www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 101
PROSTATE CANCER
STATE PAGE 8
TREES PUT A GLOW
IN THE HOLIDAYS
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17
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By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo
Alto, urged the Federal
Communications Commission yes-
terday to “keep on track” with its
mission to implement an auction of
wireless spectrum.
A successful auction, planned for
June 2014, will provide more spec-
trum for wireless companies and
their customers
and has the
potential to pro-
duce more jobs
and free up more
spectrum at a
time in which
demand for wire-
less broadband
continues to
soar, Eshoo said
in a Communications and
Technology subcommittee meeting
yesterday in Washington, D.C.
The auction could raise billions
for the U.S. Treasury but Democrats
and Republicans differ on how it
should be implemented.
The GOP has concerns over
“guard bands” that protect wireless
and broadcast television signals
from interference. Republicans have
said the guard bands were too broad
and limit revenue but Democrats
have concerns it would lead to less
unlicensed spectrum.
Eshoo sent a letter to FCC Chair
Julius Genachowski Tuesday to
prod the commission to protect pub-
lic access to unlicensed spectrum.
When the Middle Class Tax Relief
and Job Creation Act of 2012 was
passed earlier this year, it preserved,
protected and enhanced access to
unlicensed spectrum, according to
the letter.
“As the FCC considers proposed
rules implementing an incentive
auction of broadcast television
spectrum, the agency has a respon-
sibility to adhere to the statute —
recognizing the enormous econom-
ic value of both licensed and unli-
censed spectrum in the television
band,” Eshoo wrote in the letter to
Genachowski.
Eshoo: Keep broadband spectrum law ‘on track’
Spreading
‘The Bug’
By Ashley Hansen
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
“The day grew hotter and hotter,” Lauren Savage
read from the “Penguin and the Pinecone,” a chil-
dren’s book by Salina Yoon to an attentive group of
avid readers, both young and old. “Can you fan your-
self like it’s very hot?”
Savage is co-owner of The Reading Bug, a not-so-
typical bookstore on Laurel Street in San Carlos.
“The Bug” doesn’t just sell books. It also offers a
wide variety of parent-child classes in an effort to
interact with the community.
“I really like her,” Hisako Kanamaru of Foster City,
and mom to 13-month old Leo, said of Savage.
“She’s a lot of fun.”
Kanamaru brought his son to their first story time
at the Reading Bug last week. “He’s really interested
in the music because he loves to dance,” Kanamaru
said.
The Reading Bug opened its doors in September of
2009 at half its current size. Its size doubled in July
2011.
“My mother-in-law had asked me when my first
daughter was born if I wanted to open a children’s
bookstore with her,” Savage said. “And I had always
wanted to open a retail store. I didn’t know much
about children’s books at the time but I was starting
to learn because my daughter was about six months
old. I wanted a place where my kids could grow up
and what better place than a bookstore?
“There is no other toy store in this area so we put a
little bit of that in here. We want to offer the commu-
nity anything that they want. We want to be the ‘us’
people.”
The Reading Bug opened its doors with the inten-
tion of running birthday parties and has since mor-
phed into doing classes, book fairs and workshops.
The goal of “The Bug” is to offer a mix of free events
with those that cost a minimal amount to get people
in the door and working together.
“They just got bigger and better and we have
incredible parties in here now and great girls to run
them,” Savage said.
Savage attributes her business’success to “thinking
outside the box.” The Reading Bug offers classes at
Anna Eshoo
See SPECTRUM, Page 20
ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL
Coralynn,2,and her mother take part in story time at The Reading Bug in San
Carlos. Above, parents and their children gather to hear story time.
San Carlos shop creates a
community space for kids
Neighbors
irked with
school plan
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Residents near a soon-to-be reopened Burlingame elementary
school will consider a legal challenge for the traffic plan approved
by the Board of Trustees Tuesday.
Growing enrollment resulted in the purchase of the previously-
closed Hoover Elementary School in 2010. Since then, the district
has been working on plans to renovate the building to meet current
standards. The plan is to open Hoover at 2220 Summit Drive for the
2014-15 school year. On Tuesday, the board approved the mitigat-
ed negative declaration for the project which included a traffic plan.
Many residents who live near the school, however, felt the approval
should be postponed to allow for more discussion and possible
changes to the traffic plan. As a result of Tuesday’s decision, resi-
dents have planned to meet with a California Environmental
Quality Act attorney to challenge the decision.
Superintendent Maggie MacIsaac said the district met the
requirements under CEQA. The topic has been discussed over two
Hoover elementary traffic a
concern,legal action possible
Fisherman pays $12K
for illegal crab haul
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A San Mateo County commercial fisherman agreed to pay
$12,500 for illegally taking crabs last year from protected
waters in the Montara State Marine Reserve.
The stipulated judgment filed in San Mateo County
Superior Court on Tuesday settles the case against Mark
See SCHOOL, Page 20
See CRAB, Page 20 See READ, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Jamie Foxx is
45.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1862
Union forces led by Maj. Gen. Ambrose
Burnside launched futile attacks against
entrenched Confederate soldiers during
the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg;
the soundly defeated Northern troops
withdrew two days later. (It was during
this battle that Confederate Gen. Robert
E. Lee is said to have remarked: “It is
well that war is so terrible, or we should
grow too fond of it.”)
“My theory is to enjoy life, but
the practice is against it.”
— Charles Lamb, English essayist (1775-1834)
Actor Steve
Buscemi is 55.
Singer Taylor Swift
is 23.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
An activist hurls stones at anti-riot policemen guarding the Tucuman provincial house in Buenos Aires .Several people were
reportedly injured and others were arrested during a protest over the ruling in the Maria de los Angeles Veron case.Thirteen
suspects were acquitted in a trial which took place in Tucuman province,investigating the disappearance of Veron,who dis-
appeared from her hometown at the age of 23 and evidence from the investigation of her disappearance suggests she was
kidnapped and forced into prostitution.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid
50s. North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday night...Partly cloudy. Lows in the
upper 30s to mid 40s. North winds around 5
mph, becoming southeast after midnight.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of
showers. Highs in the mid 50s. South winds
5 to 10 mph. Chance of showers 20 percent.
Friday night, mostly cloudy. Lows in the upper 30s to mid 40s.
North winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming east after midnight.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Saturday night and Sunday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of
rain. Lows in the 40s. Highs around 60.
Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers.
Lows in the lower to mid 40s.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Solid Gold,No.
10, in first place; Lucky Star, No. 02, in second
place; and Winning Spirit, No. 09, in third place.
the race time was clocked at 1:46.83
(Answers tomorrow)
MODEM CANAL VULGAR UPBEAT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: She didn’t buy the automobile because of its —
BAD “CARMA”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GWIRN
CIKYP
AQUOPE
STOUMT
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
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b
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k
.
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ju
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Print your answer here:
0 4 4
39 44 51 52 54 13
Mega number
Dec. 11 Mega Millions
1 2 11 17 25
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 1 6 9
Daily Four
0 7 7
Daily three evening
In 1642, Dutch navigator Abel Tasman sighted present-day
New Zealand.
In 1769, Dartmouth College in New Hampshire received its
charter.
In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson arrived in France, becom-
ing the first chief executive to visit Europe while in office.
In 1928, George Gershwin’s “An American in Paris” had its
premiere at Carnegie Hall in New York.
In 1937, the Chinese city of Nanjing fell to Japanese forces;
what followed was a massacre of war prisoners, soldiers and
citizens. (China maintains as many as 300,000 people died;
Japan says the toll was far less.)
In 1944, during World War II, the U.S. cruiser Nashville was
badly damaged in a Japanese kamikaze attack that claimed
more than 130 lives.
In 1962, the United States launched Relay 1, a communica-
tions satellite which retransmitted television, telephone and
digital signals.
In 1978, the Philadelphia Mint began stamping the Susan B.
Anthony dollar, which went into circulation in July 1979.
In 1981, authorities in Poland imposed martial law in a crack-
down on the Solidarity labor movement. (Martial law formally
ended in 1983.)
In 1994, an American Eagle commuter plane crashed short of
Raleigh-Durham International Airport in North Carolina,
killing 15 of the 20 people on board.
Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz is 92. Actor-come-
dian Dick Van Dyke is 87. Actor Christopher Plummer is 83.
Singer John Davidson is 71. Singer Ted Nugent is 64. Rock
musician Jeff “Skunk” Baxter is 64. Actress Wendie Malick is
62. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is 59. Singer-actor
Morris Day is 56. Actor Bart Johnson is 42. TV personality
Debbie Matenopoulos is 38. Rock singer-musician Thomas
Delonge is 37. Actor James Kyson Lee is 37. Actress Chelsea
Hertford is 31. Rock singer Amy Lee (Evanescence) is 31.
Indian sitar virtuoso
Ravi Shankar dies at 92
NEW YORK — The kids at first didn’t
seem to know how to respond as Ravi
Shankar began his four-hour set on the
final afternoon of the Monterey Pop
Festival, in the fabled summer of 1967.
As captured in D.A. Pennebaker’s docu-
mentary, some nodded along and smiled;
Jimi Hendrix listened carefully. Others
dozed, or chatted. A few hippies danced
wildly, as if they couldn’t tell — or didn’t
care about — the difference between
Shankar’s raga and a Jefferson Airplane
jam. But as the performance accelerated
from isolated strains to a pace that could
exhaust the speediest rock star, eyes
opened, minds expanded and Shankar and
his fellow musicians left to a long standing
ovation.
Labeled “the godfather of world music”
by Beatle George Harrison, Shankar
helped millions of Westerners — classical,
jazz and rock lovers — discover the cen-
turies-old traditions of Indian music. From
Harrison to John Coltrane, from Yehudi
Menuhin to Andre Previn, he bridged,
sometimes unsteadily, the musical gap
between East and West, between what
Shankar noted as the classical East’s
emphasis on melody and rhythm and the
classical West’s foundation of “harmony,
counterpoint, chords, modulation and
other basics.”
Shankar died Tuesday at age 92. A state-
ment on his website said he died in San
Diego, near his Southern California home
with his wife and a daughter by his side.
The musician’s foundation issued a state-
ment saying that he had suffered upper
respiratory and heart problems and had
undergone heart-valve replacement sur-
gery last week.
Gimmicky date a boost
for lovelorn Las Vegas
LAS VEGAS — Las Vegas, land of
the quickie wedding, is in the midst of a
serious love recession, and chapels in
the city accustomed to playing the num-
bers were not about to let the latest
money-making opportunity —
Wednesday’s auspicious 12/12/12 date
— pass without a marketing push.
They worked for months to turn the
day into a major payout, luring thou-
sands of lovebirds with the promise of a
wedding license bearing the century’s
last string of identical numbers.
Sin City’s share of the weddings busi-
ness has fallen by a third since 2004, as
destinations from New Orleans to New
York have gotten into the elopement
game.
“From a marketing perspective, it’s a
very big deal. Numbers are associated
with Vegas,” said Ann Parsons, market-
ing director for Vegas Weddings, which
runs four of the more than 60 chapels in
town. “Unfortunately, it’s the last date
like that we’ll have.”
From the rundown courthouse area to
the ritzy Strip, chapel programmers
jumped at the chance to sell 12-12-12
packages at three times the normal price
for a weekday ceremony during the
wedding offseason, from November to
April.
At the high-end Bellagio, 12 couples
paid $5,000 apiece on Wednesday to say
their “I do’s” near the casino’s famous
fountains. The 12-12-12 packages,
which included an hour of chapel time, a
bag of white rose petals and a buffet for
two, had sold out weeks before, MGM
Resorts spokeswoman Yvette Monet
said.
In the absence of any obvious symbol-
ism — like 7-7-07, which gamblers will
recognize as the numbers for a lucky slot
machine winner— promoters turned to
Chinese numerology.
17 24 30 33 45 22
Mega number
Dec. 8 Super Lotto Plus
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BURLINGAME
Disturbance. An intoxicated person was
involved in a argument with their neighbor
over a leaf blower on the 1400 block of
Lincoln Avenue before 2:19 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 1.
Disturbance. A woman pressed her car’s
panic button while two people were having an
argument in front of a bar on the 200 block of
Park Road before 1:36 a.m. on Saturday, Dec.
1.
BELMONT
Disturbance. Four juveniles knocked over a
trash can on Notre Dame Avenue before 11:05
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1.
Fraud. A charge account was fraudulently
opened on Yorkshire Way before 5:14 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 1.
Accident. A man was arrested for driving
while intoxicated and being involved in a vehi-
cle accident on Middle Road and El Camino
Real before 12:04 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1.
FOSTER CITY
Disturbance. An employee of a business and a
customer were involved in a verbal altercation
on Triton Drive before 10:17 p.m. on Sunday,
Dec. 2.
Vandalism. The front passenger window of a
vehicle was broken on Vintage Park Drive
before 4:27 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2.
Disturbance. A verbal dispute occurred
What a Grinch
Christmas lights were stolen from a home
on the 700 block of Crossway Road in
Burlingame before 5:58 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 1.
Police reports
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Venture capitalist Tim Draper unveiled plans
for the former Collective Antiques building in
downtown San Mateo last night that will include
pop-up retail and space for the public to pursue
their entrepreneurial dreams.
Tentative plans include turning the old
antiques building on Third Avenue into the
Collective Entrepreneurs Club, which will be a
flexible co-working space that offers collabora-
tive peer-to-peer workspaces for entrepreneurs
on daily, weekly, monthly and annual member-
ship terms.
The Collective will also feature a retail pop-up
store that can be rented on a short-term basis and
a large multi-purpose event space that can be
rented out on evenings and weekends for events
such as art shows, jazz concerts, corporate
events and meetings when not in use by staff or
students with the Draper University of Heroes
located at the former Benjamin Franklin Hotel at
44 E. Third Ave.
“We want the whole thing to feel like a cam-
pus,” Draper said.
The university has also extended the lease for
the Astaria restaurant on the ground floor of the
hotel and has plans to occupy the spot for at least
eight years.
“Whether you are for it or not, I sat in your
shoes,” said Astaria’s Alicia Petrakis.
The property has had five landlords in nine
years, she said.
“It is a magical opportunity not just for stu-
dents but the entire community,” Petrakis said
after working with the university the past few
months. Astaria provided breakfast for the uni-
versity’s students over the summer.
The Downtown San Mateo Association host-
ed a forum at the Main Library last night for
curious residents to hear about the project.
Most had questions about parking and how
the university will prevent its students and facul-
ty from parking in the nearby Baywood neigh-
borhood.
Draper has already committed $15,000 to start
a traffic management association downtown to
monitor how parking can be better managed in
the area.
No students will be allowed to bring a car to
the school, said Carol Lo, the university’s chief
operating officer.
Some in attendance at the workshop, howev-
er, asked if regular people off the street will be
able to use the Collective space.
The answer was a definite “yes.”
The university launched this summer with its
first pilot program and plans a second round of
courses early next year.
Draper is the founder of the venture capital
firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson and funded
Hotmail, Skype and Baidu in their infancies.
Draper is still seeking city approvals for the
school and will come before the city’s Planning
Commission Jan. 8.
Draper unveils collective plans
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
San Mateo County nonprofits hoping to pro-
vide happy holidays for local boys and girls are
running short on toy donations this year.
Both Samaritan House and CALL Primrose
are reporting low toy donations this holiday sea-
son and are asking the public to help.
“Each year, Samaritan House’s holiday pro-
gram reaches nearly 5,000 low-income commu-
nity members, over half of whom are children,”
said Samaritan House Communications
Specialist Marcy Spiker.
Samaritan House urgently needs toy donations
for its holiday distribution. The public can help
by bringing new, unwrapped toys to the
Samaritan House’s third floor administrative
office, located at 4031 Pacific Blvd. in San
Mateo. Donations will be accepted from 9 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. weekdays through the end of
December. For more information call 341-4081.
Those who need ideas can check the Samaritan
House wishlist page on Amazon,
http://bit.ly/Holiday2012Toy, for suggested toys.
Burlingame-based CALL Primrose estimates
it will have about 350 children to provide gifts for
this holiday season. Executive Director Mary
Watt said the nonprofit is currently extremely low
on toy donations. It is in need of new, unwrapped
toys for children ages 2 to 12. Donations can be
brought to the CALL Primrose Center, 139
Primrose Road in Burlingame through Dec. 17.
Toy donations low, more needed
4
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Interviews will be held next week
to possibly fill a vacancy on the
South San Francisco City Council
but it is still undetermined if there
will be an appointment, and for how
long.
Nine people have applied thus far
to fill the seat left vacant when
Kevin Mullin was elected to the
Assembly. Mullin still has nearly
three years in his term. The council
decided to accept applications but
has yet to finalize if it will appoint
and, if so, for how long. But last
night, the council did decide to
interview candidates Wednesday,
Dec. 19 and Saturday, Dec. 22 at
City Hall. The earliest the council
could make a decision about
appointing a replacement or calling
an election will be during the
Saturday, Dec. 22 meeting.
Despite the lack of clear direc-
tion, applications have been submit-
ted from Rhonda Ceccato, San
Mateo County Board of Education
trustee; Parks and Recreation
Commissioner Mark Nagales;
South San Francisco planning com-
missioners Pradeep Gupta, John
Prouty, Rick Ochsenhirt and Carlos
Martin; John Poletti; Nakshin Shah
and Arnel Junio, according to the
City Clerk’s Office. If the council
decides to appoint, candidates have
until 5 p.m. today to apply.
There are a few options before the
council: Appoint someone to fill the
remainder of the term, through
2015; appoint someone until the
next regular election in 2013; or
hold a special election. If the coun-
cil decides to appoint, special meet-
ings for interviews and an appoint-
ment will be scheduled.
South City isn’t often faced with a
vacancy on the council. Councilman
Rich Garbarino first joined the
council through an appointment in
2002 after Gene Mullin, then
mayor, was elected to the Assembly.
Garbarino was the most recent
appointment to the City Council.
Also on Wednesday, the council
appointed Deputy City Treasurer
Frank Risso as the new city treasur-
er. Richard Battaglia, who had
served as the city treasurer since
November 2003, died Nov. 25.
Risso will serve the rest of
Battaglia’s term through November
2013.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by
email: heather@smdailyjournal.com or
by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
South City sets date for council interviews
Deputies tase suspect
in assault with shovel
WOODSIDE — A man wandering
a Woodside neighborhood after
allegedly assaulting a relative with a
shovel was Tased when confronted by
sheriff’s deputies Wednesday after-
noon, according to the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office.
The sheriff's office received reports
that Milo Imrie, 23, hit a relative in the
back with a shovel in the area of 150
Wildwood Way at 2:05 p.m.
Deputies responded and examined
the victim, a Woodside man, and he
was treated for his injuries at the
scene, sheriff’s spokeswoman
Rebecca Rosenblatt said.
Local brief
5
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Walter Daniel Gonion
Walter Daniel Gonion, born Jan. 26, 1918, died
Dec. 10, 2012. He was a resident of Millbrae.
Walter arrived in the Bay Area in the ’40s. He
worked as an electrician for over 40 years.
Walter was the loving husband of 62 years to the
late Aurora Gonion. He is survived by his daugh-
ters Alicia G. Chu and Lucinda G. Dade; sons-in-
law Herb and Howard, his grandchildren Don,
Phillip, Lauren and Rafaela and his sister June
Davis. He will be missed by the Sedano, Bywater,
Davis, Johns, Benavides and Chu families and
friends.
“He loved music, dancing, a good argument,
treating everyone fairly, learning and caring for his
family and friends. We will remember his infec-
tious smile.”
Visitation is after 3 p.m. until 9 p.m. with a 7
p.m. vigil service Friday, Dec. 14 at Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El Camino
Real in Millbrae. A memorial mass, interment and
a celebration of his life will be in January.
Dolly Constance DeSantis
Dolly Constance DeSantis, born June 9, 1919,
died in her home Dec. 5, 2012. She was 93.
She joins her husband Frank and leaves behind
her family and many friends, all of whom remem-
ber her for the caring, giving, fun-loving mother,
grandmother and great grandmother she was.
Born in Astoria, Ore., she moved to Ashland,
Ore. where she met and married Frank DeSantis.
They settled in San Mateo and raised two sons,
Gary and Steve DeSantis.
Along her life’s journey she worked at, and was
voted, Miss United Airlines, conquered the wilds
of Alaska, raised a family, retired from administra-
tion at the College of San Mateo and traveled the
world with Frank, lighting the earth with her
boundless energy every step of the way.
“Always quick with a smile, a helping hand, and
ready to dance, she will be missed by all.”
Friends and family invited to a celebration of
Dolly’s life 3 p.m. Dec. 22, at the San Mateo Elks
Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave. in San Mateo.
Arrangements by Sneider & Sullivan &
O’Connell’s, 650-323-5143
Obituaries
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Which districts children living in 70 homes on
a nine-acre parcel once used for a San Bruno
elementary school should attend is still up for
debate as two boards take on residents’ request
for a change tonight.
In August, home owners from 58 of the 70
homes in the disputed area in San Bruno —
known as the Merimont subdivision — submit-
ted a petition to County Superintendent Anne
Campbell requesting the boundaries be changed
from the South San Francisco Unified School
District. Along with the fact that the land previ-
ously housed a school in the San Bruno Park
Elementary School District, the petitioners also
note most of the neighborhood children attend
school in San Bruno. As such, they would like to
continue with friends through high school into
the San Mateo Union High School District,
according to the petition.
South San Francisco officials oppose the
switch. Tonight, both the San Bruno Park
Elementary and San Mateo Union High school
district boards are set to discuss the petition. San
Bruno Superintendent David Hutt said the dis-
trict’s stance is unchanged — it supports the
switch. Kirk Black, assistant superintendent of
human resources and administrative services for
San Mateo Union, said the board will take a vote
in January.
San Bruno students attended Carl Sandburg
Elementary on Evergreen Drive in San Bruno
until it was closed in 1978. In 2005, the land was
sold and, shortly after, houses were built which
brought families to the area. While the land is
located within San Bruno city limits, it is also
located within the South San Francisco Unified
School District boundary. Both San Bruno Park
Elementary and South San Francisco Unified
school districts saw the land as being within its
boundaries. In 2010, both sides disagreed on the
topic so it remained with South San Francisco.
Before a decision can be made, each district
board of trustees will vote on the petition. Two
public hearings were held through the County
Office of Education, said Nancy Magee, county
Office of Education spokeswoman. If no one
objects, the San Mateo County Committee on
School District Organization can make a deci-
sion. An objection could spark a vote by proper-
ty owners. The committee will not meet again
until Feb. 5 and has until March to take action,
said Magee.
Both the South San Francisco and San Bruno
districts wanted the parcel when discussing the
boundary lines in 2010. School boundaries were
drawn prior to city limits. When Carl Sandburg
Elementary was built, the land was in unincor-
porated San Mateo County. In 1977, the Local
Agency Formation Commission annexed the
land to the city of San Bruno.
It’s not only about boundaries. The boundaries
dictate where property revenue is funneled.
In 2005, the San Bruno district sold the site for
$30.5 million which became the land on which
70 single-family homes were built. In 2007,
property tax revenue from the site began to be
collected and forwarded to the South San
Francisco Unified School District. If the school
district boundaries are changed, future tax rev-
enue would go to San Bruno Park Elementary
and San Mateo Union High school districts
instead.
The San Bruno Park School District meets 7
p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13 at Crestmoor
Elementary School, 2322 Crestmoor Drive, San
Bruno. The San Mateo Union High School
District Board of Trustees meet 7 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 13 at the San Mateo Adult School, 789 E.
Poplar Ave., San Mateo.
School boundary shift up for discussion
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Five people linked to the hit on a rival gang-
member ordered from a prison inmate pleaded
not guilty to trying to kill a San Bruno police
officer on their way to carry out the execution
order.
Daniel Garcia, 24, Jordy Diego Bernal, 19,
and Michael Apolinario, 26, Andrew Delgadillo,
23, and Mickie Lei Gardiner, 23, each appeared
in San Mateo County Superior Court yesterday
for the second time since a criminal grand jury
indicted them on charges of attempted murder
on a peace officer, conspiracy to commit murder,
being a gangmember and assault with a deadly
weapon. Garcia is also charged with car theft,
recklessly evading a police officer and personal-
ly discharging a firearm. Each pleaded not guilty
to all charges and set a May 13 jury trial.
The prison inmate who allegedly ordered the
hit has not been charged.
Delgadillo and Gardiner were not involved in
the actual attempted murder May 26 but are sim-
ilarly charged and face a potential life sentence
because they acted as the conduit between the
prison inmate and the others, according to pros-
ecutors.
The three others, all documented gangmem-
bers, were intercepted after San Bruno police
responded to calls of suspicious individuals near
Belle Air Elementary School just before 2 a.m.
and an officer gave chase to the vehicle after it
went through a stop sign. Garcia allegedly
pulled a gun and fired two rounds which the offi-
cer returned although neither were hit. Police
found Apolinario and Bernal hiding nearby and
arrested Garcia later that evening. The next day,
a 9-year-old boy playing with his sister in the
backyard found the gun and asked his mother if
he could play with it.
All defendants remain in custody without bail.
They return to court April 15 for a pretrial con-
ference.
Not guilty pleas in attempted cop murder
6
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Timing
BELT
Special
$199 +up
30K/60K/90K
Service
Mon-Fri 8am-5pm
Sat: 9am-1pm
(650) 342-6342
635 South Claremont St. San Mateo, CA 94402
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
Belmont-Redwood Shores School District
NOTICE
OF PUBLIC HEARING
Please take notice that on Tuesday, February 7,
2013, at 7 p.m. or as soon thereafter as can be
heard, at the Belmont-Redwood Shores School
District Board Room, 2960 Hallmark Drive,
Belmont, California, 94002, the District’s Board
of Trustees will conduct a public hearing. The
school board will consider adopting a resolution
proposing to renew and increase the District’s ex-
isting Measure G parcel tax and to renew and in-
crease its existing Measure U parcel tax each for
10 additional years to a combined level of $349
per parcel per annum (annual collections of ap-
proximately $4,240,000), maintaining an exemp-
tion for certain seniors and disabled persons from
both, to fund a variety of educational programs,
such as maintaining academic excellence by
continuing emphasis on math, science, reading,
writing, art, music, instructional technology, staff
development and maintaining qualified teachers
and instructional days.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The electrification of Caltrain is featured in a
new national report from the Sierra Club as one
of the best transportation projects in the United
States.
The report identifies how the nation’s best and
worst transportation projects will move the
United States beyond oil.
For each of the 50 states, Sierra Club identifies
a “best” and “worst” project. For California,
Caltrain modernization, particularly electrifica-
tion, and a San Diego freeway project were the
two projects picked as the best in a report called
“Smart Choices, Less Traffic: 50 Best and Worst
Transportation Projects in the United States.”
Officials with the Loma Prieta chapter of the
Sierra Club, in Palo Alto, said Caltrain electrifi-
cation is an example of the kind of projects
California needs to move beyond oil.
“Electrification will cut the railroad’s operat-
ing costs in half by avoiding the purchase of 4.5
million gallons of diesel fuel a year and replac-
ing it with far cheaper and cleaner electricity,”
Gladwyn d’Souza, Belmont planning commis-
sioner and transportation committee chair for
the Loma Prieta chapter, wrote in a statement.
“It is exactly the kind of infrastructure we need
as part of a 21st century transportation system
that increases our transportation choices and
increases our housing options by enabling tran-
sit-oriented development.”
Megan Fluke Medeiros, the Loma Prieta
chapter’s conservation manager, is a daily
Caltrain commuter and praises the system’s
modernization effort.
“I love Caltrain because it gives me time to
respond to emails, a space for my bicycle
enabling me to get much-needed exercise and
the freedom of not owning the car I don’t want.
With more frequent and faster service, we’re
going to have less traffic on our roads, more
active lifestyles, more disposable income and
happier people all around,” Fluke Medeiros
wrote in a statement.
Some of the best projects on the list include
the installation of a 4-mile electric streetcar sys-
tem in Tucson, Ariz.; a 61.5-mile commuter-rail
service in Orlando, Fla.; The Midwest High
Speed Rail project between Chicago, St. Louis
and Detroit; and a new streetcar system in New
Orleans.
Some of the worst projects on the list include
a 100-mile gravel road proposed for untouched
wild Arctic landscapes in Alaska that crosses six
rivers; the South Mountain Freeway project in
Arizona that will cost $2 billion to build; and the
Jefferson Parkway project that would build a
section of beltway surrounding Denver, Colo.
The Sierra Club is the nation’s oldest and
largest grassroots environmental organization
with 1.4 million members with chapters in all 50
states.
Caltrain project deemed ‘best’ by Sierra Club
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A former apartment manager for a Daly City complex operated by
Shelter Network is suing the homeless services nonprofit after her
family, who lived in one unit, allegedly fell ill from carbon monox-
ide poisoning due to a faulty heater.
Vivian Hernandez also claims she was fired after filing a worker’s
compensation complaint about the incident because the organization
feared a future lawsuit about the exposure and regularly discriminat-
ed against Hispanic and Latino employees.
The suit by Hernandez, her husband, children and cousin names
Shelter Network and InnVision which merged earlier this year.
Shelter Network declined to comment on the suit because it has
not yet been served, said spokeswoman Maria Duzon.
Hernandez was resident manager for roughly 20 years of a 20-unit
apartment complex at 50 Hillcrest Drive in Daly City owned and
operated by Shelter Network. She lived on-site with her husband and
two daughters throughout those years, including seven years in the
unit where she claims the family was poisoned. The only source of
heat was a gas-fired wall furnace in the living room which the suit
claims was never replaced, cleaned or repaired prior to them moving
in or during their residence. The suit claims the same type of heating
unit is used in the majority of the apartments in the complex.
On Feb. 18, 2011, a cousin staying overnight reportedly developed
a severe headache and extreme nausea. The next morning,
Hernandez and her two children complained of similar symptoms.
The cousin suspected carbon monoxide poisoning and told
Hernandez to contact Pacific Gas and Electric which tested the
heater that day and found very high levels. The PG&E worker called
911 for the family and they were rushed to Stanford Hospital’s emer-
gency room. During the ambulance ride, Hernandez called the
cousin to urge her to seek medical care and she went to a hospital
near her Concord home. PG&E replaced the entire heater unit that
day
The family continues suffering physical symptoms like blurred
vision, headaches and memory loss because of the exposure, the suit
claims. The youngest daughter whose room was closest to the heater
in the living room experiences the most chronic symptoms, includ-
ing impaired cognitive functioning, the suit states.
Shelter Network knew the wall surface was hazardous and unsafe
because of the lack of inspection and maintenance, the suit claims.
However, “it is the regular practice of [Shelter Network] to inten-
tionally disregard safety measures and inspections concerning wall
heaters ... in an effort to keep administrative costs low,” the suit
states.
The unit had no carbon monoxide detector inside. However,
beginning Jan. 1 state law will mandate that all complexes place
detectors inside each apartment.
Hernandez’s medical bills were paid through workers’ compensa-
tion but not that of her family and she was denied long-term benefits
Shelter Network sued for carbon monoxide poisoning
See SUIT, Page 20
7
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 8
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It’s the scenario that’s
been spooking employers and investors and
slowing the U.S. economy:
Congress and the White House fail to strike
a budget deal by New Year’s Day. Their stale-
mate triggers sharp tax increases and spend-
ing cuts. Those measures shrink consumer
spending, stifle job growth, topple stock
prices and push the economy off a “fiscal
cliff” and into recession.
The reality may be a lot less bleak.
Even if New Year’s passed with no deal, few
businesses or consumers would likely panic
as long as an agreement seemed likely soon.
The tax increases and spending cuts could be
retroactively repealed after Jan. 1.
And the impact of the tax increases would
be felt only gradually. Most people would
receive slightly less money in each paycheck.
“The simple conclusion that going off the
cliff necessarily means a recession next year
is wrong,” says Lewis Alexander, an econo-
mist at Nomura Securities. “It will ultimately
depend on how long the policies are in place.”
It’s always possible that negotiations
between President Barack Obama and
Republican congressional leaders will col-
lapse in acrimony. The prospect of permanent
tax increases and spending cuts could cause
many consumers and businesses to delay
spending, hiring or expanding.
But most economists expect a deal, if not by
New Year’s then soon after. Businesses and
consumers will likely remain calm as long as
negotiators seem to be moving toward an
agreement.
“The atmosphere is more important than
whether the talks spill” into next year, said
Paul Ashworth, an economist at Capital
Economics.
Still, if budget talks dragged on, many busi-
nesses might put off investment or hiring.
That’s why most economists say it would be
crucial to reach a deal within roughly the first
two months of 2013.
Already, uncertainty is causing some busi-
nesses to delay spending. Consider Apex Tool
and Manufacturing, a 10-person shop in
Evansville, Indiana, that makes parts for the
automotive glass, telecom equipment and
plastics industries.
U.S. economy might
handle brief ‘cliff’ fall
(650) 372-4080
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California Gov. Jerry
Brown is being treated with radiation for early
stage prostate cancer, his office announced
Wednesday.
The 74-year-old Brown is receiving a short
course of conventional radiotherapy for “local-
ized prostate cancer,” the statement said.
Brown’s “prognosis is excellent, and there are
not expected to be any sig-
nificant side effects,”
University of California,
San Francisco oncologist
Eric Small said in the state-
ment. Small is Brown’s
oncologist.
The radiation treatment
will be completed the week
of Jan. 7 — nearly four
weeks from now — and
Brown will continue to
work a full schedule, the statement said.
Brown’s spokesman Gil Duran declined fur-
ther comment.
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in
men. More than 241,000 new cases are expected
to be diagnosed in the United States this year.
More than 90 percent are early stage, and nearly
all men with such diagnoses survive at least five
years.
Localized prostate cancer means “the tumor is
still contained within the prostate,” said Dr. Mark
Litwin, chairman of the UCLA Department of
Urology, who is not involved in Brown’s care.
“Of course, that’s what you want because you
can treat it much more effectively.”
It is the governor’s second bout with cancer. He
underwent minor surgery in spring 2011 to
remove a cancerous growth on his nose. He was
put under local anesthetic and doctors removed
basal cell carcinoma, a common, slow-growing
form of skin cancer, from the right side of his
nose.
For that cancer, Brown underwent micrograph-
ic surgery, in which a doctor can tell even before
the wound is closed that all the cancerous cells
have been removed.
Typical radiation treatment for an early stage
prostate cancer is five days a week for four to five
weeks, said Dr. Ralph de Vere White, urological
oncologist and director of the University of
California, Davis comprehensive cancer center in
Sacramento.
Gov. Brown treated for prostate cancer
Jerry Brown
Library hosts cultural celebrations
The San Mateo Main Library will host three
different cultural events in the Oak Room over
the next week.
First is the Tongan Culture Program today
starting at 4 p.m. The celebration will include
Tongan history, music, dance, arts and crafts and
light refreshments.
The second event is the celebration of Persian
culture this Sunday, Dec. 16, starting at 1:30
p.m. for the winter solstice, Yalda 2012. The
event will feature a live theatrical production of
“Nasrudin’s Magnificent Journey to
Samarkand” and story and poetry readings.
The third is event is the celebration of Latino
culture with the Los Posadas candlelight proces-
sion Wednesday, Dec. 19. The Los Posadas is a
Latin American cultural celebration for the
whole family that will include the candlelight
procession, music, refreshments, stories and
crafts.
The San Mateo Main Library is located at 55
W. Third Ave. For more information go to
www.smplibrary.org.
State Allocation Board grants
schools millions for construction
The State Allocation Board disbursed $383.8
million Tuesday for new school construction and
modernization projects across 110 school dis-
tricts, county offices of education and charter
schools statewide, State Superintendent Tom
Torlakson announced through a press release.
Among the allocations were: $1.59 million for
the Burlingame Elementary School District and
$126,000 for the Jefferson Elementary School
District.
“Our schools play a key role in California’s
future,” said Torlakson. “These new funds pro-
vide vital assistance to local districts in the con-
struction and rebuilding of schools, creating jobs
in the community, and providing better opportu-
nities to students for a successful future.”
The SAB meets monthly to allocate state
matching funds for the construction of new
classrooms and the modernization of existing
schools and to consider policies and regulations
regarding SAB programs. The funds allocated
by the SAB are from voter-approved general
obligation bonds that cannot be used for school
operational expenses.
Caltrain plans drill Saturday
Caltrain will conduct an emergency prepared-
ness drill on the train tracks behind Costco in
Redwood City Saturday, Dec. 15. The exercise
will be held from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on a rail spur
that is not used for regular train service.
This annual drill supports Caltrain’s emer-
gency preparedness efforts by providing an
opportunity to train with local public safety
agencies on how to respond to a rail emergency.
There will be no disruption to traffic or train
service during the drill. Neighbors and residents
have been notified in advance. Onlookers will
not be allowed into the area where the drill is
being conducted, according to Caltrain.
Suspect arrested after
early-morning burglary
A 24-year-old man was arrested early
Wednesday morning for commercial burglary
after a brief foot pursuit in South San Francisco,
according to police.
At 2:09 a.m., South San Francisco police
received an alarm call from a closed check cash-
ing business on the 600 block of El Camino
Real. Police arrived to find the front glass door
had been kicked in, according to police. Officers
saw a man running in the area of the business.
Othman Elayyan was arrested after a short
chase. He had stolen currency and other items
belonging to the business on him at the time.
County names new IT chief
The chief information officer for San
Francisco is moving slightly south, taking up the
same role for San Mateo County beginning next
month.
Jon Walton will be both the new CIO and
director of the Information Services
Department, according to an announcement yes-
terday by County Manager John Maltbie and
Deputy County Manager Reyna Farrales.
“We are excited to have Jon join San Mateo
County as we design a new model for IT service
delivery — one that provides flexibility and
adapts well to change,” Maltbie said in a pre-
pared statement.
Maltbie is currently working on restructuring
the county organization to make the workforce
more agile and service delivery more sustain-
able.
Farrales, who has served as CIO since May,
credits Walton’s customer service excellence
and wealth of experience as benefits for San
Mateo County.
Walton is currently the CIO and director of
technology for the city and county of San
Francisco. During his tenure, San Francisco has
won many awards for its services, finished a
five-year IT plan and created citywide IT train-
ing. Prior to that position, Walton worked in the
private sector as a technology consultant and
served as deputy CIO for the city of San Jose.
Local briefs
OPINION 9
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cougar cubs shot
Editor,
I want to convey, along with thousands
of others apparently, my outrage at De-
partment of Fish and Game shooting the
two cougar kittens hiding under a porch
in Half Moon Bay.
I know the fearless Fish and Game war-
den felt his life was threatened by these
few month old cubs and that’s apparently
because we haven’t hired the right people
for the job. These folks work for us, not
the other way around and, as a voter, I’m
beginning to think we don’t need Fish
and Game if this is the way they will act
in this situation. Just disgusting.
John Dillon
San Bruno
Cost of diesel fuel answers
Editor,
This is in response to Harry
Roussard’s letter complaining about the
cost of diesel fuel on Friday, Dec. 7.
When I was young, (which I
longer am) folks were using diesel
for the economy that it offered. Of
course the long haulers and the big
tractors were able to take advantage
of the of the low RPM and high
torque ratio of the diesel engine and
move tremendous loads with them
economically.
Today, the diesel is no longer an eco-
nomical alternative fuel for a myriad of
reasons I am sure. Thanks to good old
Yankee Ingenuity, these days, American
businesses, local governments and indi-
viduals are working rapidly to convert
the American fleet to natural gas burn-
ers.
Natural gas burns cleaner and more
powerfully than gasoline and we have
plenty of it made right here in
America. The advantages can be list-
ed out ad infinitem, the largest being
price.
At this point, the emphasis is on long
haulers, buses and medium truck fleets,
and converting them to burn natural gas.
As the fueling stations are built out and
onboard fuel tanks become more effi-
cient, most cars and trucks will run on
natural gas.
This will keep us good for the next 40,
50, maybe 100 years until electric cars
and trucks are more standard.
Thomas Edison wanted us to have
electric cars way back when, here we
are 100 years later trying to figure it out.
Diesel is a fuel of the past, my new vehi-
cles will be natural gas fueled — the
new normal.
Mike Lillis
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
By Gita Dev
N
ew York, New Jersey and
Pennsylvania are going, hat
in hand, to the federal gov-
ernment for close to $100 billion to
recover from Hurricane Sandy.
However, only about 10 percent is for
building new protections against
future such events.
The rest is for
repairs and restora-
tion of the homes
and businesses back
to where they were
in their current vul-
nerable situation.
Does this make
sense to us?
San Mateo
County already has more property at
risk from sea level rise than any other
county in the entire state. According
to the Pacific Institute’s report, “The
impacts of sea level rise of the
California coast,” we will face as
much as $26 billion in property dam-
age; more than a quarter of the total
damages expected in all of California
from sea level rise. This amounts to
more than $35,000 per county resi-
dent. And we should remember,
economists projected Sandy’s cost
would be in the millions ... but it was
in the billions.
And these projections do not
account for the personal tragedies,
financial devastation, business losses
and — let us not forget — loss of
lives for the 110,000 San Mateo
County residents who are at risk from
inundation.
Why is San Mateo County so much
at risk? Quite simply, we have been
filling and developing into the Bay,
paving over our natural shoreline
buffers that used to protect our com-
munities. The wetlands that once sep-
arated our cities from the Bay, absorb-
ing water and reducing the waves,
have largely been filled. In their place
stand private homes, offices, airports,
waste treatment plants and more.
There is a striking parallel to New
Jersey, where residents have recently
experienced the unfortunate conse-
quences of the loss of their natural
buffers. Many of the barrier islands
and beaches that once protected the
New Jersey coast now have buildings
and roads where beaches and marshes
once stood. Due to Hurricane Sandy,
many of those houses are now flood-
ed, countless roads are under water
and the Jersey Shore’s iconic roller-
coaster sits broken in the sea.
For us in the Bay Area, hurricanes
may not be at the forefront of our
mind, but sea level rise certainly
should be. In addition, earthquake
action under the Bay could cause
large waves, which would inundate
shorelines.
The Bay Conservation and
Development Commission’s projected
inundation zone for San Mateo
County includes the entire city of
Foster City, almost all of Redwood
Shores, the San Francisco
International Airport, Highway 101,
both the San Mateo-Hayward and
Dumbarton bridges and numerous
neighborhoods and critical infrastruc-
ture up and down the county.
Recently, the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers started using new sea level
rise data based on more current
research findings that shows sea levels
rising faster than earlier projected.
Yet, despite the enormous cost tax-
payers are already saddled with given
San Mateo County’s existing vulnera-
bility, developers continue to propose
new projects that will put even more
residents at risk.
The most audacious is the current
push by Cargill and developer DMB
to develop the below-sea-level salt
ponds in Redwood City with thou-
sands of new homes. Not only would
this unnecessarily put tens of thou-
sands more people at risk, below sea
level, but it will also cost us taxpayers
billions when we have to bail them
out.
It’s time to get smarter about where
we build. We need to restore the edge
of the Bay to natural wetlands to
buffer our communities from sea level
rise and waves, rather than constantly
filling it in for new development.
Let Hurricane Sandy be our last
wake-up call.
Gita Dev is an architect who currently
volunteers on the Sustainable Land Use
Committee of the Sierra Club’s local
chapter and advocates for sustainable
growth on the Peninsula. She has
served as chair for the National
Housing Committee for the American
Institute of Architects.
A wake-up call for San Mateo County
County officials
bank on Maltbie
N
obody would accuse the county manager posi-
tion of being a dead-end job. Job holders usual-
ly come packing significant experience in gov-
ernment organization and budgeting — the kind of
resume for which a Board of Supervisors is willing to
shell out a substantial amount of dough. Local supervi-
sors did just that on Tuesday to keep County Manager
John Maltbie at the wheel permanently another four years
by approving a sweet $300,000 annual salary not to men-
tion benefits that drew him out of retirement and back
into the arms of public employ-
ment.
The vote is not surprising
because the board would proba-
bly have offered up their first-
born children and a basket full
of puppies to keep Maltbie
around. Maltbie spent approxi-
mately 20 years in the position
before his 2008 retirement —
which only came after a few
other false starts to riding off
into the proverbial sunset. The
board then named his hand-
picked successor David Boesch
to the spot but that relationship seemed more fitting of
“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” than “Love Story.”
Boesch finally took his walking papers last fall and
Maltbie stepped back in for the interim. Harmony was
restored. The area between the supervisors and the coun-
ty managers office was no longer referred to (rumor has
it) as the Gaza Strip. The budget got some solid swipes.
Measure A and a car parking tax were passed by voters in
two elections. Everybody took a deep sigh of relief.
It’s hard to imagine the board ever letting Maltbie go.
This means the supervisors have four years to devise a
solution to their quandary — in other words, how to keep
Maltbie alive and willing to work for the county forever.
Perhaps they should slip in a caveat to this new con-
tract mandating a steady diet of vitamin supplements and
oxygen baths. Regular rest and relaxation from the gruel-
ing task of laying off employees is also key. Good thing
he gets 45 days vacation per year.
On the flip side, of course, Henry Allingham, who was
briefly the world’s oldest man praised the benefits of cig-
arettes, whiskey, wild women and a sense of humor.
Too bad the county instituted a wellness plan for its
workers and particularly its vending machines.
One movement, though, swears by caloric restrictions
as a way to promote longer living. Keep Maltbie from the
vending machines — heck, keep him away from any
food! No more work lunches with other department heads
for him.
But what if, God forbid, Maltbie does someday go off
to manage that great big heavenly government body in
the sky? What then?
The county could prop him up in a box for the public
much like Lenin or Stalin. Maybe just his presence will
provide the stability and reassurance the county wanted
when they asked him to stay on.
Don’t scoff; other governments have held on to their
beloved. Remember Eva Peron? Those Argentinians
might have been on to something even though it did take
decades for her well-preserved body to come to rest at
home.
Or, they could lie to and claim Maltbie is still alive just
rarely seen. Think Elvis. The county can issue press
releases about his elusive sightings in remote Michigan
malls or exotic locales. Callers to his office will receive
the sympathetic message, “Oh, you just missed him.”
Cryogenics a la Ted Williams is a novel approach
although freezing Maltbie’s head until a medical solution
to whatever ailment brought his end is probably not the
most fiscally sound approach to immediately ending the
structural deficit and keeping other economic wolves at
bay. County leaders want Maltbie forever and consistent-
ly, not packed away for safe keeping in the future.
But the hard truth is someday Maltbie will be gone.
Hopefully for him, this only signifies he finally gives in
to retirement permanently but, for the county brass, it
means they will finally have to break down and fill
some pretty big shoes whether they like it or not. Until
then, let’s hope Maltbie is everything they wanted
because in four years the county is likely going to be
faced with somebody else holding the financial reins.
Maltbie might be the best fit for San Mateo County but
immortality? That’s probably something even he can’t
manage.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,245.45 -0.02% 10-Yr Bond 1.697 +2.91%
Nasdaq3,013.81 -0.28% Oil (per barrel) 86.77
S&P 500 1,428.48 +0.04% Gold 1,711.60
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stocks ended the day
little changed Wednesday after a rally
prompted by the Federal Reserve’s latest
economic stimulus program fizzled out.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed down 2.99 points at 13,245.45. It
had risen as much as 81 points after the
Fed said earlier in the day that it would
extend a bond-buying plan and keep
interest extremely low.
The S&P finished 0.64 points higher at
1,428.48. The Nasdaq composite was
down 8.49 points at 3,013.81.
The Fed said it will keep spending $85
billion a month on bond purchases to
drive down long-term borrowing costs
and stimulate economic growth. Of that
amount it will spend $45 billion on long-
term Treasury purchases to replace a
previous bond-buying program of equal
size.
The central bank also said it would
keep its key short-term interest rate near
zero at least until the unemployment rate
drops below 6.5 percent or inflation rises
to 2.5 percent. Previously, it had said
that it expects to keep the rate low until
at least mid-2015.
The enthusiasm over the Fed’s
announcement, which came at 12:30
p.m. EST, was short-lived. It briefly
drew investors’ attention away from the
tense, high-level budget talks taking
place in Washington. Also, the amount
of bond buying the central bank said it
would undertake was in line with what
investors were expecting, Joseph
Tanious, a Global Market Strategist with
J.P. Morgan Funds, said.
“I don’t think you’re seeing markets
react hugely” to the Fed, Tanious said.
“Clearly what is driving markets right
now is the fiscal policy. What’s holding
markets hostage....is uncertainty around
the fiscal cliff.”
In Washington, lawmakers were still
trying to reach a deal to avoid the fiscal
“cliff,” a series of sharp tax increases and
spending cuts that will hit the economy
in January if Congress and President
Barack Obama are unable to thrash out
an agreement to reduce the U.S. budget
deficit.
The Dow and the S&P advanced for
the previous five days as optimism
increased that a deal can be struck. The
S&P is trading at its highest in five
weeks and has now erased all of its post-
election losses. Stocks fell immediately
after the vote Nov. 6 on concern that a
divided government would struggle to
resolve the budget issue.
Little change as Fed rally fizzles
Wall Street
NEW YORK — Stocks that moved substantially
or traded heavily Wednesday on the New York
Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Eli Lilly & Co., down $1.60 at $49
The drugmaker is planning another study for
a potential Alzheimer’s treatment, delaying
possible FDA approval and the drug’s sale.
Aetna Inc., up $1.43 at $45.91
A Goldman Sachs analyst says the health
insurer’s initial forecast for 2013 may have
been stronger than some investors expected.
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., down
$2.20 at $39.47
Some analysts are disappointed that the
drugmaker didn’t give more specific details
about the drugs it’s working on.
YM BioSciences Inc., up $1.25 at $2.88
The Canadian drug developer is being bought
by Gilead Sciences for $2.95 per share, an 81
percent premium.
For the more heavily traded Class B shares of
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., up $2.05 at $89.32
Warren Buffett’s company is paying $1.2 billion
to buy back 9,200 Class A shares, and the
board approves higher prices for future
buybacks.
Nasdaq
Coinstar Inc., up $1.15 at $51.96
The company’s DVD kiosk operator, Redbox, is
starting an unlimited streaming-video plan
for $8 a month in a challenge to Netflix.
Charles River Laboratories International Inc.,
down $3.65 at $35.65
The medical research equipment provider’s
profit prediction for 2013 falls short of the
average estimate of Wall Street analysts.
Ziopharm Oncology Inc., down 27 cents at
$4.17
Big movers
American Airlines
rolls out new fare structure
DALLAS — American Airlines is
changing the way it charges you to fly.
American will charge up to $88 more
per round trip for passengers who want a
basic ticket that includes checking bag-
gage or changing the reservation later on.
Currently the airline levies separate fees
for those and other extras for everyone
except premium passengers.
It’s calling the new fare levels “Choice,”
“Choice Essential” and “Choice Plus.”
American said Wednesday that the
options will be sold on its aa.com website
and through travel agents for flights in the
contiguous 48 states.
Rick Elieson, managing director of
aa.com, said the new pricing structure is a
response to customer complaints about
fees for changing a reservation.
Elieson said that American would still
sell a basic fare without protection against
add-on fees “for the less-discriminating
passenger who is just looking for the
cheapest way to get to where they’ve got to
go.”
McAfee released in
Guatemala, flies to Miami
GUATEMALA CITY — Anti-virus
software founder John McAfee was
released from a detention center
Wednesday and was escorted by immigra-
tion officials and police trucks to the
Guatemala City airport, where he was put
on a commercial flight bound for Miami.
McAfee sat in a coach-class seat on the
flight, which took off at midafternoon.
The escort to the airport, accompanied
by a throng of journalists and two police
trucks with sirens blaring, marked the last
chapter for McAfee’s strange, monthlong
odyssey to avoid police questioning about
the killing of an American expatriate in
neighboring Belize.
“McAfee entered the country illegally,”
immigration service spokesman Fernando
Lucero said. “Guatemala is expelling him.
Since his country of origin is the United
States, Guatemala is expelling him to the
United States.”
Business brief
<< Warriors stun Heat with last-second win, page 13
• NFL news: Bounties, steroids, page 14
Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012
RAIDERS UPDATE: ROLANDO McCLAIN RETURNS TO PRACTICE WITH THE TEAM >> PAGE 15
Sheeper is a natural in goal
Heart drives Olson-Fabbro
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
There were several times during the latter part
of the 2012 season when Menlo-Atherton’s
Morgan Olson-Fabbro could not be in the pool.
As in, physically his body was not responding
the way he wanted.
“I know there were times there where we was
really hurting,” said M-A head coach Dante
Dettamanti. “He missed two days of training
and we’d have a game the next day and he’s just
right in and play. There were times when he’d
jump in the pool for practice and half way
through he’d say, ‘I just can’t go anymore
today’ and get out and watch the rest of practice
from the sideline.”
Dettamanti said his star 2-meter player was
hit with a form of non-contagious mono that
doctors didn’t quite understand exactly at a
point in the season where the Bears were bat-
tling to win the Peninsula Athletic League and
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Colin Kaepernick and
the San Francisco 49ers are looking forward
to matching up with Tom Brady and the pro-
lific offense of the New England Patriots on
Sunday night.
It may be more a matter of keeping up.
After breakout performances in
Kaepernick’s first two NFL starts, the San
Francisco offense lacked rhythm and punch
the past two weeks as the 49ers lost in over-
time to the St. Louis Rams and struggled for
three quarters before finishing off the Miami
Dolphins.
The Niners realize they likely will need
more this week with the NFL’s top-ranked
offense on the other sideline. And it’s another
prime time opportunity for San Francisco’s
12th-ranked attack to show what it can do now
that Kaepernick has settled in as the team’s
starting QB.
“This is a showdown we’ve been waiting
for, and we’ve got to put points on the board,”
tight end Delanie Walker said Wednesday.
“We know New England’s got an explosive
offense, and we can be the same with Kap.
One thing we’ve got to do as a team is keep
our offense on the field and keep our defense
on the bench. That’s the main focus this
week.”
The last time the 49ers played in a national-
ly televised evening game, Kaepernick lit up
the Chicago Bears in his starting debut Nov.
19 to spark San Francisco in a 32-7 rout. The
next week, Kaepernick passed for a touch-
down and ran for another as the Niners put up
31 points in a win at New Orleans.
Those are San Francisco’s highest scoring
outputs since the first week of October, when
Alex Smith was the team’s starting quarter-
back. But things haven’t gone as smoothly the
past few weeks, when the 49ers had their least
productive offensive performances since slip-
ping past Seattle in another prime-time game
Oct. 18.
The 49ers even experienced problems get-
ting to the line of scrimmage on time last
week, when they converted on just two of 10
third-down plays and didn’t secure a 27-13
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Three years ago, the Menlo-Atherton girls’
water polo program saw a young Sierra
Sheeper jump into the pool as a freshman —
not just a freshman in terms of academics, but
one who admittedly knew zero about the sport
of water polo.
But there was something that spoke to the
M-A coaches about Sheeper’s natural ability
and her instincts in the pool. So when necessi-
ty came a’knocking, head coach Chris Rubin
made a move that forever changed the course
of Sheeper’s career.
They put her between the pipes, guarding
the cage, protecting that which matters the
most.
“It really is kind of shocking,” Sheeper said.
“I’m really glad my coach asked me to play
the goal because I never thought I would be
here.”
See GIRLS, Page 13 See BOYS, Page 12
Facing Pats, 49ers looking to step up offensively
See 49ERS, Page 15
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — One of the most
important road trips the Stanford
men’s basketball team will have
made this season never shows up on
the schedule, in the team’s record or
total miles traveled.
In September, the Cardinal gath-
ered around to support one of their
own after junior forward Dwight
Powell lost his mother. The coaches
and several players flew to Toronto
for the funeral.
Jacqueline Weir died on Sept. 13
in Boston after a short fight with
cancer, three months shy of her 54th
birthday. Powell’s coaches visited
the hospital in the Boston area,
where Weir worked and lived. And
Stanford received permission from
the NCAA to fly the players from
Powell’s recruiting class to Canada
to be there for him at the memorial.
“It was important, for sure,”
Powell said. “My friends in my life
are my family. The team is my fam-
ily, so it meant a lot for them to
come out there. I have a really good
support group in Toronto as well,
some guys I played with in high
school.”
Coach Johnny Dawkins realizes
the importance of everyone support-
ing Powell, an only child attending
college so far from home. Dawkins
already had a close-knit group on
the reigning NIT champions, who
hope last season’s special run is
only a preview of bigger things for
the program this March in the
NCAA tournament. Stanford hasn’t
been since 2008, and not yet under
fifth-year coach Dawkins.
Powell will be an integral part in
getting Stanford there. Keeping him
in the right frame of mind as he con-
tinues to mourn his mother has been
a joint effort.
Dawkins considers the trip to
Toronto one that showed Powell just
how much support — and how
many brothers — he has within his
own locker room, and on campus.
“Absolutely,” Dawkins said.
“That’s what it’s about. It was very
unfortunate what happened to his
mom, and very sudden. It really puts
it in perspective when something
happens to a young man and a fam-
ily. The players understand that. His
teammates and his coaches are a big
part of his life. It’s important to rally
around him.”
The Cardinal (6-3) are finishing
up their annual two-week break for
final exams before returning to the
court to host UC Davis on Saturday,
the first of four remaining noncon-
ference games ahead of Pac-12
play. Stanford is picked fourth in
the conference.
Powell has led Stanford in scoring
three times already, including going
off for a career-high 29 points in a
71-58 victory against Denver on
Dec. 2. He is averaging 14.2 points
per game, second to Chasson
Randle’s 14.7, while also pulling
down 6.9 rebounds.
“This is the best place for me to
be right now. First of all, it’s a dif-
ferent country, so I don’t even have
too much family except for the
team,” Powell said. “I can’t really
think of anyone else I’d rather lean
on right now than my teammates.
Regardless of what goes on, they
can take my mind off things.”
Stanford players rally around Powell in tough time
secure a spot in the Central Coast
Section playoffs. For the first time
since Dettamanti started coaching
Olson-Fabbro, the idea of substitut-
ing No. 10 crossed the coach’s
mind.
“But in games, he was a gamer,”
Dettamanti said. “He hung in there.
I really think that’s something that
sets him apart from other players —
not just in our team but all athletes
in general.”
Admittedly, there were players in
San Mateo county who had more
eye-popping seasons than Olson-
Fabbro — at least on paper. But
Olson-Fabbro is the Daily Journal
Boys’ Water Polo Player of the Year
for his grit and determination.
Olson-Fabbro was the M-A heart-
beat — when it comes to worth,
there was none more valuable to his
team than he in 2012.
“Morgan came through in the all
big games,” Dettamanti said. “All
the tough games. We had a tough
schedule and I did that on purpose.
We tried to play the best teams we
could find from the East Bay,
Southern California, the Central
Valley ... it was going to make us a
better team. Morgan came through
in the really tough games when we
needed goals, he really came
through for us.”
Olson-Fabbro needed to do that
often for the 2012 Bears. M-A truly
was a cardiac kind of team this sea-
son. And when the going got tough,
the tough turned to Olson-Fabbro.
“He would just take over a game
and part of that is the passion for the
game,” Dettamanti said. “Well, I
don’t know if you call it passion, but
just, a desire to win. And to do
what’s necessary at the time. I can’t
tell you how many times we needed
a goal and it was the last part, last
minute of the game when we’re
down by a goal and Morgan would
get that goal to tie it up and go into
overtime.”
Olson-Fabbro came through 69
times in 2012 as the Bears leading
scorer. He also tallied 47 steals and
31 assists. He was the PAL Bay
Division’s Most Valuable Player
and a member of the 2012 All-
Central Coast Section First Team.
And he led his team to a goal
from upsetting the mighty
Bellarmine Prep in the CCS
Division I championship. That
game was vintage Olson-Fabbro.
No. 10 scored five times and beat
the Bells in every way imaginable.
“What was amazing to me was he
also scored on the fast break,”
Dettamanti said. “Part of the fast
break is knowing when to go on the
counter attack, so he’s really smart
about knowing. He’s not out fastest
swimmer, but he knows when to
take off. Here’s a guy who’s coming
off being sick, he’s probably not in
the greatest shape. And even then,
he’s scoring on the counter attack,
he’s scoring from two meters, from
the outside, on the fast break.
“He’s just got the feel for playing
the game. He instinctively knows
the game. He know where to shoot
the ball, where to position himself,
he’s really good at reading the goal-
keeper. When it comes down to
what separates the great players
from just the good players, it’s how
you respond to coaching and your
feel for the game. The things you
can’t coach. And that’s what
Morgan has. He has the things you
can’t coach — a game situation,
knowing what to do, instinctively.”
And it was those instincts that
kept Olson-Fabbro at such a domi-
nant level despite his ailments —
playing everywhere in the pool for
the Bears as needed. As a 2-meter
play, Olson-Fabbro is undersized.
As a wing player, he isn’t fast
enough.
Or so you would think.
“He’s a really instinctive player.
He’s got a great feel for the game,”
Dettamanti said. “Every now in then
at practice or in a game he’d do
something and you would go,
‘Where did that come from?’ It’s a
passion for the game. That’s part of
it too. The really great athletes have
that feel for it. You look at any sport,
and the guys just have that natural
ability but for me it’s just a feel for
it, it separates the athletes from the
not-so-good athletes.”
Continued from page 11
BOYS
SPORTS 13
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Here for Sheeper is not only
accepting the title of the Daily
Journal’s Girls’ Water Polo Player
of the Year, but also coming to grips
with the fact that with only a year
and a half worth of varsity water
polo experience, she has already
cemented herself as one of the pre-
miere goalkeepers not just in the
Peninsula Athletic League, but the
Central Coast Section as well.
If it sounds a little unbelievable,
well, even Sheeper admits the story
sounds pretty crazy.
“It’s was actually really surprising
this year,” she said. “Over the sum-
mer, I’ve been trying to improve. I
joined a new club team that has a
goalie coach which helped going
into the season. But it was a shock.”
And while the Bears, whose ath-
letic program enjoyed massive over-
all success this fall, fell to Leland in
the CCS Division I semifinals,
Sheeper made it clear that with her
manning the cage, M-A would be
back in the fray come 2013.
“I think her overall success is just
a combination of things,” Rubin
said. “Obviously she has that natu-
ral ability which sets her apart. But,
she works hard day in and out. She
comes to practice, she’s coachable,
she want to learn. And that shined
through for her this season.”
The Bears won the PAL Bay
Division title and came within a
game of reaching the CCS finals in
Division I. But the season could
have been a total loss for M-A. The
Bears graduated nine seniors from
the 2011 teams and returned only
four players.
Amidst the turmoil of having to
reshape a team on the fly, the one
constant was the young Sheeper in
goal — covering up for any mistake
her defense might make and spring-
ing the young offense as well.
“This season, she had the starting
role from beginning to end and I
think that just played a lot into her
confidence,” Rubin said. “And it
really showed as we made it to the
end of the PAL season and CCS.
“Sierra’s improvement over the
last year and half really allowed us
to play more of an attack-oriented
defense. We were able to be a little
more risky. Also, with Sierra’s great
throwing arm, the was able to help
us with counter attack opportunities,
as well.”
“I wanted our team to do well,”
Sheeper said, “just help out the new
players coming into the team. They
are obviously already really good
players, but I just showed them how
varsity was a little more. It took
quite a while during the season,
probably farther along in PAL play.
Definitely preseason was a lot more
of rebuilding the team since we had-
n’t really played together.”
And perhaps her leadership in the
pool and out was Sheeper’s biggest
contribution to the team. At almost
11 saves a game, the numbers were
always there. But, as a steady pres-
ence, Sheeper was invaluable, so
much so that the Bay Division
coaches named her the league’s
Most Valuable Goalie. She was also
named to the All-Central Coast
Section First Team.
“Sierra at the beginning of this
year, if I had to break down who the
leaders of the team were going to
be, I may not have originally looked
at Sierra,” Rubin said. “But
throughout the season, she was a
great leader in the pool. During the
game, she was always calm, cool
and collected. She would make
some incredible saves but had the
mindset to take her time and make a
good outlet pass. And so, her
demeanor in the pool really stabi-
lized our defense.
“She works hard day in and day
out,” he said. “She’s got such a pos-
itive attitude. She’s trained year-
around from the beginning of her
freshman year. I’m sure she’s
already in the pool training for next
season.”
Sheeper’s Player of the Year play
this season has the entire M-A
Nation pumped for her senior cam-
paign.
“We’re very excited for next
year,” Sheeper said. “We think we
can improve more on this season
and move forward and have a
chance to win CCS next year.”
“I always think junior year is the
hardest year for any high school
water polo player,” Rubin said. “It’s
a transition year, you’re an upper
classmen and now you’re expected
to contribute. I kind of feel like
Sierra took that all in and did really
well with the pressure of junior
year. I’m excited to see how she
comes in senior year. She’s got
nothing to lose. I’m sure she’s going
to have an outstanding year in the
cage.”
Continued from page 11
GIRLS
Warriors stay perfect on road trip, beat Heat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Draymond Green
made a layup with 0.9 seconds left
to give the Golden State Warriors a
97-95 win over the Miami Heat on
Wednesday.
Klay Thompson tied a season
high with 27 points to lead the
Warriors, who have won five
straight.
LeBron James led Miami with 31
points as he reached the 20-point
mark for the 25th consecutive game,
the longest current streak in the
NBA.
Jarrett Jack dribbled the ball at the
top of the key for the Warriors as the
clock ticked down before finding
Green open underneath the basket.
Green caught the pass in mid-air
and made the basket.
James’ jumper from the baseline
banged off the rim giving Golden
State the win as Miami lost for just
the second time in 12 home games.
David Lee scored 22 points and
grabbed 13 rebounds and Jack
added 20 points off the bench for
the Warriors.
Golden State took a 77-74 lead
into the fourth quarter after leading
for most of the third.
After hitting a 3 to tie the game at
87, James gave the Heat their first
lead since early in the third with a
turnaround 18-footer with 6:41 left
for an 89-87 advantage.
The teams played a one-posses-
sion game over the next four min-
utes before Lee knocked down a
pair of free throws to tie the game at
95 with 1:54 left.
The score was still tied at 95 with
under a minute remaining. Ray
Allen had a chance to give the Heat
a lead with 45 seconds left. Lee fol-
lowed by missing a driving layup.
Shane Battier’s miss from the corner
with 12 seconds left gave the
Warriors an opportunity in the clos-
ing seconds.
The Heat received a scare in the
second quarter when Lee sent James
to the floor with a flagrant foul send-
ing James to the floor on his back.
Warriors 97, Heat 95
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 10 3 0 .769 472 274
N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 306
Buffalo 5 8 0 .385 289 352
Miami 5 8 0 .385 240 276
South
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Houston 11 2 0 .846 365 263
Indianapolis 9 4 0 .692 292 329
Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 386
Jacksonville 2 11 0 .154 216 359
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 9 4 0 .692 331 273
Pittsburgh 7 6 0 .538 278 264
Cincinnati 7 6 0 .538 321 280
Cleveland 5 8 0 .385 259 272
West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 10 3 0 .769 375 257
San Diego 5 8 0 .385 292 281
Oakland 3 10 0 .231 248 402
Kansas City 2 11 0 .154 195 352
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 8 5 0 .615 373 270
Washington 7 6 0 .538 343 329
Dallas 7 6 0 .538 300 314
Philadelphia 4 9 0 .308 240 341
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Atlanta 11 2 0 .846 337 259
Tampa Bay 6 7 0 .462 354 308
New Orleans 5 8 0 .385 348 379
Carolina 4 9 0 .308 265 312
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 9 4 0 .692 323 279
Chicago 8 5 0 .615 308 219
Minnesota 7 6 0 .538 283 286
Detroit 4 9 0 .308 320 342
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 9 3 1 .731 316 184
Seattle 8 5 0 .615 300 202
St. Louis 6 6 1 .500 236 279
Arizona 4 9 0 .308 186 292
Thursday’sGame
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Green Bay at Chicago, 10 a.m.
NFL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 16 5 .762 —
Brooklyn 12 9 .571 4
Boston 11 9 .550 4 1/2
Philadelphia 12 10 .545 4 1/2
Toronto 4 19 .174 13
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 14 6 .700 —
Atlanta 13 6 .684 1/2
Orlando 8 13 .381 6 1/2
Charlotte 7 14 .333 7 1/2
Washington 3 16 .158 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 12 9 .571 —
Milwaukee 11 9 .550 1/2
Indiana 11 11 .500 1 1/2
Detroit 7 17 .292 6 1/2
Cleveland 5 18 .217 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 18 4 .818 —
Memphis 14 4 .778 2
Dallas 11 10 .524 6 1/2
Houston 10 11 .476 1/2
New Orleans 5 16 .238 12 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 18 4 .818 —
Utah 12 10 .545 6
Denver 11 11 .500 7
Minnesota 9 9 .500 7
Portland 9 12 .429 8 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 16 6 .727 —
Golden State 15 7 .682 1
L.A. Lakers 9 13 .409 7
Sacramento 7 14 .333 8 1/2
Phoenix 7 15 .318 9
Wednesday’sGames
Brooklyn 94,Toronto 88
Indiana 96, Cleveland 81
Atlanta 86, Orlando 80
L.A. Clippers 100, Charlotte 94
Chicago 96, Philadelphia 89
Golden State 97, Miami 95
Houston 99,Washington 93
NBA STANDINGS
@Patriots
8:20p.m.
NBC
12/16
@Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/23
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/30
vs.Chiefs
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/16
@Panthers
1p.m.
CBS
12/23
@Chargers
1p.m.
CBS
12/30
vs.New
Orleans
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/18
@Kings
7p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/19
vs.Bobcats
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/21
@Charlotte
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/10
@Miami
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/12
@Orlando
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/14
@Atlanta
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/15
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with
RHP Joe Blanton and LHP Sean Burnett on two-
year contracts.
MINNESOTATWINS— Agreed to terms with RHP
Scott Elarton on a minor league contract.
TAMPABAYRAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Hector Lopez on a minor league contract.
TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed C Eli Whiteside off
waivers from Toronto.Agreed to terms with INF/OF
Brandon Snyder on a minor league contract.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS — Claimed RHP Sandy Rosario
off waivers from Boston.
COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with
RHP Mike McClendon and RHP Logan Kensing on
minor league contracts.
PITTSBURGHPIRATES — Agreed to terms with
RHP Jason Grilli on a two-year contract.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Traded OF/INF Skip
Schumaker to the L.A. Dodgers for INF Jake Lem-
merman.
SANDIEGOPADRES— Agreed to terms with OF
Travis Buck, RHP Sean O’Sullivan, RHP Jason Ray,
RHPDaniel Stange,INFGregorioPetit,CReneRivera
and C Eddy Rodriguez on minor league contracts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Fined Minnesota P Chris Kluwe $5,250 for
wearing a message on his uniform promoting Ray
Guy for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
ARIZONACARDINALS — Placed QB Kevin Kolb
on injured reserve. Signed OL Mike Gibson.
BUFFALOBILLS — Signed RB Zach Brown to the
practice squad.
CAROLINA PANTHERS — Released WT Lee
Ziemba. Placed S Haruki Nakamura on injured re-
serve.SignedDBAndersonRussell fromthepractice
squad and DB Kamaal McIlwain to the practice
squad.
CHICAGOBEARS— Signed DT Amobi Okoye to a
one-year contract.
DALLAS COWBOYS — Released TE Chase Ford
and DB Reggie Jones from the practice squad.
Placed DT Josh Brent on the reserve/non-football
illness list. Signed DT Brian Schaefering. Signed DB
Micah Pellerin to the practice squad.
DETROITLIONS—PlacedDTCoreyWilliamsonin-
jured reserve. Signed DT Andre Fluellen. Released
DEKendrickAdamsfromthepracticesquad.Signed
DT Jimmy Saddler-McQueen to the practice squad.
INDIANAPOLISCOLTS—PlacedRBDonaldBrown
and FB Robert Hughes on injured reserve.Released
RB Alvester Alexander from the practice squad.
Signed G Robert Griffin, RB Mewelde Moore and
RBDeji Karim.SignedRBDavinMeggett totheprac-
tice squad.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former New Orleans defensive coor-
dinator Gregg Williams testified that he
tried to shut down the team’s bounty
system when the NFL began investigat-
ing but was overruled by interim Saints
head coach Joe Vitt, according to tran-
scripts from appeals hearings obtained
by The Associated Press.
According to the transcripts, Williams
said that then-assistant Vitt responded to
a suggestion that the pay-for-pain setup
be abandoned with an obscenity-filled
speech about how NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell “wasn’t going to ... tell
us to ... stop doing what won us the
Super Bowl. This has been going on in
the ... National Football League forever,
and it will go on here forever, when they
run (me) out of there, it will still go on.”
Williams and Vitt were among a num-
ber of witnesses whose testimony was
heard by former NFL Commissioner
Paul Tagliabue, who on Tuesday over-
turned four player suspensions in the
case. Tagliabue was appointed by
Goodell to handle the final round of
appeals. The AP obtained transcripts of
Tagliabue’s closed-door hearings
through a person with a role in the case.
Vitt was a Saints assistant who was
banned for six games for his part in the
scandal but now is filling in for head
coach Sean Payton, who was suspended
for the entire season. Williams was sus-
pended indefinitely by Goodell. Others
who testified included former defensive
assistant Mike Cerullo, the initial
whistleblower and considered a key
NFL witness.
Transcripts portray the former coach-
ing colleagues, all part of the Saints’
2010 Super Bowl championship, as bit-
terly disagreeing with one another and
occasionally contradicting how the NFL
depicted the bounty system.
Vitt, Williams and Cerullo appeared
separately before Tagliabue and were
questioned by lawyers for the NFL and
lawyers representing the players origi-
nally suspended by Goodell: Jonathan
Vilma, Will Smith, Scott Fujita and
Anthony Hargrove.
Williams testified he wanted to stop bounties
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Accusing the
NFL players’ union of “trying to
back out” of an August 2011 agree-
ment to start checking for human
growth hormone, a congressman
worried aloud Wednesday that the
league will head into next season
without a test for the banned drug.
“Hopefully as we move down the
line, players will see how incredibly
ridiculous it looks for them not to ...
straighten this thing out,” said Rep.
Elijah Cummings of Maryland, the
House Oversight and Government
Reform Committee’s ranking
Democrat. “We’re now getting
ready to go into a third season, and
it does not look very good.”
The panel held a hearing to
examine the science behind the
testing, and heard from experts that
it is reliable.
“No test is perfect ... but there
hasn’t been a single false positive,”
U.S. Anti-Doping Agency Chief
Science Officer Larry Bowers testi-
fied.
While the latest, 10-year labor
contract paved the way for HGH
testing in professional football once
certain parameters were set, the
NFL Players Association wants a
new study before it will agree to the
validity of a test used by Olympic
sports and Major League Baseball.
The sides haven’t been able to agree
on a scientist to help resolve that
impasse.
HGH is a banned substance that is
hard to detect and used by athletes
for what are believed to be a variety
of benefits, whether real or only per-
ceived — such as increasing speed
or improving vision.
Lawmaker: NFL players are
‘trying to back out’ on HGH
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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victory over the Dolphins until a late offensive
charge produced two fourth-quarter touch-
downs.
Kaepernick led the charge and sealed the
win with a 50-yard touchdown dash with 2:10
to play, his second consecutive game with a
50-yard run, the longest by a quarterback in
franchise history. Against the Patriots, the
49ers may rely more on the big-play ability
that gave Kaepernick the starting job over
Smith, the NFL’s third-ranked quarterback
who hasn’t played since suffering a concus-
sion on Nov. 11.
“There are definitely things that we’re doing
that tailor the offense to his skill set,” coach
Jim Harbaugh said.
Kaepernick is 3-1 as a starter but this
Sunday is the biggest stage yet for the second-
year pro. As is his style, Kaepernick displayed
little emotion and was brief with his answers
when talking about the Patriots on
Wednesday.
“It’ll be a great challenge for us,”
Kaepernick said. “It’s a great opportunity to
go out and show what we’re capable of.
They’re going to give you a lot of different
looks on defense. You just have to be ready for
it, for their disguises and different coverages,
different fronts they’re going to give you.”
Kaepernick was ready for much of what he
saw during his first month as a starter. He’s
completing 67.4 percent of his passes and is
averaging 217 yards passing per game and 8.3
yards per pass attempt as a starter. He’s
thrown just one interception in 129 attempts
this year and has a passer rating of 97.4.
And despite not playing in three games and
having 13 combined carries in five others,
Kaepernick is third among NFL quarterbacks
with 351 yards rushing and five touchdowns
on the ground.
The 49ers figure to need everything they
Continued from page 11
49ERS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Oakland Raiders linebacker
Rolando McClain met with coach Dennis
Allen before returning to practice Wednesday
after serving a two-game suspension for con-
duct detrimental to the team.
Allen would not discuss details of the meet-
ing but said McClain would remain on the
roster in a backup role after starting nine
games this year before his suspension.
“I laid out exactly what the expectations are
for him moving forward,” Allen said. “Really
that’s about it. We’re moving on from there.
Rolando’s part of this team and we’re going to
move on.”
McClain had not been at the team’s facili-
ties since Nov. 28 when he was kicked out of
practice following an argument with Allen.
McClain was told not to return to practice and
was suspended two days later.
That McClain is back with the Raiders is
somewhat surprising considering he posted
several comments on Facebook criticizing the
team after he was sent home from practice.
Those comments were later removed.
“Things get said in the heat of the moment,”
Allen said. “We’ve gotta move on.”
Whether McClain has moved on is
unknown.
The eighth overall pick in 2010, who posted
that he was “mentally done” and “just waiting
on my papers” after being sent home, did not
appear in the Raiders locker room during the
45-minute media access period and did not
issue a statement.
He practiced with Oakland’s second-team
defense Wednesday while Omar Gaither, who
started at middle linebacker in place of
McClain the past two weeks, continued to
work with the starters.
Although neither McClain nor the Raiders
have said publicly what the dispute between
the two men was about, Allen acknowledged
the linebacker was told before the suspension
that he had lost his starting job on defense.
“Everybody makes mistakes in life, and to
be honest I still don’t know the whole story,”
Gaither said. “I don’t know who’s at fault.
(But) you welcome him back with open arms,
put him back in the mix, and you just go from
there.”
McClain was reinstated to Oakland’s roster
on Monday but was unable to meet with Allen
because the coach was in Texas to attend his
father’s funeral.
In 41 career games with Oakland, McClain
has 6 1/2 sacks, one interception, one forced
fumble, no fumble recoveries and did little to
help improve Oakland’s struggling run
defense.
Other players who have struggled with the
Raiders this season have already been
released.
Starting cornerback Ron Bartell was cut on
Monday as part of a handful of moves to open
a roster spot for McClain. Backup fullback
Owen Schmitt was also let go, three weeks
after outside linebacker Aaron Curry — a pro-
jected starter before the season — was given
his walking papers.
McClain has struggled so far in his career
and has had his playing time sharply reduced
in recent weeks, but Allen and general manag-
er Reggie McKenzie resisted the urge to cut
him with three games left.
“Just different circumstances,” Allen said.
“I’m not going to get into the specifics.”
Oakland’s players didn’t seem too con-
cerned about McClain’s return becoming a
distraction.
“It hasn’t distracted us for the past two or
three weeks,” quarterback Carson Palmer
said. “This team is completely focused on
beating the Kansas City Chiefs and that’s all
we’re going to worry about. If anybody has a
problem with it I’ll help guys through it, but
it’s no issue for us.”
Notes: Allen said there was “a chance”
third-string quarterback Terrelle Pryor will
make his season debut against the Chiefs. ...
DT Richard Seymour (knee, hamstring) is still
limited in practice but the Raiders are hopeful
he can play for the first time since Nov. 4.
McClain practices with Raiders
16
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Some artificial Christmas trees
glow cheerily even without lights:
The branches themselves softly
glow, fading on and off in different
colors at the tips.
That got me wondering: Could
you get the same effect from a real
tree?
If plain old green evergreens are
too ho-hum for you, there’s a world
of “self-igniting” evergreens await-
ing.
For example, consider growing a
variety of yellow-leafed conifer,
many of which make good cut trees.
The Aurea, Lutea and Rheingold
varieties of arborvitae; the
Aurescens variety of Japanese yew;
the Gold Cone variety of common
juniper; and the Gold Coast or Old
Gold varieties of Chinese juniper all
sport yellow foliage.
Any of these conifers also have
relatively dense, small needles, so
the trees look full even when viewed
up close, propped by the fireplace.
Some evergreens even provide
their own version of tinsel: silvery
leaves. Try something like the
Glauca variety of Japanese white
pine or the Argentea variety of
Colorado blue spruce. The blue of
evergreen needles results from a
waxy coating, and that waxy blue is
not far from silver, making the
Angelica Blue, Blue Cloud and
Blue Vase varieties of Chinese
juniper also self-decorating, sort of.
OK, let’s admit that while a yel-
low or silver conifer might look
good among other plants out in the
garden — especially lighting up a
shady area — it could look sickly,
boring and bereft of holiday cheer
standing alone in a living room.
Nature has provided for us here
also, though.
For instance, Dragon’s Eye pine,
a variety of Japanese red pine, has
two yellow bands decorating each
of its otherwise green needles. And
the green needles of the
Aureovariegata variety of arborvitae
are randomly splotched with yellow.
Still interested in tinsel? Grow
Nana Variegata Japanese falsecy-
press for leaves that are both green
and white.
Like the artificial tree that glows
at its tips, another variety of
Japanese red pine, Alboterminata,
glows pale yellow only at the tips of
the leaves. A couple of Hinoki false-
cypress varieties ignite similarly.
Mariesii glows white, and a tree of
Crispii is a pyramid of green suf-
Some trees put a natural glow on the season
Above: the Glauca variety of the Japanese white pine has a white stripe
on each needle, giving it a silvery appearance. Right: The Colorado blue
spruce gets its bluish coloring from a waxy coating on each needle.
See TREES, Page 19
18
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Holly Ramer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Forget Bing Crosby’s classic “White Christmas.” For me,
Christmastime will forever be evoked by David Cassidy
crooning “My Christmas Card to You,” and I still have the
1972 Partridge Family holiday record album to prove it.
The music has long since been transferred to my iPod, but
the rest of my family can stand only so much of Cassidy’s
oddly melancholy rendition of “Frosty the Snowman.” So I
came up with another way to get my fix of nostalgia: I repro-
duced the album cover art on a tile coaster that now resides on
my coffee table, not my parents’ old turntable. In fact, I had
enough vintage albums to make a set of four holiday coasters,
and at a cost of 15 cents per tile, can afford to make more to
give to my sister.
But why stop there? I’m also awfully fond of my 1973 Little
Golden Book versions of “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”
and “Frosty the Snowman,” and I get out my battered copies
every year. But the books end up lost amid my son’s enormous
collection, so I came up with a way to make them part of our
holiday dicor.
Instead of shrinking the covers as I did for the albums, I
enlarged them a bit to fit 8-by-10-inch canvases and hung them
on the wall. Slapping a print into a frame would be even easi-
er, but I had the blank canvas on hand and didn’t want to buy
a new frame. I may be a hopeless sap at the holidays, but I’m
also thrifty.
Record album coasters
Materials:
— record album covers
— scanner or digital camera
— printer
— craft knife and metal ruler or scissors
— spray adhesive or adhesive tape (I used a Scotch-brand
Advanced Tape Glider)
— ceramic tiles, approximately 4-by-4 inches
— clear enamel topcoat (I used Rust-oleum Crystal Clear
Enamel)
— felt, cut to the size of the coasters
Instructions:
1. Take a picture of your album cover. Scanning it would
also work, but most small, desktop scanners won’t be big
enough to scan the entire cover in one pass. It’s best to stand
the album up on a shelf against a wall, so you can get a
straight-on view for a photo.
2. Use photo-editing or word-processing software to crop
and re-size the image to fit your tile. Print the image, then trim
it to size using the craft knife or scissors.
3. Use adhesive tape or spray adhesive to glue the image to
the tile. Many online tutorials call for using Mod Podge, a type
of decoupage medium, for this kind of project but I find it
messy. And because it is water-based, the finished coasters
likely will not stand up to moisture or heat from a cold bever-
age glass or warm mug.
4. Allow adhesive to dry thoroughly, following product
directions. Working outdoors, apply several light coats of the
clear enamel spray, again following the product directions for
how long to wait between coats.
5. Glue squares of felt to the underside of the tiles to prevent
the rough surface from scratching your table.
6. Allow the finished coaster to dry for at least several days
before using.
Give vintage holiday items a fresh look
Use the cover art from your favorite band, cut and glue to
pieces of tile to serve as custom drink coasters.
NATION/WORLD 19
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Mariesii glows white, and a tree of Crispii is a
pyramid of green suffused with a glowing yel-
low surface.
One more conifer worth mentioning is the
Aurea variety of Scotch pine. It actually fades
in and out of color like those artificial trees —
though not nearly as quickly. Young leaves
emerge yellowish in spring, turn pure green in
summer, then become yellowish again in cold
weather.
For anyone who wants their living tree to
actually glow with light from within, British
genetic engineers have been working on tech-
niques to use genes from luminescent jellyfish
and fireflies to produce real holiday trees that
glow without added lights.
All of these real trees — whether all yellow
or silver, just so at their tips, or changing color
— have a place in the garden, and perhaps
even cut as branches or whole trees indoors.
None can offer the festive, dramatic con-
trasts that you get from a lush, green tree
draped with shiny tinsel and brightly colored
decorations. Then again, neither do those soft-
ly glowing artificial tree.
Continued from page 17
TREES
Blast at Syrian regime
building in capital kills 5
BEIRUT — Three bombs collapsed walls in
the Syrian Interior Ministry building Wednesday
in Damascus, killing at least five people, as rebels
fighting to overthrow President Bashar Assad
edged closer to the capital, the symbol of his
power.
The blast came as more than 100 countries rec-
ognized the opposition umbrella group as the legit-
imate representative of Syria, a diplomatic blow to
Assad.
Five people were killed in the Wednesday’s
attacks and 23 others were injured in the attacks,
according to a statement by the Interior Ministry.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights said at least eight people were
killed, most of them soldiers, and more than 40
wounded.
Such bombings have been a trademark of
Islamic radicals fighting alongside the rebels, rais-
ing concerns about the extremists’ role in the civil
war.
On Wednesday afternoon, attackers detonated
two explosive devices before an explosives-laden
car went off near the entrance of the Interior
Ministry building in Kafar Souseh district in
Damascus. The blast knocked down walls inside
the ministry building, scattering debris on the
street and shattering windows in nearby structures,
including at the Egyptian Embassy.
Police cordoned off the area. The pro-govern-
ment Al-Ekhbariya TV showed splotches of blood
on the street in front of the ministry.
World brief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND, Ore. — Gunfire
rang out in the mall food court,
instantly transforming a casual
afternoon of holiday shopping into
a nightmare. The shooter, armed
with a rifle, was dressed in dark
clothing and wore a hockey-style
face mask.
As panicked shoppers fled for
cover, workers ushered some into
hiding places within stores, or
helped them to the exits. The first
officers to arrive formed groups and
rushed into the chaos, rather than
waiting for the more heavily armed
SWAT team.
“If we would have run out, we
would have ran right into it,” said
Kaelynn Keelin, who saw a window
get shot out and, along with other
Made In Oregon co-workers, pulled
customers into the store for shelter.
The quick mobilization of mall
workers and police reflects the real-
ity that, while mass shootings are
rare, they have forced authorities to
rehearse for such outbreaks of vio-
lence as if they are the norm.
“This could have been much,
much worse,” Clackamas County
Sheriff Craig Roberts said.
Roughly 10,000 people were
inside the Clackamas Town Center
on Tuesday afternoon, when police
say Jacob Tyler Roberts, 22, armed
himself with an AR-15 semiauto-
matic rifle he stole from someone
he knew, and went on a rampage
that left two people dead.
The sheriff said the rifle jammed
during the attack, but the shooter
managed to get it working again. He
later shot himself. The sheriff and
Roberts are not related.
As authorities tried to determine a
motive for a shooting they said had
no specific targets, details emerged
about Roberts from acquaintances
and neighbors. They described him
as relaxed, friendly and outgoing.
Mall shooter used stolen rifle
By Hope Yen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — White people
will no longer make up a majority of
Americans by 2043, according to new
census projections. That’s part of a
historic shift that already is reshaping
the nation’s schools, workforce and
electorate, and is redefining long-held
notions of race.
The official projection, released
Wednesday by the Census Bureau,
now places the tipping point for the
white majority a year later than previ-
ous estimates, which were made
before the impact of the recent eco-
nomic downturn was fully known.
America continues to grow and
become more diverse due to higher
birth rates among minorities, particu-
larly for Hispanics who entered the
U.S. at the height of the immigration
boom in the 1990s and early 2000s.
Since the mid-2000 housing bust,
however, the arrival of millions of new
immigrants from Mexico and other
nations has slowed from its once-tor-
rid pace.
The country’s changing demo-
graphic mosaic has stark political
implications, shown clearly in last
month’s election that gave President
Barack Obama a second term — in no
small part due to his support from 78
percent of non-white voters.
There are social and economic ram-
ifications, as well. Longstanding
fights over civil rights and racial
equality are going in new directions,
promising to reshape race relations
and common notions of being a
“minority.” White plaintiffs now
before the Supreme Court argue that
special protections for racial and eth-
nic minorities dating back to the
1960s may no longer be needed, from
affirmative action in college admis-
sions to the Voting Rights Act,
designed for states with a history of
disenfranchising blacks.
Residential segregation has eased
and intermarriage for first- and sec-
ond-generation Hispanics and Asians
is on the rise, blurring racial and eth-
nic lines and lifting the numbers of
people who identify as multiracial.
Unpublished 2010 census data show
that millions of people shunned stan-
dard race categories such as black or
white on government forms, opting to
write in their own cultural or individ-
ual identities.
Census: Whites no longer
a majority in U.S. by 2043
LOCAL/DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, DEC. 13
Tongan Culture Program. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. San Mateo Main Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. The library will
host a cultural spotlight program
focusing on Tongan history and
culture. The program will include
music and dance of Tonga, arts and
crafts and refreshments. Free. For
more information call 522-7808.
Designer Clothing Trunk Show:
AlexVon Bromssen. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Red Square Boutique and Art Gallery,
1628 Palm Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information visit
www.redsquareboutique.com.
Open House. 7 p.m. Summit, 890
Broadway, Redwood City. Summit
Preparatory Charter High School and
Everest Public High School, both
public, tuition-free, charter high
schools in Redwood City, would like
to invite parents and students to learn
more about their schools and the
admission process. For more
information visit
www.summitprep.net or
everestphs.org.
Holiday Square Dance Exhibition.
7 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free. For more information
call 591-0341.
NDNU presents ‘A Christmas Carol:
TheMusical’ Gala Performance. 7:30
p.m. NDNU Theater, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Reception to follow show.
Those who plan on attending are
encouraged to bring a non-perishable
food item or new toy to be distributed
to members of the Peninsula
community. Free. For more
information visit
christmascarolthegift.org.
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
presents A Bach Christmas. 8 p.m.
to 10 p.m. The Center for Performing
Arts, Menlo-Atherton High School, 555
Middlefield Road, Atherton. Tickets
start at $25. For more information and
for tickets call (415) 392-4400 or visit
http://www.philharmonia.org/dec201
2.
FRIDAY, DEC. 14
Speaker Anne Lamott. 6:30 p.m.
Congregational Church of San Mateo,
225 Tilton Ave., San Mateo. New York
Times bestselling author, Anne
Lamott, will be talking about her new
book, signing books and receiving the
Visionary Voices Award. Register for
event at ccsm-ucc.eventbrite.com.
$25. For more information call 343-
3694.
Calendar
The FCC is also working to create a $7 bil-
lion interoperable public safety network, a
need highlighted by Superstorm Sandy.
Wireless spectrum is a limited natural
resource but much of it is not used efficiently,
according to the National Science Foundation.
The spectrum is used by television broadcast-
ers and cellphone companies to transmit infor-
mation but only about 5 percent of the spec-
trum between 30 megahertz and 3,000 mega-
hertz is being used at any one time, according
to the National Science Foundation.
Eshoo wants the FCC to implement the auc-
tion and reorganize the spectrum band that
optimizes the value of both licensed and unli-
censed spectrum access.
Since the 1930s, spectrum has been
assigned through administrative licensing and
exclusive licensing was established to protect
broadcaster signals from interference.
Since the passage of the Middle Class Tax
Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012, however,
there have been several examples of the pub-
lic benefits that unlicensed spectrum brings to
consumers and businesses, according to the
letter Eshoo sent to Genachowski.
An example includes Superstorm Sandy
when many wireless phone networks were
overloaded or completely inoperable, WiFi
provided access to the Internet for critical
news and information, Eshoo wrote in the let-
ter.
To make the auction work, however, televi-
sion broadcasters will have to voluntarily
relinquish their spectrum.
The FCC needs to construct a band plan that
maximizes the enormous economic benefits of
both licensed and unlicensed spectrum, Eshoo
said at yesterday’s subcommittee meeting.
“The proposed rulemaking adopted on Sept.
28, 2012, consistent with congressional intent,
recognizes that nationwide guard bands need-
ed for interference protection can simultane-
ously provide unlicensed access, ensuring that
every megahertz of spectrum is used efficient-
ly,” Eshoo said in the meeting. Eshoo’s office
provided the Daily Journal with her prepared
speech for yesterday’s subcommittee meeting.
“Congress crafted the spectrum law to
ensure that the FCC — by rulemaking — can
adopt rules enhancing competition, consumer
choice and innovation. With the potential to
free up as much as 120 megahertz of beach-
front spectrum, wireless carriers of all sizes,
both regional and national, must have an
opportunity to participate in the auction
process,” she said at the meeting yesterday.
The FCC must also be proactive in its
approach to educating broadcasters, she said.
“Without voluntary broadcaster participa-
tion, there will be no new spectrum to repur-
pose,” Eshoo said yesterday.
The effort, she said, must be a collaborative
process that brings together broadcasters,
wireless carriers and technology companies
for the purpose of revolutionizing the mobile
broadband marketplace.
Republicans, however, contend the path the
FCC is on now may cost it up to $19 billion in
revenue through the auction process.
Unlicensed spectrum is a band that has rules
pre-defined for radios or other devices in such
a way that interference is abated by the tech-
nical rules defined for the bands rather than it
being restricted for use by only one company
through a spectrum licensing approach,
according to WiMax.com, a wireless broad-
band company.
Anyone that does not infringe upon the
rules for the equipment or its use can put up a
license-free network at any time for either pri-
vate or public purposes including commercial
high-speed Internet service, according to
WiMax.com.
Some of the most commonly used license-
free frequencies in the United States are at 900
megahertz, 2.4 gigahertz, 5.2/5.3/5.8 giga-
hertz, 24 gigahertz and above 60 gigahertz,
according to WiMax.com.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
SPECTRUM
years giving the public multiple opportunities to
weigh in, she said. The district moved forward in
hopes of meeting its goal of opening in 2014.
Steve Epstein, president of the Burlingame Hills
Improvement Association, said the residents are
disappointed in the process.
“I think they shot themselves in the foot. They
had an opportunity to get buy in from the entire
community and instead created controversy where
it wasn’t needed,” said Epstein.
Many of the residents with whom Epstein has
met learned about the traffic plans within the last
week. They said a better traffic solution could be
possible if the decision was delayed. What that
compromise could be isn’t yet known, but the res-
idents wanted the opportunity to talk about it, he
said. Now, the residents are working to find a
lawyer and possibly challenge the district’s deci-
sion.
Canyon Road and Easton Drive are the primary
roads through the neighborhood and serve about
1,000 vehicles on a typical weekday — approxi-
mately 80 vehicles in the morning peak hour and
75 during the afternoon peak hours, according to a
Nov. 29 study by Feher and Peers. Opening a 250-
student school is estimated to generate between
113 to 228 vehicles during the morning peak hour
and 70 to 150 vehicles during the afternoon peak
hours, according to the study. Given the school’s
location, topography and the lack of sidewalks in
the nearby neighborhood, the study suggests fewer
students will walk to school than would to an aver-
age neighborhood school.
The district’s proposed student drop-off and
pick-up was modified after concerns were raised
from the town of Hillsborough. As approved, the
plan calls for two 8-foot-wide curbside bays to be
created for pick-up and drop-off along the west
side of Summit Drive adjacent to the school pro-
viding enough curb space for 15 cars, according to
the staff report. In addition, the existing school site
curb would be shifted west to provide for the bays
and two 10-foot-wide vehicle travel lanes, which
will increase the width of Summit to 17 feet in
some areas. Faculty and staff would help drivers
navigate the area and signs would be posted.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
Russo who was charged with violating the
California Marine Life Protection Act. The
payment of $2,500 per violation covers civil
penalties and reimburses enforcement costs.
Russo also agreed to comply with the protec-
tion act.
Russo, who owns and operates the commer-
cial fishing vessel Freeland, unlawfully
trapped 58 Dungeness crabs last December,
according to prosecutors.
As part of the agreement, Russo had to
admit the wrongdoing, said Deputy District
Attorney Todd Feinberg of the office’s
Consumer and Environmental Unit.
The case was his first in San Mateo County,
Feinberg said.
California Department of Fish and Game
wardens seized five crabs traps belonging to
Russo on Dec. 11, 2011. The traps containing
the 58 crabs were inside the Montara State
Marine Reserve where fishing is not allowed.
The department forwarded the case to local
prosecutors who filed the civil complaint
against Russo.
The reserve and Pillar Point State Marine
Conservation Area are adjoining protected
areas that extend offshore from Montara to
Pillar Point. Collectively, they are 1.42 square
miles. Feinberg said he didn’t know if Russo
claimed the trapping was in error but that the
marine protections areas are “extremely well
publicized, especially among commercial
industries.”
Taking any marine life, including crabs, is
forbidden in the area as part of the protection
act which aims to preserve California’s biodi-
versity from overfishing, coastal development
and water pollution. Exceptions may be made
for those with a scientific collecting permit or
state approval for research, restoration and
monitoring.
Russo’s settlement comes just as dozens of
Bay Area crab boats head back out to sea after
a week-long dispute over the price of fresh
Dungeness crab.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
CRAB
at least once per day ranging from story times and
prenatal and post-partum exercise classes to
Zumba for grownups. The classes are constantly
changing. The Reading Bug also works with local
schools to host book fairs and offers discounts to
teachers and librarians.
“Events are a big thing for us and we love sup-
porting the community that way,” Savage said.
“Our hope is that they’ll support us back by com-
ing in.”
“It’s a really great place for families,” said Anna
Driedger of San Carlos. Driedger has brought both
of her daughters to The Reading Bug since its
opening. “Supporting local business is really
important too.”
For store hours and class information visit
www.thereadingbug.com.
Continued from page 1
READ
fits that August.
The medical bills now are somewhat insignifi-
cant but may increase up to $100,000 by the time
the case gets to trial, said attorney Gus
Panogotacos.
In September 2011, Hernandez was terminated
and given 30 days to move her family out of the
unit.
Shelter Network told Hernandez they were let-
ting her go to make more space for homeless ten-
ants but such a policy was not used to remove res-
ident managers at any of its other properties, the
suit contends.
Continued from page 6
SUIT
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — A judge revoked Lindsay
Lohan’s probation on Wednesday and scheduled a
hearing that could result in more jail time for the
closely watched “Liz and Dick” star.
The ruling in Los Angeles came as the 26-year-
old actress — who did not appear in court —
faces misdemeanor counts of reckless driving,
lying to a police officer and obstructing an officer
from performing duties after an accident in which
her Porsche slammed into the back of a dump
truck in June.
Lohan told police in Santa Monica that her
assistant was driving, but detectives now believe
the actress was behind the wheel as she headed to
a movie set.
Lohan was on probation at the time after previ-
ously being convicted of the misdemeanor theft of
a necklace.
A probation violation hearing was set for Jan.
15. A judge could sentence the actress up to 245
days in jail after the Santa Monica case is
resolved.
Lohan was not required to appear in court
Wednesday. She was represented by her attorney,
Shawn Holley, who did not immediately return an
email message seeking comment after the hearing.
Lohan also faces a misdemeanor assault charge
in New York after a woman claimed she was hit by
the actress at a nightclub.
Judge revokes Lohan’s probation
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- It might be smart
to avoid all kinds of fnancial risk, even if a deal
looks like a sure thing. Chances are your conception
of it will be overly optimistic.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You’re more likely
to tell others what to do than to do anything yourself.
You shouldn’t have to be told that this is a sure
recipe for dysfunction.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Use a light touch
when embellishing a story that you want others
to enjoy. If you get in over your head, chances are
you’ll trip over your own tongue.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Leave that extra cash
you’ve been saving at home if you’re going out on
the town with your pals. Your ability to prudently
manage your resources isn’t likely to be at its best.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Don’t rely on any spur-
of-the-moment promises made to you. No matter
how well meant they might be, reality will have other
plans for how things play out.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- A situation that has
had an adverse effect on your fnances is ready to
be rectifed. Although it won’t be soon enough to
suit you and your wallet, at least it’ll be over.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Be careful not to get
drawn into an arrangement where you could lose
more than you could gain. If you plunge in anyway,
make tracks as soon as you begin to see this
happening.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Don’t allow anyone
to do your thinking for you, especially in affairs that
could affect your reputation and/or status. What is
good for another might be bad for you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t tackle a complicated
do-it-yourself project that you lack the experience
and/or expertise to take on. This might be one of
those times when it’s cheaper to pay a professional.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You could have
trouble telling the difference between prudence
and extravagance. For example, after a sumptuous
dinner, you might keep the leftover salad but throw
away the caviar.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Keeping your priorities
in proper order could be a diffcult assignment at
present. Try not to place far more emphasis on
pleasurable pursuits than on productive ones.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Usually, you’re
the type of person who sees things through to a
desirable conclusion, yet you might fnd it diffcult to
do so at present. Don’t call it quits on anything just
because the end is in sight.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
12-13-12
THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 -- Canyon National Park
6 Rochester, Minn., clinic
10 Diadems
12 Leathery pods
14 Offciate
15 Depends on
16 Drew on glass
18 Response on deck
19 Claptrap
21 News article
23 Genre
24 -- vous plait
26 Penpoints
29 Spring
31 Gator Bowl st.
33 Large nose
35 Arranges bricks
36 Pregrown lawn
37 Racehorse parent
38 Bygone tyrant
40 Truck front
42 Pentagon VIP
43 Woods insect
45 Smell strongly
47 Tea holder
50 Sun’s energy source
52 Matriculate
54 Wanders freely
58 Grommet
59 Rush away
60 Thunderstruck
61 Puts on the payroll
DOwN
1 252 calories
2 Periphery
3 Kennel sound
4 Utters loudly
5 Rare -- (metallic elements)
6 Knight’s fair lady
7 Comic strip prince
8 Hatha- --
9 Knuckle under
11 Jiffy
12 Guitarist -- Atkins
13 Compass pt.
17 Knolls
19 Cote murmur
20 Gives approval
22 Playing marbles
23 Feeling lousy
25 No --, ands or buts
27 Neutral color
28 Mr. Spock’s father
30 11th-grade exam
32 Oklahoma town
34 Author -- Kesey
39 Ransacked
41 Introduce, as a topic
44 Sect
46 Lethargy
47 Pollen spreader
48 Novelist -- Seton
49 Waxed
51 Kind of agent
53 Bullfght yell
55 Fido’s warning
56 Prior to
57 UNIX or DOS
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Thursday• Dec. 13, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
PLUMBING -
GUARANTEED INTERVIEW
We need ENTRY LEVEL and SKILLED employees!!!
No experience? Looking for a career? Have you considered the plumbing industry?
Get paid while you train!!!!!
Already a Skilled Plumber or Drain Tech? We’re looking for you, too! We’re more
than just a rooter company.
• Uniforms, Tools, and Vehicle provided
• Top Techs can earn 60K to 80K per year
• Paid time off
• Excellent Benefits
Apply in person at Rescue Rooter:
825 Mahler Rd, Burlingame
or at www.rescuerooter.com/about/careers.aspx
EEO
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CLEANERS - We are looking for House
Cleaners/Laundry personnel in the Bur-
lingame area. Apply in person at 1100
Trousdale Dr., Burlingame.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PIZZA DELIVERY DRIVER All shifts
available. Apply in person at Windy City
Pizza, 35 Bovet Rd. San Mateo, CA
94402. Must speak English, Good
Driving Record.
TAXI DRIVER wanted. Pay cash every-
day. (650)766-9878
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 517443
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Andy Berdj Gamitian
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jennifer Rene’e Palm filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Andy Berdj Gamitian
Proposed name: Andrew Berdj Gamitian
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 8,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/01/2012
/s/ Beth Larson Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/30/2012
(Published, 11/29/12, 12/06/12,
12/13/12, 12/20/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253151
The following person is doing business
as: Brian’s Tutorship Center, 1220 Ho-
ward Ave. Ste. 220, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Roberto Astudillo, Po Box
620742, Woodside, CA 94062. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Roberto Astudillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253254
The following person is doing business
as: ADVEMTV, 631 Oregon Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Eyemagnet TV,
INC., DE. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Francois Modarresse /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253085
The following person is doing business
as: R Sweets, 1449 El Camino Real #2,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Riva Rufi-
no-Alvarez, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Riva Rufino-Alvarez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/22/12, 11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253334
The following person is doing business
as: Flow Salon,132 South B St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Roy Ho, 1380 El
Camino Real Apt. 8, Millbrae, CA 94030.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Roy Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253215
The following person is doing business
as: Hitting World, 1353 Cordilleras Ave.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: B Side
Enterprise, INC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Bryan Sidensol /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253340
The following person is doing business
as: Made In China Restaurant, 681 San
Mateo Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Fengzhi Gao, 1763 Hubbard Ave., San
Leandro, CA 94579. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Tiffany Lapedus /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253172
The following person is doing business
as: Lo Reaux & Son Plumbing, 570 San
Bruno Ave., West, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: John I. Lo Reaux, 549 Cedar
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066-4117. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/1960.
/s/ John I. Lo Reaux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253259
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Laurie McLean Consulting, 2) Am-
bush Books, 3) Joyride Books, 9200 Al-
pine Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Laurie McLean, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Laurie McLean /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253088
The following person is doing business
as: Chateau Esthetics, 549 Commercial
Ave. #6, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Elise Chateauvieux, 2211
33rd Ave., San Francisco, CA 94122.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Elise Chateauvieux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253385
The following person is doing business
as: Terrazza on 25th, 25 West 25th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jamie Lynn
Oliveira, 47 East 20th Ave. San Mateo,
CA 94403. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Jamie Lynn Oliveira /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253375
The following person is doing business
as: C & A Tours, 17 E. 4th Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Philip Zhou, 300
Murchison Dr., #316, Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Philip Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253374
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Table Tennis Club, 1299
Bayshore Hwy #100, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Yu Xuan Chen, 3826 Kirkham
St., San Francisco, CA 94122. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Yu Xuan Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253392
The following person is doing business
as: Ugly Duck Studio, 662 Coleman
Ave., MENLO PARK, CA, 94025 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Pauline Prideaux, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Pauline Prideaux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253409
The following person is doing business
as: K-Bob Co., A Partnership, 217 Irving
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Robert
Kidwell, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/01/2012
/s/ Robert Kidwell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253332
The following person is doing business
as: Integrity Auto, 1792 El Camino Real,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Roger
Kanbar and Paulina Kanbar, 1670 El Ca-
mino Real, #260, Menlo Park, CA 94025.
The business is conducted by Husband
and Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Paulina Kanbar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
23 Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253572
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: The Bellingham Group Consul-
tants, 4 Buccaneer Lane, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94065 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Stephen Paul Bel-
lingham & Mayling M.L. Bellingham,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by Husband & Wife. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Mayling M.L. Bellingham /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253533
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Source Beads & Arts, 810
Schooner Bay Dr., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94065 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Ting Li Xia and Zhi Ping
Wang, same address. The business is
conducted by Husband and Wife. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Ting Li Xia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253444
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Bombshell, 263 Hatch Ln., Ste.
A, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Ste-
phanie Palladino, 152 Poplar Ave., San
Bruno, CA 94010, Christina Palladino,
1628 Virginia Ave., CA 94061. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
03/29/2006.
/s/ Stephanie Palladino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/13).
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PRPERTY
AT PRIVATE SALE
No. 122764
In re the matter of the Estate of Olive
Robertson, Deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that subject
to conformation by this court, onDecem-
ber 16, 2012, or thereafter within the time
allowed by law, Ralph A. Rizzo, as exec-
utor of the above-named decedent, will
sell at private sale ot the highest and
best net bidder, on the terms and condi-
tions stated below, all right, title, and in-
terest of the decedent at the time of
death and all right, title, and intrest that
the estate has acquired in addition to that
of the decedent at the time of death, in
the real property located in the San Ma-
teo County, California, more particulary
described below:
The property is commonly referred to as
114 McLellan Avenue, San Mateo, Cali-
fornia, assessor’s parcel number 040-
052-200, and is more fully described as
follows:
The Southwesterly 50 feet, front and rear
measurements of lot 2, Block4, Map of
Town of Beresford Map 1, filed October
30, 1926, Book 14 of Maps,Page 44, San
Mateo County Records.
The property will be sold subject to cur-
rent taxes, covenants, conditions, restric-
tions, reservations, rights, rights of way,
and easements of record, with any en-
cumbrances of record to be satisfied
from the purchase price.
The personal repersentive has given an
exclusive listing to Teri Shaughnessy, a
licensed agent of the offices of RE/MAX
Star Carlmont.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and can be deliv-
ered to or mailed to the office of Teri
Shaughnessy, RE/MAX Star Carlomont,
1940 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA
94002, or to Matthew M Shafae, attorney
for the Executor, at 1156 El Camino Re-
al, San Carlos, California 94070, at any
time after the first publication of this No-
tice and before any sale is made.
The property will be sold on the following
terms: all cash, 10% of the amount of
the bid to accompnay the offer by certi-
203 Public Notices
fied check, and the balance to be paid
upon confirmation of sale by the court.
Taxes, rents, operating and maintenance
expenses and premiums on insurance
acceptable to the purchaser shall be pro-
rated as of the date of recording of con-
veyance. Examination of title, recording
of conveyance, transfer taxes, and any ti-
tle insurance policy shall be at the ex-
pense of the purchaser or purchasers.
The undersigned reserves the right to re-
ject any and all bids.
For futher information and bid forms,
contact Teri Shaughnessy, of the offices
of RE/MAX Star Carlmont, 1940 Ralston
Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
Date: December 5, 2012
/s/ Executor, Ralph A. Rizzo/
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on December 6, 13, 20, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Gold rim glasses, between 12th
& 14th Ave. in San Mateo on 12/9/12,
(650)867-1122
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY BASSINET - like new,
music/light/vibrates, $75., (650)342-8436
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BABY CARRIER CAR SEAT COMBO -
like new, $40., (650)342-8436
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
296 Appliances
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, August program, fea-
turing Gloria Stuart, George Sanders,
Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20. (650)341-
8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE “Off to the
Moon”, featuring Armstrong, Aldrin, and
Collins, article by Charles Lindburgh,
$25., San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, SOLD!
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
298 Collectibles
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO (650)345-5502
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7” x 7”
x 9”, New, never used, $25. pair,
(650)375-8044
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET TV - double doors,
34”W, 22”D, 16”H, modern, glass, $25.,
(650)574-2533
BASE CABINET, TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $55 Call (650)342-7933
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COCKTAIL BAR, Mint condition, black
leather, SOLD!
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, SOLD!
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size, Fully stuffed; new, allergy-free tick-
ing, Mint condition, $25., (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , SOLD!
24
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Song title
spelled out in a
1967 hit
8 Wicket defender
15 Composer
Vivaldi
16 People people?
17 Crick who co-
discovered DNA
structure
18 It went down in
history
19 Start of quote
attributed to
Victor Hugo
21 Troubadours’
instruments
22 Follower of
Stalin?
23 Tale spinner
26 Bastille Day
season
27 Coal carrier
30 Statue at St.
Peter’s
31 Pachy- add-on
33 Quote, part 2
36 Novelist Ferber
38 Met, as a bet
39 Quote, part 3
43 Crash site?
47 Elegant tapestry
48 Saintly ring
50 Rock’s __ Lobos
51 Volvo competitor
52 __-Julie,
Quebec
54 Round at the
saloon
56 End of the quote
60 Barbecue cook
62 Head-in-the-
clouds sort?
63 Meet
unexpectedly
64 Fraction, e.g.
65 Protective sac
for some
embryos
66 Locks overhead
DOWN
1 Offered as a
door prize, say
2 Going
somewhere
3 First-pitch
thrower
4 Florence’s __
Vecchio
5 Form into a sac
6 MXXX ÷ X
7 Deep-six
8 Second Hebrew
letters
9 Trying to lose,
with “on”
10 Bandleader
Puente
11 Stud farm studs
12 Kin of “Sacre
bleu!”
13 D-backs, on
scoreboards
14 Defense
advisory gp.
20 It marches and
flies
24 Verizon rival,
initially
25 Stadium sound
28 Royal sari wearer
29 Turkish titles
30 English poet
laureate, 1790-
1813
32 Like diets based
on body type
34 Workplace
protection org.
35 Have a hunch
37 Functional
opening
39 Scale notes
40 Author Levin
41 Coming apart at
the seams?
42 Kojak, to friends
44 Fatty-acid
ointments
45 Like some
conclusions
46 States
categorically
49 Bind legally
52 16-Across
reversals
53 Spasm
55 Red-wrapped
cheeses
57 Radius
neighbor
58 Ramadan
practice
59 At an end
60 Univ. sr.’s exam
61 Persian, e.g.
By Pawel Fludzinski
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
12/13/12
12/13/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
306 Housewares
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, $99.obo,
(650)315-5902
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT - Book ti-
tled “Fire Mountain”, reasonable, 380
pages, wine country story, adventure,
love & life, $2.00 each, (650)583-2595
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case SOLD!
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLAYBOY MAGAZINE COLLECTION -
over 120 magazines, $60.obo, (650)589-
8348
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
RUG - 8x10, oriental design, red/gold,
like new, $95., San Mateo, SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SMALL SIZE Kennel good for small size
dog or cat 23" long 14" wide and 141/2"
high $25 FIRM (650)871-7200
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 (650)341-1728
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WHEELCHAIR - Used indoors only, 4
months old, $99., (650)345-5446
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
311 Musical Instruments
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
KEYBOARD CASIO - with stand, adapt-
er, instructions, like new, SanMateo,
$60., (650)579-1431
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, SOLD!
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, SOLD!
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MEN’S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened package, XL, High Sierra, long
sleeves and legs, dark green plaid, great
gift, $12., SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS JACKETS
(2) - 1 is made by (Starter) LG/XLG ex-
cellent condition $99. for both,
SOLD!
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
25 Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
317 Building Materials
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
CALLAWAY GOLF Clubs Hawkeye
Irons, Graphite Shafts, # 4 thru P/W
Excellent Condition $79 SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2000 CHEVY camaro standard transmis-
sion $2000 call dave at (650)344-9462
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
orSOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95.,
(650)333-4400
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, SOLD!
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry Cleaning
Cleaning
Rose’s
HOUSE CLEANING
Affordable
Move In & Move Out
Discount
First Time Cleaning
Commercial & Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 847-1990
www.roseshousecleaning.com
BBB • Lic. & Bonded
Ask about
our Holiday
Special
Concrete
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction Decks & Fences
NORTH FENCE
& DECK CO.
Lic #733213
Specializing in:
• Redwood Fences
• Decks
• Retaining Walls
650-756 0694
W W W .
N O R T H F E N C E C O
. C O M
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
26
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
HVAC
HRAC HEATING & APPLIANCES
Refrigeration - Water Heaters
REPAIR ,REPLACEMENT
& SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES WITH REPAIR
SAME DAY SERVICE
(650)589-3153 (408)249-2838
www.hracappliancerepair.com
Lic.#A46046
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
Food
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
27 Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health & Medical
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
ERRANDS WITH
CARE
Housecleaning,
Cooking,
Appointments, Errands
Call anytime
(650) 271-2505
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
As your local SanMateoCountynewspaper, it is important tobe involvedinthe community
andtosupport local charitable organizations, fundraising events andlocal events.
January 22...................... E-Waste Collection Day, San Mateo
January 22...................... Millbrae Health & Wellness Faire, Millbrae
January 29...................... E-Waste Collection Day, San Mateo
February 12& 19............ Chinese New Year Events, San Mateo
February 19 ................... Family Resources Fair, San Mateo
March 5 ......................... Ombudsman Services of San Mateo Fundraiser, San Mateo
March 5 ......................... Burlingame Community for Education Foundation
March 7 ......................... Art in Action, Menlo Park
March 10 ....................... Sustainable San Mateo County Awards, So. San Francisco
March 18 ....................... SSF Senior Health Fair, So San Francisco
March 20 ....................... NAACP Fundraiser, San Mateo
April 2............................ San Bruno Business Showcase, San Bruno
April 2............................ San Mateo County Youth Conference, San Mateo
April 2............................ Plant Sale, Master Gardeners, San Mateo
April 3............................ Peninsula Humane Society Fashion for Compassion, B’game
April 8............................ Job Boot Camp, San Mateo
April 8............................ Nueva School Beneft Auction, Hillsborough
April 12........................... Peninsula Confict Resolution Center Fundraiser Breakfast, FC
April 23.......................... City of San Mateo Eggstravaganza, San Mateo
April 28.......................... Celebrity Roast, Assemblymember Jerry Hill, Belmont
May 1............................. Pacifc Coast Dream Machines, Half Moon Bay
May 2............................. Mills Peninsula Women’s Luncheon, Burlingame
May 6............................. Golf Tournament beneftting Hiller Aviation Museum, HMB
May 7............................. Samaritan House Gala, Redwood Shores
May 10........................... Spring Job Fair, San Mateo
May 11........................... Victory Over Stroke, Millbrae
May 17........................... Taste of San Mateo, San Mateo
May 19........................... Tributes & Tastings, Burlingame
May 20........................... Senior Showcase Information Fair, Burlingame
May 23........................... Peninsula Humane Society Golf Tournament, Menlo Park
June 4& 5....................... Foster City Art & Wine Festival, Foster City
June 5............................. Posy Parade, San Bruno
June 7............................. Job Boot Camp, San Mateo
June 10........................... HIP Housing Luncheon, Redwood City
June 11........................... Disaster Preparedness Day, San Mateo
June 11-19...................... San Mateo County Fair, San Mateo
June 11& 12 ................... Burlingame Art in the Park, Burlingame
June 14........................... Senior Day at San Mateo County Fair, San Mateo
June 18 & 19 .................. Helifest, Belmont
June 26........................... Ryan’s Ride, Burlingame
June-July........................ Central Park Music Series, San Mateo
July 16 & 17 ................... Connoisseur’s Marketplace, Menlo Park
July 22 & 23 ................... Blues Festival, Redwood City
July 23............................ Bike For Breath, Foster City
July 30............................ Cars in the Park, Burlingame
August 1......................... San Mateo County Health Foundation Golf Tournament, PA
August 7......................... Tour de Peninsula Bike Ride, San Mateo
August 20....................... Peninsula Humane Society Mutt Strutt, San Mateo
August 27....................... Senior Showcase Information Fair, Menlo Park
August 29....................... Community Gatepath Golf Tournament, Palo Alto
September 3 & 4............. Millbrae Art & Wine Fair, Millbrae
September 16-18 ............ San Mateo Library Book Sale, San Mateo
September 17& 18.......... Filipino American Festival, Daly City
September 22 ................. Anti-Bullying Program Fundraiser, Foster City
September 23 ................. Gary Yates PAL Golf Tournament, San Mateo
September 23 & 24......... College of San Mateo Athletic Hall of Fame, San Mateo
September 24 ................. Burlingame Pet Parade, Burlingame
September 28 ................. San Mateo County Business Expo, San Mateo
October 1....................... CRUSH Supports Education, San Carlos
October 4....................... Taste of San Bruno, San Bruno
October 7 & 8 ................ ChocolateFest, Belmont
October 8 & 9 ................ San Carlos Art & Wine Faire, San Carlos
October 14 ..................... One Book One Community Kick-Off event, Redwood City
October 14 ..................... League of Women Voters Luncheon, San Mateo
October 15 ..................... Family Resources Fair, San Bruno
October 15 ..................... Mission Hospice “Jewels & Jeans” Gala, Burlingame
October 15 ..................... Peninsula Oktoberfest, Redwood City
October 16 ..................... San Mateo Rotary Fun Run, San Mateo
October 20 ..................... Power of Possibilities Recognition Breakfast, Burlingame
Oct 21 & 22.................... McKinley School Harvest Festival, Burlingame
November 11-13 ............ Harvest Festival, San Mateo
November 18 ................. Senior Showcase Information Fair, Foster City
November 19 ................. South San Francisco Fun Run, So. San Francisco
Nov. 26-27 & Dec. 3-4.... Peninsula Youth Ballet, San Mateo
December 2.................... Night of Lights, Half Moon Bay
To inquire about Daily Journal event sponsorship
call (650)344-5200 x114
Your Local Newspaper Supporting
Events supported by the Daily Journal in 2011
The Community The Community
28
Thursday • Dec. 13, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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