www.smdailyjournal.

com
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 104
A DEADLIER PLAN
NATION PAGE 7
HOBBIT RULES
BOX OFFICE
DATEBOOK PAGE 17
NINERS BEAT
BRADY, PATS
SPORTS PAGE 11
SCHOOL SHOOTER HAD BIG ARSENAL
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Carlos Villegas tried some college
after graduating high school but it
did not work out for the young man
from East Palo Alto.
A cousin of his, however, told
him he would be a great fit for an
internship program in San Francisco
that trains urban young adults with
the skills needed to work at many of
the Bay Area’s top companies.
Villegas applied for and was
accepted into a year-long program
with Year Up
Bay Area, a
nonprofit, and
was taught for
five months an
exhaustive set of
computer and
i nf or ma t i on-
t e c h n o l o g y
skills.
The second
part of the program placed him into
an internship with Electronic Arts in
Redwood Shores where he learned
new skills in a real work environ-
ment.
Villegas worked in the IT depart-
ment at EA, doing trouble-shooting
in a hands-on environment that sent
him down his current career path.
While taking drives on Highway
101, however, Villegas could see
from his car some of the nation’s
top high-technology companies
headquartered here in the Bay Area
— from EA, Oracle, Cisco,
Facebook and Google — and won-
dered if he may one day work at one
of these prestigious companies.
Two months ago, Villegas landed
a job at Mountain View-based
Google and hopes to be with the
company a long time, he told the
Daily Journal.
Villegas, who just turned 23, now
offers tech support for buyers of the
Chromebook laptop computer all
over the world.
Even though he has only been
working at Google for about eight
weeks, he already feels like a part of
the company as the learning is fast
paced.
“It is a cooperative environment
and the training is as you go,”
Villegas said. “It is a professional
environment but the company
allows for unique personalities to
shine through.”
Although Year Up Bay Area did
Training program reaps success
Year Up Bay Area links young adults with high-tech companies
Carlos Villegas
See VILLEGAS, Page 19
County agency
seeks to make its
services more
user-friendly
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The noticeable change starts at the
door of the Human Services Agency
lobby in Redwood City.
A touch screen kiosk asks what
the user needs. Applying for food
stamps or Medi-Cal? The kiosk spits
out a numbered ticket and a greeter
gives the person the necessary forms
to fill out before they are even called
to a window. Need to drop off docu-
ments? The person is directed to a
confidential box around the corner,
right next to the new copy machine.
Looking for Social Security? The
kiosk informs the user is in the
wrong location but prints out the
office’s contact information.
In the quest to make residents
who use county services more self-
sufficient in terms of food, jobs and
shelter, HSA is making it easier for
clients to be more self-sufficient in
connecting with those services.
Apply online, update on the phone,
submit paperwork — users may not
Overhaul for
agency that
serves needy
County, tech
fellows pair up
to ease hunger
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Cure hunger.
The request is no small feat but
then again neither are the people
charged with the solution.
In an innovate partnership, San
Mateo County officials are turn-
ing to tech-savvy professionals
willing to devote a year to come
up with fresh and creative solu-
tions. The county isn’t asking for
specific solutions or requesting
particular applications or pro-
grams. Instead, three fellows
with Code For America will land
in San Mateo County with carte
blanche to deliver the goods.
Code for America is often
referred to as the Peace Corps for
geeks. Founded in 2009, the non-
profit embeds developers and
Hungry
for ideas
See HSA, Page 20
See HUNGER, Page 20
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It was during their third visit to
the doctor that the Carlsons of
Menlo Park got a surprise.
The nurse commented on the
well-being of baby A and baby B,
explained 32-year-old K.C. Carlson.
Thirty-one-year-old Allison
Carlson, who was carrying the two
little bundles of joy, was also excit-
ed. They had expected to welcome a
baby in mid-January. Up until their
17th week checkup, it seemed like
that’s what would happen. Having
twins was a fun but scary change in
plans.
Fifteen minutes later, the couple
learned there may be a problem.
Normally, there is a thin membrane
that forms to separate the twins.
Less than 1 percent of U.S. twin
pregnancies are monoamniotic, in
which both babies share the same
amniotic sac in utero. Sharing space
can create complications often due
to the umbilical cords becoming
entangled. That’s what happened to
Kate and Annie, who were born via
an emergency cesarean at Lucile
Early Christmas delivery
K.C. and Allison Carlson welcomed twin girls at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Nov. 7.
Kate and Annie
A weekly look at the people who
shape our community
See TWINS, Page 20
President George H.W. Bush, Canadian
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney (muhl-
ROO’-nee) and Mexican President
Carlos Salinas de Gortari (sah-LEE’-
nuhs deh gohr-TAHR’-ee) signed the
North American Free Trade Agreement in separate cere-
monies.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actress Milla
Jovovich is 37.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1992
“Democracy is not an easy
form of government, because it is
never final; it is a living, changing
organism, with a continuous shifting
and adjusting of balance between
individual freedom and general order.”
— Ilka Chase, American author, actress, humorist (1905-1978).
Actor Ernie
Hudson is 67.
Actress Vanessa
Zima is 26.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Rescuers search for trapped residents at a collapsed residential building in Ningbo, Zhejiang province Sunday. According to
municipal firefighters, the accident happened in the Jiangdong district of the city of Ningbo around noon, when a six-story
residential building collapsed.
Monday: Showers in the morning...Then
scattered showers in the afternoon. Highs in
the upper 50s. West winds 10 to 20 mph...
Becoming 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Monday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers. Lows in the lower 40s. North
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers. Highs in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 15 to 20
mph. Chance of showers 40 percent.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear. Lows around 40. Northwest
winds 15 to 20 mph.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 50s.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s.
Thursday: Breezy. Rain likely. Highs in the mid 50s.
Thursday night: Breezy. Rain likely. Lows in the mid 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 2 Lucky
Star in first place; No.12 Lucky Charms in second
place; and No.11 Money Bags in third place.The
race time was clocked at 1:43.21.
(Answers tomorrow)
FAINT GLADE SESAME VORTEX
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When he answered questions about all the touchdowns
scored against his team, he — GOT DEFENSIVE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MUBAL
YANOG
TUMEAT
GEAVOY
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

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n

F
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k

h
t
t
p
:
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f
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Print your answer here:
0 9 6
11 28 33 41 43 41
Mega number
Dec. 14 Mega Millions
2 7 10 31 32
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 8 8 2
Daily Four
9 4 7
Daily three evening
On this date:
In 1777, France recognized American independence.
In 1830, South American patriot Simon Bolivar (see-MOHN’
boh-LEE’-vahr) died in Colombia.
In 1865, Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 8, the “Unfinished”
(because only two of its movements were completed) was per-
formed publicly for the first time in Vienna, 37 years after the
composer’s death.
In 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright of Dayton, Ohio, conduct-
ed the first successful manned powered-airplane flights near
Kitty Hawk, N.C., using their experimental craft, the Wright
Flyer.
In 1939, the German pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee was
scuttled by its crew, ending the World War II Battle of the River
Plate off Uruguay.
In 1944, the U.S. Army announced it was ending its policy of
excluding Japanese-Americans from the West Coast.
In 1975, Lynette Fromme was sentenced in Sacramento, Calif.,
to life in prison for her attempt on the life of President Gerald
R. Ford. (She was paroled in Aug. 2009.)
In 1979, in a case that aggravated racial tensions, Arthur
McDuffie, a black insurance executive, was fatally injured after
leading police on a chase with his motorcycle in Miami. (Four
white police officers accused of beating McDuffie were later
acquitted, sparking riots.)
Actor Armin Mueller-Stahl is 82. Rock singer-musician Art
Neville is 75. Actor Bernard Hill is 68. Political commentator
Chris Matthews is 67. Comedian-actor Eugene Levy is 66. Actor
Wes Studi is 65. Actor Joel Brooks is 63. Rock singer Paul
Rodgers is 63. Actor Bill Pullman is 59. Producer-director-
writer Peter Farrelly is 56. Pop singer Sarah Dallin
(Bananarama) is 51. Country musician Tim Chewning is 50.
Country musician Duane Propes is 46. Actress Laurie Holden is
43. Actor Sean Patrick Thomas is 42. Actress Claire Forlani is 41.
Actress Sarah Paulson is 38. Singer Bree Sharp is 37. Actress
Jennifer Carpenter is 33. Actress Shannon Woodward is 28.
Owner of Rivera plane
denies drug connections
PHOENIX — The man who runs the
business that owns a luxury jet that
crashed and killed Latin music star Jenni
Rivera says he has never been involved
in drug trafficking and that the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration has dogged
him for more than two decades without
ever proving a single narcotics connec-
tion.
DEA spokeswoman Lisa Webb
Johnson has said two planes owned by
Las Vegas-based Starwood Management
were seized by the agency in Texas and
Arizona this year, but she declined to dis-
cuss details of their ongoing investiga-
tion. The agency also has subpoenaed all
the company’s records, including any
correspondence it has had with a former
Tijuana mayor long suspected by U.S.
law enforcement as having ties to organ-
ized crime.
Christian Esquino, 50, who runs the
business and has a long and checkered
legal past, told The Associated Press on
Friday that the DEA has been investigat-
ing him since the 1980s around the time
he sold a plane in Florida to a major traf-
ficker who later used it as part of a mas-
sive smuggling operation.
The federal government has also
claimed Esquino is involved with
Tijuana’s notorious Arellano Felix cartel,
he said, a charge he vehemently denies.
“The DEA has been investigating me
my whole life,”
Equino told the AP in
a telephone interview
from Mexico City.
“They can investigate
me all they want and
they can investigate
Starwood all they
want, but they’re not
going to find any-
thing.”
“I would have to be the smartest drug
trafficker in the world to be able to stay
away from a drug conviction with the
DEA looking at me under a microscope
for 20 years,” he added.
The 43-year-old California-born
Rivera died when the plane she was trav-
eling in nose-dived into the ground last
week. Rivera was an internationally
known star who sold more than 15 mil-
lion records in her career.
Esquino said the singer was consider-
ing buying the aircraft from Starwood for
$250,000 and the flight was offered as a
test ride. The 78-year-old pilot and five
other people were also killed. Esquino
said the pilot was an experienced airman
with more than 24,000 hours flight time,
and that Rivera had been considering
buying a plane from Starwood for some
time.
“She was a very nice lady and I’m very
sad that this happened,” he said. “It’s a
terrible accident.”
He did not have any information on the
cause of the crash.
“We’re a legal business that has now
had a terrible tragedy and we’re basical-
ly licking our wounds right now,” he
said.
Esquino’s legal woes date back to the
late 1980s, and he says it’s all part of an
aimless witch hunt by the U.S. He said
the government wrongly assumes he
must be involved in drugs just because he
is a successful Mexican businessman in
the high-end aviation industry.
He was indicted in the early 1990s
along with 12 other defendants in a
major federal drug investigation that
claimed the suspects planned to sell
more than 480 kilograms of cocaine. He
eventually pleaded guilty to conspiring
to conceal money from the IRS and was
sentenced to five years in prison, with all
but about six months suspended.
Cynthia Hawkins, a former assistant
U.S. attorney who handled the case, said
it began with the arrest of Robert
Castoro, who was at the time considered
one of the most prolific smugglers of
marijuana and cocaine into Florida from
direct ties to Colombian drug cartels.
Castoro was convicted in 1988 and sen-
tenced to life in prison, but he began
cooperating with authorities and had his
sentence reduced to 10 years, Hawkins
said.
Esquino said he only pleaded to the
money charge to avoid a much lengthier
sentence in the narcotics case. He said he
came under scrutiny because he sold a
plane to Castoro for about $220,000 that
he later learned was used to smuggle
drugs.
11 15 24 26 28 10
Mega number
Dec. 15 Super Lotto Plus
Jenni Rivera
T
he first attempt to finance a line from
San Francisco to San Jose failed due
to a financial depression in 1855.
Another attempt was made a few years later,
however, and after an initial bond-raising suc-
cess by a new company named the San
Francisco and San Jose Railroad, a contract
was signed Oct. 24, 1860, for the actual begin-
ning of the railroad.
The tracks to San Francisco were laid
through the well-populated sandy hill area of
Colma rather than the more direct and shorter
route to the east of San Bruno Mountain. The
Colma route was a longer one to downtown
San Francisco, but the terrain was easier on
which to lay tracks. The east side was rugged,
hilly and steep-cliffed, and the technology to
overcome the engineering obstacles was not
yet available. Although construction was start-
ed early in the 1900s, this eastern route would
not be conquered until after the earthquake in
1906.
In the late 1860s, a lot was happening in the
young railroad industry. A transcontinental
rail-line was being planned by numerous indi-
viduals — men who become known as the
“Big Four” — Leland Stanford, Charles
Crocker, Mark Hopkins and Collis
Huntington. They beat the competition,
formed the Central Pacific Railroad and began
the construction of it in the 1860s. It was near-
ing completion by the end of the 1860s and
these men, wealthy and full of self-confidence
and power, were planning on controlling all of
the western railroads they could, regardless of
what they had to do to own them. Plans were
already circulating about another southern
transcontinental railroad from Southern
California to the middle of the continent. A
power struggle resulted from this idea.
The San Francisco and San Jose Railroad
acquired the Market Street Railroad (which
ran trolleys down Market Street to the Mission
District) and in the 1860s that combination
was acquired by members of the Central
Pacific Railroad. This combination of rail and
trolley franchises locked up the most lucrative
rail business from San Francisco to San Jose.
Many other small railroads were acquired by
the “Big Four” by devious methods and slow-
ly they gained control over much of the
Northern California rail traffic. In this process,
Southern Pacific Railroad was formed.
The east side of San Bruno Mountain had
been impassable until the San Bruno Toll
Road was built in 1859. The S. B. Toll Road
(San Bruno Avenue in San Francisco) opened
up the eastern section and cut off the time to
get to San Francisco from the Peninsula. The
Southern Pacific Railroad began acquiring
property east of Bernal Heights and the
Potrero area where acres of reclaimed land
was becoming available that the SP needed to
expand its empire. Plans were made by the
Southern Pacific Railroad (which now includ-
3
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Police reports
Yep, that’s me!
A man attempted to provide officers with
false identification and was subsequently
arrested on Hillcrest Avenue and El
Camino Real in Millbrae before 11:21
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8.
BELMONT
Fraud. A juvenile attempted to pass counter-
feit money on El Camino Real before 3:27
p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4.
Vandalism. Two tires were slashed on a vehi-
cle on Granada Street before 12:49 p.m. on
Tuesday, Dec. 4.
Hazard. A small oil spill occurred in front of
a business on Ralston Avenue before 11:42
a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4.
Found property. A wallet containing an ID
and credit cards was found on Hastings Drive
before 8:51 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4.
Dispute. A customer and an employee were
involved in a verbal dispute on Alameda de las
Pulgas before 11:54 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 3.
Hit and run. A traffic accident occurred on
Cipriani Boulevard and Ralston Avenue
before 10:18 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 3.
Medical emergency. A person fell from a
roof on Old County Road before 2:12 a.m. on
Monday, Dec. 3.
FOSTER CITY
Fraud. Someone reported their credit card
was used to make $9,000 of fraudulent
charges on Shell Boulevard before 11:21 p.m.
on Monday, Dec. 10.
Theft. A woman reported movers stole prop-
erty from her residence on Friday, Dec. 7 val-
ued at over $1,000 on Pitcairn Drive before
5:04 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 10.
Southern Pacific Railroad
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE TOM GRAY COLLECTION
Activity at SP’s Third and Townsend streets terminal was hectic at arrival time.
See HISTORY, Page 19
4
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There Is
New Hope!
A Health Center
Dedicated to
Severe Disc
Conditions
You’ve seen the ads and heard the
radio commercials about my Non-
Surgical Spinal Decompression
treatment. At Crossroads Health
Center, I’ve created an entire facility
dedicated to patients with severe disc
conditions that have not responded
to traditional care. My revolutionary,
Crossroads Method, provides a very
high success rate to patients with
serious back, neck, leg and arm pain
– even when all else has failed. This
FDA cleared; non-surgical treatment
allows us to rehabilitate your
herniated or degenerative disc(s)
by reversing internal pressure and
enabling your disc(s) to heal from the
inside out. We succeed where other
treatments have failed – by removing
the pressure that is causing pain to
your disc(s) and nerves – without
drugs, injections, invasive surgery or
harmful side effects.
The only office to have
“The Crossroads Method”
This method which includes
computerized true disc
decompression is considered by
many doctors to be the most
advanced and successful non-
invasive treatment of serious back,
neck, leg or arm pain.
This procedure allows for a much
higher success rate by increasing
hydration of your discs, fexibility,
relaxation of muscles and ligaments
along with improving muscle and
core strength, balance and posture.
This results in a more effective and
lasting solution to your pain. There
are no side effects and no recovery
time is required.
This gentle and relaxing treatment
has proven to be effective… even
when drugs, epidurals, traditional
chiropractic, physical therapy
and surgery have failed… The
Crossroads Method has shown
dramatic results.
Patient Testimonials
During the 1 1/2 years of having
constant daily lower back pain and
spasms, I took anti-infammatory
and pain medication, but nothing
helped lessen the pain. When
an MRI showed that I had two
degenerative discs, I went through a
series of lumbar epidural injections
without success. The only thing
that made the pain and spasms go
away was Spinal Decompression
treatments at Crossroads Health
Center. Four years later and I am
still pain-free!
Lisa K.
My severe low back and sciatica
pain have been reduced signifcantly
since receiving spinal decompression
therapy at Crossroads Health Center.
I am now able to walk, golf, and do
things that I haven’t been able to do in
years! I would also like to say thanks
to Dr. Ferrigno and the offce staff as
they went above and beyond to make
sure my back problem was resolved. I
couldn’t be happier!!
C.M. Allard
How Will I Know If I Qualify
for Treatment?
When you come in for a
complimentary consultation we will
ask a series of questions and perform
a comprehensive examination to
determine exactly where the pain is
coming from. If x-rays are necessary,
we can take them in our offce. Once
we determine the cause of your
pain we will let you know if we can
help you and if you qualify for our
treatment protocol.
If we don’t feel like we can help we
will refer you to someone who can.
Serious Back or Neck Trouble?
Leg/Arm Pain or Numbness?
Have You Been Diagnosed With a
Bulging, Herniated or Degenerative Disc?
Crossroads Health Center
San Mateo: 177 Bovet Rd. #150 • San Mateo, CA 94402 (in the NeuroLink offces) 650-231-4754
Campbell: 420 Marathon Dr., Campbell, CA 95008 • 408-866-0300 • www.BayAreaBackPain.com
2011 Best Chiropractor in Campbell Nominee
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Free
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San Mateo 650-231-4754
Campbell 408-866-0300
www.BayAreaBackPain.com
Free visit cannot be used with Medicare or
Federal Insurance Plans.
Paid Advertisement
5
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/LOCAL
A reverse mortgage can be an effective tool for
giving homeowners (62+) additional cash to live on
by using the equity in their home. However, it is
not a decision to be taken lightly.
It’s important to work with an
experienced originator who can
help you assess your individual
situation to determine if a reverse
mortgage is right for you.
A reverse mortgage is a unique loan that
enables homeowners (62+) to borrow against their
equity without requiring them to give up title, sell
the home, or take on a monthly mortgage payment.
Proceeds can be taken either through a line of
credit, lump sum, or monthly installments.
There are no income requirements or credit
qualifications on a reverse mortgage. However,
the homeowner must maintain the property as their
primary residence and remain current on property
taxes and insurance.
The Home Equity Conversion Mortgage
(HECM) provides the most money, but there is
a newer “Saver” HECM with significantly lower
closing costs. Like the original HECM the “Saver”
HECMhas a fixed and adjustable
interest rate program.
Carol Bertocchini is a Reverse
Mortgage Consultant for Security
One Lending with more than
25 years of local financial
experience and is ready to help customers navigate
this sometimes complex process. She is also a
Certified Public Accountant and a member of the
National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association
(NRMLA) which demands the highest standard of
ethics and code of conduct.
She is passionate about the Reverse Mortgage
program and the opportunities it provides
homeowners (62+). Carol takes a genuine interest
in each client’s financial future and enjoys getting
to know each one personally. For her, it’s about
allowing each and every client the opportunity to
live a better quality of life. She says, “I pledge to
provide excellent customer service with honesty
and integrity”
Carol received her Bachelor’s Degree from
Golden Gate University in San Francisco. Currently,
she resides in Belmont with her husband and two
children. Her interests include family, hiking,
kayaking and cycling.
For a free detailed quote along with a brochure
of information about reverse mortgages, call Carol
Bertocchini.
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
Passionate about
reverse mortgage
programs
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
1-650-453-3244
NMLS #455078 Security One
Lending, NMLS ID 98161. CA DRE
Corporation License #01820779
Man killed Saturday in crash
on Interstate 280 identified
A 31-year-old man who was
killed Saturday in a crash on
Interstate 280 in South San
Francisco has been identified as
Heinrich Santos, of Daly City,
according to the San Mateo County
coroner’s office.
Wet weather was likely to blame
for causing the crash that involved at
least three vehicles on southbound
Interstate 280 at the Westborough
Boulevard on-ramp at about 12:20
p.m., according to the California
Highway Patrol.
Santos was pronounced dead at
the scene.
The crash remains under investi-
gation by the CHP.
Olympic swimmer Nathan
Adrian to lead toy drive today
Olympic swimmer Nathan Adrian
will be at Target in Colma this
morning to lead a toy-buying shop-
ping spree for underprivileged kids.
Adrian, who won two gold medals
at the 2012 London Olympics, will
be participating in the Salvation
Army’s “Dig Deep SF,” which aims
to purchase $25,000 worth of toys
for Bay Area kids between eight and
16 years old.
Adrian will join Oakland
Athletics player Tyson Ross and a
group of Santa’s elves at the toy
drive.
The shopping spree starts at 7
a.m. at Target, located at 5001
Junipero Serra Blvd. in Colma.
Three arrested in connection
with stolen car, pursuit
Three people were arrested this
week in connection with a vehicle
theft after a pursuit by Pacifica
police.
The vehicle, which had been
reported stolen to Daly City police,
was spotted by a Pacifica police
unit on Wednesday around 3:50
p.m. in the 1400 block of Crespi
Drive, according to Sgt. Daniel
Steidle.
Police pursued for a little over a
mile before dropping the chase in
the interest of public safety, Steidle
said.
A few minutes later, the vehicle
was found at St. Peter’s Church, at
700 Oddstad Blvd., and police
arrested the driver, 20-year-old
Jimmy Baylor of Austin, Texas.
After learning that two other sus-
pects had fled the car, police
searched the church and surround-
ing areas, but did not locate them.
On Thursday, however, around 9
a.m. officers located the two sus-
pects in the 1100 block of Crespi
Drive. Logan Wilcox, 25, and
Shannon Wilcox, 23, both tran-
sients, were arrested and booked
into San Mateo County Jail, Steidle
said.
All three suspects face charges of
vehicle theft, grand theft, possession
of stolen property and criminal con-
spiracy, Steidle said.
Three passengers killed
in Interstate 280 crash
Friday identified
The California Highway Patrol
has identified the victims of a crash
involving a stopped car on Interstate
280 near Redwood City Friday
afternoon that left three people dead
and two seriously injured.
The CHP said 48-year-old Manjit
Kaur, 21-year-old Jasdeep Kaur, and
Manpreet Singh, 28, were killed
after a Volkswagen SUV crashed
into their Lexus sedan, which was
stopped with a flat tire in the center
median of northbound Interstate 280
north of Edgewood Road in an unin-
corporated area west of Redwood
City.
The car’s driver, identified
Amarjit Singh Multani, 56, was
taken to Stanford Medical Center
with moderate injuries and is in sta-
ble condition, CHP Officer Art
Montiel said.
Local briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWPORT BEACH — A suspect
who fired about 50 shots in the park-
ing lot of a crowded Southern
California shopping mall, sending
shoppers sprinting for safety, was
cooperative when officers took him
into custody, authorities said
Sunday.
Witnesses said people ran,
screaming and ducking for cover,
when 42-year-old Marcos Gurrola
fired into the air and onto the ground
Saturday afternoon near the Macy’s
department store at the open-air
Fashion Island mall in Newport
Beach.
He paused to reload several times,
police said.
Then Gurrola put the gun down
and offered no resistance when
bicycle officers arrested him around
4:30 p.m., said Lt. John Lewis.
“He just gave up,” Lewis said.
Investigators have no motive,
Lewis said.
Gurrola, of Garden Grove, was
charged with shooting at an inhabit-
ed dwelling. He was being held
Sunday on
$250,000 bail.
Police recovered
a handgun and
ammunition.
Officials said
one person suf-
fered a minor
injury while run-
ning away, and
was treated at
the scene.
The gunfire caused panic, coming
a day after a gunman killed 26 chil-
dren and adults at a Connecticut ele-
mentary school, and days after a
deadly mall shooting in Oregon.
The mall, near Pacific Coast
Highway in the heart of Newport
Beach, was crowded with holiday
shoppers and the parking lot was
full.
Many people ran into stores, a
movie theater and other businesses.
“It’s a miracle nobody got
injured,” said Sven Maric, who said
he was celebrating his wife’s birth-
day at a restaurant patio about 50
yards away. “The bullets had to land
somewhere, and he shot so many.”
Some stores voluntarily closed
their doors and kept shoppers inside
while police investigated.
Bret McGaughey, 22, of Laguna
Beach, said he was with his mom in
the Apple store when shoppers ran
to the rear of the store as employees
locked the front entrance. He esti-
mated that up to 100 people stayed
in the back of the store for about 30
minutes until Apple employees
announced that police said it was
safe to reopen the doors.
Gurrola is a licensed security
guard whose firearm permit expired
in 2001, according to the Orange
County Register, which cited state
records.
Gurrola doesn’t appear to have a
criminal record, the newspaper said.
A telephone number for a Marcos
Gurrola was disconnected.
On Tuesday, a gunman at an
Oregon shopping mall killed two
people and wounded a third amid a
holiday crowd estimated at 10,000
people. Clackamas County authori-
ties are still trying to determine why
the gunman opened fire before
killing himself.
Gunman fired 50 rounds
Marcos Gurrola
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Hundreds
of guns have been taken off the
streets of Oakland and San
Francisco in a gun buyback program
that Oakland police Officer Johnna
Watson described as a “huge suc-
cess.”
In exchange for $200 in cash,
Oakland officers collected 300 guns,
while San Francisco police collect-
ed 290 guns during Saturday’s holi-
day gun buyback program, Watson,
an Oakland police spokeswoman
said Sunday.
The buyback, announced earlier
this month, was the largest
exchange of cash for guns that the
city of Oakland had ever held,
Watson said.
The buyback happened to take
place the day after a man with a rifle
went on a rampage, killing 20 chil-
dren and six adults at a Connecticut
elementary school on Friday, per-
haps spurring more people to turn
over their weapons.
It also occurred just a few hours
after four people were wounded in a
shooting between an occupant of a
car and a man standing on an East
Oakland sidewalk, police said.
“What inspired me really was
incident that just took place in
Connecticut and my own son was
murdered,” Emad Abdullah told tel-
evision station KTVU
(http://bit.ly/U5quOQ). “I just want
to help out.”
The weapons collected by
Oakland police included handguns,
a fully automatic assault pistol,
shotguns, rifles, and a rifle with a
bayonet attached to it, Watson said.
“Given the tragedy that happened
last Friday at the elementary school,
whatever small part we can do to
prevent a tragedy like that and save
even one life is worth our time and
effort,” Watson said.
Police collect hundreds of guns
6
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The next big
issue in the national debate over
guns — whether people have a right
to be armed in public — is moving
closer to Supreme Court review.
A provocative ruling by a panel of
federal appeals court judges in
Chicago struck down the only
statewide ban on carrying concealed
weapons, in Illinois. The ruling is
somewhat at odds with those of
other federal courts that have large-
ly upheld state and local gun laws,
including restrictions on concealed
weapons, since the Supreme Court’s
landmark ruling declaring that peo-
ple have a right to have a gun for
self-defense.
In, 2008, the court voted 5-4 in
District of Columbia v. Heller to
strike
d o w n
Washi ngt on’s
ban on handgun own-
ership and focused
mainly on the right to
defend one’s own home.
The court left for another day how
broadly the Second Amendment
may protect gun rights in other set-
tings.
Legal scholars say the competing
appellate rulings mean that day is
drawing near for a new high court
case on gun rights.
The appeals court ruling in
Chicago came early in a week that
ended with the mass shooting in
Connecticut that left 28 people
dead, including 20 children at an
elementary school and the pre-
sumed gunman.
Laurie Levenson, a professor at
the Loyola Law School in Los
Angeles, said that along with thorny
legal issues, “we have the overlay of
these tragedies hitting us on a some-
what regular basis.”
The author of a book that traces
the battle over gun control in the
U.S. said he thinks Supreme Court
intervention is likely in the short-
term. “Since the Heller case, the
next great question for the Supreme
Court to decide was whether there is
a right to carry guns in public,” said
UCLA law professor Adam
Winkler, whose book “Gunfight”
was published last year.
Roughly 40 states make it easy
for people to carry a gun in public.
But in California, New York and a
few other states, local and state reg-
ulations make it difficult if not
impossible to get a license to carry a
weapon. Illinois and the District of
Columbia have been the only places
to refuse to allow people to be
armed in public.
“In some of our most populated
states, the right does not exist either
because it’s completely forbidden or
practically forbidden,” said Alan
Gura, the lawyer who won the
Heller case at the Supreme Court.
Gun rights advocates and gun
control supporters are as split over
the issue of having guns in public as
they were over whether the
Constitution protected gun owner-
ship at all — and along the same
lines.
Jonathan Lowy, an attorney with
the Brady Center to Prevent Gun
Violence, said, “If law enforcement
makes a determination that some-
body would increase the danger to
the public by carrying a loaded gun
on the streets, then that person
should not be carrying a loaded gun.
Some people in the gun lobby want
to tie the hands of law enforce-
ment.”
But Wayne LaPierre, chief execu-
tive officer of the National Rifle
Association, said, “Clearly, the indi-
vidual right under the Constitution
does not apply only to your home.
People have lives outside their
home and the constitutional right
applies outside their home.”
Sometimes, LaPierre said, “The
only thing to stop a bad guy with a
gun is a good guy with a gun.”
Judge Richard Posner of the 7th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
employed similar reasoning in his
majority opinion striking down the
Illinois law.
High court fight looms over guns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Officials have
released the name of a veteran California
Highway Patrol officer who was killed in an
off-duty motorcycle crash, while his col-
leagues remembered him as a dedicated pub-
lic servant.
John Fanene died after the motorcycle he
was riding clipped a pickup truck that had
turned in front of him on Highway 12 near
Fairfield around 5:45 p.m. Friday, said CHP
Sgt. Diana McDermott.
The impact knocked Fanene off his
Kawasaki Ninja motorcycle, his personal
motorcycle, and he was hit by a car traveling
in the opposite direction.
Fanene, 38, was pronounced dead at the
scene. A resident of Napa, he had been a CHP
officer for 14 years and was assigned to the
CHP truck scales alongside Interstate 80 in
Fairfield.
“John was a fun-loving co-worker, with a
big heart,” said CHP Lt. Mike Ferrell, who
worked with him at the truck scales.
CHP officer killed
in crash identified
By Julie Watson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ENCINITAS — Public school yoga instruc-
tor Katie Campbell proudly looks out at 23
first graders as they contain their squirming in
a kid-friendly version of the lotus position.
In a voice barely above a whisper, she says
into her microphone: “Why look at everyone
showing me they’re ready for yoga. A-plus,
plus, plus!”
Then the lesson begins with deep breathing
and stretches common to many yoga classes.
But there is no chanting of “om,” no words
spoken in the Indian language of Sanskrit nor
talk of “mindfulness” or clasping hands in the
prayer position.
Campbell avoids those potential pitfalls for
the Encinitas Union School District, which is
facing the threat of a lawsuit as it launches what
is believed to be the country’s most comprehen-
sive yoga program for a public school system.
Parents opposed to the program say the
classes will indoctrinate their children in
Eastern religion and are not just for exercise.
It’s a debate public schools across the coun-
try are increasingly facing with the rising pop-
ularity of the practice and the recent dispute
over school prayer.
Yoga is now taught at public schools from
the rural mountains of West Virginia to the
bustling streets of Brooklyn as a way to ease
stress in today’s pressure-packed world where
even kindergartners say they feel tense about
keeping up with their busy schedules. But
most classes are part of an after-school pro-
gram, or are offered only at a few schools or
by some teachers in a district.
Encinitas is believed to be the only public
school system that will have yoga instructors
teach full-time at its nine schools as part of an
overall wellness curriculum that includes
nutrition and a school garden program, among
other things.
“This is 21st century P.E. for our schools,”
said Encinitas Superintendent Timothy B.
Baird. “It’s physical. It’s strength-building. It
increases flexibility but it also deals with
stress reduction and focusing, which kickball
doesn’t do.”
The program is expected to teach a 30-
minute yoga lesson to roughly 5,000 students
twice a week at the district’s schools, which
run kindergarten through sixth grade. It is
funded with a $533,000 grant from the Jois
Foundation, a nonprofit whose board of direc-
tors includes the son of the late Indian instruc-
tor Krishna Pattabhi Jois.
School yoga tries to avoid
controversy over religion
NATION 7
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Matt Apuzzo
and Pat Eaton-Robb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWTOWN, Conn. — The gun-
man in the Connecticut shooting
rampage was carrying an arsenal of
hundreds of rounds of especially
deadly ammunition — enough to
kill just about every student in the
school if given enough time,
authorities said Sunday, raising the
chilling possibility that the blood-
bath could have been far worse.
Adam Lanza shot himself in the
head just as he heard police draw-
ing near to the classroom where he
was slaughtering helpless children,
but he had more
ammunition at
the ready in the
form of multi-
ple, high-capac-
ity clips each
capable of hold-
ing 30 bullets.
The disclo-
sure on Sunday
sent shudders
throughout this picturesque New
England community as grieving
families sought to comfort each
other during church services devot-
ed to impossible questions like that
of a 6-year-old girl who asked her
mother: “The little children, are
they with the angels?”
With so much grieving left to do,
many of Newtown’s 27,000 people
wondered whether life could ever
return to normal. And as the work-
week was set to begin, parents
weighed whether to send their own
children back to school.
Gov. Dannel Malloy said the
shooter decided to kill himself
when he heard police closing in
about 10 minutes into the attack.
“We surmise that it was during
the second classroom episode that
he heard responders coming and
apparently at that decided to take
his own life,” Malloy said on
ABC’s “This Week.”
Authorities said they found hun-
dreds of unused bullets at the school,
which enrolled about 670 students.
“There was a lot of ammo, a lot of
clips,” said state police Lt. Paul
Vance. “Certainly a lot of lives were
potentially saved.”
The chief medical examiner has
said the ammunition was the type
designed to break up inside a victim’s
body and inflict the maximum
amount of damage, tearing apart
bone and tissue.
By late afternoon, President
Barack Obama arrived to console
families and speak at a vigil in mem-
ory of the 26 teachers and school-
children who were killed in the sec-
ond-deadliest school shooting in U.S.
history.
Newtown officials couldn’t say
whether Sandy Hook Elementary
School, would ever reopen.
“We’re just now getting ready to
talk to our son about who was killed,”
said Robert Licata, the father of a boy
who was at the school during the
shooting but escaped harm. “He’s not
even there yet.”
Jim Agostine, superintendent of
schools in nearby Monroe, said plans
were being made for students from
Sandy Hook to attend classes in his
town this week.
The road ahead for Newtown was
clouded with grief.
Evidence hints at deadlier plan
Adam Lanza
By Christine Amario
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Schools around the country are
reviewing security plans, adding extra law
enforcement patrols and readying counselors
for the first day of classes since a shooting
massacre at an elementary school in
Connecticut.
Districts from Alabama to Arizona and
Florida to New England were asking local law
enforcement to increase patrols on Monday.
School officials in some areas sent messages
to parents addressing security or stressing that
they have safety plans that are regularly test-
ed. While some officials refuse to discuss
plans in detail, it was clear that vigilance will
be high this week at schools around the coun-
try.
Additional police patrols are planned this
week in northern Virginia around the Fairfax
County Public Schools, which is the largest
school system in the Washington area with
181,000 students. Counselors will also be
available at all schools.
“This is not in response to any specific threat
but rather a police initiative to enhance safety
and security around the schools and to help
alleviate the understandably high levels of
anxiety,” Superintendent Jack Dale said
Sunday.
Those sentiments were echoed to the South
in Florida’s Hillsborough Co., where Sheriff’s
office spokesman Larry McKinnon said
unmarked and marked cars will patrol the
schools along with deputies in plain clothes.
He wouldn’t say how many extra officers will
be involved.
The additional patrols will supplement
deputies already assigned to every high school
and junior high school in the area to ease the
fears of parents “who may feel uneasy about
sending their children to school.” The county’s
public school system in the Tampa area
includes around 195,000 students.
The precautions come after a gunman shot
his way into Sandy Hook Elementary School
in Newtown, Conn., on Friday and killed 26
people before shooting himself. The dead
include 20 children ages 6 and 7.
Aside from their students’ physical safety,
administrators were also concerned about the
psychological toll of the shootings. In
Maryland’s suburbs outside Washington,
Montgomery County Public Schools will have
counselors available at each school Monday to
support the system’s 149,000 students. Chief
of Staff Brian Edwards said officials posted
advice online from the National Association of
School Psychologists on Friday to help parents
talk about acts of violence.
“Obviously, this is a very difficult situation
that all school communities are dealing with
and the entire nation is dealing with,” Edwards
said, adding that the system doesn’t discuss
security procedures. “You can’t change what
occurred, but you try to do the best you can to
help families cope.”
In Tucson, Ariz., where a January 2011 mass
shooting killed six and wounded U.S. Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords and 12 others, the largest
school district increased security after Friday’s
shooting. Tucson Unified School District
spokeswoman Cara Rene said Sunday that the
district was participating in a memorial being
held at one of its schools on Sunday evening,
with Gifford’s replacement, Rep. Ron Barber,
a featured speaker along with Superintendent
John Pedicone. Barber was with Giffords at
the constituent meet-and-greet and was among
the wounded.
Rene said planning was under way to help
teachers and students with grief and fear issues
when school resumes Monday, and the district
was working with Tucson police on security
issues.
Many schools increase
security after massacre
REUTERS
A mourner places joss sticks at a memorial for victims of the recent mass shooting in Sandy
Hook village in Newtown, Conn. Sunday.
WORLD 8
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sarah El Deeb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Nevine Mustafa final-
ly had enough after 10 hours of
waiting to cast her “no” vote in
Egypt’s referendum on a highly dis-
puted draft constitution. She and the
other women in line were convinced
the judge running the polling station
was deliberately stalling to drive
away voters opposed to the docu-
ment.
So the 39-year-old housewife and
dozens of other women launched a
protest, blocking the street and
chanting against the judge in an
upper class district of Alexandria,
Egypt’s second largest city.
“The line was not moving since 8
a.m. I protest. It is now 7 p.m.,” an
agitated Mustafa said at the time.
“He wants us to get bored and
leave.” After their protest, new offi-
cials were brought in to speed up
the process.
The scene was a reflection of the
deep distrust of Egypt’s ruling
Islamists and their management of a
referendum on a draft constitution
that they largely wrote. Questions
raised Sunday over the referen-
dum’s legitimacy suggest the con-
frontation between Islamists and
their secular, liberal and Christian
opponents will not be resolved by
the long-await-
ed vote.
As Islamist
P r e s i d e n t
Mo h a m m e d
Morsi rushed
the referendum
despite high
pitched opposi-
tion, the dispute
over the charter
has turned into a
fight over the Islamists’ hold on
power, and the ballot has become a
yes or no vote on the president him-
self.
Rights activists and opponents of
the constitution said Sunday that the
first round of voting a day earlier
was marred by widespread viola-
tions, including suppression of vot-
ing by opponents of the charter, par-
ticularly women, Christians. A
coalition of rights groups said the
first round was invalid and should
be held over again.
That appeared highly unlikely.
The Muslim Brotherhood, from
which Morsi hails, said the constitu-
tion was on route to approval.
But the margin from the first
round of voting, which took place in
10 of Egypt’s 27 provinces, was
narrow — and turnout low, at only
32 percent.
Preliminary results showed 55.8
percent backed the draft, according
to the Brotherhood. Its count was
based on a compilation of results
announced at each individual
polling station. In past elections, the
Brotherhood’s counts have proven
largely accurate.
The strongest “no” vote was in
Cairo, with 68 percent, according to
the official website of Egypt’s state
television. The “yes” vote narrowly
carried Egypt’s second largest city,
Alexandria, with nearly 56 percent.
The head of the referendum com-
mission said the official results will
be announced after the second and
last round, scheduled for next
Saturday.
Mistrust runs deep over Egypt referendum
Mohammed
Morsi
Rocket still centerpiece as
NKoreans mourn Kim
PYONGYANG, North Korea —
North Korea parlayed the success of
last week’s rocket launch to glorify
leader Kim Jong Un and his late
father on Sunday, the eve of the first
anniversary of his death.
The successful firing the rocket on
Wednesday — ostensibly to place a
satellite in space — was a clear sign
that Kim will continue carrying out
his father Kim Jong Il’s policies
even if they draw sanctions and
international condemnation.
The West sees the rocket as a thin-
ly disguised way of carrying out
U.N-banned tests of long-range mis-
sile technology, which it says not
only threatens regional stability but
is also a waste of resources when the
country is struggling with a chronic
food shortage.
There are concerns also that in
upcoming weeks, Pyongyang will
press ahead with a nuclear test.
World brief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRIPOLI, Libya — Four police-
men were shot dead in Libya’s trou-
bled eastern city of Benghazi on
Sunday when gunmen fired rocket-
propelled grenades on a security
compound there, according to the
Interior Ministry.
Police spokesman Ezzedine al-
Fazani said that the attack was
linked to the recent detention of a
man allegedly involved in last
month’s assassination of the head of
one of the city’s security agencies,
National Security chief Col. Farag
el-Dersi.
The unknown assailants attacked
the security compound, in an appar-
ent attempt to break into a nearby
detention center where the suspect
in el-Dersi’s killing is being held.
In Benghazi, where the revolt that
unseated longtime ruler Moammar
Gadhafi began last year, security has
sharply deteriorated over the past
year.
An attack in September on the
U.S. Consulate in Benghazi killed
U.S. ambassador to Libya Chris
Stevens and three other Americans.
Security in the country’s south is
also of concern.
Four police killed in Benghazi
By Barbara Surk
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Syria’s longtime vice president
said Sunday that his regime and the rebels are
both going down a losing path after 21 months
of civil war, a rare admission by a top govern-
ment official that President Bashar Assad’s
victory is unlikely.
The comments by Farouk al-Sharaa came as
an Islamist faction of Syrian rebels captured
an infantry base in the northern city of
Aleppo, and Syrian warplanes blasted a
Palestinian refugee camp in Damascus, killing
eight people and wounding dozens, activists
said.
Al-Sharaa told the Lebanese newspaper Al-
Akhbar that neither the rebels nor the Assad
regime can “decide the battle militarily.” It
appeared to be an attempt to show that the
rebels are not the solution to the Syria con-
flict, and their victory might bring chaos to the
country.
Balancing that, he said the Assad regime
“cannot achieve change.”
The solution to the conflict must come from
within Syria, al-Sharaa said, adding that any
political settlement “must include stopping all
types of violence, and the creation of a nation-
al unity government with wide powers.”
The Assad regime has long rejected Western
involvement in the civil war and has called for
talks with the opposition. Most rebel groups
refuse to meet with Assad, demanding his
removal from power before laying down their
arms.
Excerpts of the interview were posted on
Al-Akhbar’s English-language website late
Sunday. The full interview will be published
on Monday, the newspaper said.
Syria’s vice president:
both sides losing war
OPINION 9
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Death by deficit
Editor,
This is an addendum to Rick
Zobelein’s excellent observation of our
looming debt problem and eventual
downfall published in his letter in the
Dec. 14 edition of the Daily Journal.
Our $16 trillion deficit, which will
become over $20 trillion by the time
Obama sinks us, is a huge amount of
money. Let’s put that in perspective. If
a dollar is a second in time, one trillion
seconds will take us back to 22,000
B.C.! And no one is worried? And
don’t forget, there’s 16 of those pesky
little trillions right now! And you folks
voted for that little pretender twice?
Good luck!
Joseph Locasto
San Mateo
Adult education
Editor,
Against the backdrop of the call for
more coherency and accountability in
California’s adult education system, I
want to speak to the category of “fit-
ness classes and enrichment courses for
senior citizens.” I pay to enroll in San
Mateo Adult School’s excellent Fifty
Plus classes. For me and others, the
program fosters the maintenance of
both mental and physical capacity. We
not only consume fewer community
and health resources but also contribute
skills, knowledge and talent in our
homes, neighborhoods, and towns.
Demographically, we are a huge group
of unpaid workers who volunteer in
schools, senior centers, churches, pub-
lic agencies and nonprofit organiza-
tions. That most of us are no longer
members of “the workforce” does not
mean we lack benefit and, accordingly,
should be excluded from adult educa-
tion offerings.
Sue Brinton
San Carlos
Response to ‘Moving
right along’
Editor,
In his letter published in the Dec. 14
edition of the Daily Journal, Rick
Zobelein thinks that the victory of the
Democrats will cause us lots of prob-
lems because Democrats want to raise
taxes on the rich. He says we need to
“take a closer look at some entitlements
that are self serving for a lucky few.” Is
he talking about our Social Security
and Medicare? I paid into the Social
Security fund for decades. Social
Security is not funded by the govern-
ment. It is paid for by the workers.
Rick doesn’t think raising the taxes
on the wealthy is a good idea. He
prefers cutting our domestic programs.
Rick sees a big difference between the
two corporately funded political parties
that I can’t see. Seems like we are still
“Moving right along” on the same path.
Wars, bankers’ bailouts, massive job
loss and the danger that our economic
system will come to a total collapse as
the value of the dollar continues to
decline.
Rick doesn’t want us to attack the
Republicans but asks for ideas on how
we can solve our financial problems as
a nation. My idea is to put a 1 percent
sales tax on all transactions on the
stock market and end the wars. There
you are. The crisis would be over.
These two steps will give us plenty of
funds to reinstate the WPA and put
Americans to work repairing our crum-
bling infrastructure. We would not have
to cut Social Security, and we could
fund Medicare for all.
Patricia Gray
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
— The Sacramento Bee
F
or years, numerous outside crit-
ics have urged lawmakers and
the state’s stem cell agency, the
California Institute for Regenerative
Medicine, to take a hard look at
CIRM’s internal structure and revamp it
to avoid conflicts of interest and possi-
ble misuse of taxpayer funds.
Instead of listening, leaders of this
institute — a poster child of how ballot
initiatives can be manipulated to create
quasi-public institutions with little pub-
lic oversight — have been consumed by
a siege mentality that has prevented any
real introspection.
There’s a chance that may change
today. A blue-ribbon committee of the
National Academy of Sciences is
scheduled to formally present CIRM’s
oversight board with a report examining
the agency’s internal workings.
Although the report by the academy’s
Institute of Medicine commends the
agency for raising the profile of stem
cell research nationally, it warns that
the appearance and reality of built-in
conflicts could undermine future sup-
port for CIRM’s mission.
California should be concerned about
this for at least two reasons:
1). Stem cell research still holds the
promise of potential cures and treat-
ments for diabetes, spinal cord injuries,
Parkinson’s and other diseases.
2). The agency will soon run out of
money, limiting the potential from
transforming basic research into real-
world therapies.
A creation of Proposition 71, a 2004
ballot initiative that authorized $3 bil-
lion in state bond funding for stem cell
research, the institute was the brain-
child of Robert Klein, a bond financier
and patient advocate. Klein, who served
as institute chairman until 2011, wrote
the initiative so CIRM would be insu-
lated from political interference,
whether it be opponents of stem cell
research or taxpayers looking out for
how their money is being spent.
Under the structure that Klein
designed, ultimate decisions about
researching funding are made by a 29-
member governing board largely made
of up representatives from California
universities and hospitals seeking stem
cell research funding. To date, this
oversight board has doled out about
$1.7 billion, with roughly 90 percent
going to institutions with representa-
tives on the board.
Over the years, the built-in conflicts
have become all too apparent. In 2007,
the CEO of the Sanford-Burnham
Medical Research Institute in San
Diego, a member of CIRM’s oversight
board, intervened to endorse a grant
application to his institution. The inci-
dent — brought to light by David
Jensen, the dogged author of the
California Stem Cell Report blog —
eventually led to the disqualification of
grant applications from 10 institutions
that were the focus of improper lobby-
ing by oversight board members.
Although the Institute of Medicine
report didn’t go into specifics about
conflicts, it recommended that oversight
board members not be allowed to
decide on specific grants. It also urged
CIRM to create a new scientific adviso-
ry board - composed of experts who do
not have a stake in the funding — to
advise CIRM staff on scientific priori-
ties.
In addition, the report also recom-
mended a clear division of responsibili-
ties at the agency, with the oversight
board focused on policy and day-to-day
operations handled by the agency’s
president and its senior management.
It is to CIRM’s credit that it solicited
the Institute of Medicine report last
year. Although some taxpayers may
blanch at the report’s $700,000 price
tag, it will be worth the cost if it leads
to a restructuring of how CIRM oper-
ates.
Of course, if it fails in that task, it
will only affirm the view of many vot-
ers that they should never again endorse
a California research initiative, espe-
cially one like Proposition 71 that lacks
proper controls and accountability over
taxpayer dollars.
Conflicted stem-cell agency must look inward
David Lim —
San Mateo’s
new mayor
D
avid Lim is the first Asian American to serve as
San Mateo mayor and city council member. Even
though Asian American Pacific Islanders (API)
make up more than 25 percent of the county’s population,
the group is just beginning to flex its political muscle in the
region and cities on the Peninsula. Lim joins a growing list
of local city councilmembers: Karyl Matsumoto, South San
Francisco; Wayne Lee,
Millbrae; Peter Ohtaki,
Menlo Park; Steve Okamoto,
Foster City; Jeffrey Gee,
Redwood City; Naomi
Patridge, Half Moon Bay;
Mike Guingona, Daly City;
and Paul Seto, recently
retired from the Millbrae
City Council.
Lim is proud of his her-
itage and happy to be a role
model for young students.
His family history involves a
memorable connection to the
city in which he now lives
and serves.
Lim’s great grandfather came to the United States in 1903,
illegally because of Chinese exclusion laws. Later his son,
and Lim’s grandfather, joined him. But the great grandfather
urged his son to move out of San Francisco’s Chinatown so
he could better assimilate into American culture. The grand-
father came to San Mateo where he worked in a restaurant
and was later hired as a houseboy by a San Mateo family.
According to Lim, his grandfather could cook great
American food as well as traditional Chinese dishes. His
specialty was desserts, recipes he learned from preparing
delicacies for ladies’ bridge groups.
The family moved to East Los Angeles where Lim’s par-
ents settled and he and his sisters grew up. Lim attended
local public schools, UCLA where he majored in political
science and obtained a masters in education. He taught
world history for two years at a public middle school. While
waiting for his application to law school, Lim worked in
Washington, D.C. as an intern for the late congressman Bob
Matsui, D-Sacramento. He was accepted at Hastings law
school, graduated in 1999 and was hired by Alameda
County’s district attorney. He now works for the Santa Clara
County District Attorney’s Office. His specialty is real estate
fraud.
***
Lim met his wife Terri on a Southwest flight from Oakland
to Los Angeles. They were married in 2002 and have three
children — twin girls and a new baby boy. Terri Lim is a
pharmacist for Packard Children’s Hospital in Palo Alto. Lim
has a busy schedule. He is an active member of the council,
is the mock trial coach at Aragon High School and has run
14 marathons to date. He tries to run three to five miles
every other day. But he also tries to be a good dad and help-
ful husband. He limits his nights out to two to three a week,
saves Friday night for the family, does his laundry and
divides up some chores with his working wife
Lim started a neighborhood watch board and was appoint-
ed to the city’s Human Relations Commission (now
Community Relations) in 2003. He was elected to the coun-
cil in 2009. In that time, Lim has been a major player in city
politics. He is not afraid to take bold actions and ask tough
questions. He was the councilmember who called for a spe-
cial meeting on the 7-Eleven debacle, where a chain conven-
ience store has opened up in a residential neighborhood and
infuriated neighbors. It is not a done deal. The Planning
Commission and City Council still have to determine
whether staff improperly issued a permit to locate the chain
on the site of a closed deli despite the fact that the site had
been rezoned as residential and whether 7-Eleven is allowed
to remain open as a non-conforming use. In the meantime,
Lim has publicly questioned the role of his colleague, Jack
Matthews whose firm was hired to work on the 7-Eleven
project.
Lim has a full plate now but there is no question he is des-
tined for higher political office at some future time. He is a
second generation American ( his father’s family came from
Guangzhou, China; his mother’s family is Chinese but came
from the Philippines) but his ties to the Asian Pacific
Islander advocacy and legislative groups is strong. He is
close to state legislators Paul Fong, Leland Yee, Fiona Ma
and Phil Ting. Being an Asian American is increasingly
becoming a political asset in California. While San Mateo
County has a long way to go before it catches up to San
Francisco and Cupertino where Asian Americans predomi-
nate, 43-year-old Lim has a promising future at either the
regional or state level.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — On the road and in
financial markets, it pays to ask some-
body with a good sense of direction.
Two years ago, most of Wall Street’s
economists believed interest rates had
bottomed out.
But not Priya Misra, a top investment
strategist at Bank of America Merrill
Lynch.
She was one of few to argue that the
sputtering U.S. economy and the
European debt crisis would knock long-
term interest rates to record lows in
2011.
“I was called quite crazy at that point,”
she says.
Her forecast looks clear-sighted today:
The rate on the 10-year Treasury note,
an all-important anchor for mortgage
rates and other loans, seems stuck under
a historically low 2 percent.
So what does Misra think now?
Long-term interest rates will creep
higher, she says, as the economy gradu-
ally gains strength. The wild card is
Washington, where talks are under way
to avert tax increases and government
spending cuts scheduled to start in
January.
Most on Wall Street are confident that
congressional Republicans and the
White House will stave off the full “fis-
cal cliff” because the stakes are so high.
Economists say the tax hikes and spend-
ing cuts could trigger a recession early
next year.
“Our assumption is that a deal will get
done,” Misra says. If the two sides fail to
strike a bargain, “politicians know that
the markets will take it very badly and
blame Washington for it.”
Confidence in a deal may be shaken,
pushing Treasury yields lower, if the
talks drag on too long. Ethan Harris,
Bank of America’s chief U.S. economist,
says it looks increasingly likely that
budget negotiations will run into the new
year.
If that happens, it may take the finan-
cial markets to force Congress to com-
promise.
“Congress and the president have
given themselves way too much to do in
way too little time,” Harris says.
“Something has to slap Washington in
the face, and it’ll be the stock market.”
Why not the bond market? A fight
over a government’s budgets and debt
might be expected to send investors flee-
ing from its bonds, causing prices to fall
and yields, which reflect the govern-
ment’s borrowing rate, to climb.
Battles over budgets in Spain and
Italy, for instance, regularly cause those
countries’ borrowing rates to jump. In
the United States, traders say a brawl in
Washington would have the opposite
effect.
That’s because rates are also a barom-
eter of worry. When the world economy
appears in danger, banks and big
investors hide money in Treasurys,
ignoring mounting U.S. government
debt because they see this country, the
world’s largest economy, as a trustwor-
thy borrower.
In July, fear that Europe’s debt trou-
bles could set off a global financial crisis
drove the 10-year Treasury rate to a
record low, 1.38 percent. Since then, the
European Central Bank has taken steps
to calm the crisis, and the 10-year
Treasury rate has climbed. It was 1.70
percent on Friday.
Could a big budget fight
rattle the bond market?
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Millions of fami-
lies and businesses will get hit by big tax
increases a lot sooner than many realize
if Congress and the White House don’t
agree on a plan to skirt the year-end fis-
cal cliff of higher tax rates and big gov-
ernment spending cuts.
In fact, they already have.
More than 70 tax breaks enjoyed by
individuals and businesses expired at the
end of 2011.
If Congress doesn’t extend them
retroactively back to the beginning of
this year, a typical middle-class family
could face a $4,000 tax increase when it
files its 2012 return in the spring,
according to an analysis by H&R Block,
the tax preparing giant.
At the same time, businesses could
lose dozens of tax breaks they have
enjoyed for years, including generous
credits for investing in research and
development, write-offs for restaurants
and retail stores that expand or upgrade,
and tax breaks for financial companies
with overseas subsidiaries.
Even if Congress does act, last-minute
changes to federal tax laws could make
it difficult for taxpayers to figure out
their 2012 tax bills.
“We’re really expecting this upcoming
tax season to be one of the more chal-
lenging ones on record,” said Kathy
Pickering, executive director of The Tax
Institute at H&R Block. “For your 2012
returns there’s so much confusion about
what will be impacted.”
Much of Washington is consumed by
negotiations over how to address auto-
matic tax increases scheduled to take
effect next year. That’s when tax cuts
first enacted under President George W.
Bush, and extended under President
Barack Obama, are scheduled to expire.
A temporary reduction in the Social
Security payroll tax is set to vanish as
well.
Obama wants to let the Bush-era tax
cuts expire on incomes above $200,000
for individuals and $250,000 for married
couples, while extending the tax cuts for
people making less.
Millions face higher taxes real soon without fix
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LA VALL D’UIXO, Spain — When Felix Valls followed his
bank manager’s advice and invested his entire savings in the
bank’s stocks, he did it without thinking.
It was a simple question of loyalty. After all, how could he
doubt the local bank that opened an account for him just after
he was born in 1935 with a gift of 5 pesetas, a small fortune in
those days, as a sign of respect to his parents, who were life-
long customers? Now the 77-year-old Valls feels betrayed as he
finds himself locked out of his hard-earned money.
“I don’t understand what’s going on,” he said. “The only thing
I want is for them to return what is mine.”
His plight is shared by thousands of his fellow townspeople
and nearly a million across Spain: Lured by the family-like ties
nurtured between bankers and customers, they poured their
life’s savings into higher-yielding financial instruments recom-
mended by the people managing their money. When boom
turned to catastrophic bust, they found the stock they had
acquired had become all but worthless.
Once-lifelong friendships have turned to enmity, as victims
cry treachery. In some towns, angry customers have burst into
bank branches with shotguns and yelled death threats. Despair
has set in as many of the victims are elderly people who were
depending on the money to fund their last years.
In towns like La Vall D’Uixo, bank employees and customers
would often have close relationships, sometimes going out to
have coffee and other times finding themselves sitting together
at school plays. But those times are over.
Jose Romero has spent nearly four decades working at
Bancaja, a regional savings bank that is now part of Spanish
banking giant Bankia. He said relationships with clients have
recently become very tense and sometimes have hovered on the
verge of violence.
“The client trusts the brand, but the employee even more,”
Romero said. “But when you touch their money, people change
radically. We’ve seen death threats, insults, people who come in
with shotguns.”
Savers in Spain fall victim to
country’s friendly bankers
<< Lin back in New York tonight to play Knicks, page 13
• Boeheim a win away from 900, page 13
Monday, Dec. 17, 2012
NFL SUNDAY: PACKERS BEAT BEARS; TEXANS TOPPLE LUCK, COLTS >> PAGE 15
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The
New England Patriots silenced their
“End Zone Militia” on Sunday
night, paying tribute to the victims
of the Connecticut school shooting
by canceling the traditional scoring
celebration in which men dressed as
Revolutionary War soldiers fire
muskets into the air.
Two days after 20 children and
six adults were shot to death at the
Sandy Hook Elementary School in
Newtown, Conn., the Patriots joined
teams across the NFL that honored
the victims’ memory by asking for a
moment of silence and darkening
their scoreboards.
New York Giants receiver Victor
Cruz, after learning that he was the
favorite player of one 6-year-old
victim, wrote “R.I.P. Jack Pinto,”
“Jack Pinto, my hero” and “This
one is for you” on his shoes for the
Giants game against the Falcons in
Atlanta. Cruz said he called the
boy’s family after hearing he was a
Giants fan and was told they
planned to bury him in one of
Cruz’s No. 80 jerseys.
“I don’t even know how to put it
into words,” Cruz said. “There are
no words that can describe the type
of feeling that you get when a kid
idolizes you so much that unfortu-
nately they want to put him in the
casket with your jersey on. I can’t
even explain it.”
The Patriots, the closest team to
Newtown that was home on Sunday,
wore a helmet sticker with the city
seal and a black ribbon on it. The
Giants, another popular team in
southwestern Connecticut, affixed a
decal with the school’s initials —
“SHES” — on their helmets.
Houston Texans defensive end J.J.
Watt wrote “Newtown, CT” on one
of the gloves he wore in warmups
and on both of his shoes for the
game.
“We’re playing football, and
there’s something much bigger
going on in this world,” Watt said.
“I just wanted them to know, and I
wanted everyone to know, that our
Moments of silence around NFL for shooting victims
See VICTIMS, Page 14
Raiders
shut out
Chiefs
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The Oakland Raiders final-
ly found a team they could beat.
Sebastian Janikowski kicked five field
goals, Darren McFadden rushed for 110 yards
and the Raiders shut out Kansas City for the
second time ever, beating the Chiefs 15-0 on
Sunday.
The Raiders (4-10) overwhelmed the under-
manned Chiefs (2-12) to snap a six-game los-
ing streak. Sandwiched around those losses
are two wins over Kansas City, a rare bright
spot in this disappointing season in Oakland.
There has been little to cheer for this season
for the Chiefs, who have lost 10 of 11 games
and are tied for the second most losses in fran-
chise history behind a 2-14 mark in 2008.
Kansas City’s only win since September came
the day after linebacker Javon Belcher killed
his girlfriend before committing suicide at the
team’s practice facility.
About the only bright spot from this loss is
it kept Kansas City in the running for the No.
1 overall draft pick. The Chiefs and Jaguars
are tied with the worst record in the NFL with
two weeks remaining.
This matchup between two old AFL rivals
lacked the meaning many of the past meetings
had with both teams entering the game with at
least 10 losses for the first time ever.
The quality of play matched the poor
records for much of the day as the Chiefs took
nearly 40 minutes to earn their initial first
down of the game and the Raiders failed to
reach the end zone.
But with McFadden topping 100 yards for
the third time this season, Carson Palmer
playing turnover-free for the first time since
September and the Raiders dominating defen-
sively, Oakland came out on top.
The Raiders held Jamaal Charles to 10
yards rushing on nine carries, giving him 14
yards on 14 carries in two games against
Oakland this season. Brady Quinn was 18 for
32 for 136 yards and an interception as he
missed injured receiver Dwayne Bowe.
The Chiefs finally got a first down with just
more than five minutes remaining in the third
quarter when Dexter McCluster fought for 8
yards on a catch on third-and-6. Two penalties
by Oakland gave Kansas City 42 yards and
helped set up Kansas City with first-and-goal
from the 9.
But the drive stalled when Charles was
tackled at the 8 by Matt Giordano after a short
catch on fourth down.
Kansas City also failed to capitalize on a
fumble by McFadden that Justin Houston
recovered at the Oakland 18. An offensive
pass interference and four straight incomple-
tions by Quinn gave the ball back to the
Raiders and helped seal the shutout.
By Dan Gelston
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VILLANOVA, Pa. — Villanova’s Big East
banner that hangs in the rafters already has a
white patch stitched over West Virginia.
The Wildcats can now start putting Xs over
most of the rest of the conference schools, as
well.
The Big East — a proud league built on bas-
ketball moments like the 1985 Wildcats stun-
ning conference rival Georgetown in the
national championship game — will soon
become extinct, even if the name lives on in
some unrecognizable form.
On Saturday, Villanova, Georgetown, St.
John’s, DePaul, Marquette, Seton Hall and
Providence all decided to officially separate
from the conference many of them helped to
build, so they can construct a league focused
on basketball in this ever-changing landscape
of college athletics.
The breakaway from the Big East was only
the first step. It will be weeks and months of
uncertainty, and possibly lawsuits, before the
final structure over this transition period falls
into place.
The seven schools must decide who will
join them in the new hoops-heavy conference,
when they want to depart, where they’ll play a
conference tournament, and whether they will
attempt to keep the Big East name. Plus, the
league will need a commissioner.
There is no true timetable for any of those
decisions. Like so many of these reshaped
conferences that stretch from coast to coast,
this new league won’t be confined to eastern
teams. Xavier, Butler, Dayton, Creighton, and
Gonzaga, way out in Spokane, Wash., also
don’t play major college football and would
be natural fits to align with these Catholic
schools. The league also will consider non-
denominational schools, as well.
“They don’t necessarily have to be Catholic,
but it could happen,” Patrick Lyons, Seton
Hall’s athletic director, said. “We’re not
restricting it. We also have to consider our
football-playing Big East partners and what
they plan to do. But we’re extremely excited
about being able to shape our future.”
The seven departing schools have won three
men’s basketball national championships with
18 Final Four appearances. Georgetown, St.
John’s, Seton Hall and Providence helped
form the Big East, which started playing bas-
ketball in 1979. Villanova joined in 1980, and
Marquette and DePaul in 2005.
Unified basketball schools continue to plot future
Niners win thriller
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The
San Francisco 49ers earned a play-
off berth by withstanding a stunning
comeback by New England from a
28-point deficit to beat the Patriots
41-34 on Sunday night in the rain.
Michael Crabtree took a short
pass from Colin Kaepernick and
sped around cornerback Kyle
Arrington for a 38-yard touchdown
with 6:25 to go, then David Akers
made a 28-yard field goal to clinch
it.
San Francisco (10-3-1) owns at
least a wild-card spot and plays at
Seattle next week with a chance to
win the NFC West. A loss would
bring the division race down to the
final weekend.
Kaepernick threw for four touch-
downs, two to Crabtree, who had
107 yards receiving. The defense
rattled Tom Brady at times, but also
yielded 443 yards passing.
AFC East champion New England
(10-4), which had won seven in a
row, trailed 31-3 at one point and
lost for the first time at home in
December in 21 games. The Patriots
also had won 21 in a row in the sec-
ond half of the schedule before San
Francisco somehow regrouped late
in a game it seemingly had clinched
long before.
The 49ers appeared headed for an
easy win in a sloppy game. They
forced four turnovers, matching the
number of giveaways New England
had at home all season.
But then the Niners began sleep-
walking, and back came Brady and
the Patriots on a 6-yard TD run by
REUTERS
San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Randy Moss (L) and quarterback Colin Kaepernick celebrate after Moss’-
touchdown reception in the first quarter of their NFL football game against the New England Patriots
in Foxborough, Mass. Sunday. See NINERS, Page 14
12
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Jeremy Lin was
barely hanging on to an NBA job
when he stepped on the floor at
Madison Square Garden last
February.
He returns Monday having
proven he’s a legitimate starter and
sometimes star, capable of energiz-
ing a franchise and a fan base, a
player who saved his team’s season
and was rewarded with a lucrative
contract.
Linsanity was short but spectacular,
and even the New York Knicks’ lock-
er room is filled with Lin, who attend-
ed Palo Alto High School, admirers.
Yet on the
court, his old
team hasn’t
missed him at
all.
“What he did
was amazing. I
mean, I was
watching every
game. He was
hitting game-
winners, he was doing all that. He
was amazing,” point guard
Raymond Felton said. “But it’s time
to move on. We’re 18-5, whatever
the record is, we’re 10-0 at home, so
no need to talk about that no more.”
Lin makes his lone New York
appearance with the Houston
Rockets, who threw big dollars at
Lin in July and were maybe just as
surprised as so many others when
the Knicks let them have him. They
could have kept Lin simply by
matching the Rockets’ offer, which
was widely considered to be a fore-
gone conclusion, and the big-mar-
ket Knicks certainly could have
afforded him.
Instead, they traded for Felton,
and signed Jason Kidd and Pablo
Prigioni, and nobody can argue
now. The Knicks are the best in the
league in taking care of the ball — a
Lin weakness even during his high-
est point — and they have the best
record in the Eastern Conference
with Felton and Kidd starting
together in a two point guard back-
court.
“I’m not taking anything away
from what we had last year, those
guys gave us all they had, but to
win at a big level in this league
you’ve got to have good point guard
play. I think Jason Kidd and
Raymond and Pablo have filled that
void that we were somewhat miss-
ing last year,” Knicks coach Mike
Woodson said.
The Knicks were going nowhere
without anyone to run former coach
Mike D’Antoni’s offense and just
days from needing to cut Lin or
guarantee his salary for the remain-
der of the season when D’Antoni
turned to him in a Feb. 4 game
against the Nets. Lin scored 25
points off the bench, was promoted
to the starting lineup two nights
later, and the phenomenon known
as Linsanity was born.
An undrafted player from
Harvard who had been cut three
times already and was so uncertain
of his NBA future that he had slept
on teammate Landry Fields’ couch
the night before his breakout
because he had refused to get his
own place with an unguaranteed
contract, Lin became an immediate
hit with fans around the world.
Knicks welcome Linsanity back to New York
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Jim
Boeheim has experienced a lot since
the dawn of the new century —
prostate surgery, a national champi-
onship, induction into the
Basketball Hall of Fame, a pair of
Olympic gold medals, the firing of a
lifelong friend on his staff.
Yet even though it’s been 50 years
since he enrolled as a freshman at
Syracuse, the 68-year-old Boeheim
just keeps rolling along, as intense
and focused as ever in his 37th year
at his alma mater, worried only
about the next
game when he’s
not recruiting or
raising money
for cancer
research.
‘’He hasn’t
lost a beat,” said
Boeheim’s wife,
Juli. “Jim’s got
an intense edge
at all times.”
One that has brought him to the
doorstep of another milestone —
900 victories. Sometime soon —
the first chance comes against
Detroit on Monday night in the
Carrier Dome on the court that
bears his name — Boeheim will
join a most elite fraternity, one with
only two other members — Mike
Krzyzewski (936) and Bob Knight
(902), the only men’s coaches in
Division I history to win that many
games.
“The sooner we get through it, the
better we’ll be able to focus on the
season,” said Boeheim, 899-304 for
his career after his fourth-ranked
Orange (9-0) beat Canisius 85-61
on Saturday night. “This team does
not care about how many wins I
have. They care about getting the
next win. That’s it. Everything else
does not matter. It really doesn’t.
I’m happy I’m still here.”
Even though his Orange have
won more games the past three sea-
sons than during any three-year
stretch in his career and Boeheim’s
program is probably better than it’s
ever been, crossing another thresh-
old on the victory list isn’t fodder
for the dinner table.
“We don’t even mention it at
home,” Juli said.
One of a vanishing breed, Boeheim
has been head coach at Syracuse
since 1976 and has never had a desire
to go anywhere else. His first victory
as a college coach was against
Harvard in Springfield, Mass., a 75-
48 triumph on Nov. 26, 1976.
“We were behind at halftime, not
playing well at all,” Boeheim
recalled. “We just kind of went to
something real simple offensively
and outscored them about 20-some-
thing to six in the second half.”
After taking over for Roy
Danforth, Boeheim’s Orange went
26-4 in his rookie season, losing in
the second round of the NCAA
tournament.
Syracuse’s Jim Boeheim 1 away from 900 wins
Jeremy Lin
Jim Boeheim
SPORTS 14
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
thoughts are with them. Nothing is bigger
than that. We played our game today, but hon-
estly our thoughts are with them, the families,
the teachers, the friends, the first responders,
who had to go see that. My dad is a first
responder. They were just kids.”
Giants coach Tom Coughlin said the fact
that the town was only about 90 minutes from
New York City made the loss hit even harder.
“Being close to home, the players were
greatly upset about it,” he said. “Many of the
players have young children so they can
empathize with the parents who had young
children killed. There was no one that
escaped the effect of it, but that’s not an
excuse for why we played the way we played
today.”
In St. Louis, the players who wear No. 26
— Rams running back Daryl Richardson and
Vikings cornerback Antoine Winfield —
joined hands in a circle with their coaches at
midfield before their game, surrounded by
dozens of children wearing jerseys.
“I have a son that’s in kindergarten. It
choked me up because I would hate to be one
of those parents,” Rams running back Steven
Jackson said. “You drop your kid off at
school and he or she wants to go there and
learn and better themselves, and to then go to
the school and find that your child will no
longer be with you. I couldn’t imagine that
thing.”
The U.S. flag was at half-staff at Gillette
Stadium, and a spokeswoman said the team
planned to fire 26 flares into the air in a
pregame ceremony before New England’s
night game against the San Francisco 49ers.
Flags were also at half-staff in Baltimore,
where the scoreboards went black as the pub-
lic address announcer asked the crowd at the
game between the Ravens and Denver
Broncos to observe “silent reflection” in the
wake of Friday’s “horrific tragedy.”
“As a parent you drop your kids off at
school many times,” said Miami Dolphins
coach Joe Philbin, whose 21-year-old son
Michael fell into a Wisconsin river and
drowned in January. “It’s hard to put into
words what that community and those fami-
lies must feel like. We obviously kept them in
our prayers.”
A moment of silence was observed at all 14
NFL games on Sunday; in Houston and in
Arlington, Texas, the scoreboard went black.
Members of the Buffalo Bills and Seattle
Seahawks stood quietly with their heads down
on their sideline while fans stood silently at
the Rogers Centre in Toronto.
The Bills did continue their pregame habit
of playing U2’s “Sunday Bloody Sunday,”
which they’ve played before every home
game this season. The song is in reference to
British troops shooting and killing unarmed
protesters in Derry, Northern Ireland in
January 1972.
In Chicago, Green Bay wide receiver
Donald Driver retweeted the names of the vic-
tims. St. Louis defensive end Chris Long said
after the 36-22 loss the Vikings that it was
hard to feel sorry for himself.
Continued from page 11
VICTIMS
Danny Woodhead and a 1-yard dive by Brady.
A 5-yard pass to Aaron Hernandez and
Woodhead’s 1-yard run with 12:13 remaining
tied it.
San Francisco mounted a quick response.
Rookie LaMichael James broke free for a 62-
yard kickoff return. On the next snap — the
third time the Niners would have a one-play
TD drive — Crabtree took a pass on the left
side, spun and headed into the end zone.
New England turned over the ball on downs
and Akers made his kick. Stephen
Gostkowski added a 41-yarder for the Patriots
with 38 seconds remaining, but they couldn’t
recover the onside kick.
Continued from page 11
NINERS
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The College of San Mateo women’s basket-
ball team couldn’t shutoff Santa Monica’s 3-
point shooting barrage and fell to the visiting
Corsairs, 77-65, in the consolation finals of
the Tom Martinez Women’s Basketball
Invitational Sunday.
CSM (3-7) scored first, on a jumper by
Jenna David, before 3-pointers by all-tourna-
ment guard Angelique McDaniel and Aniese
Palmore put Santa Monica ahead for good.
The Corsairs (6-7), started with a 12-5 run and
never looked back as McDaniel and Palmore
each sank five 3-pointers.
The Bulldogs did rally at the end, cutting a
24-point, 62-38, deficit in half. That included
a 10-2 run over the final 3:30 of play before
time ran out.
San Mateo’s comeback hopes were hurt
when 5-10 freshman Kate Larson (Notre
Dame-Belmont) fouled out with 5:16 left in
the game after grabbing eight rebounds and
scoring six points.
In the Bulldogs’ 81-72 win over Hartnell on
Saturday Larson had CSM’s season high of 23
points and pulled down 12 rebounds. Her play
was an encouraging highlight of the tourna-
ment, according to CSM coach Michelle
Warner.
Larson had missed most of CSM’s
November games with an injury.
In the consolation semifinal against
Hartnell, San Mateo needed several come-
backs in the close game, which had 17 lead
changes and six ties. The Bulldogs finally
took the lead for good with at 55-54 with 8:29
left in the game on a steal and lay-in by fresh-
man guard Amanda Lee (Mills High School),
who scored 13 points in the game.
“We played our best game, by far,” said
CSM coach Michelle Warner after the
Hartnell win. Four Bulldogs scored in double
figures.
CSM ends tourney with loss
SPORTS 15
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — The Green Bay
Packers clinched their second
straight NFC North title with a 21-
13 victory over the archrival
Chicago Bears on Sunday.
James Jones caught all three
touchdown passes thrown by the
Packers’ Aaron Rodgers. Green Bay
has now won six straight in the
NFL’s oldest — and fiercest —
rivalry.
The Packers (10-4) have won 12
straight against NFC North oppo-
nents, the longest streak in the NFL.
Brandon Marshall had a 15-yard
TD catch for the Bears, who have
lost five of six and are in danger of
missing the playoffs after beginning
the year 7-1. Clay Matthews contin-
ued his torture of Jay Cutler with
two sacks, and Alshon Jeffery hurt
the Bears (8-6) with three offensive
pass interference calls late in the
second half.
TEXANS 29, COLTS 17
HOUSTON — The Houston
Texans are AFC South champions
for the second straight year.
Andre Johnson had 151 yards
receiving and a touchdown, Bryan
Braman scored on a blocked punt
and Shayne Graham kicked five
field goals.
The Texans (12-2) grabbed their
first AFC South title last season
after the Colts nosedived without
injured quarterback Peyton
Manning. Manning is gone and
Andrew Luck couldn’t do much
against Houston’s defense.
The Colts (9-5) had won three
straight and needed a win to clinch
a playoff berth a year after going 2-
14.
J.J. Watt had three sacks as
Houston’s defense got back on track
a week after a 42-14 loss to New
England.
The Texans will have home-field
advantage throughout the AFC
playoffs in they win out.
REDSKINS 38, BROWNS 21
CLEVELAND — Rookie Kirk
Cousins threw for 329 yards and
two touchdowns filling in for
injured star Robert Griffin III, lead-
ing Washington to its fifth straight
win.
Cousins connected with Leonard
Hankerson for both TDs in his first
career start and the Redskins (8-6)
barely missed a beat without the tal-
ented and multi-dimensional RG3,
who sat out with a sprained knee.
Last week, Cousins came off the
bench after Griffin got hurt. Cousins
was behind center from the start of
this one and delivered a perform-
ance that extended Washington’s
longest winning streak since 2007
and moved the Redskins into a tie
for first in the NFC East.
Rookie Trent Richardson had a
pair of TD runs for the Browns (5-
9).
VIKINGS 36, RAMS 22
ST. LOUIS — Adrian Peterson
ran for a season-best 212 yards,
including an 82-yard touchdown
that fueled the Minnesota’s big sec-
ond quarter.
Peterson has 1,812 yards rushing,
leaving him 294 shy of breaking the
NFL’s single-season record of 2,105
by Eric Dickerson of the Los
Angeles Rams in 1984. Peterson,
less than a year removed from a
serious knee injury, has two games
left — at Houston and home against
Green Bay — to top Dickerson.
The Vikings (8-6) scored 10 of
their 23 points in the second quarter
off turnovers by Sam Bradford,
including a 29-yard interception
return by defensive end Everson
Griffen.
The Rams fell to 6-7-1.
FALCONS 34, GIANTS 0
ATLANTA — Matt Ryan threw
three touchdowns passes and
Atlanta handed the Giants their first
regular-season shutout since 1996.
Julio Jones caught a couple of
scoring throws from Ryan, who
broke his own franchise records for
completions and passing yards in a
season. He finished 23 of 28 for 270
yards.
The Falcons (12-2), who have
already clinched the NFC South,
moved a step closer to locking up
home-field advantage throughout
the conference playoffs. One more
win would lock it up.
Eli Manning threw two intercep-
tions for New York (8-6), which
came into the game with a one-
game lead over Washington and
Dallas in the NFC East.
BRONCOS 34, RAVENS 17
BALTIMORE — Chris Harris
returned an interception 98 yards
for a momentum-turning touch-
down, and Denver won its ninth
straight.
Peyton Manning threw for 204
yards and a score in his ninth con-
secutive win against Baltimore, the
first with the Broncos (11-3).
Down 10-0 late in the first half,
the Ravens had a first-and-goal at
the Denver 4 when Harris stepped in
front of Anquan Boldin, picked off a
pass by Joe Flacco and sprinted
down the right sideline en route to
the longest regular-season intercep-
tion return in Broncos history.
The Ravens (9-5) were playing
their first game under offensive
coordinator Jim Caldwell, who
replaced the fired Cam Cameron.
SEAHAWKS 50, BILLS 17
TORONTO — Seattle rookie
quarterback Russell Wilson ran for
three touchdowns and threw for
another in leading the Seahawks to
their second straight rout.
Wilson scored on runs of 14, 25
and 4 yards and then hit Zach Miller
for a 4-yard touchdown in helping
the Seahawks score 31 points on
their first five possessions. The
defense forced three consecutive
turnovers to start the second half,
including Earl Thomas scoring on
57-yard interception return.
A week after a 58-0 win at home
against Arizona, the Seahawks (9-5)
inched closer to clinching a playoff
berth and became the NFL’s third
team to score 50 points on consecu-
tive weekends. The Bills (5-9) were
knocked out of playoff contention
for a 13th consecutive season.
COWBOYS 27, STEELERS 24 OT
ARLINGTON, Texas —
Brandon Carr intercepted a pass
from Ben Roethlisberger to set up
Dan Bailey’s 21-yard field goal in
overtime.
The Cowboys won a Bailey kick
on the final play for the second
straight week since practice squad
linebacker Jerry Brown was killed
in a one-car accident that led to
manslaughter charges against team-
mate Josh Brent.
Carr intercepted Roethlisberger’s
pass along the sideline and returned
it 36 yards to the 1. Bailey’s kick
came after Tony Romo took a 2-
yard loss to put the kicker in better
position.
The Cowboys (8-6) moved into a
three-way tie for the NFC East lead
with the Giants and Redskins. The
Steelers (7-7) lost for the fourth
Packers beat Bears; Texans hold back Colts
See NFL, Page 16
16
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 10 4 0 .714 506 315
N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 306
Miami 6 8 0 .429 264 279
Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 306 402
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 280
Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 358
Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 386
Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 383
North
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 307
Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 293
Pittsburgh 7 7 0 .500 302 291
Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 280 310
West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 11 3 0 .786 409 274
San Diego 5 9 0 .357 299 312
Oakland 4 10 0 .286 263 402
Kansas City 2 12 0 .143 195 367
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 8 6 0 .571 381 350
Dallas 8 6 0 .571 327 338
N.Y. Giants 8 6 0 .571 373 304
Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 375
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 371 259
New Orleans 6 8 0 .429 389 379
Tampa Bay 6 8 0 .429 354 349
Carolina 5 9 0 .357 296 319
North
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 10 4 0 .714 344 292
Minnesota 8 6 0 .571 319 308
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 321 240
Detroit 4 10 0 .286 330 380
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-San Francisco 10 3 1 .750 357 218
Seattle 9 5 0 .643 350 219
St. Louis 6 7 1 .464 258 315
Arizona 5 9 0 .357 224 302
Monday’sGame
N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 5:30 p.m.
NFL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 18 5 .783 —
Brooklyn 13 10 .565 5
Boston 12 11 .522 6
Philadelphia 12 12 .500 6 1/2
Toronto 6 19 .240 13
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 15 6 .714 —
Atlanta 14 7 .667 1
Orlando 10 13 .435 6
Charlotte 7 16 .304 9
Washington 3 18 .143 12
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 13 9 .591 —
Milwaukee 12 10 .545 1
Indiana 13 11 .542 1
Detroit 7 19 .269 8
Cleveland 5 20 .200 9 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 19 6 .760 —
Memphis 15 6 .714 2
Houston 11 12 .478 7
Dallas 11 13 .458 7 1/2
New Orleans 5 17 .227 12 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 19 4 .826 —
Minnesota 12 9 .571 6
Denver 13 12 .520 7
Utah 13 12 .520 7
Portland 10 12 .455 8 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 17 6 .739 —
Golden State 16 8 .667 1 1/2
L.A. Lakers 11 14 .440 7
Phoenix 9 15 .375 8 1/2
Sacramento 7 16 .304 10
Sunday’sGames
Toronto 103, Houston 96
Denver 122, Sacramento 97
L.A. Lakers 111, Philadelphia 98
NBA STANDINGS
12/16
@Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/23
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/30
12/16
@Panthers
1p.m.
CBS
12/23
@Chargers
1p.m.
CBS
12/30
time in five games.
CARDINALS 31, LIONS 10
GLENDALE, Ariz. — Greg
Toler returned an interception 102
yards for a fourth-quarter touch-
down as Arizona ended a nine-game
losing streak.
The Cardinals (5-9) intercepted
Matthew Stafford three times,
returning two for touchdowns and
setting up a TD with the other. The
Lions (4-10) lost their sixth straight.
Rashad Johnson brought back a pick
53 yards for a touchdown to cap
Arizona’s 21-point second quarter.
Patrick Peterson’s interception set
up another score.
Detroit’s Calvin Johnson became
the first player in NFL history with
consecutive 1,600-yard receiving
seasons and tied an NFL record with
his seventh straight 100-yard receiv-
ing game.
PANTHERS 31, CHARGERS 7
SAN DIEGO — Mike Tolbert
scored twice against his former
team and DeAngelo Williams
turned a tipped pass from Cam
Newton into a 45-yard touchdown
reception.
Carolina (5-9) won consecutive
games for the first time since last
December. The loss knocked the
Chargers out of playoff contention
for the third straight year.
The Chargers (5-9) clinched their
first losing season since 2003, when
they were an NFL-worse 4-12.
Coach Norv Turner is expected to be
fired at season’s end, most likely
along with general manager A.J.
Smith.
Tolbert capped Carolina’s first
two drives with 1-yard scoring runs.
His second TD was set up when
Philip Rivers lost a fumble, his 21st
turnover this season and 46th in less
than two full seasons.
SAINTS 41, BUCCANEERS 0
NEW ORLEANS — Drew Brees
passed for 307 yards and four touch-
downs, and New Orleans posted its
first shutout since 1995.
Brees connected on his scoring
passes with tight end David
Thomas, running back Darren
Sproles and receivers Lance Moore
and Joe Morgan.
Mark Ingram added an 11-yard
touchdown run.
Josh Freeman endured one of his
worst outings of the season for
Tampa Bay (6-8), throwing four
interceptions and losing a fumble.
Jabari Greer made two intercep-
tions, Rafael Bush and Isa Abdul-
Quddus the others. Cameron Jordan
forced Freeman’s fumble on a sack
and recovered it.
New Orleans (6-8) also bottled up
standout rookie running back Doug
Martin, holding him to 16 yards on
nine carries.
DOLPHINS 24, JAGUARS 3
MIAMI — Miami kept former
teammate Chad Henne out of the
end zone, made three fourth-down
stops deep in its own territory and
benefited from an odd penalty.
Henne, playing in Miami for the
first time since he departed as a
Dolphins bust last offseason, threw
for 221 yards with no turnovers. But
the Dolphins turned back three scor-
ing threats, and a go-ahead touch-
down for the Jaguars came off the
board because of an illegal-substitu-
tion penalty.
Ryan Tannehill went 22 for 28 for
220 yards and two scores with no
interceptions to help Miami (6-8).
stay in playoff contention. The
Jaguars (2-12) helped their chances
of getting the No. 1 draft pick next
April.
Continued from page 15
NFL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COURCHEVEL, France — Tina
Maze is looking more and more
unbeatable in giant slalom this sea-
son — and her lead over Lindsey
Vonn in the World Cup standings is
getting bigger and bigger.
Maze won her fourth straight GS
race on Sunday to extend her overall
World Cup lead — and more impor-
tantly create a bigger gap to Vonn, the
defending cham-
pion who failed
to finish.
Maze had a
comfortable lead
of 0.63 seconds
o v e r
Fr enchwoman
Tessa Worley
after her first run
and the 29-year-
old Slovenian then held off Austria’s
Kathrin Zettel in the second to win
by 0.22. Worley was third, 0.40 back.
Austria’s Anna Fenninger finished
fourth but was 1:16 behind Maze.
“This year I’m actually amazed
by myself, how good I can do the
races,” Maze said. “For this I have
to thank my team, that’s working the
whole summer and already for four
now with me. They’re getting me
ready to be able to follow all the
races that are coming.”
Maze wins 4th straight WCup GS
Tina Maze
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A
decade ago, I proposed my column
to the then upstart Daily Journal. As
I contended then and still do now,
I’m the best they have in my price range.
Seriously, I love reaching readers and gladly
volunteer my time to dispel myths, offer tips
and explain helpful services. Back in 2002, I
thought long and hard about that first col-
umn. The first of anything sets a tone, right?
I wanted that first column to say something
about my style and my organization’s style. I
wrote about dog poop. I wanted readers to
see that this column would cover business,
but go for a few smiles, too. Still, there was a
moment after I pressed send when I thought
that might be my first and only column. Ten
years later, dog poop is still around — we
haven’t solved that one. My friends at Doody
Calls, professional poop-scoopers (“When
nature calls, we answer”), described a recent
poop emergency and urged me to use this
forum to encourage good behavior and avoid
angry interactions. A man was walking his
dog and the dog “went” on a neighbor’s lawn.
That neighbor flew out of the house, irate.
The dog owner did his best to clean up. Since
the homeowner was upset, the dog walker
called Doody Calls. The homeowner seemed
satisfied with the relief work, but still con-
tacted the police to report the dog walker.
This must have been a frequent occurrence.
People don’t like poop, especially when it
doesn’t come from their pet. People have got-
ten into fisticuffs over dog poop, they’ve
harmed animals doing their business and a
person was shot over it. Be responsible. Pick
up day or night, whether you’re in plain view
or hidden, whether you’re on private or pub-
lic property. If you allow your cat to roam
outside, know you are inviting trouble from
neighbors who don’t want their yards to be
litter boxes.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Services, Cruelty Investigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos
Center for Compassion.
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Peter Jackson’s “The
Hobbit” led the box office with a haul of $84.8
million, a record-setting opening better than
the three previous “Lord of the Rings” films.
The Warner Bros. Middle Earth epic was
the biggest December opening ever, surpass-
ing Will Smith’s “I Am Legend,” which
opened with $77.2 million in 2007, according
to studio estimates Sunday. “The Hobbit: An
Unexpected Journey” also passed the
December opening of “Avatar,” which opened
with $77 million. Internationally, “The
Hobbit” also added $138.2 million, for an
impressive global debut of $223 million.
Despite weak reviews, the 3-D adaptation of
J. R. R. Tolkien’s first novel in the fantasy
series was an even bigger draw than the last
“Lord of the Rings” movie, “The Return of the
King.” That film opened with $72.6 million.
“The Hobbit” is the first of another planned
trilogy, with two more films to be squeezed out
of Tolkien’s book.
While Jackson’s “Rings” movies drew many
accolades — “The Return of the King” won
best picture from the Academy Awards — the
path for “The Hobbit” has been rockier. It
received no Golden Globes nominations on
Thursday, though all three “Rings” films were
nominated by the Hollywood Foreign Press
Association for best picture.
Particularly criticized has been the film’s 48-
frames-per-second (double the usual rate), a
hyper-detailed look that some have found jar-
ring. Most moviegoers didn’t see “The Hobbit”
in that version, though, as the new technology
was rolled out in only 461 of the 4,045 theaters
playing the film.
Regardless of any misgivings over “The
Hobbit,” the film was a hit with audiences.
They graded the film with an “A”
CinemaScore.
“What’s really important, what makes this
special is the CinemaScore,” said Dan Fellman,
president of domestic distribution for Warner
Bros. “All these things point to a great word of
mouth. We haven’t even made it to the
Christmas holidays yet. Kids are still in school
this week.”
The strong opening culminated a long jour-
ney for “The Hobbit,” which was initially
delayed when a lawsuit dragged on between
Jackson and “Rings” producer New Line
Cinema over merchandizing revenue. At one
point, Guillermo del Toro was to direct the film
with Jackson producing. But eventually the
filmmaker opted to direct the movie himself,
originally envisioning two “Hobbit” films. The
production also went through the bankruptcy
of distribution partner MGM and a labor dis-
pute in New Zealand, where the film was shot.
The long delay for “The Hobbit,” nearly a
decade after the last “Lord of the Rings” film,
made it “one of those movies that had everyone
scratching their heads as to how it would
open,” said Paul Dergarabedian, an analyst for
box-office tracker Hollywood.com.
‘Hobbit’ bests ‘Rings’ with $84.8 million opening
1.“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,”
$84.8 million ($138.2 million international).
2.“Rise of the Guardians,”$7.4 million
($20.1 million international).
3.“Lincoln,”$7.2 million.
4.“Skyfall,”$7 million
($12.2 million international).
5.“Life of Pi,”$5.4 million
($11.5 million international).
6.“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part
2,”$5.2 million ($13 million international).
7.“Wreck-It Ralph,”$3.3million
($4.7 million international).
8.“Playing for Keeps,”$3.2 million
($1.4 million international).
9.“Red Dawn,”$2.4 million.
10. “Silver Linings Playbook,” $2 million
($370,000 international).
Top 10 movies
18
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
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The San Mateo County
Association of Realtors (SAM-
CAR) installed its 2013 President
Suzan Getchell-Wallace and its
Board of Directors Dec. 6 at the
Green Hills Country Club in
Millbrae. Getchell-Wallace is a
Realtor at Coldwell Banker Fahey
Properties in Pacifica.
Bob Marshall Sr., was posthu-
mously named as 2012 “Realtor of
the Year” for his many years and
efforts in serving SAMCAR and
the real estate industry. The award
was accepted by his daughter and
SAMCAR 2012 President Anne
Oliva.
State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San
Mateo, received the first ever
SAMCAR “Homeowner Hero
Award.” David Zigal was presented
with the first Lifetime Achievement
Award for extraordinary distinction.
Dennis Fahey and Patricia Giosso
were honored with SAMCAR’s
2012 “Community Service” Award
for their service to the Endue
Foundation whose mission is to
enrich the lives of individuals with
developmental disabilities and sup-
porting organizations that assist
them and their families with hope
and dignity.
Val Hardwick of AMS Bekins
was named the 2012 “Affiliate
Member of the Year” for her efforts
in serving SAMCAR and the real
estate industry.
The 2013 SAMCAR Board of
Directors is Suzan Getchell-
Wallace, 2013 President-Elect —
Coldwell Banker Fahey Properties;
Philip Houston, 2014 President
Elect — Coldwell Banker; Dennis
Pantano, Treasurer — Pantano
Properties; Anne Oliva, Immediate
Past President 2012 — Marshall
Realty; Michael Bohnert —
Coldwell Banker; Robert Brisbane
— KW Peninsula Estates; Bill
Curry — Access Financial;
Marianne Osberg — Coldwell
Banker; John Prouty —
Prudential California; Corrin
Trowbridge — Trowbridge
Insurance; Frank Vento —
Dolphin Real Estate; Michael
Verdone — Economic Concepts;
Diane Viviani — Prudential
California; Diane Wilson —
Intero; and Marianne Zanone
Rush — Coldwell Banker San
Carlos .
***
The SF-Peninsula Chapter of
NAIFA (National Association of
Insurance and Financial Advisors)
held its Annual Toy and Food
Drive Raffle and raised $2,805 in
addition to toy and food donations
to benefit a local charity, Samaritan
House.
Samaritan House is a private
nonprofit organization providing
services to help meet the essential
daily needs of more than 12,000
low-income people within San
Mateo County.
The San Mateo Public Library
Foundation (SMPLF) is pleased to
announce its newly formed Auxil-
iary Board,The Literary Society.
The Literary Society will work to-
gether with the SMPLF’s Board of
Directors in support of the organi-
zation’s fundraising mission by
offering their expertise in the con-
ception, planning and execution
of key foundation events. Front
Row (l to r): Debbie Brown, Shashi
Deb,Tina Crisci, Julie Lev. Second
Row (l to r): Michele Freed, Petalyn
Albert, Bea Murphy.Third Row (l
to r): Paige Bacon, Amy Laughlin,
Lori Tamura –Chinn. Back Row (l to
r): Valerie Gartner, Lynn Song, Car-
oline Low, Pam Casey
LIBRARY FOUNDATION’S NEW BOARD
Once again, the Peninsula Thunder
U12 girls soccer team of Foster City
spent a Sunday afternoon creating
holiday cards for veterans. On De-
cember 8, the cards will be coupled
with gifts the San Mateo American
Legion Auxiliary bought for patients
residing at the Menlo Park VA Hospi-
tal. Back row: Kaitlyn Waller, Prgya
Anur, Maya Angel, Bella Jimenez,
Emma Tormey, Maddy Delaney, Is-
abela Cortwright, Mahak Bindal.
Front row:Yazmin Tilly, Miranda
Chai, Zoe Wilson, Katie Toye, Kristyn
Waller, Aimee Goell, Olivia Versen.
ATHLETES REACH OUT TO VETERANS
LOCAL 19
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ed the Central Pacific Railroad as well as
many others tracks) to complete a more
direct line to San Jose around the east side of
San Bruno Mountain but a number of tunnels
needed to be built before the tracks could be
laid. This construction began toward the end
of the 1900s but was interrupted by the 1906
earthquake when a tunnel was damaged.
This event actually aided the SP and other
businesses along the Mission Bay area
because much rubble the quake created was
used to fill in the many water barriers that
slowed the development south of the
Townsend Street/China Basin area. Railroad
yards were placed south of China Basin and
planned for more repair and storage yards by
Brisbane when the Bay was filled in there.
After cleaning up from the earthquake, the
line to the south was completed to San
Bruno by Dec. 8, 1907. This became known
as the Bayshore Cutoff. The former SF & SJ
RR tracks from Daly City were connected
with the Bayshore Cutoff in South San
Francisco and San Bruno. Rail traffic to
Daly City was conducted by these connec-
tions and, by the early 1940s, the rail line
through the Mission District was discontin-
ued and the rails removed. The property
through the Bernal Cut was acquired by San
Francisco and San Jose Avenue was con-
structed. With the increase in truck trans-
portation, the commerce of the Daly
City/Colma area decreased for Southern
Pacific Railroad and the line from Daly City
was discontinued.
By 1955, passenger traffic peaked at
16,000 passenger round trips per day (com-
pared to Caltrain’s 11,750 round trips per
day) and SP was looking for ways to cut
costs. In 1953, the first diesel locomotive
took over the chore of motive power. In
1957, the last scheduled steam train left San
Francisco at 5:45 p.m. on its last commute
trip. The completion of Bayshore Freeway in
the mid-50s and the shift to the electronics
industry to Silicon Valley that moved jobs
south led to greatly decreased patronage and
the SP continued to lose money on passenger
service. Amtrak was formed in 1971 and pas-
senger service across the United States was
taken over by it. This resulted in Caltrain
being formed to take over the Peninsula
commute in 1980. In 1988, Southern Pacific
was taken over by Rio Grande Industries. In
1992, the Joint Powers Board bought the
right of way from SP for about $210 million
and, by July of 1992, Amtrak was hired to
run the passenger operation.
In 1996, the SP merged with Union
Pacific, forming the largest railroad in the
United States.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily
Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Mark Twain’s “The Adventures
of Huckleberry Finn” is considered
one of the greatest novels in
American literature. Its musical
version, “Big River,” doesn’t reach
an equivalent pinnacle, but it has
its virtues.
They’re apparent in the
TheatreWorks production directed
by Robert Kelley. For one, the
excellent cast produces some fine
renditions of the music and lyrics
by Roger Miller, who has created a
score rife with country, blues and
spirituals. For another, the cast has
fun with some of the situations in
the book by William Hauptman,
who adapted his script from
Twain’s novel.
Best of all, there’s James Monroe
Iglehart, who plays Jim, a runaway
slave who shares Huck’s adven-
tures as their raft drifts down the
Mississippi River from the fiction-
al town of St. Petersburg, Mo. A
fine singer, Iglehart is just back
from three years in the Broadway
production of “Memphis,” in which
he continued to play the role of
Bobby. He had originated the role
in the world premiere at
TheatreWorks. The imposing
Iglehart imbues Jim with a dignity
and integrity that surpass any other
character in the show.
Therefore, the decision by Huck
(Alex Goley) to help him elude
capture becomes both believable
and inevitable even though Huck
understands that in doing so, he’s
breaking the law. After all, the
action takes place in the early
1840s, when slavery was legal in
many states and when slaves were
regarded more as property than as
human beings.
This theme comes through
despite the shenanigans of other
characters like Tom Sawyer (Scott
Reardon), a decent fellow who
nevertheless makes everything too
complicated in the name of adven-
ture. The script also spends too
much time on two flimflam men,
the King (Martin Rojas Dietrich)
and the Duke (Jackson Davis),
despite the comedic talents of both
actors. Except for Iglehart and
Goley, nearly everyone else in the
large cast plays multiple charac-
ters.
While Jim is trying to reach a
non-slave state and earn enough
money to free his wife and chil-
dren, from whom he has been sep-
arated for several years, Huck is
trying to escape his drunken, mur-
derous father, Pap (Gary S.
Martinez). The two set off on a raft,
drifting by night and sleeping in
secluded spots during the day. In
one of the more touching scenes,
they spot a boat full of recaptured
slaves, who sing a mournful spiri-
tual.
Music director William
Liberatore conducts the singers and
the six-member orchestra from the
keyboard. The uncluttered set, fea-
turing a backdrop of a winding
river, is by Joe Ragey, with lighting
by Pamila Z. Gray. The choreogra-
phy is by Kikau Alvaro, while the
costumes are by B Modern and the
sound by Jeff Mockus.
“Big River,” which premiered on
Broadway in 1985, won seven
Tonys, including Best Musical,
Best Score and Best Book. It does
have much to commend it, but the
source still has greater depth.
The show will continue at the
Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto,
through Dec. 30. For tickets and
information, call (650) 463-1960
or visit www.theatreworks.org.
Editor’s note: This story is
reprinted in its entirety from the
weekend edition.
Iglehart provides moral heart in ‘Big River’
MARK KITAOKA
Huck (Alex Goley) and Jim (James Monroe Iglehart) run away down the
mighty Mississippi in ‘Big River,’ playing Nov. 28-Dec. 30 at TheatreWorks
at the Lucie Stern Theatre in Palo Alto.
not actually get Villegas the job at Google, he
credits his experience there with his current
success.
“They led me along the right path and gave
me my footing in the door,” he said.
Year Up Bay Area is a one-year, intensive
training program that provides low-income
young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination
of hands-on skill development, college credits
and corporate internships.
Since opening its doors in 2008, Year Up
has helped almost 500 young adults find work
or get into college.
About 88 percent of the program’s gradu-
ates are employed or attending college within
four months of completing the program.
Year Up has more than 20 corporate partners
in the Bay Area including eBay, Zynga,
Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Gap and Yelp and
a full 100 percent of its students are placed in
internships with these companies and others.
Villegas, a Woodside High School graduate,
always had high expectations for himself.
“I wish I had known about Year Up after
graduating high school,” he said.
Villegas was a little lost after dropping out
of California State University East Bay but
now knows there are alternatives to finding
success in life other than attending college or
getting a degree.
Most who enroll in the Year Up programs
come from San Francisco or the East Bay but
about 13 percent reside in the Peninsula.
To learn more about Year Up Bay Area go
to: www.yearup.org and click locations for
the San Francisco section of the site.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
VILLEGAS
LOCAL 20
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY,DEC. 17
HolidayLuncheon. Noonto2 p.m. San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo. $16 per person.
Festive holiday luncheon of beef
medallionsinmushroomsauce,cheddar
mashed potatoes, grilled asparagus,
holiday salad, dinner rolls and red velvet
cake. Price includes door prizes.
EntertainmentprovidedbypianistSteven
Shalom.Formoreinformationandtopre-
register call 522-7499.
DanceConnectionwithlivemusic by
theRonBorelliTrio/Christmasholiday
dress updancenight. 6:30 p.m. to 9:30
p.m.BurlingameWoman’sClub,241Park
Road,Burlingame.Therewill befreedance
lessonsfrom6:30p.m.to7p.m.andopen
dancebeginningat 7p.m.Therewill also
belight refreshments,mixersandraffles.
$8 for members and $10 for guests. For
more information call 342-2221.
Historical Society of South San
Francisco’s Annual HolidayProgram.
7p.m.MagnoliaSenior Center,601Grand
Ave., South San Francisco. Under the
direction of Drama and English teacher
Mary Bishop, the South San Francisco
High School Glee Club will present a
fantastic musical celebration of the
holiday season. There will also be
refreshments served. Free. For more
information call 829-3872.
TUESDAY,DEC. 18
SanMateoCounty Newcomers Club
Luncheon. Noon.WedgewoodBanquet
Center at Crystal Springs Golf Course,
6650 Golf Course Drive, Burlingame.
Guitar sing-along. Checks must have
beensentinbyDec.12inorder toattend.
For more information call 286-0688.
TasteforModernism: DocentLecture.
7p.m.Belmont Library,1110Alamedade
las Pulgas, Belmont. This docent
presentationwill reviewselections from
the William S. Paley Collection at the
Museum of Modern Art in New York on
exhibitatthedeYoungMuseum.Free.For
more information go to smcl.org.
BethlehemA.D. 6p.m.to9:30p.m.1305
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. 2012
marks the 20th year of Bethlehem A.D.,a
South Bay Christmas tradition for the
entire family. There will be costumed
actors, music and more. Free. For more
information go to
http://www.BethlehemAD.com.
WEDNESDAY,DEC. 19
Medical Center and Santa toDeliver
ToystoKidsatLocalShelter.2p.m.First
Stepfor FamiliesShelter,325VillaTerrace,
San Mateo. Santa and the San Mateo
Medical Center’sMobileDental Clinicwill
deliver toysdonatedbytheGoldenGate
Harley Owners Group and San Mateo
Medical Center staff. For more
information go to
www.sanmateomedicalcenter.org.
SanMateoPublicLibraryPresentsLas
Posadas. 6p.m.SanMateoPublicLibrary,
First Floor, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
This Library Program celebrates a Latin
Americancultural traditionfor thewhole
family,includingacandlelightprocession,
music, refreshments, stories and crafts.
Free.For moreinformationcall 522-7838.
TerryHiattandFriends.7p.m.ClubFox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For
more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY,DEC. 20
Annual ChristmasDinner. 11:30a.m.to
1 p.m. Little House, 800 Middle Ave.,
MenloPark.$9.For moreinformationand
to register call 326-2025.
FRIDAY,DEC. 21
Holiday party. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. San
BrunoSeniorCenter,1555Crystal Springs
Road,SanBruno.DancingwiththeSwing
Shift band and a ham lunch. For more
information or tickets call 616-7150.
BethlehemAD. 6 p.m.to 9:30 p.m.1305
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Walk
throughavillageof costumedcharacters
and animals and experience ancient
Bethlehem. Free. For more information
call 368-3821 or go to
www.BethlehemAD.com.
Calendar
designers, often from the private sector, into
local governments that often haven’t adapted at
the same rate with new technology.
San Mateo County is one of 29 municipalities
that applied for the 2013 fellowship cycle and
the first county Human Services Agency
accepted.
“This is a way for us to sort of accelerate our
connection to a new world and bring very dif-
ferent eyes,” said Beverly Beasley Johnson,
director of the county’s Human Services
Agency.
Although the primary focus of the fellows is
better connecting the needy with food and
increasing participation in state and federal pro-
grams, they also receive a month to work on an
issue of their choice and are also free to tackle
other issues or problems that might arise. The
thought of Code For America is that the fellows
will bring a fresh perspective outside of the typ-
ical mode of operation and cut through a lot of
the red tape that bogs down civic innovation in
government. Cities or counties get highly
skilled professionals who could probably pull
in hefty salaries in private employment; the fel-
lows get a shot at creative freedom and the
chance to give back by improving government
service. The code for all projects is open source
and made available for any government entity
so San Mateo County’s solutions may end up
providing answers to needs in any number of
other jurisdictions.
While the fellows are not handed specific
projects, the county’s focus includes raising
public awareness of available services, creating
a central point to connect with food resources
and better coordinating between the public and
nonprofit food service providers and agencies.
With HSA seeing a 93 percent increase in
food stamp caseloads over the last three years,
Johnson and others involved with hunger issues
say the need to strengthen the food safety net is
more important than ever. And with technology
ever-evolving, the old way of doing business
might not be the most efficient.
“In HSA, we’ve always believed that part of
the problem was the technology divide. Even
our clients often have smartphones,” Johnson
said.
A smartphone app might be one result of the
partnership, maybe something a client can use
as one-stop shopping to find food banks, apply
for food stamps or, as Board of Supervisors
President Adrienne Tissier said, who even
knows?
“They will probably come up with things we
never even thought of. The project is to end
hunger in San Mateo County, but we’re certain-
ly not telling them how to get there,” Tissier
said.
Tissier thinks one of the other issues that
could be taken on is developing some sort of
tool to help emancipated foster youth transition
out of the system, such as easing how to receive
copies of birth certificates and court filings.
“That the demographic that would really use
an app,” she said.
She also hopes the hunger solutions in part
target seniors who are a big piece of the popu-
lation not utilizing the CalFresh program.
Tissier and Johnson had never heard of Code
For America until tipped off by Bill Somerville,
the president and founder of Philanthropic
Ventures Foundation, who Tissier said is always
ready with a new idea or suggestion to make the
community better.
PVF is funding $130,000 of the county’s par-
ticipation which is primarily housing, travel and
the stipends the fellows receive for participat-
ing. HSA is covering another $60,000 and
$140,000 came from the general fund.
James Higa, PVF’s executive director, said
the unique collaboration should change the
image of the public sector’s approach to prob-
lems.
“Throw everything you’ve heard about gov-
ernment being slow and conservative out the
window,” Higa said.
The fellows dig into the work in San Mateo
County beginning in February but have already
been busy interviewing county staff and under-
going orientation in Code For America’s San
Francisco offices.
Serena Wales knows what the fellows just
starting can expect. Wales, a web developer
from New York with a focus on campaigning
tools, was a 2012 fellow in New Orleans, work-
ing on ways to fight blight. She learned how
city government works from the clerk’s office
up to the mayor and at the end felt a great sense
of accomplishment.
“Its awesome to see. The code that I spent a
year on is now in the world and that’s exciting,”
she said.
She said fellows don’t come into a communi-
ty saying they have all the answers but rather
are ready to collaborate and offer their skills.
“We kind of see the fellowship as the begin-
ning of a process. Everything isn’t all shiny in a
year, but it’s the beginning,” she said.
In her case, Wales said there was some skep-
ticism on the part of government workers
because they had a history of working with con-
sultants who promised solutions but never
delivered.
“There might be some institutional stagnation
but most people are excited about doing some-
thing different,” Wales said.
Back in San Mateo County, officials say they
are fired up about channeling that type of
excitement and getting under way even if the
task at hand is a bit daunting.
“Trying to end hunger is like saying you want
to end homelessness. We may not get 100 per-
cent, and it will take some time, but we’ve got
to start somewhere. We’ve got nowhere to go
but up,” Tissier said.
Continued from page 1
HUNGER
even need a face-to-face appointment anymore.
But when they do, the lobbies of HSA’s five
offices will be better equipped to get them seen
and served more efficiently.
The Redwood City location at 2500
Middlefield Road is the first of five to get the
office facelift and the county celebrated the
multi-year system redesign on Wednesday by
showing off the renovated space. More than
90,000 residents currently use HSA’s services
and, with the full start of the Affordable Care
Act looming in 2014, Clarisa Simon, director of
self-sufficiency, and HSA Director Beverly
Beasley Johnson, said even more residents are
expected through the doors.
An estimated 12,500 people will receive
health insurance through the programs’ Medi-
Cal expansion and those who receive one form
of help through HSA often overlap with other
services.
Clients previously had to wait in lines for
their turn at a window to tell a worker their
needs before being handed forms and told to
fill them out, balancing a clipboard on their
knees while often also trying to keep small
children occupied. The process was lengthy,
often frustrating and not the best use of time
and resources for either workers or clients,
HSA members said at the unveiling.
Now, the documents are completed at tables,
phones are available for those whose problem
can be solved with a call and toys will be
mounted on walls and inside a glassed-in play
area to keep tiny hands and minds occupied
while Mom and Dad focus on the tasks at hand.
The kiosk will deliver the client’s requirements
directly to a worker so that he or she is pre-
pared for the case when the number is called
over a speaker and posted on flat-screen moni-
tors posted throughout the room. Clients taken
into back areas for interviews no longer crowd
into open cubicles with a lack of privacy.
Instead, now there are individual rooms with
several chairs and even toys. Printers and scan-
ners are at workers’ fingertips rather than else-
where.
Data from the kiosk will also let HSA analyze
when the offices have attendance peaks and
lows to better schedule the number of workers
actually needed at any given time.
Some of the changes seem like common
sense. Nobody seemed to know exactly why a
confidential drop box inside or after-hours
box outside had never before been imple-
mented. Other arose out of visiting similarly
sized counties as well as counties that imple-
mented their own renovations to check best
practices for ideas. Some they used, some
they discard and some they know are a work
in progress.
But a common theme through the changes is
technology and a new population of users used
to downloading their own forms or connecting
with answers via computers and smartphones.
As part of the redesign, clients can access phone
and online services 24 hours a day, seven days
a week in multiple languages.
The redesign “represents the future of eligi-
bility and enrollment,” Johnson said at the
unveiling.
Continued from page 1
HSA
Packard Children’s Hospital Nov. 7. Today,
the girls are gaining weight and getting closer
to going home for the holidays. But the road
to parenthood took a number of unexpected
turns for their parents.
There was an additional baby to plan for
and less time to do the work. There was a lot
of hustle, even a quickly thrown-together
baby shower. There was nine weeks between
the time the Carlsons learned they would have
twins and when Allison Carlson checked into
the hospital at 26 weeks to be constantly mon-
itored. Allison Carlson was given a shot of
steroids at that time to help the little ones start
developing their lungs earlier, said neonatolo-
gist Dr. William Rhine, medical director of
Packard Children’s neonatal intensive care
unit.
Once checked in, there was lots of waiting
and monitoring. Constant monitoring by the
nurses is important. There is a weighing of
risks and benefits and trying to be sure the lit-
tle ones are safe.
Dr. Susan Crowe, attending physician and
obstetrician who led the delivery team,
explained the Carlsons’ situation is quite rare.
The babies’ umbilical cords created a per-
fect knot — leading to an emergency cesare-
an delivery when the girls were 30 weeks
along.
“This is her once-in-a-lifetime emergency.
This is my every day,” said Crowe when
describing how important it is to make per-
sonal contact with a mom when meeting her
just before delivery.
The team — nurses, those in the delivery
room and the NICU — was prepared, Crowe
said, making things go a bit smoother. Crowe
took comfort in knowing the NICU team was
ready for the girls. Kate, who was born first,
weighed in at 3 pounds while Annie weighed
3 pounds 2 ounces.
“It was a testimony to the skill of the obste-
tricians to allow the twins to grow in the
womb as much as they did, so that their lungs
were able to mature,” Rhine said.
It’s natural for the tiny girls to lose weight
at first, but it was concerning because they
were already so small, said K.C. Carlson. The
couple found comfort in taking part in the reg-
ular baby tasks that they could, like changing
diapers. Today, the girls graduated out of
intensive care and each weighing in at about 5
pounds 2 ounces.
Allison Carlson is optimistic about the chal-
lenges noting they are new parents who have
had significant help during the first month.
Any time they were scared or concerned, they
were put at ease, K.C. Carlson added.
“We’ve learned how to do everything we
need to do,” said Allison Carlson.
The last step will be getting into a family
routine at home. First, the little ones need to
be able to feed either by bottle or breast. Then
Kate and Annie will be introduced to Riley,
the family dog. And, they can all celebrate
their first Christmas together — one which
the new parents thought would be their last
before welcoming children.
“They get an extra Christmas,” K.C. said of
his daughters.
Continued from page 1
TWINS
MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Although it’s
always important for you and your spouse or loved
one to be like-minded, today it could be even more
crucial. Don’t expect desirable results if you two
aren’t simpatico.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Even though you
might do little, you could still expect a lot. However,
because your rewards will be commensurate to
your service, you’re not apt to get what you want.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Going to a place that
attracts only small groups of people is likely to be
far more pleasing to your taste than being where the
large crowds gather. Make a smart choice.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you’re planning on
hosting something at your place, be very selective
about the guest list. Without careful consideration,
you could invite someone who doesn’t ft in, making
everyone uncomfortable.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- You might not be as
well tuned to your audience as you think, so be
extremely careful that you don’t blurt out something
that could be offensive to your listeners.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Your judgment
regarding a commercial matter might not be up to
its usual sharpness. Tread softly when it comes to
negotiating a transaction so that you don’t make any
bum deals.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t be tempted to
change a well-considered opinion due to pressure
from a companion. He or she might merely be
biased or self-serving.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you accidentally put
your foot in your mouth by blurting out something
you shouldn’t have, take care when trying to make
amends. You could do more damage if you’re not
careful.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It could be a big mistake
today to try to alter some social plans that would
affect others in order to suit your personal
interests. You might get your way, but anger a lot of
companions in the process.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You aren’t apt to
achieve too much today if you’re not methodical or
purposeful. Even if you get back on track, it might
be too late to get to where you need to go.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Pretending to
comprehend something you really don’t understand
could put you in an embarrassing position. Don’t
let your ego get you in a situation that you won’t be
prepared to handle.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- If you’ve been
pretending to be the underwriter of hopeless causes
lately, there’s a chance that others might get you
involved in a costly undertaking that you’ll have a
hard time dodging.

COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
12-17-12
wEEkEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Calgary Flames org.
4 Tearful request
8 -- -f fick
11 Perfume label word
12 Ladd and Shepard
13 Sizzling
14 Winter forecasts
16 Yvette’s date
17 Echo
18 Waterloo resident
20 Mouths, in biology
21 Exec
22 Jean-Claude Van --
25 Like some yams
29 Discord goddess
30 How come?
31 Juan’s gold
32 Cold mo.
33 Towel word
34 Floor coverings
35 Heavenly
38 Rev. Jackson
39 Caesar’s man
40 Miss Piggy’s word
41 Toyland visitors
44 Fork over (2 wds.)
48 TV brand
49 Chinese soup (2 wds.)
51 Sighs of distress
52 Four duos
53 Drop -- -- line
54 Pint-size
55 Monster’s loch
56 Language suffx
DOwN
1 Kan. neighbor
2 Robust
3 Tiant or Aparicio
4 Preferred strategy (2 wds.)
5 Shortening
6 Wrap up
7 Give homework
8 “Pygmalion” writer
9 Deep sleep
10 Take -- -- stride
12 Sky blue
15 Moves fast
19 California fort
21 Willie -- of baseball
22 -- vu
23 Galway Bay islands
24 Porcelain vase
25 In vogue
26 Promises to pay
27 Joule fractions
28 Rx amount
30 Vibrate
34 Rule
36 Eden exile
37 Portuguese port
38 Tournament of yore
40 Styles
41 Forehead
42 Feel pain
43 Pedestal
44 PC screens
45 Half, in combos
46 Depletes
47 Nile god
50 Decorate cupcakes
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Monday• Dec. 17, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
PLUMBING -
GUARANTEED INTERVIEW
We need ENTRY LEVEL and SKILLED employees!!!
No experience? Looking for a career? Have you considered the plumbing industry?
Get paid while you train!!!!!
Already a Skilled Plumber or Drain Tech? We’re looking for you, too! We’re more
than just a rooter company.
• Uniforms, Tools, and Vehicle provided
• Top Techs can earn 60K to 80K per year
• Paid time off
• Excellent Benefits
Apply in person at Rescue Rooter:
825 Mahler Rd, Burlingame
or at www.rescuerooter.com/about/careers.aspx
EEO
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CLEANERS - We are looking for House
Cleaners/Laundry personnel in the Bur-
lingame area. Apply in person at 1100
Trousdale Dr., Burlingame.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ENGINEER
Company: KMS Service Inc.
Location: Foster City, CA
Position Type: Full-time
Experience: Unspecified
Education: Bachelor’s
\Mail to: Network Sys/App Servers/Net-
work Modeling, etc. Job #KMSKH02,
KMS Service, 1065 E. Hillsdale Blvd,
#301, Foster City, CA 94404
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
PIZZA DELIVERY DRIVER All shifts
available. Apply in person at Windy City
Pizza, 35 Bovet Rd. San Mateo, CA
94402. Must speak English, Good
Driving Record.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253524
The following person is doing business
as: Aeromedical Transport, 3603 Cole-
grove St. Apt 1, SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Manuel M. Dayag, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Manuel M. Dayag /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/10/12, 12/17/12, 12/24/12, 12/31/12).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF ALCO-
HOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Dec. 10, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
NBR TOMATINA MENLO PARK, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
827 SANTA CRUZ AVE.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer and Wine-Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
December 17, 2012
210 Lost & Found
FOUND CHIHUAHUA mix Terrier tan
male near West Lake shopping Center in
Daly City (415)254-5975
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Gold rim glasses, between 12th
& 14th Ave. in San Mateo on 12/9/12,
(650)867-1122
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST SET of keys. Down town San Ma-
teo. 8 to 10 keys on Key chain including
Lincoln car key, kodatrue@gmail.com
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY BASSINET - like new,
music/light/vibrates, $75., (650)342-8436
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BABY CARRIER CAR SEAT COMBO -
like new, $40., (650)342-8436
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
296 Appliances
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $50 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, August program, fea-
turing Gloria Stuart, George Sanders,
Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20. (650)341-
8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE “Off to the
Moon”, featuring Armstrong, Aldrin, and
Collins, article by Charles Lindburgh,
$25., San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO (650)345-5502
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
23 Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7” x 7”
x 9”, New, never used, $25. pair,
(650)375-8044
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET TV - double doors,
34”W, 22”D, 16”H, modern, glass, $25.,
(650)574-2533
BASE CABINET, TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $55 Call (650)342-7933
304 Furniture
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CIRCA 1940 Mahogany office desk six
locking doors 60" by 36" good condition
$99 (650)315-5902
COCKTAIL BAR, Mint condition, black
leather, SOLD!
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
304 Furniture
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, SOLD!
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size, Fully stuffed; new, allergy-free tick-
ing, Mint condition, $25., (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 10x30”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , SOLD!
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW (Sears) 10" belt drive new
1 horse power motor $99 (650)315-5902
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, Best Offer,
(650)315-5902
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOOD DEHYDRATOR made by
Damark, 5 trays, works good. $30.00
(650)367-8146
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT - Book ti-
tled “Fire Mountain”, reasonable, 380
pages, wine country story, adventure,
love & life, $2.00 each, (650)583-2595
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. Folds in half $99
(650)341-8342
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case SOLD!
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLAYBOY MAGAZINE COLLECTION -
over 120 magazines, $60.obo, (650)589-
8348
310 Misc. For Sale
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RUG - 8x10, oriental design, red/gold,
like new, $95., San Mateo, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SMALL SIZE Kennel good for small size
dog or cat 23" long 14" wide and 141/2"
high $25 FIRM (650)871-7200
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 (650)341-1728
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 (650)341-8342
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WHEELCHAIR - Used indoors only, 4
months old, $99., (650)345-5446
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
KEYBOARD CASIO - with stand, adapt-
er, instructions, like new, SanMateo,
$60., (650)579-1431
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
UPRIGHT BASS 3/4 size, SHEN SB100
with bag and stand and DBL Bass bug-
gie, all new $2000, OBO
wilbil94204@yahoo.com
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, SOLD!
24
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Mop & __:
cleaning brand
4 “Fiddler on the
Roof” dairyman
9 Hannibal crossed
them
13 Author Fleming
14 On __: counting
calories
15 Cathedral topper
16 “Shakespeare in
Love” Oscar
winner
18 Ann __, Michigan
19 Sporting site
20 “Brian’s Song”
actor James
22 Johannesburg’s
land: Abbr.
23 Part of a bottle
24 “Pirates of the
Caribbean”
series star
27 Moose relative
28 Cousin of edu
29 Perfectly
30 Venus, e.g.
33 USPS pieces
34 The Yankee
Clipper
37 ’Vette roof option
39 Cooks over
boiling water
40 Sea west of
Greece
43 Drill insert
44 Law school
grads, briefly,
and an apt title
for this puzzle
47 “Slouching
Towards
Bethlehem”
author
50 Song for two
51 Final: Abbr.
52 Nerve cell part
53 “It’s Not About
the Bike” author
Armstrong
54 Pale
56 “East of Eden”
co-star
59 “Cool beans!”
60 Eye-fooling
pictures
61 First of a Latin
threesome
62 Periodic table
fig.
63 Uses a swizzle
stick
64 Good times
DOWN
1 Demi Moore
military movie
2 Hardy’s comedy
partner
3 Next to bat
4 “I did it!”
5 Suffix with stamp
6 Wine, on le
menu
7 “That’s gross!’’
8 Revolutionary
Allen
9 Showery mo.
10 Opera text
11 Flourish
12 Colorful shawls
15 Japanese
electronics giant
17 Squid’s squirt
21 Formicarium
insect
24 “The Grapes of
Wrath” surname
25 Old Dodge
hatchbacks
26 Works by
Salvador
28 Cavs, on
scoreboards
30 Drop by
31 CPR specialist
32 Trendy aerobics
regimen
34 Satirist Swift
35 Narrow the gap
36 Prime meridian
hrs.
37 Mexican border
city
38 Gift for a
handyman
41 Hersey’s bell
town
42 Say no to
44 U.S. capital
nearest the Arctic
Circle
45 Take down the
tents and move on
46 Pool workers
48 Judo schools
49 Not suited
50 Youngster’s “play
catch” partner
53 D-Day fleet
55 Gen. Eisenhower’s
arena: Abbr.
57 Month after avril
58 Go down the
wrong path
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
12/17/12
12/17/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
312 Pets & Animals
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, SOLD!
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MEN’S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened package, XL, High Sierra, long
sleeves and legs, dark green plaid, great
gift, $12., SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS JACKETS
(2) - 1 is made by (Starter) LG/XLG ex-
cellent condition $99. for both,
SOLD!
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
316 Clothes
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
CALLAWAY GOLF Clubs Hawkeye
Irons, Graphite Shafts, # 4 thru P/W
Excellent Condition $79 SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
318 Sports Equipment
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2000 CHEVY camaro standard transmis-
sion $2000 call dave at (650)344-9462
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some break work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
orSOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95.,
(650)333-4400
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, SOLD!
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
25 Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Cleaning
Rose’s
HOUSE CLEANING
Affordable
Move In & Move Out
Discount
First Time Cleaning
Commercial & Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 847-1990
www.roseshousecleaning.com
BBB • Lic. & Bonded
Ask about
our Holiday
Special
Concrete
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
26
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hauling
HVAC
HRAC HEATING
& APPLIANCES
Refrigeration - Water Heaters
REPAIR ,REPLACEMENT
& SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES WITH REPAIR
SAME DAY SERVICE
(650)589-3153
(408)249-2838
www.hracappliancerepair.com
Lic.#A46046
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
Painting
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR
NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
THE COLLEGE of SAN MATEO
OFFERS
EVENING SOCIAL BALLROOM &
SWING DANCE CLASSES at the
BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE
LEVELS
Starting Jan. 14, 2013
• fees average $4.70 per class
• go to http://collegeofsanmateo.edu
• or call (650) 574-6420 or Email
waltonj@smccd.edu for more info
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
27 Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
As your local SanMateoCountynewspaper, it is important tobe involvedinthe community
andtosupport local charitable organizations, fundraising events andlocal events.
January 22...................... E-Waste Collection Day, San Mateo
January 22...................... Millbrae Health & Wellness Faire, Millbrae
January 29...................... E-Waste Collection Day, San Mateo
February 12& 19............ Chinese New Year Events, San Mateo
February 19 ................... Family Resources Fair, San Mateo
March 5 ......................... Ombudsman Services of San Mateo Fundraiser, San Mateo
March 5 ......................... Burlingame Community for Education Foundation
March 7 ......................... Art in Action, Menlo Park
March 10 ....................... Sustainable San Mateo County Awards, So. San Francisco
March 18 ....................... SSF Senior Health Fair, So San Francisco
March 20 ....................... NAACP Fundraiser, San Mateo
April 2............................ San Bruno Business Showcase, San Bruno
April 2............................ San Mateo County Youth Conference, San Mateo
April 2............................ Plant Sale, Master Gardeners, San Mateo
April 3............................ Peninsula Humane Society Fashion for Compassion, B’game
April 8............................ Job Boot Camp, San Mateo
April 8............................ Nueva School Beneft Auction, Hillsborough
April 12........................... Peninsula Confict Resolution Center Fundraiser Breakfast, FC
April 23.......................... City of San Mateo Eggstravaganza, San Mateo
April 28.......................... Celebrity Roast, Assemblymember Jerry Hill, Belmont
May 1............................. Pacifc Coast Dream Machines, Half Moon Bay
May 2............................. Mills Peninsula Women’s Luncheon, Burlingame
May 6............................. Golf Tournament beneftting Hiller Aviation Museum, HMB
May 7............................. Samaritan House Gala, Redwood Shores
May 10........................... Spring Job Fair, San Mateo
May 11........................... Victory Over Stroke, Millbrae
May 17........................... Taste of San Mateo, San Mateo
May 19........................... Tributes & Tastings, Burlingame
May 20........................... Senior Showcase Information Fair, Burlingame
May 23........................... Peninsula Humane Society Golf Tournament, Menlo Park
June 4& 5....................... Foster City Art & Wine Festival, Foster City
June 5............................. Posy Parade, San Bruno
June 7............................. Job Boot Camp, San Mateo
June 10........................... HIP Housing Luncheon, Redwood City
June 11........................... Disaster Preparedness Day, San Mateo
June 11-19...................... San Mateo County Fair, San Mateo
June 11& 12 ................... Burlingame Art in the Park, Burlingame
June 14........................... Senior Day at San Mateo County Fair, San Mateo
June 18 & 19 .................. Helifest, Belmont
June 26........................... Ryan’s Ride, Burlingame
June-July........................ Central Park Music Series, San Mateo
July 16 & 17 ................... Connoisseur’s Marketplace, Menlo Park
July 22 & 23 ................... Blues Festival, Redwood City
July 23............................ Bike For Breath, Foster City
July 30............................ Cars in the Park, Burlingame
August 1......................... San Mateo County Health Foundation Golf Tournament, PA
August 7......................... Tour de Peninsula Bike Ride, San Mateo
August 20....................... Peninsula Humane Society Mutt Strutt, San Mateo
August 27....................... Senior Showcase Information Fair, Menlo Park
August 29....................... Community Gatepath Golf Tournament, Palo Alto
September 3 & 4............. Millbrae Art & Wine Fair, Millbrae
September 16-18 ............ San Mateo Library Book Sale, San Mateo
September 17& 18.......... Filipino American Festival, Daly City
September 22 ................. Anti-Bullying Program Fundraiser, Foster City
September 23 ................. Gary Yates PAL Golf Tournament, San Mateo
September 23 & 24......... College of San Mateo Athletic Hall of Fame, San Mateo
September 24 ................. Burlingame Pet Parade, Burlingame
September 28 ................. San Mateo County Business Expo, San Mateo
October 1....................... CRUSH Supports Education, San Carlos
October 4....................... Taste of San Bruno, San Bruno
October 7 & 8 ................ ChocolateFest, Belmont
October 8 & 9 ................ San Carlos Art & Wine Faire, San Carlos
October 14 ..................... One Book One Community Kick-Off event, Redwood City
October 14 ..................... League of Women Voters Luncheon, San Mateo
October 15 ..................... Family Resources Fair, San Bruno
October 15 ..................... Mission Hospice “Jewels & Jeans” Gala, Burlingame
October 15 ..................... Peninsula Oktoberfest, Redwood City
October 16 ..................... San Mateo Rotary Fun Run, San Mateo
October 20 ..................... Power of Possibilities Recognition Breakfast, Burlingame
Oct 21 & 22.................... McKinley School Harvest Festival, Burlingame
November 11-13 ............ Harvest Festival, San Mateo
November 18 ................. Senior Showcase Information Fair, Foster City
November 19 ................. South San Francisco Fun Run, So. San Francisco
Nov. 26-27 & Dec. 3-4.... Peninsula Youth Ballet, San Mateo
December 2.................... Night of Lights, Half Moon Bay
To inquire about Daily Journal event sponsorship
call (650)344-5200 x114
Your Local Newspaper Supporting
Events supported by the Daily Journal in 2011
The Community The Community
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Monday • Dec. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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