Why is class size important?

• Class size reduction one of 4 reforms proven to work through rigorous evidence, acc. to Inst. Education Sciences, research arm of US Ed Dept. * • Benefits especially large for disadvantaged & minority students, very effective at narrowing the achievement gap. • NYC schools have largest class sizes in state. • 86% of NYC principals say cannot provide a quality education because of excessive class sizes. • Smaller classes are top priority of parents on DOE learning environment surveys every year. *Other three K-12 evidence-based reforms, are one-on-one tutoring by qualified tutors for at-risk readers in
grades 1-3, Life-Skills training for junior high students, and instruction for early readers in phonemic awareness and phonics.

• • •

Contracts said classExcellence too large to for sizes in NYC schools were In 2003, the State’s highest court
provide students with the constitutional right to a sound basic education. April 2007, NY State settled the Campaign for Fiscal lawsuit by passing the Contracts for Excellence (C4E) law. State agreed to send billions in additional aid to NYC & other high needs school districts; which they would have to spend in six approved areas, including class size reduction.* In addition, NYC had to submit a plan to reduce class size in all grades. In fall of 2007, the state approved DOE’s plan to reduce class sizes on average to no more than 20 students per class in K-3; 23 in grades 4-8 and 25 in core HS classes. In return, NYS has sent more than $2.4 billion in C4E funds cumulatively to NYC since 2007, though funding has never reached its full level..

• • •

*other allowed programs include Time on Task; Teacher & Principal Quality; Middle & HS Restructuring; Full-Day Pre-K; & Model Programs for English Language Learners

This year, class sizes increased in grades K-3 for the 5th year in a row
Average class size K-3
(gened, ICT & G&T)
25 24.5 24 23.9

23
22.1 21.4 21 21 20.9 20.7 20.5

22.9

22

C4E Target Citywide Actual

20.3

20

20.1

19.9

19.9

19

18 Baseline 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

Class sizes in Grades 4-8 up for the 5th year in a row
Average class sizes 4-8
gened, ICT & G& T
27 26.6 26.3 26 25.6 25 Axis Title 25.1 24.8 25.3 24.6 C4E Target 23.8 23.3 Citywide Actual 25.8 26.7

24

23

22.9

22.9

22

21 Baseline 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

Class sizes increased this year sharply in HS as well, far above C4E levels
(data on HS class sizes not reliable)
Core HS class sizes
27.5 27 26.5 26 25.5 25.2 25 24.8 24.5 24 23.5 23 2007-8 2008-9 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-2013 24.5 24.5 26.1 26 26.2 25.7 26.6 26.5 27

26.4

Actual C4E targets

Long term trends (IBO data 1998-2006)

Class sizes are now the largest in the early grades in at least 14 years
• Class sizes in K-2 grades are the largest since 1998 • Class sizes in 3rd grade are the largest we have in the historical record (before 1998) • Class sizes in 4th grade are the largest since 2001 • Class sizes in 5th, 7th & 8th grades largest since 2004 • Class sizes in 6th grade largest since 2003

The number of Kindergarten students in very large classes continues to grow
K students in classes of 25 or more
50% 45% 45% 42%

40%
35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 24% 22% 17% 34%

.
• Children who are in small classes in Kindergarten are shown to have significantly better life outcomes

• They are more likely to have graduated from college more than 20 years later.
• And own their own homes and have a 401K3.

Conclusion:
• The city’s record in providing an adequate education is abysmal. • Our children are being cheated of their right to an adequate education, according to the state’s highest court.

• The DOE is not interested in abiding by the law, listening to the priorities of parents.

• SED recently informed us they still have not yet approved the city’s C4E plan for LAST year (2011-12) though all the money was granted and spent. • The city missed the deadline for posting this year’s plan (in Sept.) and holding hearings (in October) and still has not released it. • There is no accountability for DOE.

Where is the state? missing in action

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