacnut. Conn's Half. Ixii. '2i:?. Ixi.. k. XX. . navians... Mercia. . Ixxxii. cix. and origin. of.. burg built by lii. xlvii. (attacks on . Kiirolua- Ecgbeorht. Colchester. Eadweard I. SI) 4. . Corbridge. coius in Cuerdule Find.. types copied by Scandi.. coius of . bust) Ixxxix. cix. . king. — GKNEHAL xiii. on coins. mints xcii. Ixxix. division of his dominions. penny of . III. tliu IJiilil coin-type imitated by ChiirlcB revivea xx. xxii. treaty Ixxxix. coins (helmeted liead . (uucvrtuiu mints. coins of. umbrian coins in. xci. on coin 21 «.. . . cxxv. coin-types. of churches and monasteries. Taylor. order. on roin-tyjH-a by Erf. xci. joins Ix. burg built rebellion of. i&jUfs of. xxvi. xxxiii. Viking imitations xxxix. restored by uEthelflffid. granted Scotland. Coins. Cuerdale Hoard. D. xix. Ead- kings. cvii. . proclaimed ib. nmrriago of value. list ... coinage for 21 n. returns to England. accuracy of names in. Chester. tributes. Coinage. . ib.types. ravaged by Vikings. 248 coins..

. ' Ixi. coin-tyix's. Ixv. of ib. rows Padstow. Delgany Hoard.. ib.1). coins 121 . : opposes the Ixxx.. process of engraving inscriptions on. and Norman invasions money ers. the row on the Dee. coins Ixvii. cix. Eadgith. Derby. account Simple of France. INDEX. 12. distin- ib. Ixxii. u. adds Worcester.s Ixvi.. ih. London. submission of Nortlimubriuiis to extent of power in Ecgbeorht at. mint civ. mint cance. of. and ScanIxviii. Wight and conquest of //. at.infs. Ixxxix. Emptror. xl.. Strathclyde. . 481 of Southhampton.. 168-190 (with mint namo the Darenth. . Ixx. with names of ^Elliel- Eadnnnid I). confirmed by Danish and Viking invasions guisliod. contrasted.. : ir. mariiage to Ixi. .. 122. Cnut. (Inmsidc) Ixxix. 1G5. horou^h.. coin -types. nni] ('mil. Nurthumluia.. Ixiv. . of Canterbury. Chester. Enghind.) See also under Vikings. Dufnall. — GENERAL Thanct. Dorchester. dominions.. . Eadgar on the Dee. . Double-cross type. Ixxix. &c. accession Ixix. mint of. xv. defeat at Maldnn. on coin. Kent. . siege of Exeter.. on Ipswich and . list of Danish. dinavian moneycrs. of. to tiironc of Mercia. 2 I . notice. 168 : without mint name. dune and treaty of Oluey. . Iv. confirms Cumberland to Malcolm assists Danish kings Ixxxix. of Scotland. cxiii. 175). iu. Eadgar. treaty with. notice. hmding in tlie Isle of . .. mint Dies. 124-141 without (with mint name. Charles xx. k. Coinage : —mints of.. duke of France. Northumbria.>inn. ib. Ixiii. from English coins. attacked by how supplied. laws of. Howel in North Wales. I.' subjection . Ixxiii.. Ixx. Ragnald murder of. xxviii. Ixx. all Pen Selwood and Assan- king of England. the Five of. Denmark. coinages of. xlvi. baptism of Olaf Domesday. Dereham. return of Svend and . iEthclwuli'. I. coins. 163. Dorchester.. xcix. Bam- Dunstan. Eadmund. Olaf Quaran and Wulfstau of York. civ. cxiii. Ixxviii. xlv. Ixxxii. xxvi. monogram-type of Ecgbeorht xxii. Quaran. Abp. //*. invasions of. death. struck list at Swedish cojjies of coins of moneyers. Eudgifu. iu England. Viking. cojiied Ixi. marriage to Hugh the Great. Ixxxiv. coins of. 'Dorobornia' on coins of Jilfnd. Dorstat. E. marriage to Otto early coin-types of. ib. . Dublin. Eadhild. ac<>rs. Ixxvii. . and Watcliet. notice of. . 12:?. cxiii. accession. xxxi. hattles of . Dore. DORIBl and CANT of Coinage : — Prankish York. on supply of dies to East Anglia and the Five Burgs to his Ixiv. ex. defeat of Olaf and of. arrival of C'nut. Burgs. . its fiscal signifi- name. coins of Jithclstan struck Ixii. xxix. coins rcil of. Ixxv. xcviii. xlvi. Ixxiii. Hereford. Ixxx.

list of Ecgbeorht. 158 without driven il>. . burgs. xvii. 192-196. . accession. xix. in (a. Coinage Coinage : — Frankish and Scamlixlvi. 143 Ealhstan. at York. I'jiiliimnd (IridiHidt'). 158- ^V^llf^t^m. Viking settlement . — Frankish and xlv. Eadwig. of Kent. earls. xxiii. Olnoy. 191 types derived from issues of Mercia. 866). Ixviii il}. Hi. Erik 1G2 (with mint name. Ptn Hclwofxl. Ixxxiv.. INDEX. .d. 87-100 (with — xxii. coin-types. made llio Karl of Jlercia. .. to Eadinto dofents yEthelwald of Nortliumbria at weard I. against iEtlielstan. ih. established. mint name. over. kings Mercia. 482 botlU'B of I. coin-types. 141). at ' Henge&tdunc. xlvi. coins. . 84. xlix. liis unpoim- nn<l Aiwiiniliiiu'. xiii. Iv. . ih. Earbbtms established Cnut. in England by Kadrcd. . P^irikseon. . of xlv. . . submission of the wars with Wales. xxxvi. liii. incorporated Holme. . in. To. flight to France. l. of York.. 87 87). (lunth.. Frankish of. 156. accused of murder of Endiiiund Ixxxiii. . : Coinage —probable xvii. his conijuest^. . rivalry of Coinage : — Franki-sli Ixviii. ... . . his royal ib. first mint name. extent of rule. :— no navian moneyers. xiii. . XX. coins. without mint name. to Louis. : submission of Nortliumbriims ih. Ixviii. without mint name. Ixvi. . marriage Ixi.' tions. moneyern.-liii. dunc. coins of .. Ixvii. 144. xxviii. kingdom EMcr. Eadweard accession. ib. early types of coins. Ixxxvi. xxxv. coins. Coinage navian coins. 83 . Al)i). k.. . . deatli. York. d( ath. nnd Sran.. 156. his policy . xxxii. character of reign reIv. XV. dinavian moncycrs. xliv. list . list Provence. building of the burgs. . xiv. his moneyers of Kentish IT. Eadweard lington. . of Berniein. . coin-types. of IUi)?iix ih. xx. moueyers. coinage.. . flected i7>. . of moneyers. . — OENKKAL eiioiston. 1. moneyers' names on coins submission of Vikings of. 192. their relation to Eadrio Striona. treachery at Assan- supremacy of Ecgbeorht xxiii. xxxviii. by coinage. . and Vikings. bp. . XV. government of the of. Ellandunc. Ealgifu. xc. xiv. with Wessex. xii. battle of Danes. xlviii. Ixxx.. earl of Mercia. feats de- types of coins and inscriplist Vikings . xvii. battle of Biit. . Ironside. xiv. : origin. xx. larity. acrcssion. of Sherborne. Ixix. Ix. incorporates Mercia. Eiiiln (I. . I'^iidwine.stig. 112 coin-types. liv. . ravaged by Vikings. . . East Anglia. k. . captures Tcmpsford from liv. ih. of. xciv. Carlovingian . Scandi- at Dore. Baldred. xiii. enins struck cdiiiH I'xfiiiit. earldom of. . ih. . coins. Ixv. . dtalli. a'^ces^ion. xciv. supremacy over East ib. from Nortliumbria.... ullepiancc of ih. .. 213 H. trcKily of i7). .. death. Ixx. rivalry xciv.. foundation of Viking . Guthorm titles... treaty . 1. Ivi. Ixxxvi. coin- Coinage — list of moneyers. joItis coalition rivalry of... of moneyers.. . defeat of 141-155 (with mint name. &c. IGO). date of xxi. Kent. 1. titles on Anglia and Northumbria.

part of . . xl. Frajnc. xvii. Ixxxviii. . East Angliii. xxxii. title of Rex Saxonuni. of Newport. 1. xliii.' 2 2 Norway. flight to Nor.. France and Germany.. France. l. by Vikings. s. of dies. Norway. G with- Erik. succession throne of Freeman. xviii. II. marII. xcv. 1. England. INDEX. and divergence of typos. on xix. &c. raid of Vikings in. . lii. Coinage : — Norman influence not . . by iElfred. Evans. cxvii.. standing. . P.^Ethclred Ixxxi. Ixvii. Ixxix. connection and separation. by Svend of Denmark. coins. Ixxvii. of. Ixvi. of. .. Ixxxvi. on mint accession. list . xxi.. Normandy.. n. Fleet. belonging to. building of. increase of Norman coinof Ecgbeorht influence. . . xxxv. traceable in coinage. . ' riage to ^Etlulrcil flics to Five Burgs. liv. T. his moneyers.. rexcii. coin-types. killed at Ashdown. . xc. instituted by Cnut. 329 . Emma (^Ifgifu) of Normandy.' the ' Five. coins. derived from MeroCaroliiigian issues. . )'. joins coalition out mint name. John.. its earliest types. coins xcvi. 450). against receives Olaf Tryggvason. Eadweard I... Frankish coin-types their xlvii. 7). earl of Norway. . xcix. Godwin. Ixxvii. . ib. cxxii... — GENERAL xs. . submit to Eadweard Sir I. throne ceives Essex. engraving and xcix. . xii. kingdom English coinage.. England. . ceases with whether moneyers. . xciii. and wealth. English and Prankish coinage early xviii. expelled. Cnut. . of. xcvii. 1 n.-xlvi.' See Burgs. xciii.. of Nortlium- I . of. of. xxxviii. battle of. briii.Kxvii. . cxxiii. 1 03-474. ih. added to Wesscx. Ixxxiv. early coinages of. Frankish moneyers' names on coins of Wesscx. building of. vingian cxxii. coinage order of captured by Vikings. their early connection. Delgany Hoard.. xxv. Iviii. cxi. of support of ib. Edward the mandy. EcGBOR. aids Cnut. moneyers at Thetford and ciii. xxxvi. monogram of. ' Erik Blo^ox. made earl of NorthDanes the umbria. 334 coins. Eddesbury. Ixxxvii. xv.. burg built by iEthelflrcd. state Ixxi. 4. Ecgbeorht's xx. Ixxx. Exeter. xxxv. of moneyers.. of moncyers. Ixxix. . marks first probable date of coinage. xcv. .. in distinetive nature of. taken coin-types. Confessor. chronological . Ellandune. xiv. xvi. xxiii. . under Cnut's Forts. Iviii. ib. li. Faatolfs. C-8 (with mint name. claim to English . . under . Engravers their errors. n. Cuerdalc Hoard. coin-types. . retreat of Guthorm to. xviii. 183 influence on list early coin-type. 330-459 (uncertain mints. Lincoln. supported. to reign of Ecgbeorht. Ixxvi.-cii. successors. xli. xxi. restored. account xxii. process of Friinkish and English coinages. Ixxxvi. struck by uElfred. .. married to Cnut. under Floral designs on coins of cvii. Earl. k. See Burgs. . .

. murder ib. of Viking. battle of.. of Nor- way. Harold I. coins of. See Guthorm (JEtheUtan). xxxi.. notice. Coin of ^Etiiulbald. : reproached by Gyda. made earl of Norway. xxxii. ib.. Norway. murdcrofiElfred. the iEtheling. xliv. xxxv. of Edward the xcii. of Den- Gloucester. k. Ixxiv. of East Anglia. conversion of. xliv. . . Denmark. . 21 n... of . in Cuerdale Hoard. its 208. coins xl. struck by iElfrcil. xxxi. J. — copies coins coin-types xli. . xxxi. moueyers chiefly Franks. . Ixi. xcvi. Ixxxvi. of Cnut. gram. Gyda. synod to mints.^Ethandune ib. power. II. 1. of liis England invasion Guthorm Eirikssou.. of Northumbria. claims briix. on 'Orsnaforda' edict of Greatley. of East xxxv. xxxiii. Earl. Viking.. mint. Northumattacks Harald Harfagr (Fairhair). •IS I. ap|)ointt'd . of Dublin.. H.. tiie (iuthnnmd. bon of HaraM. treaties with Eadweard I. xciii. . liii. Ix. (}( riimny. and baptism East at Weilmorc. earl of Wossex. xxv. xlvi. mint of. Earl.. and the Vikings of the West. k. xxxiv. tftiuit. of. t\ j>i'8 (iililis. England and death. ib. ilffi'nt raiilrt of Vikinjis in. of Anglia. dejwses Burgred .. k...Hter fxiv. ih. Mr.. (»lti<linouth. of Northumbria. Coinage: iElfred. his of Mercia. II. xliv. . attempted conversion of Earl . deatli. (iyda. xlix. xciv. of Cnut. Ixxiii. hi. i-inp. opposes claim of Hakon Eriksson. lp^^vicll. xxxvi. . . k. of. supports cause xcii. : claims throne of coins of.-5 relations with . battle invades Wessex. attempted conversion See Cledcniutha.. marriage and succession.-xxxix. its influence on Hafirsfjord. xxxiv. his character.. mark. wife of Harald Fairhair. xxxvii. tiie Viking king. : xlii : d( ath. . xl. notice xxxvii. slii. xxii. Anglia. of Hakon. her G. and . of .. Gold coin of ^thelred of. .. . — OENKltAL INDICX. XXX. coiungo of. xxxiv. &c... cxv. . Ixxxvi Halfdan. of Norway. n. of.. Ashdown. and Harald. H. assists Tostig.. Ixvi. coin with Loudon mono. mint coins. Ixi. decree relating Hamtune (Southampton). xlviii. Hakon. xlvii. Harald Hardratla. xcv.Etlieling. xxx.. Ixxiv. Gu{5rura. godson of iEthclstan. of and of (ireen. coinly|K'8 as . I.Eilr. Ixxxvii. . C'ouf. k.Ethelstau. liis Ilakon. ni. GuT^rcd-Cnut. ixxiv.. k. takes London. xxxii. k. xxxi. 0»<oSaliiirli (Jill burffli). Harold accession. Ixxxvii.rs. Earl. Ixxiv. Ixxxvi. . killed at Ashdown.. \1.i. king Grealley. xc. expelled from Norway. Harald. defeated at . cix. . cviii. (iutliorin (/Ethelstan). of Alfred. xciii. GulhfrilS.s by Arnulf. Ixxxii. receives Harald his Blaatand. . Earl. CuKlwiue. Ixxxviii. k.

Vikings establish kingdom coins Hincmar. xlvi. xlii. Henry the Fowler. mints. Hertford.... of coins. obtains crown of Denmark.. mint of and Imitation of coins by Vikings. Eadmund. ib. and Skye. death. among Scandion succession to liberality to the Church. brought by Vikings found in English Irish coinage. to Cln-istiauity. Delgaiiy. coins. new dies for coins. of N. xci. burg built by li. Mr. cix. of Ead- weurd Coinage : I. Ixix. 304. rows opposes Tostig. of of edict of Greatley. .. Iceland. 302 coiii- Cuerdalc. notice. his Inheritance. burg built by Eadweard I. betrays Exeter Ixxvii. and duties. receives . of Rlicims. . Ixxxiv.*. lii. of moneycrs. xlii. Abp. : Coinage list —types Viking. liis riglit . . the rival claimof xcvi.. of. ib. I. . Wcssex. 320 . : — coin-types. —type of. Count. on reverses of Hereford. . character. n. . Ixxxvi. of. Ixi. Ixxxv. Ipswich attacked by Vikingn. cv. . snp|>licd to. list of . battle xxii. k. . Abp. Ixxxviii. Harold II.. of Denmark. xlvi. Ixxxviii. struggles English throne. 319). —GENERAL order . xxiii. assistance from Eadgar.. by Vikings. xcvii. how I. Scandinavia. xxiii. laws of. ib. when initiated.. ^Ihelwulf Hoards of to Judith. &c.. to Svend. iEifred. lii. of relating to fiuL'S.. Bridge and Hastings. Hugh the Great. Emperor. 461 40 1-474 (uncertain Hunt. Ed- k. . conversion of. xxxiii. Ixx. Eadgar on the Dee.. . Ciuit. xlvi. moneycrs. of. n. Hastings.. coins. joins coalition Ix. on the Huscarls and the Comitatus. . battle xcvi. on coins of Ixxxix. dau. Helmet. to English throne. against ^thelstan.. accession.. William. Exeter. under list of moneycrs. Inscriptions. ants. xxii. xlix. Horndon. Ixxxiv. accession. 321 coins of. . ib. xciv. mint cxv. xviii. St. 474). law of. to duke of France. marriage Eadhild. certain mints. massacre at Worcester. Eadwcard Ireland. cvii. xlvii. Ixxxi. see also 485 . Huntingdon. Ine. xlvi. . takes Hasting. Huscarls. Hengstone (Hengestdune). coin-types. coins 307-319 (un- Holme. rebellion of the Earls. . xiii. . xxv. his influence under Conf. the xxxviii. Ixxiii. 325-328. Plcgmund. . navian. their origin of. . Wales. Avard the lb. battles Stamford . levy of danegeld. INDEX. invasion of. pointed. of coins. . war ih. marriage of there. of. of.. civ. 4G0 coins coin-types.. Hurthacnut. Howel. xxi. xcv. of. xciv. battle of. xli. death. . with Magnus ib. . Ixxxvii. Hugo. terminated. . Ixxv. xcii. xi. English to.. its eflect Heptarehic Kingdoms. nature of. Coiimge xcii. Ixxxvi. tyi^es.

. ings. Ivor. Coinage : —types of coins imitated xix. of. of. . Viking raids from. Llandaif. k.lapn?). of.. n. title of. Jumieges. XXX. by Korik the Dane. of Westmoreland.. to Baldwin. xxxviii. taken prisoner by bury. Vikings. xxxvi. predominant in Louis d'Outremer. xxvii. xxii. Lymnc. mint cix. xxxiv. or Conn's Half of Ireland. ib. notice. Coinage : — monogram cf. to See also Index of Judith. . n. Bi . rows Eadgar on the Dec.. Jago. relieved by . of Mercia. xxxix. Justin. of Scotland. Lcth-Cuind. xlvii. mint of.. cxvi. of iEtiielstan.. coins of. . xx. Ixi. . of Charles the Types. Korolus-monogram Kenneth. k. btruek in Wessex. Ixx.. xc. > Louis. of. Wi^lit uttuckfd by Danes. West Franks. xv. type on coins '• Xristiana Eeligio" coins. Bp. of Provtuce. Ealgifu. . of. Ixx. sister of Eadweard k. King. . of. E. xxviii. eviii. Eadmund Iron- Charlemagne rows Eadgar side.-xxxix. church. his influence. united with Wessex. jduudercd by the Danes. Ixxv. xxvi. xxxix. Northuinbriu. Lincoln. Kent.. Greatley. of. Lindsay Ixxiii. tho Viking. xxxvii. marriage to I. on coins of on the Dec.ffithclbald. liii. burnt by Vikings. xxv. of Canterxciii. Ixxx. —QENKUAL INDEX. Leicester and Cheater. Ixvi. Ixis. Leicibter. xxxvii. Iv.. Juchill. of Halfdan. their relation to Mercia. dau. xxiii. . copied by Ecgbeorht. heavily taxed by Cnut. and edict of Greatley. Couut of Flanders. kings xiii. North Wales. cxvi. xxxvii. chiim to the throne of Wales. Ixi. Ixxv. k. xxiv. Loudon plundered Halfdan. Liiieoliisliirc marriage iEtliclwulf. uuder-kings strike no Louis the Pious. of Ixxii. of Eadmuud at Pueklc- Jacob (. n. Ixxviii. of. and llmiho coind of.. . . attacks Ipswich. death. kingdom of. . in. ravaged by . iElfied. cix. Ixx. Ixxiii. on coin on the Dec. LcwcH. I«Io «f . xxiii. xxxiv. 486 IhIo (if I. . Jedburgh. Muii iittiK k((l I'}' ^T-^ilulrid IF. till death of ^thelbuld. mint notice. l>y Vikings. to ravaged by Vikings. mint and edict of Vikings. Laws relating to coinage of Ino xviii. Ludiciin. Leofa murders J. rows giir EudBald. of. the south xviii. xxxiv. Kent. meaning of among Vik- Luffwiik. L. xvi. Ixxxiii.. of by Ecgbeorht. See Geotaburh. . xxiii. 27. k. Lowiek. : parate kingdom. liv. invaded by Vikings. IxT. a on coins of Alfred. taken by rebuilt by Alfred. Abp. k. BotlleiiiLnt of. under kings of Wessex. monogram xxxix. Robert of. See Lowiek.

. xxxvii. ib. Ct. . mint names. See also Index of Mints. cxxii. difficulties of identificat6. . ib. scent from Judith. its po. cxix. . mint of. earliest «S:c. &c. Tcmpsford^ . cxiv.. Mints. «. Ixxiii.. xiii. (growth Magnus the Onod. kingdom . xcii.. cxii. increase of. xxxiv. . cix. GeoTaburh. ib.Sthelstan tated by Halfdan. Maccus. cxii. rows Eadgar on Mints. cxiii. Lowick. cviii. to Eadgar.. .. Iv. notices of. k. . Hereford.. Ixxxvi. . . cix. cxvi. xl. Sidmouth. death. Sid- Mercia. cix. cix. . Nottingham. . classification of coins of Wessex witli the Dee. Brew- mint of. . I. cxv.. and by Alfred and Ccolwulf Mercia.. .. . Exeter. ib. k. a source of revenue. xxxiv. cester. tion. of forms. Matilda. king an earl- Maldon. xl. xciv. Ixii. . xxxviii. ib. Jedburgh. rivalry aasists : of. wife of Baldwin. claims throne of divides right of coinage granted to religious hou. . Magnus Maxiinus. Ixii. South- ampton. wife of William her de- Ixii.. cxiv . xiv. . . . cix. uncertain and new mints. Bridgnorth. laws of iEthelstan relating Sjnaod of Greatley. xxxvi. Eadweard chester. &c. . . mint cxii. Mercia and Northumbria. . Iv. . Bedwin. type of solidua imi. of. Oxford. cxvii. I. Ixxxiii. of. xxvi. Jago in Merovingian coins. xxxix. notice. attacked by Vikings.. Itoiseng. li. n. cxv. I. Deriham. xciv. its iire-emiuence under Offa. cxv. Harthacnut.-cx. receives ib. achis cviii. . . Glou. . .. . of. Leicester. I. 487 of. Canterbury. into Wessex.. cix. Ixx. . of Norway. . cix. notices Hi. xxxix..>ition after battle of EUandune. cxi. . . Lymne. I. notice... xvi. cxv. Eadgar. . 1. Ixix. Kichborough. xix. xxxii. moneyers Kentish. . bury. Ixix. .. ib. .. Ixix. cv. separated from Wessex. cxvii. xli. in Newport. of Flanders. xl. of. with Harald Hardrada.. to. . ampton.-cxx. Ixii. — GENERAL INDEX. ib. . II. coin-types copied by Ecgbcorht. claims English throne. : Ddrchester. Newark. dom. Hanitune. cxvii. xxviii. Denmark. cxviii. Cadbury. ib. cession. . Shaltcsbury.. of Man. M. u. cxiii.-cxxi. .. . Horndon.. xxxviii. xvii. North- —coins struck of. Lewes. ChiCor- Manclitstor.... of. 11. : Aslidown. Eadgar. Lin- incorporated xxsvii. Bath. cxii.. . Derby. . of . rivalry xiii. . ton.. xxxvii. : of. cix. . cix. . rivalry Coinage Kent.) cxxiii. xxvii. xxxix. . cxi. London.. . . Ixxxviii. invabion of Wessex by. coln. Malcolm Dee. ib. ib. cxxiii. xxxvi. Maldon. Mercia. . rows Eadgar on ib. Darenth. . ib. cxvi. xli.ses. their types copied Wiiles. supremacy of Wessex over.. xl. burg built by Eadweard battle of. Cumberland from tiie cxi. xiii. Otford. cxiv. burg built by lii. Malmesbury. in reign of Eadgar.. . Ixxii. ih. compact with cviii. .. ex. Ixx. Mercia and Wessex. . Colchester. historical importance of. Castle Rising. . cxiii. Ixx.. cxviii. cxviii. Malmesbury. bridge.. ib. Western.. civ. . mark conquests of Eadweard names placis. Hastings. Dublin.. . . bis allegiance on English coins.. Chester.

' on coins . Ixix. of A'AUli].»2.'!!. Ecg- Ixvii. ib. . their . Monogram Northumbria. oix-. notice. to Ecg- origin. ih. later Koiseng. : Cant . blundered names of. of Ecgbcorht.lge. .. fluenced by that Nonuandy. (?). xii. xcviii. . 57. earls of.f-xix. Ead- mund. under Eadwig. liv. between Olaf Ixiv. London. . • Lincoln. of of. divided with Malcolm of . Moniyerg.toii. Totlcigh.. coinage in England of unin- Scandinavian. of Bedford &c. cxx. Ixv. Eadred. . xxxix. ford. 35. and biblical names. of Vikings..^thclwulf and revolt.Alfred. . 21 of WunllKinmj. Rising mint. dom in. Wtybri.. xlvi.. Norman. fusion xliv.. . cxxv. . English. Iv.. Newark. of Vikings of. Northunibria under iErhelslan. and Leicester. son of . Ixvii. xcviiL. 488 cxix. . names rarity ciii.- Norman xciii. wald. xxxiv. l'. INDKX. their niixtil nationality. xliii.^thclred accession division xlviii. . . belonging to. cix. names civ. ment of. cv. xli. ' of. of Latin Ixxvi. of Ecgbcorht. bcorht in. of Ilaroli I. not in National of xvii. on coins of Chester muud and Scotland. mint of cxv. Prankish and . xxix.. coinage.. Mr. whether itinerary. its allegiance to EadIxvi. of. Northampton. liloN. of Canterbury on coins tb. of and Olaf Godfredsson. ex. . Witham. Murchison Collection. cxii coinof .. 5 . punish- Northampton. or Moik- M — X on coins of iElfrcd. Winchcombe. WinIxii Morkcrc.. accession of . . .-xlvi. cxvii. xxxvii. xxviii. on Castle- ib. early cii. coin of n. .. Ecgbcorht. of. con- Newport. . 12 . of . whether Norman influence during reign of Edward the Confessor. Monkwcarmouth. xxix. status. . xxx. on coinage. cv.-cii. or no trace of. accession of uEthelI. . * of of ' Doribi ' and foundation of Viking kingxxxiv. .. . H.. of mints. inaugurated. eliffllor. of Vikings at. arius?). . earl of Northunibria. Quaran : xxxix. cxi. of ib. . cvi. xciv. of.. xc. and Danish invasions contrasted. xx. &c. N. n. red. . York. Viking. Ixiv. of. . Ixviii. . types. nnd varieties of namesof. Normandy. . : I. Viking army . 'M I'ladwenrd IL. — OENEUAL ih. of . of Kcntieli origin... cxvii. xlii. Ixvii. . XV. Wnrclmin. . in possessive case. xxvi. Ixiii. by ^thcl- of English etymology. xxxix. initiation on Viking coinages.^thelwulf. invasion red II.. a Frankish device.. submission bcorht. cix.. . their . attacked by Vikings. xxxix. xl. iSee Hamtune. ciii. of York and local. xciii. Quaran. 30(. civ.. rivalry with Toatig. attacked by Olaf not engravers of dies. . mint of. wreck xxi. little . Weliiifs. Viking raids from. names G)lIuction.. ih. ' xxiii. Olaf Quaran. of iEtlielbald. . il>. ToiibridRo. mint notice. submission of. counuered by Ead- Montagu. . . MoNETA (Moncta of. xxvii. Wnrininf. : liii. xxxii. cxxi. chiefly Frankish and Scandinavian ciii. Norse invasion of Ireland.

reigns Ixvi. of. xxxii. struck by Alfred. Norwieb burnt by Svend. siege xlix. death. joins coalition Tryggvason. . Cuerdale board. "). to of. treaty be- xxxvii. made on Ixiv. Oxford. Olaf CJodfredsson. of. I. Quaran. xv. rivalry of. II. accession.. Pacx on coins of Cnut. xxiv. witb ih. . origin cxxii. of Canterbury. . Ixv. to . ronnics of iElfrcd. k. Ixiv. Erik B16:!ox. into England. Paris. after sub. coins of. Abp. . OCCIDENTALIVM^ SaXONIORVM OU COiuS of iEtbelwulf. . Otto I.. . battle of Pen Solwood. of. burg. Owen. Odo. Tadstow harried by Vikings. of Nortbumbria. . P.. xcvii. Ixxiii. stan struck at. Ixxix. k. a Tamworth. from Englisb. Nortbumbria Ixiv. his coinage. and introduction of. Ixxxv. of Sweden. Ixxvi. mot at. bis moneyers. to England. deatli . . . Ixxx. cxviii. 10. rule of Olaf Haraldsson and Eiidred to in.. Ixviii. 489 Okf) conveys Nortbumbria.. peace with Eadib. throne. . sister of Eadweard of I. Ixxxiv. Ixxxvi. Ixvi. Cbiistianity. ib. Nortbumbria.. Brunanburg. . of Sweden. (St. xl. attack Northampton and . Edward the Conf. 50. during mund and ib. xiii. of England. to Christianity. k.. built by Orsxaforda Otford. divides Penny. Ixxix. baptism. cix.. burg.. coins of Jitbel- xxvii. . Nuttingbam. conversion Ixxv. burg. siege of.. by iEtbelrcd .. ib.. Ixxvii. INDEX. k. Ixi. . . Ixxxii.. and defeat of Vikings. divides of Eadmuud and Eadred. 50.. xli. ' 'Offering xli.. notice of. Norway. driven from kingdom. Viking coinage. coin-typeB Ixxxii. . copied Ixxvii. lii. Ixviii. — GENERAL Eadmund . ib. . xl. 55. Ixiii. Ixxxii. Olaf Quaran. his partiticn after of assistance to Cnut. . mission to Ecgbeorbt. coins of. attacks jEthelstan. rivalry : xciv. and iElfred. Olaf Skutkonung. Ixiii. mint on -coins of iElfred. attacks Ipswich. Olaf.. battle of k. an earldom.. Isxvii. Ixiii. Ixxxv. . battle of Brunan- Ockley. . Offa. .. battle of. early coinage in Sweden. xl. Olaf Tryggvason. ib. Nortbumbria witb Olaf Godfredsson. Ixxiv. k. of Brunan- Coinage —continued xli. Cumberland. o. re- Nortbumbria and Mcrcia. in coins xlvii. Ixxix.. stored his Ixvii. meeting of Witenagc- tween Eadmund and Olaf Quaran. Pied-forts of . introduction of penny coinage cxxii.. I. battle of. bis deatb. . of against assists Olaf Cnut. . xlii. Eadweard I. Ixxii. of. marriage to Eadgith. k. Ixvi. xl. of. of Norway. Ixii. converted ib. . Emperor. xiii. Ixiii. united j ^thelred Olaf marriage. xiii.El frod. institutes Olaf Tryggvason.

;

490
riffanl,

I.— GENERAL INDEX.
Mr. E.
J. O., coin of

Ecgboorht

Robert of Jumieges, Abp. of Canterbury, his influence, xciii.

btlon^jiiiK' to, H.

ritn'8,

Kilict

of,

and
n.

the

Karoltis-

liochester plundered by Vikings, xxiii.

nionn^mni typo, xx.

Roiscng,

monogram
mint
of.

of,

on

wjin

of

Plopmund, Ahp. of Cnntcrbiiry, cointypoa as iElfred's,
xl.
:

iElfred, xxxix.
lloiseiig,

Viking,' imita-

See Castle Rising.

tions of coins of, xlii., xlvi.

Rorik, the Dane, attacks Canterbury

rortniitiiro on Enf^lish coins, cvii.

and London,
nt,

xxiii.,

xxiv.
li.,

rortsmnntli,
xxiii.

victory

of

Vikings

Runcorn, burg built by ^Ethelflasd,
Hi.

Prrotorian gate?, type of, on English
coins, 86.

rriniogeniture and succession

among
of

St.

Andrew, coinage
massacre

of, 7.

Teutons, XXV.
Providence,

St. Brice,
of,
;

of, Ixxvi.,

Ixxvii.

hand

on

coins

St. Clair-en-Epte, treaty of, Ivii.
St.

Eadwear<l
cvii.

I., Ivi. n.

as a coin-type,

Eadmund
xl.
;

coinage,

imitated
xli.,

by

.Alfred,

date

of,

xliv.

Pucklechurch, nnirdcr of
Ixv.

Eadmund

at,

struck by Vikings,

xlii., xlvi., xlvii.;

moneycrs, names on,
38, 59.

xliii.

;

coins

of,

Sandwich attacked by Danes,

Ixxviii.

R.
Ragnald
or Rognald, k. of

Saxoniorvm on coins
Northumxix.

of Ecgbeorht,

bria, betrotliod

to .^Ifwyn, dau. of
:

Scandinavia, coinages
ated,
xlvi.
;

of,

when

initi-

.Sthelfla3d,

li.

n., lix.

accession, lix.

early,

imitated
;

from from

Ragnhiid, marriage to Harald Hsirfagr,
XXV.
71.

English, Ixxxii., cxxiii., cxxiv.

Frankish, cxxiii.
tion, cxxv.

;

extent of circula-

Reading, encampment of Vikings at,

and

flight of Ilidfdan to, xxxii. k. of

Scandinavia, greater, kingdoms
the 10th cent.,
Ivii., Iviii.

of,

in

Regnald, son of Godfred,
umbria, Ixiv.
;

North-

driven out by Ead-

Scandinavian moneyers, names
coins, xliii.-xlvi.

of,

on

mund,

Ixv.

Religious

divisions

in

England and

Sceattas,

coinage
;

of,

extent

of

cir-

Scandinavia, Ixxiv.
Religious houses receive right of coinago, cix.

culation, cxxii.

tj^es derived from

Merovingian
Scergeat,

coin.«, cxxiii.

burg built by

.^thelflsed,

Rex Saxonvm on
Eadwcard
*Rex
totius
I.,

coins of .lElfred
1.

and

li., lii.

xix. n., xl.,

'Seven Burgs,'
'

liv.

See also

under

Britanniit)'
Ixi., Ixii.

on coins of

Burgs, Five.'
of,

.^thclstau,

Shaftesbury, mint

and ediit of
attacked

Ricliborough, mitit

of, notice, cxviii.

Greatley, cix.

Ripon
Ixvi.

Cathedral burnt

by Eadred,

Sheppey,

island

of,

by

Vikings, xxii.

;

-GENERAL INDEX.
Shoiston, battle
of,

491
Denmark, invasion
xxix.
Ixxiii.
;

Ixsx.
cix.
;

Svend, k. of
notice
of,

of

Sidbury,
cxviii.

mint

of,

England,
borough,

attacks

Bamto

;

opposition
;

Sidmoutb, mint

of, notice, cxviii.

Ciiristianity,

Ixxiv.
;

invasions

of

Siefer* or Sitfred, k. of Wales, rows

Germany,
against
receives

Ixxv.

joins

coalition
;

Eadgar on the Dee,
Siefred,
k.

Ixx.
assists
;

Olaf

Tryggvason, Ixxvi.
Norwaj', Ixxvii.
St. Brice, ih.

of

Nortlumibria,

part of

;

Hasting, the Viking, xxxviii.

coinof,

revenges massacre of
besieges
Ixxvii.,

;

type as .Alfred's,

xl.

;

coins

in

Exeter,
Ixxviii.
;

Norwich,

&c.,

Cuerdale hoard,
Sigvahl,

xlvii.

conquest of Eng;

the

Viking,

betrays

Olaf

land and death, Ixxix.
Ixxxii.

his coinage,

Tr\ g^vason, Ixxvi.
Sihtric the Elder, Earl, killed at Ash-

Svend,

son of Cnut,

k.

of

Norway,

down, xxxii.
Sihtric

Ixxxvi., Ixxxvii.

the Younger, Earl, killed at
xxxii.

Svend

Estrid's ton, claims throne of
Ixxxviii.
;

Ashdown,

Denmark,

offer of

English

Sihtiic Gale, k. of Northumbria,

war
cix.,

crown

to, xcii.
of,

with iEtlulstan and death,
Skye, hoard of coins found
cxx.
Solidus, a

Ix. in,

Svold, battle

Ixxvi.
of,
;

Sweden, coinage

imitations of coins

of Dorstat, xlvi.

date of

first

coin-

money

of account in AVest;

age,

ih.

;

coin-types

copied

from

Saxon laws,

xviii.

typo

of,

on coin

Enjrlish, Ixxxii.

of Halfdan, xxxiv., xxxviii.; and on

coin of .Alfred, xxxviii., 34.

Southampton, defeat of Vikings
xxiii.
;

at,

attacked by Vikings, Ixxii.

T.
Tamwoith, burg
li., lii.
;

mint

fif,

and edict
Sons,

of Greatlcy, cix.

Southiiinplon, mint

of.

See

Hamtuuc.
coin
n.

built

by .^thelflsed,

Spink and

Messrs.,

of

besieged by Olaf Quaran,

-^tlielbald belonging to, 21
Stafford,
li., lii.

Ixiv.

burg built

by

.^Ethelflscd,

Taxes, forced levies
Ixxxviii.

of, Ixxviii., Ixxxiii.,

Stamford, burg built by Eadwciird

I., lii.

Temple

type, its Carolingian origin, xc. built

Stamford Bridge, battle
Stcenstrup, his
list

of,

xcvi.

Temj)sford,

by Vikings,
I., ih.
;

liv.

;

of burgs founded
I
,

taken by Eadweard
notice, cxix.

mint

of,

by

iEtlulflred

and Eadweard
its

lii.

Stockholm Museum,

series of Anglo-

Tettenhall, battle

of,

liii.

Saxon

coins, xii
of,

,

Ixxxi,
cxxii.

Tiianet, winter quarters of Vikings at,
xxviii.
;

Stycas, coinage

attacked by Vikings, Ixxii.
I.,

Surrey, under supremacy of Wcssex,
after battle of Ellandnnc, xvi.

Thelwall, burg built by Eadweard
lii.

Sussex, under supremacy of Wetscx,
after battle of Ellandunc, xvi.

Thctford, burnt by Svcud, k. of Dcnnuvrk, Ixxvii.

; ;

;

402
Tliorpitil. tlio

I.

— GENERAL

INDEX.
Proviflcnce, buildings, &c.,
ib.

Vikinp,

liiu

inviiMion of

;

busts

Ircliiiid, xxi., xxii.

on coins,
cvii.).

cvii.,

cviii.

;

portraiture,

Thurkill, Kiirl of KhhI Anglia, Ixxxvi.
TonhritlKP, uiint
Totttig,
of, notice,

rxix.

Kurl
witli

of

Northumbria,

bis

rivalry

Eiirls
;

Morkcro

and
ib.

u.
Ulf,

Eadwino,

xciv.

iMiniBlimcnt of,

BCeke aid from William of

Normandy
;

Earl,
;

his

rule

over

Denmark,
Cnut and

and

Iliirald of

Norway,

xcv.

battle
xcvi.

Ixxxv.

his treacliery to
ib.
;

of Stamford Bridge

and death,

death,

his son,

Svend, claims

Totleigh, mint

of,

notice, cxix.
I.,

tiirone of

Denmark,
of
to

Ixxxviii.

Towccstcr, burg built by Eadwcard
lii.

Ulfketil,

Earl

East Anglia, his
Danes,
Ixxvi.-

opposition
Turfcri5, his unsuccessful

the

invasion of

Ixxviii.

;

death, Ixxx.

Northumbria,
Turgesius.

Ix.

See Thorgisl.
coins, not
;

Types of

in the

National
Valentinian
I.,

V.
type of coin
;

Colleotioii, xii.

of Ecgbeorht, de-

of,

imitated
iElfred,

rived from

Mercia, Kent, Canterxix.,

by Halfdan, xxiv.
34.

and by

bury and Charlemagne,
xc.
;

xx.,

London monogram
and
;

coins

of

Verberie, marriage of

^thelwulf

at,

Halfdan

iElfrcd,

xxxiv.,

XXV.

xxxvii.-xxxix.

monogram
;

types of
prin;

Viking, etymology

of, Iviii. n.

Alfred, xxxix.
ciple

of Wessex,
xxvi.

Viking Ages, First and Sicond, contrasted, Ivi.-lviii., Ixxii.
;

of

classification,

of

First Vik.by, Ivii.
of,

iElfrcd with mint names,

xl., xli.

ing

Age, states created

Viking imitations of types of iElfrcd,
&c., xUii., xlv.
;

Second Viking Age, warnings
Ixxii.

hand

of Providence,

buildings, &c., on coins of
I.,

Eadweard
coinII.'s,

Viking and Danish invasions
guished, xxxi.

distin-

Ivi.,

cvii.

;

Scandinavian

types copied from ^Ethelred
Ixxxii.
;

Viking, Danish, and

Norman

invasions

of

Agnus Dei and Dove types iEthelrcd II., PACS, its refer(7>.
; ;

contrasted, xxviii., xxix.

Vikings,

first

invasions
;

of, xxi.

;

attack

ence, Ixxxv.
fitcal

double-cross type,
;

its

Lindisfame, xxi.
xxi., xxii. xxii.
; ;

invade Ireland,

significance, Ixxxix. pointed helmet and crowned types of Cnut,
;

attack Island of Sheppey,
{b.
;

and Charmouth,
at
'

defeated

Ixxxix., xci., cvii., cxxv.

monogram
xcii.

by
ib.
;

Ecgbeorht

Hengistdune,'

(Ecgbeorht) and temple typos, origin
of, xc.
;

defeated at Southampton, xxiii.
at

king holding Danebrog,
of

victorious

Portsmouth, in

Lin-

Sovereign type
xcvii.
;

Edward Conf,
coins, cvi.,-cviii.
cvii.;

colnshire,
ib. ib.
»7).
;

East Anglia and Kent,

types, their general character

plunder London and Rochester,
raids in

OQ

Anglo-Saxon
religious,

;

France and Germany,
Canterbury,
ib.;

(chictly

hand

of

;

attack

and

; ; ; ;

;; ;; ;

-GENERAL INDEX.
London, xxiv.
;

493
xlii.,

defeated by Beorlitib.
;
;

of

Canterbury,

xlvi.,

xlvii.
;

wulf, k. of Mercia,

their first

during reign of uElfred,
lished under
xlvii.

xlvi.

estab-

settlument in Kent,

ib.

defeat

^tbel-

Guthorm

(iEthelstan),

bald at Ockley,
cliester, &c.,

ib.;

raids on

Win-

during rtiga of iEthel;

beariit,

xxviii.

winter in Tlianet,
ih.
;

w.
Wales attacked by Ecgbeorht,
by Vikings,
xxi., liv., Ixxii.
;

and
'

settle in

East Anglia,

their
of,

xiv.

armies,' laws

and constitution
take

allegi-

xxix.,

XXX.
;

;

York,

xxxi.,

ance of Howel, king

of, Ixix.

xxxii.

invade Mercia, xxxii.; en-

Wardborough, burg
fla;d,
cix.,
li.

built
of,

by JEthel-

camp
down,

at
ib.

Heading, defeated at Ash;

n.
;

;

coin

in

Skye Find,

defend Nottingham,

ib.

;

cxx.

mint

of, notice, cxix.

invade

North uinbria, Mercia
ib.;
;

and

East

Anglia,

defeat

Alfred
London,
ib.
;

Wareham, taken by Guthorm, xxxv. mint of, and edict of Greatley, cix.
Warmington, mint
of, notice,

at Wilton,

xxxiii.

take

cxx.

xxxiv.

;

Settle in

Nurthumbria,

Warwick, burg
li., lii.

built

by iEthelflaid,

land in Kent and defeated by Alfred,
xxxvii.
;

capture Exeter, xxxviii.
ib.
;

Watchet ravaged by Vikings,

Ixxii.

defeated at Buttingtou,
at

defeated
;

Waymere, burg
lii.

built

by Eadweard L,

Holme,

xlix.

;

at Paris,
ib.
;

ib.

settle

in

Normaud}',
//*.
;

defeated

in

Wedensborougli (Wardborough
built

?),

burg

Germany,
liii.
;

defeat at Ttttenhall,
ilcfeat of, in a.d. 914,

by

^tiielflred,

li., lii.

raids

and

Wedmore, baptism
xxxv.
;

of

Guthorm

at,

ib.;

division of terri lories in
of

England
liii., liv.,

Peace

of,

xxxv., xliv., Ixxx.

and forms
Iv.
;

government,

coins issued subsequent to Peace of

raid on
of, ib.
;

Wales

a.d. 915,

liv.
ib.

Wedmore,

xli.

defeat

build Tempsford,
ib.
;

Weland, Viking
chester, xxviii.

chief, plunders
;

Win•

march on Bedford,
to
of,

;

submission

his defeat,
of, cix.
;

ib.

Eadweard

I., ib.

invasions, eras

Welmesford, mint
cxx.

notice

of,

contrasted, (First

and Second
;

Viking Ages)
Viking Ago,
of,

Ivi.-lviii., Ixxii.
;

First

Wessex,

invaded
of,

by
xiv.,

Mercia,
xvi.
;

xiv.

;

statesof, Ivii.

kingdoms

supremacy

absorbs
;

extent in England in 10th cent,
Ix.
;

Kent and Western Mercin, xxxvi.
extent
of,

lix.,

cessation of raids, Ixviii.
re-

under Eadweard
;

I.

and

I'irst

and Second Viking Ages,
of,

his Suns, Ixviii.

an earldom, Ixxxvi.

semblance

Ixxii.

:

renewal

of

rivalry of, xciv.

altackn under j'Ktiiclred IL (Second

Coinage

:

its

extent,
;

xi.,

xii.

Viking Age)

Ixxii. -Ixxx.

See also

when
of,

lirst

Lssutd, xii.

first

coinngo
xvi.,
;

und'r Danish invasions of England.
Vikings, Coinage
of
iElfrcd,
; :

XV.,
;

xix.,

XX.

;

its origin,

—imitations of coins
xl., xli.,

xvii.

primarily Kentish, xvii.
before

no

xxxiii.,

xlii.,

native currency
xviii.
;

Ecgbeorht,
I'y

xlvi.

of coins of the Franks, xxxix.

laws
i7>.
;

of,

and payments
of

of St.

Eadinund ami riegmund, Abp.

kind,

types

Ecgbeorlifa

; ;

404
WVhwx
coiim, xix.
of,
;

I.

— OKNi:UAI.

INDKX.
built

clnHHiflrntion of
;

Witham, burg
li., lii., liii.
;

by Eadweard
;

I.

early coins

xxvi.

Frniikinh ntid
of,

mint

of, cix.

notice

of,

Scaiulitiaviun

mnneyirs
HOiitli

xlv.

;

cxxi.

mipromncy
cxxii.
;

i»f,

of

tlic Iluiiibcr,

Worcester,

its

refusal to

pay danegeld,

kiii^jdom of, ooinR, 1-102.

and massacre

of hu-scarln, Ixxxviii.
to, civ. n.,

VVoswcx

iiiid IMiroiii,

rivalry of, xiii.
of,

new
ex.

flies for

coins supplied

Wtvst-Snxoii Kiiii^iloni, extent

under

.^thtdHtan,

lix.

Wulfhrard, Earl, defeats Baldrcd,

k.

Western

Mercift,

supremacy of Wcssex

of Kent, xix.

over, xxxvi., xxxvii.

Wulfstan, Abp. of York, joins Olaf

Wcylirid^re,

mint

of,

notice, cxx.

Quaran and attacks Eadinund,
his escape,
Ixvi.
ih.
;

Ixiv.

\Vhite, Mr. John, coin of iEthclliald,
21
II.

allegiance to Eadred,

Willctt, Mr. Ernest, his statistics

on

moneyers of Edward the Confessor,
ev. n.

William,

Duke

of

Normandy, claims
;

Xristiaxa Religio coin-typo of Charlemagne, 27
n.

English throne, xcv.
ih.
;

assists Tostig,

invades England and battle of

Hastings, xcvi.
Wilton, battle
of,

xxxiii.
to,
I.,

Wimborne,

retreat

of iEthelwald,

York taken by Yikings,
Coinage
:

xxxi., xxxii.

son of iEthelred

xlviii.

—coins

of JEthelstan
;

Winchcombc, mint
"Winchester

of, notice,

cxxi.

btruck

at,

Ixii.,

Ixviii.

moneyers

plundered
;

by
mint

Weland,
of,

and coins

of,

under ^thelstan, Ead,

the Viking, xxviii.

coins
;

struck

mund and

Eadred, Ixvii
of,

Ixviii.

by iElfred,

xl.,

xli.

of,

and

York, kingdom

added
Ix.

to

West-

edict of Grcatley, cix.

Saxon Kingdom,

(

^05

)

11.— INDEX
*^* The numhers priuted in

OF MONEYEES.

names

in italics in the lists of

italics in the accompanying list correspond to the moneycrs under each king. Tliey are of moueyera

not represented in the

Museum

Collection.

I'.m;

II.

— INUKX
213.

OF jMONEYEIIH.
250, 261, 283, 294,

.'Kll.rU.l, ^l.i,

m-J.
/i:if.lm,

297,

302,

A:i.lf.-lin
'ins.

..r

197,

2^1,

JV.\ctt\ HO-J.
i^:i«ric,

320, 325.

tke

nUo

Mv\x\ii

and

vKlfrio.
i-T^lowip.

>Vc ^]lfwig.
197,

ililewinp,

221,

400.

See

aho

Elowine.
.i:!fcttcl, 197.
i-lllfinh,

197.

See iElfhcah.

MUego,
M\ich

24S.

or ^Ifcn, 243, 298, 329, 427.
2.^)7,

iElfclm, 197, 243,
^El.lfclni.

258.

See also

.Elforc, iElfhcre, or Elfere, 243, 302,

310, 329, 301.
iElfer«, 243.
iElffeh, 320.
JE\ffvi, 329, 398.

iElfgwt, ^Ifgoat, ^Ifgtt, or Elfget,
197, 199, 243, 329, 396, 4 GO, 467.
.^Ifgar, Alfgar, &c,, 163, 175, 197, 208,

225, 243, 283, 294, 302, 329, 389,
40.3,

458.

iElfgcd, 197.

See iElfgjct.

iElfheah,
243.

/Elfheh, or

^Ifcah,

197,

^Iflicrc, 329, 361.
iElfino, 302.
JElfinirr, 197.

See

aho Elfere.

See .Elfwiiic.

JFAhnvTc, 329.
J?M\\of>, JEluo*, Elfno», &c., 101, 163,

174, 197, 213,

214,

220,

221, 223,
279, 302,

226, 235, 243, 276, 278,

313, 3->0, 329, 391, 304, 395, 460.
.ElfriHl or Elfntl,

101, 102,

114, 122, 185,

142,

147. 156, 160,

163,

197,

243, 287, 292,

297, 302, 308, 320,

329, 331, 344, 345, 397, 398, 403,
406, 409, 412, 414. 457.
jElfric, Alfrio, or Elfrir, 101. 102. 106,
72:?,
1!>7,

200.

219.

231.

2;W,

2-13.

II.

—INDEX
295, 296,

OF MONEYERS,
jEscman or Escman,
195, 197, 222, 243.

497
163,
173,

243, 259, 261, 262, 267, 270, 273,
276, 282, 285,

191,

290, 294,
311,
312,

297, 299, 302,

317, 318,
349, 350, 375, 379, 414,

^sctl or ^sctli, 197.

320, 328, 329, 359, 361, 362, 380, 382, 399, 420, 421, 433,
440,

343, 348,
372.

^sculf

or iEscuulf, 156, 160, 163, 176.

374,

Jilscwig, 197.

403, 440,

406, 409,

jEscwine, 243.
^stiin, Astan, or Estan, 243, 245,
302,
303, 320,
329, 331,
2.i6,

441,
452,

443, 444,

448, 450, 451,

456,

457,

423,

436,

460, 462, 465, 473.

444, 445, 446, 449.

^Ifwine Mus,
ffilfwinig, 122.

243.

^stann and Loc, M3,
Eastmaer.

329, 445.

.^stmajr or Estmajr, 329.

See also

ffilfwold, 197, 240, 243, !M4, 302, 315,

329,

442, 460,

472.

See also

MU-

^tard

or .^tardea, 142, 145, 156.

See

wald.
/Elfwoud, 329, 399.
iElfworci, 409.

also Agtard.

^tferS, 163, 176.
.^svulf, 329.

See iElfward.

See Eawulf. See also ^?;elulf.

M\gsciT, 400, 468.

^Selaf,
See .^gclwine.

32, 54.

-Elgolwinc, 243.

JE Sela ver, 163, 191.
JESelberlit, 101, 243.

See also Adela ver.

oilman,

302, 307.

iElmaer, 197, 243, 302, 329.
.ffilmon, 329, 341.

^Selbrand. 163.
.EXelbriht, 243.

M\nnt, 302.
^lno?>, 329.

See ^Ifno«. See JEUno^.

^^elfer« or ^thclfreS,
iE^elfred, 83, 87.

101, 121, 163.

JElrm],

Elrffid, &c., 329, 331, 345, 346.

.^Selgar or Adelgar,
197, 239.

lri6,

103,

170,

^Iric, 243, 290, 302, 329, 373, 388. See also JSlfric.
.(Elstan, 243.

iE«elm, 101, 115, 122, 142, 144, 197,
213.

See iElfstan.
See JEUwig.

^Ivii, 327.

^Selmser

or ESelmasr, 197, 221, 232,

Ji:ivion\vii, 320.

243, 278, 279.

.^Iwcard or iElwerd, 243, 409, 412,
425.

yE?;elman, 197, 243.
iE«eliiio(l or

See also ^Ifweard.
302, 317, 329, 312, 421.

A^elmc.d, 101, 121, 122,

^Iwig, loG,

140.

See also JEUwlg.

.^tSclmund or A^elmund,
120, 142, 145.

101,

122,

iElwinc, 197, 243, 259, 270, 285, 290,
294, 302, 317, 32'>, 329, 348, 399,

iE?;elno«

or ESSoIno?, 9,
113,

18, 22,

24,

409,414.
.^nrod,
1.

See also .Elimne.

101, 105,

142,

197,

218,

222,

243, 278.
-<E«c]red, S5, iOi, 163,
173, 191, 195,

Mrite, 329, 432.
iEigrcd, 197.
iErigor, 142, 144.

243.

See also JE^cTvd and E^iclnd.

iESelric or ^ESerio, 122, 197, 209, 237,
329,
362.

^rngriin,

32(\

See also

243, 256, 276, 288.

Arngrim.
iEruulf, 122, 126.

iEXclsie or iEScl^igc, 101, 163, 108,
See Arnulf.
177, 197.

2

K

•11)8

II.

indp:x of

moneyeus.

/KScUliin,

/K^iHlttit,

>'K^.''tun,

EMcl-

n.

— INDEX

OF MONEYERS.

499

Alward, 320.

fiOO

II.— INDEX OF MUNEYER8.
Borlitclm or Byrhtelm, 101, 113, 122,
127, 19R.
:».

IJ.ir.1.1 ..r

Hiinl.I. 101, 112. /"/.
;.
U'>.
Il».

Illlrif»•r^,

Ilcugmiin.l,

'22,

'2:».

AV/'

Btrhtcre, 32, 60.
Berlitmffir or Byrhtmsor, 198.

alto

nonlmiund.
See also Beag-

See also

Ik-ii(;BUin, 32, fiO.

BrihtmsBr.
BerlitnaS, 198, 239. See also Btorhno«.

niMJimmifl, 27, 22, 23.
iiiiind.

Berhtrcd, 83, 89, 122.
(.r

B«ihro.I
127.

H.iinrcil, S3. 101, 111, 122,

Berhtwig, 122, 127.

Berhtwine or Brelitwine, 198.
Bcriuald, 32, 50.

n.ahHtan, 83, 88.
n.
iil.lulf,
;.'Js'.

Bermcne, 191.
Bernald, 32, 50.
See also B. nlircd.

See Bcmcine.

lUanicno, 191, 103.

See also Bemuald.
145.

nainred, 85, 101.

Bernard or Burnard, 101, 142,

BfRam,

198.

Buma«,
&c., 191.

122.

Bil-a or Beige, 101.

Berncre, iOi, 142,146.

Bimeno, Berrucnc,

Ben.fir«, 142, 146.

16.3,

177.

B.ne.liotus, 122, 127, 103, 177.

Bcrngar, 83, 101.
19S,

Beola.

Beolau,

BoUa,

&c.,

191,

Bernred or Bimred,

32, 61.

See also

244, 271.

Bcomred.
110.
&c.,

Boomrd, 101,
Bi'orhiio*,

Bemsige, 122, 127.

BcrhtDaS, ByrlitnoiJ,

Bemuald

or

Bimuald, 32,

38, 43, 45,

198. 238, 239, 244.

50,51,53,54,61,80.
uald and Bumuald.

SeeahoBi&malso

Bwrlitric, 1G3, 184.
Beorlitulf, 101.

See also Biorhtiilf.

Bemuuald,
uiiald.

83, 89.

Se-e

Boom-

Beorii, Beornn, or

Biom,

244, 267, 302,

330. 439.

Bese or Besel, 122, 142, 146.
28.

Booraeah or Biamcah, 27,
r.t'omorc, 83, 89.

IJianulf (Biarnulf), 122.

Biare«, 32, 38.

B.oriifor*, 83, 89.

Biarmod,

9.

See Biarnraod. See also

Boornhae, 27, 31.

Biameah,

27, 28.

Beomeah.

Btomhart,

1, 8. 1, 8.

Biarneard, 101.

See Biorocard.
9, 22,

Btomlicard,

Biarnmod or Biarmod,
28.
&c.,
1, 6.

23,

27,

B

urnmjcr or Boommcr, 32, GO, 82.

Bt ornm d,

Biommod,

BiamnoS,

9, 13, 16.

Boornrcd or Biornrcd, 32, 61, 83, 97.
Beorimlf, Biomuulf, or Biornulf, S3,
198.
Bt>oriiuunld,

Biarnred or Biomred, 32, 41, 42, 45,
61, 83, 97.

Biarnuald, 32, 42, 43, 57.

See also

Beornwnid,
vidd,

Bemuuald,
&c., 83, 89,

Birnuald.

BiunmunM, Byrn

Biamuine,

22, 23.

94.9.5.101, 114,122.

B

arnuulf, 32.

BwrwaM,
I^ronanl,

122.

Sre Bcornwald.

Binrcd, 330, 399.
Biorhiild, S3.
Biorlitrir,

Bcre! aid, 32, 71.
/.>«,

163.

KU.

II.

— INDEX

OF MONEYERS.
191,
196,

501

Biorhtulf or Biorhtwulf, 101, 105, 122,
128, 142.

198, 210, 218, 244, 260,

302, 320, 330, 353, 435.
Boigalet, 101, 108.

Biorlitwald, 101.

Biorhtwulf, 122, 142.
Biorn, 830, 430.

Boiusulf or Boinulf, 122, 128.
Bella, 244, 271.
or

See also Boom.

See also Boola.

Biornanl,

Biorneard,

Biarneanl,

Bonsom,
Bosa,
Bosel,

122, 128.

Byinard, ss, 101, 111, 122.
Birniard.

See aho

Borstig, 244, 281.
1, 8, 1, 6.

32, 56.

Biomhclin, S3.

See aho Biosel.
See Brand. See also Brantino. See Brihstan.

Blommod,
Biomred,

1, 6.

Brad, 437.
61,

32,

83,

97.

See also

Braintino, 244.
Bralistan, 244.

Beornred and Biamrod.
Biornulf, 19S.

See Beornulf.
83,
94,
95.

Brand, 244, 330, 378, 436, 437, 445.
See
also

Biomuuald,

Brantinc, 191, 19s, 244.

Beornuuald.
Biosel or Bosol,
1, 6.

Breco or Bregc, 83, 89, 97.
Brehstan, 244, 288.
See also Brenstan.
See also Briht-

Birgstan, 1G3, 190.
BirbtferS, 19S.
Biihtsige, Byrhtaigc, &c., 19S.

Brehtuo«, 244, 297.
no(5.

Brehtwiuc, 198.
Bior-

Birucard,
neard.

122, 128.

See

also

Brencd, 42.

See also Blarnreil.

Brenstan or Brcbstan, 244, 288.
32.

Birncd or Birured,
Birniiald,
32,

Brestan, 19^.
45,
80.

38,

43,

See

Brotocol, 198, 244.
Bricsie.

also Bernuald, &c.

See Bricsige.

Birucr, 156, 162.

Bricsigc, 330, 406.

Blacaman, Blaceman, or Blacman, 19S,
244,
292,
302,

BricsUin, 244.

310, 320, 325,

330,

Brid or Bridd,

9, 13, 19, 244, 272, :i02,

355, 356, 375, 376, 429, 460, 474.

320, 330, 370, 377, 378.

Blacan,

.90;;?.

Brightmasr, 330.
244, 292, 330, 375,

See Brihtmaor.

Blaceman, 19S,
376.

Brihclm, 244.
Brihinc, 330.
Brihfetan, 244.

See also Blacaman.

Blacer, 330, 455.

Blacman,

330,

376,

429.

See

also

Briht, H3.

Blacaman.

Hrihtfcr« or Brihtfra?*, 163, 191, 192,
214.

Blacman, 820.
Blamian, 244.

Bribtlaf or Byrhtlaf,
227, 235.

198,

218, 22(5,

Blarcnmn, 330, 355, 356.
Blaroro, 330, 455.
Bodric, 330.

Brihtmror, Brihttmror, &c., 19s, 244,
283, 285. 302, 402, 437, 438, 474. 314,
330, 397,
3;t.s,

Boeg, 122, 128.

446, 449, 450, 460,

Boga, Bogea, Boiga, or Boia, 32, 01,
83,98, 101, 105, 108, 122, 128, 142,
146,
156, 158, 160,

Brihtno»,
460.

i5S

244, 258, 297, 330, 374,

163,

168,

189,

f.02

II.

— IN1>KX
198, 393,

OF MONEVEUS.
Brnnic, Bruninc, Bruninp, Brunninc,
Bryiiiiic,
iScc.,

Brllitrf^l, 211. 2R8,

302, 830, 399, 403,

407,

4*21.',

4r.7.

103,

190,

198,

218,

Urilitric,
'Jit,

I^^i^rio,

or

Ilrylitric,

244, 283, 288,
434.

330,

372, 389, 390,

:i()J,

330,

350, 372, 392,

43'), 43t;,

437, 400, 4G4.

Bruninnn, 244, 285, 287, 802, 330.

See

Urililtinwr, 302.

See Brihlmscr.

aho BrumfiB.
Brunn.
See Brun.

IJrilitwcn, 24^1.
llrilitwi,

244, 460.

Brunuese, 330, 350. See aho Bninbyse,
Bi unnic, 244.

llrihtwii.o or IJyrhtwino, IDS, 244, 288,
H()2, 3:J0,

See Bruoic.

409, 418, 430, 437.

Brunninc.

See Brunic.
S''e

Brilitwol.l or liyrtitwold, 163, 198, 240,

Brannstan.

Brunstan.

244, 281, 330, 445, 400, 409.
Briliwi, 418.

Brunnusel, 330, 391.

See Brihtwine.

Bmnred,

320.

Brin, 830.
Brinit, 330.

Brunstan, Bronctan, or Brinstan, 198,
227, 229,

240,

244,

300, 302,

317,

Brinstnn, 244.
Brintrcil.

See Brunstan.

318, 320, 330, 454.

See Brilitred.

Bruntat, 198, 221, 244.

Brinwold, 330, 421.
J?ritf.T8 or Brilitfer«, 163, 178.

Brunti«, 19S.

Brunwine, Bruwin, Brynwine, or Burwine, 244, 302, 316,
.320,

Briuninc,

15t>,

161.

330, 431,

Brixi, 3:50, 442.

432,436,437,400,471.
Bruwin, 302.
Bryhtred, 19S.
Bryhtric, 198.

Brixoie.

See Bricsige.

See Brunwine.

Bri^nrd, 32, 61.
Bri?ric, 330.

See Brilitric. See Brunhyse.

See Brihtric.
f^3,

Bruchysc, 330.
Bniinnc, 330.

Bryhtuald or Bryhtwald,
Brjngar, 244, 285.
Brynia, 244.

101, 121.

See also

Bmngar.
See also

Brum,

330, 372.

Briuua, 244.

Bryninc, 19S, 244, 330, 390.

Bruinan, Briuusan, or Brunman, 19S,
244, 281,

Bruninc.

285, 287, 302, 330,

343,

Brynwine,

5.90.

See Brunwine.

344, 372.

Buga,

32, 61, 83, 89, 98.

Brumiiion

(

=

Bruiunau), 400, 465.
See aho Bruman.

Bulered, 330.

See Bured.

Bruiniian, 330, 344.

Burdel, 101, 112.

Brun, Bninn, or Bruna, 198, 230, 244,
302, 320, 326, 330, 444.

Burden, S3.

Bured or Bulered,
BurgnoS,

330, 407.

Druncar, 302, 314.

See

aho Brungar.

Burcwine, 244, 330, 437, 438.
27, 28, 32.

Brunctan, 244, 320.
Bruiiilwinc, 330.

See Brunstan.

Burgwinc, 400, 471.

Brum-d, 32,41,42,45.
Bningar, Bryngar, &c., 193, 244, 283,
285, 287, 291,
423. 302,

Burhstan or Bumstan, 191, 19S.
Burhtelm, 101.
314,
330,

409,

Burhwold

or Burwold, 244.

Barnard, 142, 145.
Biirncld, 101.

See aho Bernard.

Brnubyso, 330, 350.

II.

— INDEX
32,

OF MONEYERS.

503

Ilumi'lin,

Buruhulm, or Byrnelm,

r>oi

II.

— INDKX

or MONEYEKS.

C«ioln, 330.

Corf.— INDEX OF MONEYERS. 505 302. 314. . or Oorrf.II. Corff.

'. 129. or Dode. 330. 22. 400. Dunberd. Diormod. Duducol. 19S. Dryhtuald or 121. -See 27. 147. 39. 156. 142. 198. 9. Dudelet. 330. Di-orninn or Dlorman. IVS. 173. 191. 122. Dulwic. Dufacan. 32. Dring. 169. 330. D. 15. 27. 330. 32. 24. 19-^. 17. 199. &c. 129. 129. Dodnic. Dioreman or Dyrcman. 382. Dirsigc. 80. Dryhtwald. 129. 90. 95. Dudig. Dcrwino. Drtolf. 457. 193. 344. 191. 330. also Duduiue. Duncild. 18. 32. 32.orulf or Diorulf. 830. II. 27. Dodda. 142. Diarmund. 108. 430. 302. 101. 19. 302. aleo Domencce. &c. 168. 122. Dudinc. 330. 330. Duine. 320. 430.116. 1. aho Dun. 460. 244. 6. Dunninc. S3. See Deora. 163. 58. Duda. 18. 147. Dormon. Se-e Dunstan. 101. DooruuiilJ or Diuruuald. 129. 65. 244. 397. 29. 390. 19S. Diarbelm. 193. Drungar. 320. 32.— INDEX OF MONEYKUS: Dorlf. 156. 101. 14. Diar. 122. Dioriuan. Doda. See 9. Dun. 65. 198. Demcnec. Dircman. 65. Dudda or Dudd. 119. 58. DudelorDudele. 302. 163. Diaruuald. Diarald. Diarulf. 119. 159. 244. 198. 147. 24. 412. 426. 191. 122. I). 122. Dranlirig.rnir. 20. 163. 330. Direme. 101. Diorulf. Dufnelm. 122. 150. 60. See 163. or Dyrsigc. Drogl. Doniiuic. 9. Diga. Dudinic. 28. Dcorsig. Duniuc. 400. 351. Sec Drybtuald. Dudsemon. 222. See Deoruuald. 163. 32. 57. 40. 101. Dodnorr>. 32. Dodrig. 309. 29. 63. Diarniod. 378. 110. Diaruald. 193. or Dooramod. 193. See aho Diaruald. 158.. 12. 330. 244. Diurclm. . Dropa or Drowa. 412. 407. 27. Duning. 147. See aho Dcorulf. Dregel. I)<-orino<l Durulf. 1 Drhwold. .<. Drciul. Dunic. Dudeman. i9S. Dirinc or Dyrinc. 122. 193. 299. 193. 44. 131. 130. 431. i9S. Diora. 193. 379. 198. 83. 214. Dilion. 320. 83. 431. 156. 7. 90. Dircwinc or Dyrewiae. D<jrwine. 122. 198. 244. Domences. 16. 116. 273. Duddinc. 101. 171. Di-orlaf. 161. 66. 29. 82. 58. 377. 470. 22. 219. Dunioaii.330. 58. 101. 3U2. 2G7. 32. Dunn See alfo or Dunna. Deoruhg. Dcorman. 214. See alto Deorolf. Dcorrtigc. 99. 83. 32. 101. 330. Dtornred. Dude wine. 244. aho Dunn.. 1(!3. Driuniug. 156. 430. 198. 83.not.

226. 232. 357. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. Eadsige. 330. 199. 130. 199. 404. 245. 385. 199. 101. 103. 226. 06. 331. 156. Eadmund 109.281. Edrcd. 302. 147. 331. 83. 275. 342. 229. 172. 331. 199. lie. 199. 210. 400. 414. 199. 400. Durlac. 199. 397. 285. 113. 199. 199. 318.5. 122. 90. 67. 82. 283. 331. 281. 131. 174. 320. 281. 83. 227. 83. Eadwi. 410. 391. 32. 223. 507 See also Duraint. 90. 218. 191. 330. 293. 407. S3. 241. 108. 310. 233. See also Eadwald. 110. 457. 170. Dyrewine. 161. Eadsi. 320. 384. also Eadward. 59. 221. Eacrn. 330. See also Edwi. Ed- ward. 330. 283. 110. 245. iEdric. E. 303. 302. 07. 101. Eaetau. 130. Durberd. 224.404. 142. Durul. 454. 327. 330. 460. 406. Eadred. Eadlaf. 422. 344.215.. 385. Eadstan or Edstan. 19S. Eadwiue . Dyrsige. 199. 330. 319. 178. 199. 244. Eadered. 122. Eadsme. 199. 159. 238. Eaduald or Eadueald. 387. 407. Eadmo«. 372. 130. 130. 283. or Edwold. 802. 186. 90. or Durant. Eadueard. See Eadwald. 215. 20. 331. See Dun. 400. 24. 199. Dyreman. 111. 223. 331. 320. 22. 156. 423. 24. 211. Eadfred. 198. 302. 331. or Edired. 400. 331. Eatlric or Edric. 7. 392. 244. 348. Eadwerd. 330. Eadlielm. 227. 191. 199. 156. Eadwacer Dyrinc. 198. 245. 283. 262. 410. or Edmund. 281. Eadweald. Duriant. 83. 460. 199. 163. Durwig. 245. 414. 384. 232. Duran. 309. 296. 199.163. 32. 225. Eadgar or Edgar. Eaenolf. 90. 122. 122. 330. 329. 59. See Deorsige. 396. . 199. 101. 226. 330. 375. 102. 2M. 345. or Edwiue. Eailgild. 32.II. 199. 245. 260. 245. Durreb. 190. 32. 330. 211. 1. See Eadwald. Eadwold. 421. 122. 223. 462. 83. 410. 359. &c. 331. 199. 408. Eadelm or Edchn. 281. 122. 275. 289. 244. 238. 285. Eadulf or Eaduulf. Eadwig or Edwig. 101. 142. 330. 220. 331. 330. 40. 412. Durtan. 227. 286. Eadwod. See Dyyn. 99. 318. 122. Edwerd. Eadeasge. Eadweard. 400.. 412. 245. 416. 420. 101. 209. 245. Dynyn. 302.244. 381. 101. 346. 199. 407. 163. 466.or Edwald. 198. 431. See Dirinc. 101. 83. Eaduuald. 245. 330. 302. &c. D urine. Eadno«. 294. 19S. 130. 415. Ediigc. See also Ednia3r 103. 122. 80. Durandes. 320. 101. Durnnd. See also Adueard. 188. or Edwacer. 226. 245. Eadwald. 285. Eadma3r or Eudmor. 198. Eadsig. Dyrbtuijer. Eadwold 314. also 32. 32. 410. See Dioreman. 262.

45. 342.la. Eainund. 410.'XW. Edrice Edriec ( ( Fjiwidf. 410. KaMiilf or C1. See Edric. Edric. 331. Eanwald. 199. EalfBip. Edclstan. 191. 302. 199. 131. 122. Edred. 13. 08. 194. See Eamulf. Edflige. 218. Wi.'. 331. 163. 83.l. Kal. 396. 331. 460. 245. 245. 320. See Arnulf. 9^ 99. YaxcA. 410. 245. Edcred. 13.199. 101. See alto Eahlatan. Edired. Eulh. Sec algo Faatulf. Edelwine. 292.lrtxl. 220. Erfor».lpir. Eclafor Ellaf. 381. Edsie or Edsii. 9. See also Eadgar. Eanrcil. 380. Erghr rd. 55i. 440. S3. 191. luil. 111. 330. 07. 302. 320. 142. 2:n. Eastnicr. 244. 107. 10. 117. Ecwig. 83. See also Eadniser. 3:«). 227. 400. 199. 302. Kulprtr. 294. 224. 32. 318.5. See Eadelm.a/. Eiiniuund. 245. 410. 69. 262. 9. 102. 331. EiirdnoS or Erdno«. Eanwcrd. 113. 2J5. 175. 15. Edhie. 245. 331. Edsieie. 83. Eiilstan.linilf. Earngrim. 466. 110. 69. Ediric. 404. Enraoytcl. 309. See also Eil&f. 9.Sdric and Eadric. Edelm. Eaatulf. Eowulf. Earward. 103. Sve Arncetel. 245. 199. -INDKX OF MONEYERS. 330. fier Kiilpnjuntl. 331. 83. 331. 262. 199.l. Edclric. Edelgar. See also Eamwi. 22. 261. aigo 329. 10. 83. R'^jbriht. 221. II. See also Eadsige. 373. 245. 285.201. 41S. 199. 331. 101. 391. 101. 199. 357. 101. S3. 331. 397. 830. 302. 91. :W0. Edfecer. 225. Eerie. E. 208. Eurdulf. E»istma>r. 122. 199. 199. 147.21. See ahn Alhstan. Ead:)tan. 1(53. 331. 199. Kal^. Eatstan. 357.'imin. See EadnoJS. See See also . 283. 275. Ivilcti. 473. 68.stnn. = Edric). 32. EaiSno>. Ecuulf or Ecwulf. 13. Edin. 232. Eamulf. 199. 283. 101. 454. Earcil. Ediolbriht. 245. 32. Eanute. 309. 224. 32. 428. Edmund. Eaiiulf. Eadmund. See also Eadred. 91. 331. 245. Edire«. 199. 302. 199. 122. or KaMobcrd. 245. KuMwiK'. 330. 261. See ^Stlwine. Eardwulf. 199. 199. 199. 320. Edculf. 199.3. Edelic. See also Ecuiilf. 122. 244.508 EaKnuin. 244. KulK'ftrt. EftliliilM'ftrd Knl. Edmajr. 331. 199. 83. 122. 91. 190. 245. 102. See Eadred. Edelstan and Gelda. 32. 32. = Edric). 392. See also Erngrim. See Ealdgar. 407. Edraed. Eoborht. 101. Rirnwulf. 112. 245. 18t. 178. 101. . 245. 9. Edgar. Earner..

. —INDEX OF MONEYERS.II. 509 Edsigeware. 2G2. 245.

397. Ertan. See Erngrim. Ermwi. 329. Ergimbult. 421. 303. 55. Ericuuald. 142. Elfword. Elsii 0. 243. Erngrim or Ergrim. Estmajr.irod or EoroiS. Eodin. 24i. 4G0. 454. 199. 460. Klfwig. 27G. Erim or Erimcs. 362. E'la. 102. 303. 446. 243. 102. 243. 163. ISG. 199. 282. Eswig. 353. 199. l'J9. Etile. Eorflf. 331. 329. Elst. Esther. also iiCirHtiui. 199. 102. 329. 199. Escman. See also Amcetel See Elfsie. . Elfwi or EKwic. Engilbrcd. Str also vKlfwi. 329. 374. See also iElrajd. Kirwiii. III. See also Ascwig. 197. 148. 122. Kifiiiii. Erncyttl. Eodmnn. Elsipo. 163. 32. 329. 331. 122. EUaf. 156. 463. or Erncil. Eonrcd. 331. 303. Engilberht. Erostulf. 111. 453. Endric or Enric. 331. . 331. 102. 444. 3G2. Etsigc. Elfwinc. ic:?. 102. 375. 441. St'c 102. Ertmbald. See EardnoJS. Etrum. 113.'131. See iElfwig. 421. 282. 142. S3. 303. 245. 331. See also Amgrim and Eltan. II.i 171). 2-15. 331. See Estan. 302. 245. 331. 445. 423. 3119. 420. 460.3. 346. 69.510 320. 273. See also Eadsige. 331. See FroiSric. 122. 2G1. Ere. Ero«. 122. Erucctel. iElfwino. Ettige. Estan. 102. 32. 350. See also Ergrim. Erduo*. 453. (. 234. S3. 4>i0. Ericil.r Emrd. 3G1. See also Eadstan. 156. ErcoiilmM. 363. Eiric. Eoda. 163. 100. 111. 191. 331. a2. 245. Estmund. See ^stmscr. See also Cenberht Endiwern. 29. See also Eclaf. 40. 381. See also iEstan. Eofermimd or Efermund. Eowiiio. 305. 303. Enrip. Eofenilf. 142. 122. 4(J2. 15G. 284. Eoftrcd. 455. 443. 142. E. Esctli. 357. Eturcol ( = Styrcol ?). 199.1. 1G3. 245. 331. 3G1. 212. Earngrim. 27. 159. 407.i. 191. 256. 148. 313. 111. 331. 245. Eoferard. Erfric. 331. 160. Etfern. no. aht) yElfwaltl. Elwinc. Elrsed or Elrcd. 320. S3. Eulx>rht. Eofrcd. i«3. and Earncytel. 195. 303. See ^Ifsige. 174. 345. 331. 331. 331. — INDKX Sei: OF M0NEYP:RS. Eric. 122. See Fre«ic. Eli. 444. 329.«ic. 131. 101. Kr. Eol». 171. 410. Etstan. 303. See also . Krewino. Escea. 433. Eruwi. 122. See Efrard. 291. 331. 331. 24. 102. See iElfward. 446.^scman. 38. 140. Elln. See Etsige. 331.

132. 511 Eulgart. 122. .II. — INDEX OP MONEYERS.

186. 216. 420. Fn^i rir. 831. 236. 460. GftrLftr. 327. Fre«ice8. Gaoald. 132. 142. 164. 204. 308. 122. 286. Fyhtltflp. FriScwino. Godaeg. Glonnulf. 169. 122. Godman. 331. Frio«ulf. Gis. 331. 112. 303. Godog. Gcola. 91. Gertfin. fu'oilaf. 347. Giodwine. 102. 290. 331. 245. Gildewino. 245. 331. 395. Gildcwino. Gilm. or Godieg. FriStmund. 142. 112. 102. 331. aho FroXgar. See also Frotgar. 199. 141. Godd. S'^e Gcnard. 106. 156. 245. Gnapa. or FriXclberht.331. MH. 245. I Godcirca.l or Fndml. Fro«ric or Frc«eric. 303. 316. «3. i:!2. 122. 199.93. Godan. INKKX OF MONEYERH. 344. aUo Fro«ric. Goda or Godda. Gilpin. 151). Garuiuc. 213. Stie (Jeldcwinc.l. 352. 164. Fro«gar or Fro«ger. 245.95. &3. 303. Godcild.l. 91. Giolwulf (Ciolwulf ?). 83. 191. 199. Garulf. 102. Gillus. Fynuclm. 440. 158. Fninl. S<f also Vu dard. 316. 245. Fugel. 32. 282. 314. Ste also Fre*ewine. 448. Geundferd or GundferS. 102. 69. 102. 345. Giencea. 331. 102. 225. 150. 32. 164. 102. Gislemer. 102. Garfiu. Gnorine. 245. 347. Fron. Godaman.233. 102. 353. . 2G8. Giinulf. 113. . 171. 142. 132. 155. See also Frco«ric.5. See Cnapa. 12 See Giougbald. 245. 142. 83. See also Geldewine. 331. Frotierm. 396. Gillys. 320. 199. 102. See Godwine. 122. 83. 102. 24f). 245. See Gife. 112. 110. Gilles. Frotgar or Frotger. 387. 199. HI. 123. 156. See also Cylm. 245. InH S'C Kro^^ic. 331. 149 Glifwine. 217. 229. 245. 462. God or Godd. 24. 331. 438.or FruSiciu. 199. II. 460.. 305. Fri«cbriht. 320. 387. 71. 331. 410. 331. l(j4. 331. 331. 148. 303. 184. 123. 71. See aho Grimnlf. FriSfbi rht. 164. Godrildd. Fro<lar. Fulrad. 102. 199. 3G3. 32. Froma or Frome. 199.346. Fri?!c<. 245. 117. 234. Guldcwinc. 171. 83. 142. Fn•^ur(^. Fry«cmund. 102. Fri'?lt)winr. Gamwi. 199. 161. 303. 199. 80. Frostulf or Fr08«ulf. 159. 352. 148. 268. 102. ). 32. Gotcild. FriSowino or FriSiwine. 141. Gife or Gire. See also God. Fro«.512 FmiilmM. Gislehclm. Gire. 142. . See also G. 238. 186. or 295. FroJSic. Gclda. 230. V>2. 122. Fri«i. 102. 303. 156. 142. 148. 2-in. 292. Fri?. 117. Gilacris or Gillacris. or Gyllis. 303. Gyldcwinc. 122. 291. 164. or Frl<•^ric. .

428. 432. 458. 444. 320. 417. 3ol. 303. 386. 390. 210. 199. See also 447. Godeleof. 331. 268. See also Godesune. 210. 407. 331. 314. Godwine and "NVidia (Wudia). 199. Gudela«. 313. ' leow. 458. 224. 375. Goinc. 314. 391. Godwine or Godwince. See 400. 227. 274. 439. 314. 4(0. 293. 331. Goldsie. See also Godelef. 320. or Go«raan. Godeman. 341. 456. 286. Godefre<5. Goldman. 460. 308. 382. fry«. See also Guldsie. 142. Golddige. 245. 428. 234. 217. 311. 470.447. 199. Godfer«. 420. 199. Godra. See Godseg. Godsune. 410. 284. See also Godric. 397. Godric and Swot. 245. 381. 245. 200. 373. 405. 327. See Godefer«. Godric. 258. 286. Golda. 287. 199. 240. Godwin. 325. 325. Godin also or Godine. 831. See also Goldsige. Godefer<5. 24). 405. 286. Godwine and Ceoca. Goric. 308. 331. 284. Goltsige. 314. 820. 274. 259. 513 Goddere. Godwic or Godwig. 414. 316. 474. 224. 299. 462. 289. Godine. 326. 199. Godine. 298. 320. 331. 426. 831. 455. 199. 410. or Godfcr«. 284. Godeg. 308. 15G. 439. lef. 328. 299. 466. 400. 408. 290. 331. 149. 331. Godwine and 375. 320. 245. 299. 383. 820. Goodric. 286. 199. 264. 245. 212. Godere. Godwi. Godleow. 227. 354. 287. 402. 402. 395. Godleof. 423. 282. 393. 199. 381. 284. 245. 328. 229. 325. 415. 280. 278. 449. 270. See also Godere. 245. 392. 199. 387. 199. 227. 439. 320. IGl. 222. Godic. Godric and Calic. Godelfold. 298. 235. 446. 245. Gola or GoUa. 282. 276. 226. 427. 456. 331. 232. 303. 217. 445. 460. 431. 443. 320. Godkof. or 313. 245. Godwine. 808. 2 L . 414. 245. 331. 371. Godsunu. 331. Goldan. 450. 394. 229. Godrine. See also Godere. 293. 271. 245. 385. Godelef. 312. 199. 404. 384. 380. 320. Caa. 289. 215. or God- Godsie. 398. 308. 343. 397. 460. 275. 426. 292. Godesune. 384. 245. 274. 245. 211. 375. Goere. 331. or Godsunu. 410. Godeman. 303. 218. 434. Goldcytel. 364. 303. Godlamb. 28G. 245. 401. 457. Godi. 380. 270. 212. 410. Godsige. 272. 803. 239. 404. Gotric. 331. Goder. 404. 808. Godesbrand. Godefri^. Godwine and Stewer. 111. 384. 240. 245. 404. 331. 404. 245. a05. 341. Goderic. Godwine. 271. 348. 416. 211. 412. 331. 245. 245. See Godi Godwine and Ceoca. 280. 303. 245. 245. 276. See also Godruan. 456. 331. 199. 245. or Got8unu. 349. Godieg. 340. 468. 315. Godmon. Godaman. 199. 331. 274. or Goderic. 238. 373. or Goddoie. 2G0. 407. 355. 351. 245. 434. 331. Godsune 199. 388. 235.II. 260. 320. 400. Godgod. 413. 331. 275. 256. 417. See Godaeg. — INDEX Gode- OF MONEVEKS. 331. Godman. Godwine and Wudia. 227.

2:W. 303. ISO. 284. 311. H. or Nancrent. 24r. 241. 331. Mancrent See also Crurn. 245. 245. 331. 117. Hancrcut. Hadebald. Gotji or Gotiif. See Gilles. 331. 331. 142. Ser ahi) (Sola. Guldcwinc.191. 180. See Cytel. See also Godric. See See also Hsergod. 2011 II. See also Mnrcin. GHniUK>rlit. Got^Hiiu. See Godric. 200. 267. Guntcr. 233. 402. 331.i. See Cynsige. 331. Gowno. 245. 205. 191. 168. Hangrim. Haldene. Gunstan.. See Grimulf. 30. 22fi. 245. Godwino. 200. 200. Goric. 303. S3. 331.3. Gunni.9. 1G4. Gytel.1. ahn Gound- Harucytel. 83. 404. Ool. 123. 194. 331.liiH. 246. S. Gonwinc. 132. 422. . Gotric. 71. Go?rie. 123. Grid. See Arncytel. 264. 200. 95. Gnirn. 404. 272. 223. 303. Grind. 308. 309. 156. 200. 268. See also Gynsige. 308. 245. 277. 245. 71. 24o. Gustan or Gustin. Grim. Gomnn. 102. or HuarSccnut.514 OoldHtnti. See also Godcsunc. 383. Gohlwino. Gcldowino. See Godcild. See Godman. 2(X). Grimcetcl or Grimcytcl. 32. 246. 216. Gu«ort. 331. Grimwald. Gowino. 331. 32. 200. 149. 189. 200. lijerred or Herred. 128. 102. See also Crucan. Gunnulf. See Godric. for». 421. 408. 101. 331. 180. Harcin. (Jnnar or Gunor. 331. 245. (lUnno. 246. 442. 303. 383. GiXMlric. Grucan. Grinulc. 331. 422. Guolfwino. Harger. 346. 164. 200. 202. See Golprim. 278. See Colprim. See Godwine. 222. 164. 401. al»n Ooldsigo. Griniolf or Grimulf. 194. 200. 331. S3. 443. (JoSroaii. 191. Hregenrede. 431. II?erra. 2\r>. 455. 299. 191. 303. 164. 83. See also Gniiipir. 246. 375. 164.429. 196. 191. 122. 156. Gunliwat. 132. 245. 331. HarSaciiut. 91. 245. Goltsino. 344. 102. Gyllis. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 458. 380. 279. Gu«rcd. 400. 331. (Jollft. Gunsig. 200. Gundfer». Gotcild. 117. 209. Gnnloof or Gunnlcof. 102. 303. 303. (iotsalin. Gunucrd. Gyldewine. See also Godric. 374. 331. 344. See also Geldcwine. 4r. 345. 245. 158. fJoltaipo. Gunnula. HxTgod or Haregod. 123. Hafgrim. 245. Haregod. 194. 2()<). Gwelic. GuShcre. 28fi. Grininn. 24. HarSecnut. 303. 331. 191. 164. Haculf. 200. 320. 473. Haldbere. See also 331. Hana or Hanen.

Hwateman. See aho Heahmotl. 17. 320. 83. 24. 15. 14. 331. See also Ilrawulf. 56. Heremfretia. 30. Kuniga. 102. 200. 22. Hildred. 71. 102. 451. 9. Heirseric. Hunna. 265. See aho Iluubearht or Hunberht. 102. 32. Herebreht or Herebyrlit. 196. 117. Heriberht. 25. 72. 460. 156. 191. Heriberht. 24. 25. See also Hea«ulf. 200. HaiSelberht. 83. 181. Hebeca. 32. 515 Hateman or HatmaD. 263. 164. 71.. 220. 2 I. 46. 102. Hewulf. ?) 32. 32. 83. 161. 32. 200. 32. 331. 164. Hea«ulf or He«ewulf. 149. 14. 9. Hunfrtd or IIuiifrc«. 24. 123. 200. Hunlaf. Hildulf. 50. 200. Herred. Herebert. Sec also Ilerebiarht. 102. 142.56. 32. or Heauulf. 30. S3. Hildeomert. He«ul. 142. Hereford.II. Hereferd. 104. 102. 102. HaiSebald. 423. Heremund. Hcrebeav. 200. 132. Hereman. 24. Ha«elwold. 123. Herowig. See Herebearht. 202. Heldalt. 331. 50. 40. 331. 112. 27. Hunbein. 1. 27. 142. 200. Hungar. 17. 31. 200. Hiltwine. 200. 32. See Hingolf. 22. 72. bearht. 25. 22. 22.320. 40. Hear^ecnut. Higolf. Hedebeald. Iluneinan. 98. 32. Heardher. 180.5. See Heawulf. Healf. 240. 32. 72. 22. 14. Herric. Hildolf or Hildulf. 133. 91. Horn. 123. 72. 174. 46. 32. 62. 156. Helican. 102. 9. 180. 419. 123. Hiardi. 164. lOS. 200. 32. 71. Hilde. 102. 443. Hrodear or Hro«gar. See Hunna. 200. (Ciresrien Hildsige. 268. Herebearht. 142. Hunewine. 246. 142. 13. Hercbert. or Herebyrht. 71. 216. Hunia. Hundolf or Hundulf. Herwulf. 220. Hingolf or Ingolf. 32. See Har^acnut. 180. He«ewulf. Set also Hcre- Hcahearhf. 200. 107. 246. 40. 9. lluured. Herebreht. Herculf or Hcrouulf. 473. 189. Heauulf. 133. 164. 96. See also Herebearht. 200.303. 357. 180. 24. Hild. 181. 164. 18. 451. See Hildolf. 246. 83. 164. 164. 9. 331. 18. 191. Ileroinod. 246. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 246. or IIerefre<5. 22. Hotaf. 83. Herulf or Hereulf. Hcrebaldor Herebtald. 236. Hlangulf. 164. 200. 123. 22. 32. 102. 83. S3. See also Herigar or Heriger. 142. 164. 9. 21. Hereberht. 98. 32. 164. 123. 27. Herebearht. See also Unboin. 32. 331. Huna. 2 . See also Hserred. 201. Herolf or Horolfcs. 246. Hea«ewi. 246. Hereberht. 17. 123. Heawulf 228. Heregcard.

I2:<. lonana..Vi?. lofcrnnmd. 332. Ira. lolana or lonana. or Isengod. See lustegeii.3. Ste aho 359. 200. 2ix>. 1G4. 1. Ivc. 32. 102. 200. 3fi8. 189.i2. 332. r>32. IIiiHtkn. 246. 320. 13:1 Igereii. llwatiiiiiii. 73. ^32. Ildnbcrht.lrice. 246. lounus. See lustegen. [iW. ISl.V). 332. I'J]. lufinc. 99. Inpuoo?. Iseward. S. Iscula. . 200. 200. See Cynsigf. 200. Icoriff. 246. See aho Ingelrics. Irfara. See also In golf. 200. '2'. 1 12. HuH<l>al<l.aSK. Kuapa. Hv80. 164. Instan.r K. lustin. «. Indolf. 112. . 181. 238. 3. Ifinc (Lifinc?). 216. 72. lorctel. See Isegod.H2. 150. 460. Here. Isgod. 2-i(. 265. lugblet.r. 142. See also lulian. See also loban. Isgod. llwilHt'lllliD. 191. 83. 3.tllfgajt. or lole. ilwaliiiiitiii. 363. Ire. See . Isembert. lora. 92. 452. 372. Ste uhn Indolf and Ilingiilf. 'JiiO. Iiigft. ledulf. 213. 350. I. Ingoir. 1«4. . 161. 396.Ua. VXi. lolcs. Ilvvatiiiriiiii. 102. Kynsige. 216. 191.32. 164. 133. 1S5.tO. 373. luhan. Iflfwine Ifo. 305. . I.21i. 279. 279. 367. I. 11'. ir>0 IIu8. See loin.iket. 246. Inrel.W). 332. 191. 366. 98. 3. Ingclgftr. lohann or lolian. lola. See Cuapa.e Igere. 164. 142. i02. 332. Iiirelel. Ingelberht or Ingelbert.'lfgcht.'SS\. 362. 123. 169. 102. 191. 366. 332.'. 365. IJ'.«n. ^V^ aUo Hntemau mid Watunian. 164. 102. See also Ira. See lolana. Isegol. 142.'Elf\vinc). ludelbard. iir lolla. 164. Iocott!l. Isnel( = Snel?). loi-itel.M. 191. 246. loocreo. Irra. 164. 32. 361. Isegod.:{():i. 102. 155. 246. If. ( = . Iluld. 182. or lustin. 460. 83. JO-J. Iulfer«. 102. 123. lulstan.kctcl. 164. 363. 200. 332. Ingclbcrd.in IMU.l.. 246. 463. Ingelbric^. 303.32. 2(X). 3. «.. Idn. 1(>2. IIiiiiHtun. 83.X •»!• MoNKYKKS. Hiitnirl. 185. 123. lelfi. 200. . Igere. it'. Inpelric or Ing. Ingolfor?. 123. 332. 150. 117. I'. Isidemau. HiiMKiK''. lustein. •M0.332.Tll. 355. Ilunric. or Irra. 200. lua. Isulf. lustegen. 1»)4. IlnnKnfl.

303. Lefei. 454. 216. 319. 233. 332. See aho liCofwiiip. LtofmEer or Leousajr. Leofdffin. Lcocrine. 200. 447. 246. Leofmo«. 401. Lcoewine (=Leofwiae Lcrie. 2(X>. Jjefiiian. 246. 303. 433. 246. Laduu-cr. 200. 220. 363. 246. Leofa. 189. 200. 246. Landac. 164. 325. loO. 327. 451. Ladiner. 443. 381. Leofdag. 228. S3. Leofen or Leofrne. 182. 97. 318. See Leofwi. 200. Lifinc. 191.32. 431. 200. Leof here. 200. Leofno« or Liofno«.e oho LefenaS and Lcmnian. 424. 363. Leofget. See Leofdasi. 246. 293. 332. 246. 275. Lacer or Sacer. 303. IjCofnoS. 303. Lefinc or Lefing. LciftSo*. 365. See ahu Leofwi. See Leofnian. 246. 258. 246. 314. Leifiiic. 332. 3. 102. Landfer«. Leofgar or Leofgajr. 365. 332. Lefwi. 142. See LcofnoS. See Leonitnnn. Leofa. Leofgod. 4(tS. 246. 233. Leofinor. 200. 83. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 303. 832. 2'i0. Lonna. Lanfer. 200. 134. or Lcofhuse. 200. 221. 397. 200. 246. See Leofwold. 246. 303. See Lifing. 303. See aho Leofwine. Lifred.120. 200. II. 164. 200. 279. Lefstan and Swenc. 332. 318. 390. 200. 191. 420. See LonfdaMi. 298. Lajfwi. 303. 389. 246. 246. 517 Leodmaor or LeomjEr. 200. 314. 185. 277. Leofhclm. 189. 24(). 505. Lcofna^. 320. Lefedei. Leofdeg or Leofdegn. ^. 411. Leofn. Leofnel. 200. Lcifwino. 19G. Lefstan. S<'e Leofman or Lcfman. or Liofnd.>e Lefden. 373. 123. 24G. 1G4. See Leofwine. Leofinces. Leofedffig. 200. Lefena« or LefcuoS. 392. 361. 303. See aho Lefinc and LeofnoS. Leof hese. aho Leofric. 308. 303. 224. Leofred. 200. Leisinc. 246. Lecfer<5. See aho Leofstan. 820. 200. Leofdajg. 458. Leofinon. Leofnod. See also Leofena« and Leofinc. or Lodmrer. Lefwold. Leoftnai^. 246. 320. 293. 373. 303. 463. 164.t<ii. 164. 298. 286. or Leoflng. Lcfcetel.. See aho LefenatS and LeofuotS. 384. 200. 277. 320. Landa). or Leva. 274. . 413. . 320. 191. 401. 275. 308. LeofenaS or LeofenoS. also Leofinc Se^ Leofine. Leofhyse. L. 200. 246. S. See aho LeofSegn. and Lifinc. See aho Leofedajg. 164. Lefa. See Lefa. Landwine. 220. ?). 312. See aho Ladmrcr. Leofdaji or Lefedei. Leofajlm. 381. 24^. 246. 308. 117. 460. See Leofena* ami Lefwinc. 332. Lefric. 35'. See also Leofdaig. 401. aho Lioflielm. 164. 332. 344. 431. 332. 200. 332. See aho Locfdegn Lafe. 189. 384. Lood.'. 200.

< or Leofsigo. 460. 4. 440. 261. 424. 332. See Leofwic. Lfofsigo.i. 200. 246. 38G. 44. 286. 411. 284. 277. x\2.. See 32\ 332. 2^/). 200. Leuinc. 332. 371. 240. 228. 224. 303. 3:i2. 200. 246. 42 432. 9. 360. Liadrafen. Lifinc.")1 . 211. Loofwig or Lofwig. 379. Leofword. 312. and Lufinc. 419. 272.'{14. Leostan. 420. 22. 344. 418. Lii. 443. 210. 303. 284.or Lyliuc. 24G. 284. Leomajr. 280. 383.fry. 347. 347. 4G6. -W". 272. 320. :jo:{. 224. Leoric. 22K.fric. I(i4. 332. 215. 332. 383. 315.. 262.i. 246. See Lifinc. See Lefa. Lfofwic. 444. Lifing. 313. See aho 460.xS lt. 3. 112. 278. 307. 408. 32. 384.SVe also Leomun. 1. 171. 359. 303. 191. 435. 295.^. 372. 318. :is8. 164.314. 200. Liabinc or Liabincg. 15C. 260. It. 246. or Lifice. 312. Leowine. 200. See alto Leof- aid. See Leofric. 298. '2:. 162. 431. or 108. 452. 392. Li-ifDMl anil nnin. 397. 17. 458. See Ixjofwine. Lewerd. 164. 200. 282. 460. 210. 293. 27. 473. 332. 25. See aho Lcofdogn. 246. INIiKX OF MONEYEllS. 297. 279. See also Leofwig. LeofiDc. 445. l. Li'ofstaii.l. 246. 425. 292. 164. 427. 228. 317. 274. LfMifrir. 161. 298. Ijifwini^. Leofwi. 460. Leomrcd. aho Lajfwi and Lcfwi. 246. 303. 270. Leowidi. \X\. 16. 41. 309.4. See Leofman. Leowsige. Lific Leofwint'. 411. 284. See Leofstan. 246. 102. 240. 293. 345. Loofwold or Liofwold. 344. 320. 345. 358. Leonig.372. 386. 448. Lcofsuuu. 21M. Levig. 226.8. 450. 240.518 II. 303. Liafiuc. 1 1 :i2>. 104. 303.'>4. 282. 286. See also Leofmser. 150. 440. or Lofric. Loofsi.464. 332. Lifiiio. 21G. 404. 4GG. 326. Liofinc. ICO. 357. or Liof- wino. 220. Leowic. 320. Leva.389. Lcofstegt'D. 2 :u:{. 419. 142. 246. 22 G. 30. 279. 277. 246. 315. 456. '^IH. 200. Lcofsif. 401. 413. 208. 280. 374. Liofweard. 170. 439. Leostan. 121. 226. See aho Lefstan and Lifstau. 1. 413. 353. 374. 200. 228. 224. 377. 221. 473. 408. 404. Leofwine. 451. 27:^ 278. 443. 32. 320. 22. 441. 4 GO. Liofwcrd. 3:!2.5. 319.2J^. l')0. See Leofsige. 332. 371. Liofstaii. LeofSegen or Leof«cgn. 280. Leowine. 134. lot. 332. 332. 24i!. 3. 211. 195. 303. Liuba or Liuba. 37. 228.200. 290.")5. Lijolword. 464. 190. 471. 102. 4i. 200. 200. 270. 327. 332.. Lifere. 288. Lerman. 2S9. 444. 229. . 217. 246. 423. 200. 295. 350. 332. 396. 451. 388. 420. 212. . 246. 303. Leoraman or LcmiuaD. 332. 246. 358. 449. See aho Lifinc. 164. or Leofward. Loofwiiic. Liafwald. 295. 284. . 4t. See alao Lefinc.401.32. 408. 422. Loof8i. 293. 246. ward. 458. 12:{. . 303. Leowi or Leowii. UM. 210. 282. 200. 4. i:il. 123.). 156. i56. 4i.303. 457. 307. Loofrino.0. 303. 473. 351.!). 277. 326. 470. 452. 320. 317. Leo«an. 239. 229. 427. 342.

102. 471. 200. 345. Liofiieu. 200. 450. 73. 33. 300. 200. Liuba. Log. Ma)ld or Mfuldomen. 383. Lofwig. 200. or Lycoman. 383. 386. Lofman. 303. Liofeuod. See Lcofman. 200. 200. See also Lcofwiuc. Litehnan. Liofuo«. 438. 332. 303. See also Lcofstan. See also Leofhelci. 2H'. Liofsige. 388. 111. 190. 284. 24G. Ludeca. See Leofwig. 217. 123. 135. 134. Liwing. 164. 25. See also Leofsige. :i:{2. Lufa. Lytinian. 246. 246. 246. 102. 390. See Living. 455. Liofstan. . 332. See Ladiiia. 73. See Liaba. 102. Lifwidya. or Litman. See Lytclinan. 332. M. 433. Ligobird. 164. 401. Lyceman. Lyva. 164. Majgrcd. 445. See also Leofward. 246. Lowman. Liofwine. Lufestan.in. See also Leofred. 303. 213. 440. 240. Luferic. 200. Liouiiig. Lulla. Lufric. 246. 408. 246. 411.191. 200. 200. See Leofric. Lifwinc. 200. Luda. Lueinc. 347. See also Lifiuc. 435. 383. Living or Liwing. 444. 229. See Lyefea. 282. Lodmtur. S3. Liftitan. also See Leofred and Liofred. 314. 246. 277. See also Leofno<5. also Leufric. 123. Lifwine and Hurn. 0. 246. 381. 332. Ludig. 16. 332. Livcgod. 332. 117. LiofwoM. 33. 332. See Leofsige. 200. 279. Litclmnn or Litilman. 123. 74. See Lcofstau. 58. 332. 374. 332. Liofmau. 332. Lindwin. 228. 460. 277. Liofric. 33. See Leofston. See Lcofwine. Luceman See also LiofnoS. Lyefca or Lyva. Lind. 33. 445. 246. Lyfinc. 200. 332. 413. 424. See also Lytulinan. 332. 24G. Lyfsye. 22. See Lufstan. 224. Loda. 25. 123. 332.r. Luffinc or Lufinc. Liofn.II. 423. 352. See Livogod. 164. 22. Liufgod. 1 10. See also Lifiuc. ]02. 332. Lude.. 221. Lufie. 279. See also Luceman. 30. 2i6. 332. 420. 1G4. Lioeri. Liwine. Lufwine. 246. Liofwcard or Liofwerd. Lofwine. 332. Liofiuc. 134. 277. 290. 420. 332. 246. 200. See Lcofwine. 246. 200. MadsuSan or Ma-lsuSen. 332. See also See also Lcofwine. 344. 404. 347. 519 Lifred. 200. Ltofwuld. 332. Lofric. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 390. 425. 320. Liofhclm. 433. 112. or Ludda. 200. Ludia. <SVe a/so 20<). 27. 332. 425. See Leofric. Macsu<5. Lifinc. Lumar. 200. 200. 401. 32. 423. 200. 200. Luning. 200. Liofred. 156. Lifsig. 332. 168. Srr also Lylelman. Liiman. 134. 381. 377. 246. See Leofric. 246.

Mnnac. 1. Mannicen. 14. 120. 214. Marbcrt. Manolct. . 102. Melsdon. 24G. 83. Mansigc. 194. Manaii. Mere wine. Mann.'). 164.i. loi). See also Mansat. Manwine. 12. Man. Mata«an and I\ratc«an or 102. 24G. 125. 164. and Martin. Man. 140. 200. 57. 159.3. 136. 332. S3. 280. 191. Mai. 118. Maninc 25. 33'2. Mnnnn. IGO. 162. 33. 22. 183. 246. 31. 395. 142. 356. 17. 355. <ir See nhn Mann. 5G. 246.4. 2t6. See aho IVIrRrtin Manrrent. 294. 155.'>. Nelican. See also Manticen. 15. See ^lannecin. N.020 II. 303. Matan. 164. 13. Mnpnnrd. Mugenfre*. Moglu. OF MONEYERS. 27. 200. 136. 9.S. Manna. !». 214. 345. Balluc. 332.303. 2.5C. liancrent. 246. 246. Norulf. Moelf. Mon«egen or MonSign. 170. 190. i. Marctr or Marcere. Sri' aim Martin nnd J(>2. Nancrent.-). 288. — INDEX l•^r^. 135. 183. Man. See Maninc. Miurtin and Mcrtin. Mi-rtin. also Mnning. 17. 13!). Manna. also Nanan. Mertin. Maning Mann. 112. See Manne. Mangwl. 2(X>. See JIan. 102.3G. 201. 187. Mana. 182. 280. See Herebeald. Mcgored. Manngod. 246. 246. 102. . 142. 27. 112.S'" Mus. /"!'. 246. Nansige. 231. Nanue. Nerebeald. 104.. 303. Mnnnc. Mat«an. 174. 125. Marciri. See Mat«an. ir.leof. See also iMannic. Manticen. 2. Nerebeuer. See Man. 19. ManetKl. 123. 142. See aho Megred. See aho MatciSan.1. i«. 320. 344. 164. 112. See Morcere. 31(5. i:. 123. Moleman. 164. Martin. 200. 278. See. 156. 246. Mancca. 191. 332. 102. 332. 470. 34«. Nor»berd. Ma«elwoId. 102. 123. 15G. 151. 191. IGt. See aUo Morcere. 4r. See alao Hanorent. . 2fil. See Helican. 2<)(). 191. 164. Nieici. 4. Munred. See aho Marcere. Manetn. 164. -See Manugwl. M/vrloii or MuTlin. Nebeca.3. 102. 123. Mna. 142. See Maning. 356. 109. Manning. 332. Mansat. 17. Manning.'58. Maniu'. See Hebeca. 201. See also Alanine. . Norbert. Morre.»t. 123. 33. Sre. 191. 183. 74. 332. 200. 347. See Herebearbt. 144. Marrirale or Marsceale. 114. or Manninc. Mali.7. . 142. Mantat. KJ. 304. Miin. Nau«mn.. 18. 18.t2. Mcgred. 142. 164. Manninc. :i0. 154. 123. 102. 123. 175. 80. H>. 33. 110. 18. Mangod. 200. or Morgna. 71. 431.0. Na^an.

228. See (dm Oiiniud. See Ogeman. See Oda. 303. See aho Ordric. 246. 247. Ogn. 50. 201. 247. 14. 201. 123. 201. Osric. 201. 247. See aho Osulf. 332. . 21. 209. 332. 193. 142. 270. 123.5. No«ulf. 273. Odo. 246. 142. aho Osmund. 110. 191. 83. 104. 27. 201. Oecinan. 203.swie. 405. 201. Onlai. 109. 278. 130. 83. OslryS.234. 211. See aho Oswold. 279. Oe«rlieri Ofi'. 102. See aho Osbern. Oban. Osbern or Osberen. 1G4. Osbearht. 201. 411. 102. 201. 201. 247. Ordulf. 201. 201. 22. Oslac. 246. 321. 212. Oswald.371. See Oda. Oba. See aho OrtSric Oswi or 0. 123. Odu. 223. Ordrec. 191. 83. 17. 18. Oslaf. 247. 340. 400. Nimbeaiit or Nutibeurlit. 320. 247. 15. O. O^wig. 247. Odan. 201. 102. 151. See Osfer*. 102. 521 Nor«gar. 247. 4. 201. 142. 133. 247. 247. 332. Osgeard. 201.sgriiu. 25. 136. 99. Oierbd. Ogca. See OrSric. Osgar. 220. 332. 1G4. 415. 320. Osfram.33. 332. or Oswulf. 102.1. 92. 238. 279. Odda. 246. Oswart. 123. Oia. 22. 201. Oswerd. 142. 102. Oinuud See or Oaimnnd. 164. 201. Osbam. 434. 320. 471. Oscetel or Oscytel. 432. See aho Osgod. 151. 393. 201. 33. Osuerd. 394. 2'. 205. 31. 201. 20. 164. . 238. Onuraan. 201. 33. 191. 6. Ordbrigbt or Ordbriht. 240. See Oban. 332. 215. 303. Osmund.210. 142. 150. 142. 191. 201. 102. 225. 406. 123. No^cr. Ode. 123. 247. 201. Nor«man. 123. 201. 241. See Boiga. Osward. [= 0«elric?]. 9. 191. 300. 247. 22. See Oda. 247. 246. 102. Osulf. Odea. 164. 209. 201. 460. 413. 2n. fi. 190. 201. 220. 33. See O^grim. 164.<o Osward. Ondred. Osalf. 219. 74. Orlaf. 409. See aho Oda. 320. 303. 415. 240.II. 1. 201. 104. 24(k Oda. Osgod or Osgot. Odgrim. Orist or Orst. Hunbearht. 151. o. 102. S'-e «/. 391. 229. 118. 270. See Omynd.)7. 123. Nvbald. Odcotel. Oigft. Ordric. 83. 384.118. 173. Osgut. 282. 189. See Oda. OsferS. Osmajr. 33. See Osulf. 332. Osolf. 109. 247. 2i). 14. 183. 247. Osuulf. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 214. 201. 280. 164. 196. 419. 247. 24(5. 25. 303. 341. Osherc. Obn. Osalf. aho 191. 17. See aho Osgut. 225. 1. 201. 164. 320. aho Omund. 332. 303. 201. 241.

. Str also OiSgrim. 269. and OiScncar. 137. 303. 359. 191. 0<5inne. 380. Prin.'{85. alai) OXbuorn. \'2:\. 247. 370. Pastor. 332. Rjcnulf. 332. 222. 3:J'J. 201. 201. t»!5riiii. 109. 102. 394. 137. 463. Oiidwl i)r OuJScel. :U0. 123. P. 2-17. Regenold. 164. 368. OuJSgriin. 370. 281. 247. 463. 164. «/w Osuir. 247. ( Ou»bcni.V. 367. 0«bi. See Wororic. Uu8olf. 142. 369. 164. Reedes. 368. 83. 223. OSin. OuMtinan. 164. 123. 'M'J. Owulsipe. OSoncar. Prim. 321. Rffidulf. 396.-efen. 269. 303. . 110. Rasgenald. 92. 151. 332. See nUu) Uitwalil. 215. 367. 365. R. 821. 332.l:t2. l(i-J. 321. 392. OXon. Randulf. Otwiiie. OSboni. 332. 201. 189. 164.?. Sfc also OuiScncnrl.303. 460. 142. 201. 360. See aho Ou«olf. 118. 0«born. 102. 362. 332. Raifin. or 0»barn. 332.}(». 0«ulf. Pororic. 247. 201. 315. 189. 332. 201. OSctiofTCl. 369. 142. 201. 247. Set! 0»urim. Kadstan. See also OutSenciirl Raeienold. 120. Eadcr. 321. aho OutUbiarn. or 0«born. See aho OSin. 247.S. 303. 420. OiiSLcnrii or 4iU). 247. Rajgonold. 268. J 56. Regenward. Ou}5uiicarl. aho Rasfen. 0«elric. 109. 08«encar. or Ou««ulf. 395. 332. 201. 313. 247. S3. 247. Regengrim See or Regegrim. or Paulus. 137. 303. 0«bcran. 102. and OJSSincar. See Wirim. See 0«grim.olf. 332. 33. IJ^i. 395. 310. 123. 362. 247. Ou«ulf. 359. 201. 164. 109. 92. Ricgenulf or Ranulf. Rafn or Rafun. 394. R. .522 OHwiiic. . 11. Kaeduine. OSgriin.Vi?. See aho Ou^grim. 123. 332. 332. 201. carl alw OuScn- Otic. 151. See 164. OJSgriiij. 303. OSaii. Pirim. 303. See Rafen. ( See aho OSan. or 0»inno. 83. 123.SVi. 269. 247. 247. )u»cel. 123. See also Rffigcnulf. or 0S<5in. 4G0. »?. 0»«cnc!ir. 332. an. . 201. 368. 0««in. 821. 102. 268. 123. •lliO. OiSin. Price. See Oawiilf. 0»beorn. Rajgenbald. 303.•*«' Regingsed. OXhIoc. 118. See OSbeorn. aho Reingrim. 102. 360. 368. Paul. . OSflrilit. ()8W<)I(1. 30. ll:i.— INDEX OF M0NEYER8. 2i>l. 'MC. 366. 365. 360. Paules. 118. 2-20. 102. OSinn. 123. 0«tTun. See also 0»an. 142. 102. . 362. 0«in. OuiSiicar or Pitit. See Regenold and Regnald. 2i7.

— INDEX OF MONEYERS.II. 102. 106. r)23 Rcgnald. .

IIS.3. Siiebearn. 201. See also Sneabom also or Sneaburn. 201. SigLftrT>. Sigar. See aha Sn^wine. 428. 247. Siwaldor Siwoltl. 332. — INUKX <iF MONKYliUS. SitSwine. 374. Sigcherc. Snewine. li. \2'3. 102. 247. 71. 2()1. Snolf. 14. Sigot. See also Suae- SiiecoU. Sigear. 332. 3:!. 121. 288. Siuard or Siuerd. 463. 201. 247. Sirjcnd. Soxbyrlit. Siric. Sigeulfor Sigeluf.. AVfl nl»o Snitwiiu". 368. 1G4. Sue also SiJe- Sililodil. SiferS. Sibcfxla. 138. 271. 152. 164. Snsewine. 138. 102. 173. 92. 109. 201. Smertcali. Sigi-drall. 232. 123. 461. Sigesti f or Siestef.024 Srifrril. 187. See Saswine. S'-e also Sino«. Sibwiiio. 303. Sired or Siredd. 33. 92. 332. born. 118. 359. 832. 284. 332. 102. 201. 297. Siolf. Snebeom. Sigar. Sigewulf. Sneawine. 74. 138. I Smala. SibMue. 143. •/'»". 297. 'Z'i. Sil)oda. 123. 102. Sigeber«. 25.152. 247. Smerel. 201.l. Snebeam. 201. 321. Sigboda or Sigebode. 247. 247. 84.55. Sigeares. Sigfoldes.418. Sigwold. or j SnEcbeorn. Silac. 107. 102. 1. 123. 460. 438. 332. 332. 247. 102. Sigares. 367. 57. 201. 236. 25. 247. Sigeric. 2()1. Siwerd. 247. 247. Snseborn. iimn. 143 143. See aho Sedeman and Siademan. Snoter. Sigebran. 367. Sneling. Siwold. See Snsebeom.347. Sigewiiic. 366. 400. 20i. SiefercS. 22. 1. Sipoda. 228. 164. 102. 247. 201. 370. 102. 12. See Sidwine. Snel or Snell. 460. 247. Sift-rt. 332. 201. 8owiiu>. See also Siboda.228. 201. Siewinc. See also Sigestef. Sneaburn. 332. 2()1. 84. Sigboda. 84. 2t7.lcH. 247. -I'il. Siegrcd. 20i. Sueaborn. 92. Sidemau. 201. 341. See Sigar. 332. 439. Siestef. 201. SwcHiimn. 247. 247. 2-17. See Siboda. Sigeland. Sigod. 20i. Sigear or Sigeares. 368. Sibriht. 429. Sigodia. 102. 33. 201. Ccutwiuc. Suebeorii. ScrcloiiiM. 411. 102. 332. 56. Sneil. 102. or Suewine. Simun. Sidewinc or Sidwine. Sotmim. 57. 366. Sibares. 247. Sigetiuald. beorn. 247. 201. or Sibodf. Simlcinaii. Ses also Sajwine. 123. or Sneboru. 123. 143. 303. Sibil. 33. 321. . Sre nhn SefnJS. 370. S<M)lfa or Sy. or Sne! Sihares. 332. 2t)l. Sfic Hirtino. 342.3.

303. 365. 303. Spragelinc. Styrgar. or Sumerly(]. Spraecaling. also Swartcol. 266. 370. 247. Spracelinc. See also Stircer. 332. Swatic. 222. S4. See also Stircar and Swartebrand or Swartefrand. 333. See Swartgar. 266. 123. 341. Stircol. 201. 201. . See Swearta. 247. 119. 333. 247. 360. 369. See Spot. Spraceling. Sunegod. 201. 278. 280. Steiugrim. 367. 277. Sti«ulf. &c. 75. or Swcrt. 102. Swcartinc. Suartcol. 279. 333. 247. Sumerlr. Sumerleda. 353. Swartic. S4. 332. . 473. 333. Sunolf. See Suince. See Staengrim. 2i7. or Swertebrand. 267. Spronene. See aUo Sweart. 201. Stircer. 432. Stegeubit. Stefanu. Swarcolf. 2G3. Staniiiajr. 280. 364. Suinolf. Sumlos. 390. 233. 351. 333. 278. See also Sprace- Spraecaling. Sprot. Swartafa or Swertafa. 370. 303. or 247. 333. 271. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 408. Sumerluda. 201. 525 Soemud. Sunulf. 247. Swartcol. See also Swart. 247. Stefhan. Swarafuc or Swerafuc. 280. 247. 102. 101. 312. Swartgar or Sweartcar. 333. SeeaigoSwearfing. 303. See Stircar. &c. 215. 364. 332. 201. 247.-f. Sweartcar. Surtiiic or Syrtinc. 332. 332. 303. 333. 102. 266. See also Sprace- See Sumerled. Sumerlyd. Sumerled. Steland. Stewer. Stcengrim or Steingriin. 201. Swafa. 247. Ste Steorcer. 464. 247. 280. 303. 247. 332. 280. 201. 191. 33. 201. Sutere. 460. 201. II. Sumred. 207. 332. I Steorcer. Staner. Sweartcol. Styrcol. 201. Stircar or Stircer. 284. 460. 449. 464. linc. 293. 266. Spragelinc. 364. 303. 463. 201. Stircer. I Swearling. Steorccr. 247. ! Styrcar. 455. 456. See Sumerleda. 303. Stircol or Styrcol. 201. Si ire. Swartinc. Sota.. 247. 453. 303. 305. 143. 460. 191. 247. 455. Stirceore. 231. 450. 102. 247. 321. Sumerle^a. 240. Spot. Swart. 303. 247. :3ir. 247. Sweart. 265. linc. 473. 247. 164. 247. Sweartabrand See also Swartcol. Sundeid. See also Swot. 365. 390. Sre also Swetinc. or Swyrtinc. 247. 247. 352. See Stear. 408. Suetinc. 332. 201. Sweartcol. Swearta. 247. 303. 201. 286. Sumerluda. 247. 469. 333. 201. 303. Stegenciel. 312. or Swertcol 20i . See Sumerled. also Swartinc. Swertinc. Sprouiild. 460. 333. Swan. Sunrdde. 451. 460. 460. 321. 247. aho Swart. Sumerlida. Sueman. Spraful. Surclos. 247.

84. '217. Hylxida. 201. 416. 341. Swertcbrand. 102. Swogon. 260. Swciirtliiip. 19. 231. 247.{09. 411. 26. 247. 247. 417. or Tirueald. 9. 33. 33.472. nV MONKYKIJS. 303. 143. i. Swegn. 247. <">. 201. Tileuino.400. Swciirliiu'. Tideman. Tidgar or See also Swarafuc. Tiotes or Totes. Swet or Sweta. 3. Tata. 22. 333. 1. Swetric. 143.434. 11)4. 201. -PiO. 2-17. 201. Tiruald 75. 321. See Timbearht. 57. 40. See also Swartinc.irtinK H>0. 247. 471. Swerlinc. 19. Tidbald.UH(). 58. Si-e Tilefein. •MO. 25. li-Jl. 333. aUo Hwoiirl- Syoloa. — INUKX HHiJ. Net. See Swetinan. SwcrUfn. 102. 5i.465. 277. See also Sweartiug. 303. 229. Svvcrafuc. Toga. 33. Swoiio. 33. 84. See also Tiotes. See also Toca. 229. '201. 8igl)0da. 25. 299. 1. Ti«bearht. 123. 277. See Swartafa. '^47. 8uctinc. Torhthelm. 210. See also Toca. 247. Torhtulf. 303. Tidrcd. 266. 333. Swc. 201. Sedcmaii. oho Swart and Swcarta. Tuna. 247. 191. Swotric. 333. 51. 6. 333. 321. 212. Swmculf.r>2(» II. 293. 143. Swctuian.57. 247. 241. 213. 247. Torbtwald. 247. or Swote. Swcrtcol. Swcrting. Swreliuc. aho 6wcrtinc. or I7. 201. 333. 247. 231. Tolsi. inp. 304. Tuda. 102.t. 15. 280. 109.3. 333. 333. 102. 442. 201. Tuma. 247. Swiloman or Swilman. S4. 1. See also Spot. H33. See aha Toci. . Srr. 247. 303.SVc nho Hwarlinc. 364. 27. 280. Swomiin. Swert. 247. 50. :UW. 321. Tyloadrcx. Tuneman. 333. Swi'MC. '247. 75. . Tila. 191. 266. Trotan. Sweartabrand. 96. Tilcuuiiic. or Tiluuine. 171. 280. 238. 201. Si-c. Telia. 102. 109. 22. Hcolca. 31. 247. 201. Sydfiiiiiii. Ti. 75. Byrtinc. . 164. . 228. or Tooca. Tummo. Tooca. 201. Si'i. T. Swetinc. See Swartcol. 3U3. 93.152. 353. Swyrling. 7. 201. 33. 215. 212. 201. Turstan. See Hurtinc. 404.lgcr. SwTiiiit. 20i. 333. Swcnccl. 201. 415. 333. Swot. 201. . 422. 247. Swc«au. 201. 33. Tileuoie. Swota. G. Swetya. 247. Totes. 257. 1. 9. 321. Swcrtinc or Swyrtinc. 9. See also J?ui8tan. Toga. 102. 421. Torbtmund. Toca. Swvrtiuc. Swcflu-anl <'T Swinunl. SwyrcUnc. 1. 50. 'irnJ.SVc Timulf. 110.469. 120.

310. 100. 143. 396. 1 10. 84. ^7. 57. also Wulfrfig. 143. Ihilgiat. 102. 93. also Uuilaf. 201. 33. See also UinoS. 333. 394. 120. 460. 223. Uuelheard. 143. Ulfe. Ulf. Ulfcil or Ulftil. See also Uuealdheard. See also Uino«. 115. UmerS. 527 U. 22. 26. 464. 364.II. Uulfrcd or UulfrcS. Uinas. Uuarin or Warin. 84. See also Wulfred. 269. Uuilebert. 304. 93. Willieal). 215. 20. .3. 201. 247. 143. Uri. 201. 460. Ulgebert. 1(52. 22. 369. or UlflF. 16. 14. 16. 22. 143. 321. Uualeman. 25. Ustinan. 138. 33. 382. 333. 20. Ulanccard. l. 201. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 76. 77. 138. See also Uuillaf or Uuilluf. Uulfheard. 93. Uceade.V2. 26. 84. 341. 164. 123. 202. Ulfcytel. Ucede. 33. 201. Wulfgar. 102. ICI. 123. 22. 191. 191. 156. 143. Uermund. Unbein. 201. 119. 84. 84. 222. Urlewine. Uilhemt. 76. l(t9. 96.">6. 103. 84. 366. . Unbegn and 360. See Uuilric. Uilfred. 19. 93. 9. 33. 190. Uulfard or Uulfeard. 80. 102. 94. 222. 119. Utti. 143. 184. 123. Uulfsig or Uulfsige. ?). Ulftil. Uuinctin. 2G. 84.33. 360. 123. 333. 155. Iluuboiu. 9. 395. Uuildaf.. 99. 333. 84. 391. 152. See Ulfcetel. 102. See aha Uigbald. Uulfman. 31. Uuilheah. Uuinier or Uuiniger. Uulgar. 110. 84. 33. 84. 102. 123. Unswac. 76. 20. 247. Uuilaf. Ulfcetel or Ulfcytel. See Winas. Uulfgar. 14. Ulfe or Ulff. 369. 278. 33. Uuariner. 3. 152. 304. Uuefred. ll!t. Ulfhi. 367. 102. 143. Udfe. 9. 26. Uuelmlieard. 9. 247. See Wulfman. 123. 152. Ulfbeorn. Ulfgrim or Wulfgrim. 201. ami Uccdce. 26. See also Ulfcetel. 247. 304. 181. 22. Uuitelm. Uuilsig or Wilsig. 93. 217. 223. See See purstiin. Uigbald or Uuigbidd. 201. Unolf. 124. 392.33. 84. Uillaf. Uuigbald. 340. 214. 153. Uuine.")5. 109. 27. Uuerstan. 9. 370. Uuealdhelm. 333.138. See aluo l. 247. 113. 26. 333. Uhitred. Uillaf. 201. 119. Uulfstun. 365. 404. 22. Urstan. Uilno«. See also Uuajrin. See also Wiilfstun. 84. 366. See also Unbegn. See Ulfcil. 84. Uuealdheard or Uuelbeard. 143. Uilitmund. UuiferS or Wiferd. 201. 102. See also Uulfheard. l. Uuiorin (Wariu Uualdfrc?. 247. Uuilfrctl. Uuihtes or Uuihtseg. 164. 19. See Ulf.

103. 247. '2<i. 140. 333. S4. Si. 143. Uimt" iirlil. Wcrlaf. 247. WicH8«. 196. II. Wilebald. or Widua. Wigard. Wengos. 333. 123. 333. 3S0. 297. Uyi. Wvii. "Walrafin. 333. Widred. Wrelgist. 247. See aho Wihtsige or Wihtsie. 139. 201. Wilgrim. 8l. See Wincg<j8. 304. 164. "NVarimer. 247. 375. 123. 201. 201. :i3. Wigcro«. 281. 555. Wrolricfen. aho Ilwataniau. •J(ll. 304.9. Wcidts. 318. Welgist. 138. U«tlric. Wiicir. Wcdloe. 94. 81. 304. 191. 333. 247. See aho Wyusige. 84. 333. Wanstaii. 152. See Wunstan. 1-^ l-'iS. 331). 446. 121. 201. 440. 123. See aim Wrclgist. 293. !»!. Sn nho l'jiili<»rlit. Waleist. 247. See Wa^del. 217. Or Wigheard. 321.-^ijje. 156. 555. Wamnnca. Wilgrid. WaMoe. or WigSee Wielrajfeii. 143. 201. Wilfrid. Werheard.?. 2-17. 11"-'. Uiiarin. 240. heard. 301. 78. 217.528 rnlmiiiKl. or Welgist. Warin or Uuariu. 247. Warn. 304. 456. Wibearn. 201. Walrsoffen. 2()1.>7. Sec aho Wensigc. Wesig. 333. S>e Wiulgist. 247. 9. Wighard. See Wadlos. See aho Wiliegrip S-e aho ruilhcab. 247. 432. 103. WiliBgrip or Wilgrip. 460. 240. Wcrtiric. WigferS. IS. I'Jt. 84. 380.. Wultt t. See Wadlos. 7. Wida. 123. 191. Waltfor«. Wigeard. 143. aho Wudia au<l Wydia. AVihred. 123. 262. See also 0«clric. 201. Wihtemund. Walter or Walterc. 333. Wilgrip. 1(>:'. 201. rti\ii«iK<'. 333. 9. 19. See aho Swertinc. VVelric. See Winred. Uiiymlm. 247. 3. Wariiigod. 304. lO. 123. W. Wffidcl or Wicdell. INDKX OF MONKVKHS. 304.il. Wiping. 103. Wuleist. 1. WwUes. 304. 307. 2f. . Walrjvffen. 380. See Waslrajfuu. 304. See Wilebeart. 448. Wilebert. 333. 247. 247. 310. Wilcric. Ware. Widfara. S. 193. 247.l. Wadlos or Wa«los.'. Weineali. White. 448. aho Uuynburht ami Wyuliurht.304. Widia Widig or Widica. 247. Wedcl. 304. Wighard Wigniier. 84. 164. 201.. W( IH.li. Wiard. Watiiman or Watcman. Willicab. . Walrafen. 55. See Widia. 103. 191. See Wadlos and Wedles.ftiht or Uyiibirhl. 333. or Widige. 22.. Wsolrefun. 103. Isit. Wilerif.'l. Wiferd. 358.22. Sir ohn Wilmund. Wcliihcrlit. 304.:e 447. lIiijiilxTliI or Wuihrrl.

See also Winas. 123. Windecild. Wulfbald. 1. 416. 412. 260. 321. Wudia. 304. 202. 248. 413. Wulcred. Wulfgut. 396. Wlac^egen or WlancSegn. 202. or Wulborn. Wudeman. 247. 247. 170. 260. See also Winedajig. 333. 202. 202. 333. Winterfugel or Winterfuhel. Winsan. 218. Winas. 393. 156.II. Winemes. Winean. 365. 333. 304. 328. 304. . Wororie. Wirinc. Win or Wiun. 402. 304. 248. WiSirwinne. Winedeig. 248. 333. 217. 248. 184. 356. 304. 247. 191. Wilsig. Wulfgcat. Wulffine. 258. 164. Wirim. Winuc. See Wynsige. 393. 415. 187. Wulf. 194. 313. Windig. 164. 304. 153. 333. 395. 454. 219. 248. 2 M . See also Wulfbeorn. 333. 316. See also Wulbeom. 248. 388. 304. 460. Wiryn. 321. See Wulerine. 248. 380. 119. 247. 164. 202. 304. Winsi. 266. 248. also Wimuud. 304. 202. See also Uuilsig. -See Wiltraud. Wilmund. 123. Wengos. 248. Wulfbeorn or Wulfbern. 353. 373. Winus. 202. Winn. Wulbern. 298. 387. 103. 384. Wiusige. 333. Wintrcd. See Winstan. 333. 321. also Wulfno«. 173. WiSerwinne. 333. 460. Winedajig. 430. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 317. 333. 310. 460. Witil. 153. 201. 333. 333. 321. 143. 247. Wi«ering. 248. also Widia. 529 Wilinc. 304. 469. 202. Wulenno«. See Win. 321. 191. Winred or Wynred. Winegod. 333. 248. 202. 298. 313. Wulfgar or Wulgar. Wuldar. 333. 164. 24S. 248. 139. 103. 333. 248. See also Winus. 465. 309. Winstan. Wine or Winne. 333. 196. See Wulfcetl. 443. 103. 304. 396. winue. 287. WiSering. 304. Winterleda. 103. 333. See Wadlos. 202. 350. 19G. Wode. 84. 408. Wunstan and Wynstan. 202. 460. 333. See Wulbeom. 281. 1G4. Wulfget. Wi«rin or Wi«rinc. Wulfolm. 321. 313. Winne. Winele. Wulfah. See also Wine. 364. 304. Winegear. See also Wi«ir- Wilno«. See also Wulceet. Wincgos or Wynegos. Wuldric. Wraca. 258. 164. 427. 473. 2i7. 247. 404. 202. 164. 333. 270. 139. 300. 202. Wircma. Wulferd. 22. or Wulfgit. 460. 248. Witlos. 202. 143. 216. 164. 304. 291. 333. Wineman. Wilne. Wulfeh. 248. See Wulfget. See Wulfwine. 402. 304. 143. 156. Winenr. also Wulfci. or Wiuedig. See also Uulfgar and Uulgar.

259. 304. 333. orWulsige. 463.. •J'j:. 400. 104. 222. 339. 333. 372. 304. 374. 355. 311. 261. See also Wiilfstan. 143. Wulsi or Wulsie. 402. 216. 2<>2. 333. Wulwine. 373. 465. 432. 396. 321. 2trJ. 225. W^ilsiceod. 333. 469.1 — INDKX i:W. 321. 234. 333. 229. Wunsigc. 402. 304. 291. 333. Wulfwi. . 248.O. 3. 313. 304. 196. 381. 350. WiilfK'. 420 Wulsige. 227. 282. 34. 2 IS. 237. See also 248. 304. 386. Wulfward. 202. Wulwig. 304. 102. 333. or \Vuliio«. 351. Wulno«..459. 333. 299. 357. Wulfwie. 273. Wulsig. 397. 276. i/»'i?. 396. 358. 202. 327. Wulfred. 387. 164. 387. 4iJ. 258. 416. 282. 470. 304. 224. 286. 299. 413. UJ. 248. 402. 271. 304. 373.r. 248. 356. 262. aliut 10:{. 347. 355. 274. OF MCXN'HVKUS. Wiiinulm. ^*"• I 257. 202.430. 333. Wuln-. 321. 460. 21)1. 397. 321. WnlfK-riin. 191. 333. 173. Wulfstin. 229. 402. 1. W^ilward. 239. 196. 304. 427. 387. 333. 258. 304. Wullaf or Wyllaf. 298. Willful f.S" Wiill^'. 428. .$0l. Wulfsig. 405. See aho Wulfwi. 402. 460. 271. 821. 202. 462. Wulmajr. 333. 308. See also WulfnoS. 333. 1C4. See Wulfred. See Wulfred. Wul. 423. 312. 202. 321. m. 333. 164.5. 424. 346. 21G. 457. . 202. 257. Wulget. 194. 257. 333. lli:'. 298. Wulfwurd. 196. ir^'rim. 24S. See Wulfwine. 469. Wiilli. 218. 123. 804. 24S. 304. W' ulsig or 271. 373. See also Wulfget. WulfnoS and WulnoS. 413. See 313. 412. 2iS. 333. 212.i.458. 190. 279. 164. 287. 267. 405. 202. 426. 348. 191. See also Wulfgar. 281. 202.ir. 24S. 248.illnmr. 202. 239. 175. Wynsigo. 308. 355. Wullfwiuf. 27G. See also S-e also Uulfsig. 408. 164. 266. Wunsi. Wulfi'lin. li'JG. 234. 333. See also Wulfward. 281. 233. 191. 432. 262. 308. 287. See also Wulfwig or Wulwig. See also Uulfstan. Wulfsige. 416. Wuustau. 'J02. 225.. 379. 24S. 416. 430.J3. 308. 420. 248. 276. Wjustau. 382. 210. 333. See Wulgarcs. 2(iU.at) . 191. 382. See also Wulfwig. See WulfreJ. or Wulstan. 4H0. 24S.i«. 209. 304. 153. 202. "Wulmar. 289. 24S. 311. Wulhed. WiilfiioS 393. 267. W^ulred. 460. Wiilfiimn or Uulfiuiin. Wulfstau. 248. 248. 202. 457. 321. 378.438. Wulfsi. AVulfmnl. 333. 333. 346. W. 413. 355. or Wulmer. 315. 397. 350. 460. or Wulwinc. 248.422. 304. Wulstan. 413. Ste ul^ Wiilfwino. See Wynsi. 237. 333.'nr or See Wulfward. 304. 304. ir. 202. ^Vulfric. See also Wulenno*. 467. 349. 230. 333. Wtilfryd. 214. a41. 327. 405. 412. 312. 276. Wulwi. 321. 248.423. 359. 333. 111. 211. 408. See also Wulfmtcr. Wulfsig. 103. See aho Uulfred. 269. WuUfwiac. Sre Wulfwi. 379. 402. 257. 109. See also W^ulfwine. 304. 333. 304. 230. 202. 333. Wulfwcrd. 301. (i/)Mi Wiiliniur. Wiilford. 821. 395. 304. 273. 248. 191. 416. Wulmiod.

porsige. purngiim. or See por. 470. 202. 2U2. 202. 402. See also purcetel. pcgotiwine. 136. or puriiu. See also Wihtsigo. 120. 304. 248. 294. 202. See Porcetel. 143. 436. 333. 24S. 187. pore*. Wynwid. 202. pcoriocS or poreiS. 154. 436. 419. punigriin. 321. 123. 172. 172. JXiodric. 191. Purstan or purstann. 460. 420. purgod. 24% 304. 310. 24S. 333. 304. See also purgrim. 446. See porcetel and porcil. 153. porgrim. 143. 248. purfer« or porford. 202. 202. 420. 333. 216. 243. porcil. purimod. purgrim. pi«ulf. 269. 103. 419. 261. 248. purestan. 164. purulf. 164. 143. 248. 248. 214. 164. Wynstan. 202. Wynhclm. 362. peodmasr. purferd or purferS. AVyimelm. See porcetel. 285. 321. 248. 304. pcrmod. 143. 469. Wynsige and Wamanea. 101. 202. 262. 361. 304. 248. 362. 78. pcodulf. 170. 370 402. 123. pernion. peo<lred. See piirfcrS. 321. See purstan. 202. 248. 366. porcetel or porctel. 304. 202. porstteu or 333. porr. 531 Wurfurd. 474. 294. Wunstan. 143. 216. 154. Vpcalda. 333. 333. lot. punstan. 333. See purulf. pincrn. 139. See Dunstan. 294. 33. Wyllaf. 202. 120. See Winegos. 333. porulf. 269. 333. 304. 248. 81. Wynred. 196. purini. 393. See also purgrim. — INDEX OF MONEYERS. 202. 156. 333. 304. pendgar. 175. purrim or purrin. 333. Wynsig or Wynsige. 363. Wydia. 248. 248. 156. See Winred. porstan. 419. pudinei. See also Wyuberht. peodberht. 248. 333. 460. 443. AVinstan and purcil or purecil. 364. 24S. or Wynsie. 164. 360. 333. pustau. 442. 24S. 123. purefer«. 456. 103. 367. 143. 441. 2 . 419. puruer«. 333. 321. 285. 321. Wydecoc. 187.M 2 . 460. purcetel or pureetl. 24S. 248.II. 466. porctel. 369. 304. porcl. Uuynbearlit and Uynberht. See also See also porcetel. 202. Wynsi 202. 161. purlac. 460. See peoraj*. 103. 460. 333. 274. AVynnehelm. pcodgcld or peodgyld. 24S por or p(jrr. punuod. '2-1% See purniud. 304. 215. See Wullaf. 164. preodred or preo«red. 202. See also purstau. Wyltsig. 304. 333. purfurS or puruerS. 202. 321. See purstuu. See Widia. 333. 175. 143. 236. 84. porald. 333. See also porstan. 239. 202. WuwerJ. 333. 333. porman. Wyacgos. 139. 140. 378. Wurreb. 202. 287. 97. 143. 333. 158. 321. 1!)0. 164. 84.

or crescents. 2. Cross. trefoil name and slipped Annulet. 2.-INDEX OF TYPES. 337. 124. on limbs Cross. 84. 2. segment and of. 255. in centre of ehort cross voided. c. crescents. limbs terminating in three Crescents.. 22. Cross. patte's. Cross of pellets. by hand cross voided. . 207. 12. angle of short 322. 5. Annulet Crescent or broken annulet in each voided. Church or building. 322. 253. 321. short cross voided. 322. 12. king's CNVT. 8G. CNVT on limbs of cross. Circle in centre of short cross voided. 10. 103. 305.. ( r. dividing moneyer's name. Annulet in each angle of long cross voided . Cross crosslet. two lines. 12. 12. 304. six limbs patte's. in each angle.d2 ) TII. 27. 3G. broken. cross voided. around pellet. ilivitlcd U)2. 34. &c. 105. 11. 20. Circles. Cross. 103. fayade of. five limbs patte's. two pattes.. 13. 123. 204. 253. at ends of short A. two limbs moline. dividing moneycr'a name. enclosing cross patte'e. Christian temple. in each angle of 322. Crescents. 27. of Providcuce. 253. CANT (monogram). 33G. 323. 2. four. 253. sideways. two Building or church. Annulet in each angle of short cross voided. 37. (monojrraiu). Circle. 86. 252. 104. 254. BAt^ und monevers name Bird with branch. in one line. 3. 4. cross 3G. A. in Cross over cross pommee. 4. 208. Doi. 207. Annulet in centre of short cross voided limbs terminating in three cresceuts. BAB 37.. Cross. It. 9. 21. two. Cross. four. 8G. in angles of long cross voided. (jJ. 7X. 80. Agnus 305. CO. 12. Cross.{. two limbs cross crosslet. two. 11. Cross of four ovals. 10. Cross on which moneyer's name. a6. Christian monogram. Crescents.

12. Cross moliiie within lozenge. trefoil 533 in Cross crosslet. 167. short. 103. Cross potent. 252. Cross voided. Cross ponimco on cross Cross over cross moline. form- Cross voided. 323. Cross voided. annulet in centre. CRVX PA EX in angles. ing rose. limbs which issues beaded terminating in three crescents. 3G. voided. circle in centre. angles. short. angle. Cross voided. 86. moline over cross pommee. 306. Cross voided. 338. 103. 3. 322. 11. CYNT in angles. 84. 252. 166. 336. 207. 322. Cross pattee. pellet in centre 254. patte'e. three crescents. fleurs-de-lis sliort. Cross pattee. long. 85. and angle. Cross pattee over cross pattee. long. Cross voided. 11. 254. 249. long. 37. 335. Cross patte'e 5. circles. 123. witliin four crosses Cross voided. 337. 167. 103. Cross voided. sliort. — INDEX OF TYPES. long. 4. Cross pattee. 206. broken annulet Cross voidoi). straight line. short. Cross voided. on quatrefoil. long. 4. Cross 323. martlet in each flcur-ile-lis Cross voided. 305. 334. long. long. voided between two 323. Cross patte'e within lozenge. annulet in each angle. 167. 253. 250. 86. sliort. and bisecting Cross patte'e within four pellets. 192. Cross voided. long. 11. 203. in caeli angle. 336. and three pellets. 335. Cross in angles. Cross patte'e. 252. 322. 5. 251. pellet in each angle. 143. short.III. 3. short. 104. short. PACX in angles. 248. pyramid in each Cross voided. Cross voided. Cross voided. 206. 10. angle. 253. 202. 34. Cross pommee on pommee cross. Cross 2. 86. Cross voided. Cross voided. wedge in each angle. 251. Cross voided. 324. Cross moline. 305. voided. 205. from each corner of ornamented square. Cross pattee. 5. in angles. 10. 13. limbs terminating in three crescents. sliort. sliort. 334. each angle. 165. Cross patte'e within cross pattee. 305. PACX in angles. 206. 207. Cross floriated with leaf in each angle. . 338.'506. limbs terminating in forming rose. Cross voided. 335. 203. 205. 337. Cross voided. 124. 3. 249. 337. 157. 250. long. or crescent in eacli angle. 208. long. Cross voided. 12. 156. long. crescents in two Cross pattee within four crescents. 249. annulet in each Cross pattee over cross pomrade. limbs terminating in three crescents patte'es. 253. Cross voided. limbs terminating in one crescent. limbs terminating in three crescents. pellet in each angle. 12.27. 86. 322. dividing moneyer's name. 27. 9. long. 35. 306. 322. 11. CRVX PACX in angles. limbs terminating in three crescents. 11. on wliirli (juadri- . 34. 22. trefoil in angles.

sliort. Hand in of Providence^betwcen A Cx) iCJ. each 330. 35. Fieurs-de-lis Lozenge. 203. 37. 205.'Ct. Hand Hand of Providence. encli anRlc. of. . eliort. 305. 204. King seated on throne. Hand 204. 306. See Cross voided. (Gleawaceaster).— INDEX OF TYl'KH. CroH-t voiiliil. 337. 35. 37. 207. monogram of. 1. limbs terminating in tiirco crescents. jiyramid in an'^'le. 35.V l)olow moneyer's liiiit<H name. 255. 37. 35 . London.itoriil III. leaf in eacii angle. witliin which cross trefoil in patte'e and angles of beaded line issuing from each angle of lozenge. 337. 37. Martlet in each angle of short cross voided. 22. seated. CVNT in angles of cross pattec. . Fleurs-de-lis in angles of long cross long. E. liiults terminating G. voided. 336. King's E.")(j. annulet in centre. Crosfl voi(l(<l.. DOROB. Floml ornament surmounting or dividing moneyer's name. Lincoln. Dove. of Providence between A. mIioiI.ister) in pale. 86. 204. and 3:t|. tsvo. 2J4. 322. GLEAPA T. Dovo and olive-branch. 143. between moneyer's name. SG. Floriato stem with two branches en- M. 34. DOR IB or D0RIB1. tion. divided by Croaa voided. 321. around central 330. Cro88 void) in (1. Flower and roso-branch above 124. segment of circle. (monogram). short. cxitaiiding. monogram Figures. divided by moneyer's EXA (Kxance. long cross voided. 324. 84. 3. 34. Florintetl cross.iit. Long cross voided. 2. 203. C. Four crosses pattees one. in three lines. onmm. 36. liinI)B cri)HH jinttco ill expanding. 336. 337. LiNCOLLA name. ill angles of long cross voided. 534 l. hlinrt.9. 306. 167. of Providence giving benedic- CRVX 'JOti. 86. 192. 204. King's name and mint (Orsnaforda) name in four lines. CRVX angles of short cross voided. closing moneyer's name. Cross voided. 9. limbs terminating in three crescents.

. forming cross. Moneyer's 85. «&c. 33. 27. in three lines. of. 86. „ in pule Mint names 37. IGG. 10. 37. 31. „ „ of Roiseng. . divided by floriate Ornament dividing moneyer's name. name divided by name. 36. Moneyer's name stem. Mint name dividing moneyer's name.). r>. 84. 84. Moneyer's name in four lines across field. 335. 156. Ovals four. 21. 2. sideways.. 157. OCCIDENTALIVM around SAXONlORVM la three lines. ?>7. 85. in two lines 10. 5. field. floral saltire. 27. 37. 166. r A (SAX). 335. 461. lines.. Pellet in centre of short cross voided. Moneyer's name between Moneyer's name divided by cross. voided. 37. 535 10. and moneyer's name in two lines. hand tion. 157. in one line. SAX. Moneyer's divided or sur- mounted by Moneyer's ornament. ORSNAFORDA in two lines divided by king's name. PA EX in angles of . 1. of London. and cross pattc'e around in Moneyer's name and mint ' BA&) central cross patU'c. and divided by mint name. 321.. DOROB. Mint and king's names 3(3. Monograms. '). Moneyer's name between rose-branch and flowi-r. two lines.3. rx 37. field. 167. 255. and PIN. 36. 323. in angles of long cross voided. limbs terminating in one crescent. 86. 143. 143. 22. 123. in Moneyer's name two lines across field 157.Til— INDEX OF TYPES. . Providence. 85. 12. 37. 86. Mint name (BA-D). (jO. 104. 304. Mint name (BA-D). „ of Lincoln. 254. 339. C. 85. 166. 334. DORIBor DORIBI. throe. A. Moneyer's name within and without leaves of qnatrefoil. 10. 2. Olive-branch held by Dove. hand Providence. PACX in angles of long cross voided. Christian. 35. Moneyer's name divided by ornament. Moneyer's name on limbs and between angles of cross. of.O.'i3.. 36. 86. Monograms. 323. 35. 165. PA EX 252. „ giving benedic- CANT. o. SAXONV. 124. in angles of long cross voided. 124. &c. 157. (EXA. &c. Moneyer's name between two 157. 85. &c.short cross. Moneyer's name across SAXON. tw'o stars. across field. 204. PAX across field. 204. Pelkts. Moneyer's name in three lines across limbs terminating in three crescents. name. PACX 305. 157.

10. Eadmund. PIN (Wincoaster) 85. 85. Quatrcfoil with moneyer's and without. SAXON lORVM in three lines. in pale. in ryminid each angle of short cross Sovereign type of Edward Conf. 5. monogram St. below moneyer's name. X\S. 337. Star of six rays patte's. >^ (monogrim). 143. Roiseng. pommee over above ornament enclosing moneyer's each angle of cross. 36. Rosette. tlirce three crescents. TA (SAX). of. w. Star of eight rays Star of nine rays name within. coinage of. divided 10. Tribrach. Q. See Cross voided. iSquare. A. S. 3. . 249.HH voided. above 85. (Juatrefoil with moneyer's 103. ornamented. 27. 251. Tribrach moline. Quadrilateral ornament on short cross voided. Andrew. Star. on which king seated. bisc cted vuid. 166. Pn»vi(k'no<'. lu-twrrn SAXONV short. Star of six points between two pellets. 254.^39. Sliurtrro. St. limbs terminating in three crescents. 3. 204. 36. limbs terminating in voided. OCCIDENTALIVM. 250.n-'jo III. . of. 37. SAXON ^ni(inogram). 34. 10. Saltire dividing moneyer's name. 5. by long I'yniniid in (^ch angle of short cross cross voided. and below moneyer's name. 337. OF TYPES. 104. Quatrefoil within long cross voided. T. 4. 306. 'JO:i. 124. 37. 34. 10. 143. 7. limbs fourchee. Trefoil in each angle of long cross monogram of. 252. R. SAXON lORVM in three lines. SG. 321. Throne. SAX V 5. in 34. flower llose-brancli and and Trefoil. rri)viilf'nco. Imnd between A. 207. T with limbs extended. around by band of Providence. patte's. U). slipped. 11)2. 3. of. 11. 33. 334. name. 305. hand 201 of. voided. fai^ade of. Solidus type on coin of iElfred. limbs terminating in crescents. 124. dividing of mint. 335. 204. 249. coinage (monogram). name within patte's. Trefoil Rose formed of cross cross moline. name Temple. 5. — INDEX A Ci) Ci).'d. 3. ^ (monogram). (monogram).. 255.

. Bedwin (Bedewine).. 355. 356.. Cnut. 348 25G 341 Harold Harold 307 Edward II. Crewkcrne (Crucern).. 209 . Castle Rising (Roiseng).. Cnut. Eadgar. 257. ^tlielrtudll.. Eadweard 209 . Harold II. IGS. 462.... Edward Cadbury (Cadanburh). 465. II. 350.^tliclraid I... 309. Cnut.. 374 . Eadweard 462. Conf. 260.. (Colcnccastrc)..53. Edward Edward bernia). 342 . Eadweard 105.. 256 Harold Harold I. Cnut. Eadgar. Conf. Bedford (Bedanford or Bedeford).. Eadwig.d. 87. 192. Edward Conf. 212. 339. Har. 105 193 II. Harold I. Dorobernia. 192 : . &c. Harold II. the Elder. II. Cnut. . Cnut. Harold II. I.. Cambridge (Grantebrycgo). 218. Dover (Dofcran). Derby (Deoraby). 271 Conf. 310. 261 . 462. Edward Conf. Edward Conf. iEthelwulf.* * See General Index for historical notices. Brewton (Briutune). 169. Edward Conf. See Canterbury. 255. 308 . Eadmuud. Bath (Ba«an).. 210. Conf. ricdll.. . . 307 . Aylesbury (iEgk'slmrh). Cnut.. II. II. iElfrcd. 124. Dorchester (Dorceastre). Eadweard II. Bristol (Bricgstow). II. Harold II.. Edward 342. Cnut. Edward Conf. Cnut. Eadgar. 6. 339. Cnut. Cnut. Cnut.. iEthelrosd II. 312 . 388 Harold I. II. yEthcl- ^Iholnod II. 3. Eadgar.. Cricklade (Crecgclade or Crocgelade). 259 . Cnut.. ( 537 ) IV. Harold II.. Berkeley (Beorclea). 259 .^thelriBd II.. 351. 171 II. 193 258 Cnut. 38. . .. . Conf.^thelstan.. 212. 211.ffitholrajd II. iEtholrred 208 .. Cnut.. 158. ^Ethelstan. II. 260.. 276 iEthclrffid Cnut. Chichester (Ciseceastxe or Cicestrie).—INDEX OF MINTS. Eadweard iEtheirajd II. Edward 342.. 467. Eadgar. Chester 108... 461.... 352.210. ^thelrred I. 258.l Conf. Buckingham (Buccingahain). . 461. Dereham (Dyrham). ^thelrfed 220. 211 .. 13. Edward Conf. 308 . iEthelstan. ^Eifred. Canterbury (Crontwaraburh or DoroEcgbeorht. 1G8. Harold 308. iElfred. Edward 463... (Leigeceaster). 255 .. .. of Mints. Colchester II. 1G8... II. 343 Bardney (Bardanig). 54. 38 .. 208 ... Edward Conf. 462.. Edward Conf. Harold I.... 258. ^thclstan. 106. 257 I. . Harold Harold I. Harold Harold 307 . . Edward Conf. Conf.

Lydford (Lydanford)..Alfred. 274. Cnut. . 371 405.. Cnut. 380 Hartbaciiut.. 312. 311 ... Harold Conf. . Conf. Exoccftstro. 274.. ^thelned II. Eadgar. (Gleaweccaster). (fJipi'Swic). Langport (Lancport or Longport). Cnut.l. 111 Eadraund. iEthelstan. 270.Htrc. iEtlielrjcdII. — INIiKX OF MIXTS.. Leicester (Leherccaster). Conf. Edward Conf. Sec York. Leigeceaster. Cnut.. 4«4. . . 275 Conf. Harold U. IlchcBtcr (Gifclccastcr). London (Londonia II. Longport. . Eaflmiinfls- 210. I.. Hertford (Heortford). Harthacnut. Gloucester Ilchcster. Lewes (Lsewes). 313..). Eadweard IL. 380. . ^thclrred II. Cnut. A'AlWil 'IC. raed IL.f:tli(lrm<l 2t. 219. 379. Harold L. Cnut. 194. 468.i. 382.217. Edward Couf. Eadweard . Harold Conf. Harthacnut. 108. . 278. Cnut. .. Harold Hamtune. Harold II. Eadgar. Cnut. 311.. pir. 170.. 274.112. Harold L. . Conf. Edward 275 217. H.:!.. Edward (iuiliiford Couf.218. 195 . 375 . 273. . Klulmundnhnrli. I. See Jedburgh. Sre Southampton.. Edward Conf. Hartliacnut. iEtbel- Hereford. <St>« GiMcoastor. Gmntebrycpc. II. liiirv. . Eadweard fred. 125... Edward Hastings (Hii-stinga or Hestingport)... Gooi^tiburh. Harold 400.. Harthacnut.. iElfied. 281 Ilorndou (Ilorninduua). . 11..Jedburgh (GeoSaburh). IC!). Ead. ^Ethelraid IL. Edward Eadwig. 209. (Luueic).. ^thelstan. 40. iEthcIstan. 219 . 100. 194. . Harold L. EdwftnU'oiif. 404.^thelrted 216. 170 r. 221 Cnut. Eadweard II. Edward Couf. 326.. . 194. See Ipswicli. Cnut. Eadgar. Edward 467. 223. Harold U.->" M.swicli II. II.-)?: Harold II. Giposwic. 405. Conf. 373 . Lufl'wick 195. .270. Cnut.. Harold Ip. Edward Conf. :{25. 275. Kxr(i'r(Kuxiiiu'('(i. 382. Lancaster (Landcaster). 397.. . See Cambridge. Harold II. Cnut. Huntingdou (Iluntandune). :J0!» Iliirtliacnut.. Harold 4G4. Ilnn. II. 320. Edward Conf.Eltbelrred 230... jEthel- 208...'laii. . Cnut.... 383. 391 Harold 467. Eadweard IL. 2i:{ ... Cnut. 159. 387.. iEtlichiDd II. 47. 466. Cnut. See Langport. 273.. 370 .. 371 KlHtriKMiin or I'lofcrwir.. Hartliacnut. (Gildeforda or Guliieforda). ^thelstan. or Lundene). II. Lincoln (Lincolla or Lincolne).l I. 172. Edward Conf.. 311.. 272. Harold Harold I. 108 iEtlielrti)d II. Edward Al- 325 400.. This IV.lstnn. iEthclrred II. 219. . Eadweard II. 310.. If. II. Lymne (lamenc). Edward 400..-ed II. 320. 384. 325. 325 II.. 193. Edward Harold II. Hythe (Uy^a). See Chester. &c. 4G .

. Shrewsbury (Scrobesburh). 539 Maldon (Mffildune). Eadgar. 435. 453. 293. 288 Conf. 315. Edward 418. 292 cnut. Si'e Snotingaham. II. . 121. II. 50.. 471. 379 ... (Suotingaham). Harold Harold 311 . 433 Harold II.. 418. Eadweard 218 . II. 318. Harold lIiiroM I. 315 469. .. Eadgar. Elward Conf. Edward Newark (Newe). Edward Conf. Cnut.. Edward II. Eadwig. Edward sanford). Edward Conf... 425 Harold 470.. —INDEX 11. ^thelrfcd XL. 292. rsed II.. (Stanwic). ^thclstan. 428. . 287. Taunton (Tantunc). iEthelstan. Cnut. 420. Oxford (Orsnaforda or Oxnaford). 173 Harold 470. . Sudbury 235 . 294. Nottingham stan... Edward Harold II. Harthacnut. SuiSgeweorc. Stafford (Staifforda). Cnut. Southampton 159. 289 Steyning (Sta^nig). Sea Castle Rising. 294. iEthelstan. Eadgar. ^Ithelrajd Shaftesbury (Sceftesburh). 231 .. Cnut. IV. Edward Conf. Sidbury (Si^esteburh).. 327 II.. Edward Conf. 427. 288. Rnniney 233. Edward Conf.. 418 .. ^thelrred II. .. . Cnut. 232. II. 113. . 113. Ed- ward St. Harthacnut.. 112. 170. 431 Harold . TEthclnrd 233. Malmesbury (Mealmesburh). Harold Roiseng... ward Cunf.^thelraid Richborough (Ricyeburh).... . II. Cnut. Tempsford Thotford (Tiemeseforda or Tcmo175. 194 .. . II. 290.. Conf. 422 Edward Conf. Edward Conf..a^tbelI. 292. . 470. Cnut. Alfred. 272 Conf.. 423.. Southwark (Su^geweorc). 112. Harold II.. Cnut. Harold 327.... 316. Cnut.. 291 Ed- (piotford^. Conf. 316. Edward Conf. 465. 429 Harold 470.Td II. Eadweard 234.. Eadmundsbury (Eadmundsburh). 356. 144 . Edward Conf.. 125 Eadrcd. Edward Conf. Cnut. 233 . ^Ethelrred II. 234 . II. ^thelrred 11. Cnut. Conf. 290 II. 233. 429.. Newport (Niweiwrto). Harold 4G9. 173. 235. iEthelrajd II. . Rochester (Rofcceastre). yEthclnxjd 240. . Edward Conf. Harold Cnut.. . See Southwark. 290. Edward Conf. . 316. Harthacnut. Hartha430 . Eadmund. Stamford (Stanford). Tamworth (TamweorS). 299. Cnut. iEthelI. 327. Sandwich (Sandwic).. Cnut.. 173.. 232 Cnut. Eadgar. Harold I. . . 422. 315 . Cnut. Conf. (Hamtune). (Rumcnea). II. 417. 195. Edward Edward Stanwick 235. Norwich (Nor<5wic).^EthelI. . rajd II.. 434. OF MINTS. II. ... II.. Eadgar. iEthelrred I. iEthelrajd Conf.. 291.. 288 .. 171. Harold I. Conf. 230.. Edward 327 471. II.. Nottingham. Conf.. Cnut. Salisbury (Sereburh). (SuSburh). Eadwig. 160. Cnut. II... 433. . Harold 470. Harold ^thelrajd I.. II.. iEthelr..

Edward Conf. 214 Cnut. Edward Conf. Wiiicli<lHoa (WiticclHca). 'TurtHnip-). . iElfred.. II. yEthc-lncd 43. Torkwy Cniit. 160. Conf. 463. 193. 171 2:t7. Worcester (Wiliraceaster or WoriceaBter). r)iu IV... 440 . Eadweard . 471. Eadwig. 317. 55. ^Ihelraid Cnut. Ead- Wcliga- wig. l-:dward Conf. yKtlielra>(l IF. . Hartliacnut. 240 .Ktlnl.. Harold XL.. . Wclniesford. 473. Harold I..-flan. 359.. 174. 29'J. 29G 297. Edward yEthclstan. 438. . AViilliiiKfonl (Wi-nliiigftforil or iEthelstan. AVarwiok 114. Watclut (Wcccdport).. 309 . 295 . 453. Wilton (Wiltune). 316. II.. II. Harold Conf. Eadgar. Eadgar. 115. ^tliclricd 230 . 158. 295. Harold I. Eadgar... II. II. 297.. 296. Eadgar.. 114. 471. MthcUitH} 230. jEthcLstan. Cnut. Harold II.. York (Eboracum stan. OF MINTS. Wareliam (Wcrham). Edward Conf. Eadwcard 238. Cnut. 472.. — INItEX II.. Harold I. Edward Conf 443 Harold H. 439. 2:W... Cuut. 114. 2G2 Conf. Totix-HH (T<itftna<H). Harold I.. Cnut. iEthelI. Edward Harold II. Edward . iEthelrffid Cnut. peotford... 174 rffid II.. forl).. 175... iEthelrajd II. Eadgar.. 43G 328. 169. Harold II. See Torksi y. 317. . 106. Cnut. (Wa-ringwic). 435.. See Thctford. Turct'Bigo. or Eoferwic). . A1i)\i\Tmd 21):. iEthel- Eilward Conf. 237 : Cnut.S. 196. Witiclicbtcr (Wincf-aatrc or Wintonia). 317 472. II. 237. II.. 296 Harold II. Wiiichcomhc (Winctlcuinb).

.TABLES.

s of En'gmsii Grains and Frfncii Grammks.nT.s. Uiiaiim.i<. Wr.( '>^'-i ) TABLE OK 'I'm. (ruiii. .

t.( 543 ) TABLE OF TiiK Ei. .ative Weioiits of English Grains and French Grammes. Grains.

English .( >14 ) TABLE CoNVEiiTiNo English Inches into Millimetres and the Measurks of Mionnet's Scale.

£y^./.6'al.^ ECGBEO RHT . ^'fj '^i^ />k>vX:^'"-i ># g'^ Mil 'y. C^oms: MJ/Pl.

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'^f:^^j ^^ CNUT.. .ry. .m/.' ^^^>.Fn^.s. M/m. Q?(7?. Xii^.

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'^y> 4 .3ta. "^^^^ 9 ^-^^i.O.-. 15 CNUT . -~r:^. ?>^-.(^. VoUJP/.'^^ ::-// ^^n^^ 11 ^^/^a' " W^jt /.ms. 0. i^^:ir 13 V' ^--7' ^/-ri/i:.mil..

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Vo/JIP/IJX k ^' - 1^ H ^r ^\ /<rji %. C'm'^s.Ck/: /. W.^^ 15 CNUT .

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PL XX/.CalFm.Col^l^.//. ^ /=^ rm. Vol.^^ '^j^ 7 HARTHACNUT .

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